Docstoc

Botulism Images of the day

Document Sample
Botulism Images of the day Powered By Docstoc
					Images of the day 




                     In Memoriam
Congenital Diaphragmatic Hernia 
•  Bochdalek hernia: herniation commonly via posterior 
   defect in the diaphragm 

•  Occurs more commonly on the left than the right (5:1) 
•  Present at birth with severe respiratory distress 
•  Less severe cases may present later in life or 
   incidentally on radiography 
•  Degree of associated pulmonary hypoplasia is the 
   major factor determining prognosis 

 Donnelly et al. Pocket Radiologist: Pediatrics. 100 Top Diagnoses. Amirsys 2002
Hypotonia in a 7­month Old 




John D. Peoples, MD 
August 2009
Case presentation 

•  7 month old previously health male 
•  1 week of lethargy, “floppiness” 
     •  Inability to sit unsupported 
•    Decreased PO intake 
•    Difficulty swallowing 
•    Head lag 
•    Irritable, coarse cry 
•    Constipation
PMH/ROS 
•  Normal birth history 
•  Normal development 
   •    Sits without support 
   •    Holds himself up prone 
   •    Reaches for objects, transfers 
   •    Babbles 
•  Feeds: breastfeeding with recent advance to solids 
•  ROS: 
   •  No fever 
   •  Trauma – 3 weeks ago feel backwards and hit head 
         •  No LOC, abnormal behavior 
•  Intake: gripe water, teething tablets, no honey 
   ingestion 
   •  Apricot juice from can
Exam 
•    VSS 
•    General: Irritable, hoarse cry 
•    CV and Respiratory: Normal 
•    Neuro: 
     •    Little interaction with examiner 
     •    Spontaneous eye opening 
     •    Withdrawal to painful stimuli 
     •    Head lag/poor tone 
     •    Hypotonia in arms/legs 
     •    Poor gag/suck reflex 
     •    No clonus notes 
     •    Bilateral ptosis?
 Differential Diagnosis 
 •    Sepsis 
 •    Meningitis/encephalitis 
 •    Infant Botulism 
 •    Tick paralysis 
 •    Guillain­Barrè Syndrome 
 •    Congenital myasthenia gravis 
 •    Hypothyroidism 
 •    Metabolic Syndrome 
 •    Spinal muscular atrophy 
 •    Organophsophate/heavy metal intoxication 
Domingo RM, JS Haller and M Gruenthal. Infant botulism: two recent cases and 
literature review. Journal of Child Neurology. 2008 (23): 1336­1346.
Labs/Studies 
•  Lytes:        136      105        6 
                                             99 
                 4.6      28         <0.3 


•  Alb 3.7, Total bili 1.1, ALT 25, AST 55, Alk phos 137, 
   ammonia 11 
•  UA: pH 5, SG 1.025, urine ketones 150, negative 
   nitrate/LE 
•  Urine toxicology screen: negative 

•  CBC:           11.1 
             5            339 
                  34.1 
Labs/studies, part deux 
•  Heavy metals: normal levels of arsenic, lead, 
   mercury, cadmium 

•  Acylcarnitine profile, plasma amino acids: normal 

•  LP: 1 WBC, <1RBC, glucose 64, protein 26 
    •  HSV negative 
    •  Encephalitis panel: pending 

•  Stool botulinum toxin: pending 

•  Blood cultures pending
Infant botulism 
It’s not honey anymore, darling… 
•    Overview of types of botulism 
•    Pathophysiology of disease 
•    Epidemiology 
•    Clinical presentation 
•    Diagnosis 
•    Treatment 
•    Outcomes 
•    Conclusion
 Types of botulism 
•  Foodborne: ingestion of food containing botulinum toxin 
   •  Home canned fruits, vegetables, and fish 
   •  High rate in Alaska 

•  Wound botulism: colonization of wound with 
   subsequent toxin production 
   •  Injection drug users => black tar heroin 

•  Infant botulism: intestinal colonization by spores with 
   toxin production 
•  Adult intestinal toxemia botulism: intestinal colonization 
   in adults with toxin production 
•  Other: inhalational botulism, iatrogenic botulism
Clostridium botulinum 
•  Gram positive, rod shaped, spore forming obligate 
   anaerobe 

•  Ubiquitous, found on surfaces of vegetables, fruit, 
   seafood, soil and marine sediment 

•  Postulated incubation: 3­30 days 

•  Specific requirements for elaboration of toxin: 
     •    anaerobic milieu 
     •    pH<4.5 
     •    low sugar and salt content 
     •    temperature 4º ­ 121ºC 

Sobel, J. Botulism. Clinical Infectious Diseases. 2005 (41): 1167­1173.
Botulinum Toxin 
•  7 immunologically distinct serotypes: A­G 
•  Infant botulism cases split between A and B 
  •  Type A more common in Western US, B more common in 
     Eastern US 
  •  Infant botulism thought to result from immunologic 
     immaturity of gut flora 
  •  Changes in diet may create increased risk 

•  All prevent binding of synaptic vesicles to pre­ 
   synaptic membrane => block ACh release
  Botulinum Toxin 
•  Cleaves 
   proteins 
   required for 
   release of 
   Ach vesicles 

•  Different 
   toxins, 
   different 
   sites 


 http://www.derm.net/images/my_mode_of_action.jpg
Epidemiology of infant botulism 
•  Most commonly seen in California, Pennsylvania, and Utah 

