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PLUK enews July PLUK enews For the Week of July

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PLUK enews July PLUK enews For the Week of July Powered By Docstoc
					PLUK eNews For the Week of July 21-25, 2003
Volume 2 Issue 3

Welcome to the weekly PLUK eNews!

   We are proud to present news of interest for Montana families of children with
disabilities and chronic illnesses, and for the professionals and educators who serve them,
however, it does not constitute an endorsement.

                                      Edited by: Roger Holt rholt@pluk.org
                         Proofed & condensed by: Elisabeth Mills emaymills@hotmail.com

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•     Please be aware that some links provided are time sensitive. Contact us if you have
      difficulty accessing any of the information.
•     View an archive of all Weekly eNews at http://www.pluk.org/eNews.htm

    Highlights:
     “Make Me a Millionaire” Coupons...........................................................................................................................3
     Feature: .......................................................................................................................................................................3
          THE LOST ART OF MANNERS ....................................................................................................................3
     Government/Legal: .....................................................................................................................................................5
         Principal Submits Testimony to Capitol Hill...................................................................................................5
         Boy's suit against district settled.......................................................................................................................6
         Thousands object to ED's proposed ERIC changes.........................................................................................6
         De Novo Review Standard for Cases Under IDEA.........................................................................................6
     News: ...........................................................................................................................................................................7
         NPR Report: Rural States Protest Demands of Bush's Education Law .........................................................7
         A DREAM DENIED.........................................................................................................................................7
         Questions on Data Cloud Luster of Houston Schools .....................................................................................8
         By Telecommuting, the Disabled Get a Key to the Office, and a Job............................................................8
         Looking for students to field test new curriculum on "Managing Spasticity"...............................................8
         Companies firing disabled workers in record numbers...................................................................................9
     Like to help PLUK? Go shopping!.............................................................................................................................9
     Transition/Employment/Housing/Advocacy:.......................................................................................................... 10
          Supported Employment Webcourse: Begins August 11, 2003.................................................................... 10
          Increasing Opportunities for Older Youth in After school Programs (2003) ............................................. 10
          Teleconference: Youth Leadership Forums: Developing Leadership Skills in Youth with Disabilities.. 10
          Transition and Technology: Independence and Beyond, Aug 1, Minneapolis, MN.................................. 10
     Technology/Web/Resources:................................................................................................................................... 11
          New National Resource Center on AD/HD .................................................................................................. 11
          Symposium Series on Assistive Technology, Aug 11-15, Chicago, Illinois.............................................. 11
          Helping Hand Blind Wear .............................................................................................................................. 11
     Training/Workshops/Conferences: ......................................................................................................................... 11



    PLUK eNews July 21-25, 2003                                                                                                                                                     1
         Social, Emotional and Academic Skill Development for Children, August 4-5, Grand Forks, ND......... 11
         CSPD Region I August workshops: .............................................................................................................. 12
         “6 Trait Writing”, August 4-5, Glendive & August 6-7, Miles City........................................................... 12
         “CRISS” Creating Independence through Student Owned Strategies, August 13-15, Glendive ............. 12
         “Bully Proofing Your Program and Teaching Students How to Stop Bullies”, August 15-16, Glasgow &
         August 18-19, Miles City............................................................................................................................... 12
         REGION V CSPD ROUNDUP ..................................................................................................................... 13
         Severe Communication /Autism Conference, August 11-13, Whitefish.................................................... 13
         Together We’re Better, August 13-15, Missoula.......................................................................................... 13
         Paraeducator Academies, August 18-19, Kalispell ...................................................................................... 13
         Seminar on "The Management and Control of Refractory Seizures Utilizing VNS Therapy™ in People
         with Mental Retardation and Developmental Disabilities, Particularly Those Who are in Independent
         Care Facilities (ICF’S).”................................................................................................................................. 13
         Autism Montana! 2003, August 15, Butte .................................................................................................... 13
         Integrating SETT into the Assistive Technology Plan, August 18, Helena................................................ 14
         Positive Approaches to Solving Severe Behavior Challenges, Billings, Aug 19-22 ................................. 14
         National Down Syndrome Congress, August 22-24, Philadelphia PA....................................................... 14
         “Choices”: Montana’s Senior and Long-Term Care Conference, Sep 3-5, West Yellowstone ................ 14
         Addiction, Recovery and the Family, September 11-13, Whitefish............................................................ 15
         Conference on Social, Emotional and Academic Interventions for Students with High-Functioning
         Autism and Asperger Syndrome With a Special Session on Bullying Preventions, October 3 -4, Boise, ID
         .......................................................................................................................................................................... 15
         Augmentative Communication Workshops in the Rockies, October 2, Billings ....................................... 15
         Fourth annual conference on Autism and Asperger’s: Mapping The Journey, October 17 & 18,
         Edmonton, Alberta.......................................................................................................................................... 15
         Echoes of Abuse: Traumatic Brain Injury, October 30-31, Billings ........................................................... 16
         Workshops on Communication Strategies for Children with Severe and Multiple Disabilities: August 4 -
         October 6, 2003............................................................................................................................................... 16
         Technology Conferences, August - October................................................................................................. 16
         Announcing: A Series of Conference Calls on the Social-Emotional Development of Young Children. 17
         Online Workshops from Reed Martin, July 2003......................................................................................... 17
 Fun Events ................................................................................................................................................................ 18
      Winter Carnival, July 26, Billings ................................................................................................................. 18
      Blue Jack Band Benefit, September 20, Bozeman ....................................................................................... 18
      Missoula Children’s Theatre Tour, October 5-11, Kalispell........................................................................ 18
      Dinosaur Day with Jack Horner, October 11, Billings................................................................................. 18
      Halloweek, late October, Billings.................................................................................................................. 18
      Magical Tymes Party, November 11, Missoula............................................................................................ 19
      Be sure to mark your calendar with these future events: ............................................................................. 19
 Selected Sources: ..................................................................................................................................................... 19
      1.     Monday Morning in Washington, DC, http://www.inclusionresearch.org........................................ 19
      2.     Rocky Mountain DBTAC, http://www.adainformation.org................................................................ 19
      3.     Transition Newsflash, Montana Center On Disabilities, http://www.msubillings.edu/transition.... 19
      4.     PEN Weekly NewsBlast, http://www.publiceducation.org................................................................. 19
      5.     Reference Points: Transition updates from the TATRA Project,
      http://www.pacer.org/tatra/tatra.htm............................................................................................................. 19
      6.     Lisa Simmons, The Ideal Lives Express: http://www.ideallives.com................................................ 19
      7.     The American Indian Disability Technical Assistance Center Training Calendar
      http://aidtac.ruralinstitute.umt.edu/TrainingCalendar.htm........................................................................... 19