•  Nearly 50% of all cases in US are diagnosed in California 

•  90% cases < 6 m/o; peak 2­4 m/o 

•  Risk factors: 
    •    Living in endemic area => recent soil disturbance 
    •    Ingestion of honey 
    •    Living in a rural area (<2m/o), or near construction? 
    •    Role of breast feeding debated 
           •  Up to 70­90% of cases are breast fed 
           •  May decrease severity of disease, but still controversial
Clinical presentation 
•  Weakness not clinically detected until 75% of 
   receptors occupied 
   •  Diaphragm weakness not seen until 90­95% of receptors 
      blocked 

•  Symmetrical cranial nerve palsies followed by 
   descending symmetric paralysis of voluntary muscles 

•  Clinical symptoms: 
   •    Constipation                 •    Ptosis 
   •    Inability to suck/swallow    •    Head lag, hypotonia 
   •    Drooling                     •    Respiratory compromise (late) 
   •    Weakened voice/cry           •    Absent gag (late/ominous finding)
 Differential Diagnosis 
 •    Sepsis 
 •    Meningitis/encephalitis 
 •    Infant Botulism 
 •    Tick paralysis 
 •    Guillain­Barrè Syndrome 
 •    Congenital myasthenia gravis 
 •    Hypothyroidism 
 •    Metabolic Syndrome 
 •    Spinal muscular atrophy 
 •    Organophsophate/heavy metal intoxication 
Domingo RM, JS Haller and M Gruenthal. Infant botulism: two recent cases and 
literature review. Journal of Child Neurology. 2008 (23): 1336­1346.
Clinical mimics of infant botulism 




Francisco, AMO and SS Arnon. Clinical mimics of infant botulism. Pediatrics. 
2007 (119): 826­828.
Diagnosis 
•  High index of suspicion critical 

•  In infants – often concern for meningitis/encephalitis 
   •  Normal CSF 
   •  No signs of infection, increased protein 

•  Stool studies: 
   •  Best is naturally obtained specimen 
   •  May need to do enema lavage (constipation) 
   •  Two steps 
       •  1. toxin isolation (mouse bioassay) 
       •  2. culture 
   •  Overall sensitivity 33­44%, but varies inversely between 
      onset of symptoms and sample collection
Work­up and Diagnosis 
•  EMG 
  •  Not necessary, but supportive of diagnosis 

  •  Triad: 
       •  Compound muscle action potentials of decreased 
          amplitude in at least two muscle groups 

       •  Tetanic and post­tetanic facilitation defined by an 
          amplitude of more than 120 percent of baseline 

       •  Prolonged post­tetanic facilitation of more than 120 
          seconds and absence of post­tetanic exhaustion 


  *JM Castelli, Infant Botulism. 2009
 Treatment 
 www.infantbotulism.org 

•  Human Botulism Immune globulin 
  •  1mL/Kg => $45,300 per infant (2005) 
  •  Give as soon as possible 
  •  Neutralizes free botulinum toxin for several 
     months 
  •  Side effects: flushing (common) 
     •  Anaphylaxis and hypotension (rare) 
  •  No live viruses for 5 months after BabyBIG
BabyBIG 
   5 year placebo controlled trial to evaluate BabyBIG




Arnon, SS et al. Human botulism immune globulin for the treatment of infant botulism. NEJM. 
2006 (354): 462 – 470. 
Treatment: 
Supportive Intensive Care 
•  Frequent monitoring of respiratory status, vital capacity 

•  Prophylactic intubation with loss of gag reflex 

•  Tube feeds 

•  Avoid aminoglycosides 
     •    May potentiate blockade & lyse spores 

•  Okay to use antibiotics after BIG administration 
     •    BIG will neutralize elaborated toxin 

•  Other measures: 
•    Infection control (autoclave diapers) 
•    Occupational, physical, speech therapy and rehab 
•    Continued visual and auditory stimulation 
•    Support for parents
Outcomes 

•  Mortality < 1% for infant botulism 
  •  For other forms: <5% ­ 8% 


•  Full and complete recovery expected 

•  Biphasic features of infant botulism: 5% 
   of cases
Conclusion 
•  Maintain a high index of suspicion for infant botulism! 
•  Diagnose with stool sample/studies, although 
   treatment will need to proceed prior to confirmation 
•  Utilize federal resources: 
    •  www.infantbotulism.org 
•  Close monitoring and early treatment with BabyBIG 
   are critical 
•  Mortality < 1% 
   •  Patients should have full recovery
Sources 
•    Donnelly et al. Pocket Radiologist: Pediatrics. 100 Top Diagnoses. Amirsys 2002 

•    Domingo RM, JS Haller and M Gruenthal. Infant botulism: two recent cases and literature 
     review. Journal of Child Neurology. 2008 (23): 1336­1346. 

•    Sobel, J. Botulism. Clinical Infectious Diseases. 2005 (41): 1167­1173. 

•    Thompson, JA et al. Infant botulism in the age of botulism immune globulin. Neurology. 
     2005 (64): 2029­2032. 

•    Arnon, SS et al. Human botulism immune globulin for the treatment of infant botulism. 
     NEJM. 2006 (354): 462 – 470. 

•    Long, SS. Infant botulism and treatment with BIG­IV (BabyBIG). The Pediatric Infectious 
     Disease Journal. 2007 (26): 261­262. 

•    Francisco, AMO and SS Arnon. Clinical mimics of infant botulism. Pediatrics. 2007 (119): 
     826­828. 

•    Castelli, JM. Infant Botulism. 2009. 

•    Pegram, PS and SM Stone. Botulism. Uptodate.com. May 2009. 

•    http://www.derm.net/images/my_mode_of_action.jpg

				
DOCUMENT INFO
Shared By:
Categories:
Tags:
Stats:
views:4
posted:4/3/2011
language:English
pages:27