##




PLUK eNews July 21-25, 2003                                                                                                                                                        2
                     “Make Me a Millionaire” Coupons
                         The Billings Gazette has started the 2003 version of “Make Me a
                     Millionaire”. These coupons will be printed in The Billings Gazette
                     daily through September 27. To “buy” items the coupons need to be
                     clipped from the paper and collected and traded for items to be
                     auctioned. The Billings Gazette will be holding weekly auctions as
                     well as the final auction on September 27.
                         Parents, Let’s Unite for Kids is collecting these coupons in order to
                     bid on some of the items to be auctioned. We will then use any items
we acquire to help raise money at upcoming fundraisers.
   Please collect these coupons and drop them off or mail them to PLUK at 516 North 32 nd
Street, Billings, MT 59101. You don’t even have to clip the coupons! Just bring the
newspapers to us and we will have volunteers clip them.
   SO START SAVING “MILLIONAIRE” COUPONS NOW!

  ##


Feature:

   THE LOST ART OF MANNERS
   by Kathie Snow
   What are manners? Years ago, I read a meaningful definition (and, unfortunately, cannot
remember the source) which described manners as "making another person comfortable."
Most of us probably try hard to have good manners, but it seems many of us lose the art of
manners when it comes to people with disabilities.
   While I was presenting the "History of Disabilities" at Idaho Partners in Policymaking in
April, Howard (who is probably fifty- or sixty-something) raised his hand and said he wanted
to add something about how individuals had been treated and talked about in the past,
based on their disability labels.
   "I have two brothers," Howard began. "All the time I was growing up, when my father
introduced us, he said my brothers' names and then he always said, 'And this is our
retarded son, Howard.' Why did he do that, Kathie? It always made me feel so bad." Then
Howard broke into shoulder-heaving sobs, as the years and years of pain poured out.
Several of us comforted him as best we could. Resuming my presentation, I noted that
years ago, many people probably believed that it was appropriate to share this information
with anyone including strangers) and perhaps they also thought people with disabilities did
not have the cognitive abilities to understand what was being said, so they didn't think their
words would hurt.
   Howard's pain was clear evidence that words---especially the words used by parents and
others who profess to care about you---hurt very deeply and the pain is long-lasting. In
Howard's case, the pain was decades old, but on that day, it felt just as raw as it did every
single time Howard's father said, "My son is retarded." It seems that things would have
changed over the past thirty, forty, or fifty years, but...
   Week in and week out, I meet parents who talk about their children (regardless of the
child's age) in the same way Howard's father did! Sometimes the child is present,
sometimes not, when parents say things like:
   ---My daughter is autistic.
   ---He's sixteen, but he functions like a 5-year-old.
   ---She doesn't have much "upstairs."



  PLUK eNews July 21-25, 2003                                                                    3
    Would we share private information about family members who don't have disabilities?
Would we ever say things like:
    ---My teenager still sleeps with a night light.
    ---My husband needs to take Viagra.
    ---My wife has a big boil on her behind.
    I don't think so, because most of us have better manners than to share private, personal
information that is no one's business! How in the world can we, in all good conscience,
share private information with others, including talking about people in front of them, as if
they're not there? And talking about them when they are NOT present isn't much better---
that's a form of gossip, and the person isn't there to defend himself!
    Family members aren't the only guilty parties, however. Many professionals have lost
their manners, as well. After inviting me to present a seminar, some meeting coordinators
have "helpfully" warned me, "Some of our 'consumers' will be there, and they're more like
children." Would a coordinator make this announcement during the seminar, when adults
with disabilities are in the audience? Don't think so. If a coordinator feels it's appropriate to
warn me about people with disabilities, why isn't she also motivated to warn me about
others? As in, "Some of the parents and professionals who are coming to the meeting are
real duds." Many educators, especially those in non-inclusive schools, routinely use labels
and negative descriptors about their students, both in front of the students and behind their
backs. Ditto for many therapists who shamelessly call out, "The Down's is coming in this
afternoon."
    The loss of manners isn't limited to our words. Our actions speak volumes. "Janelle"
recently introduced me to her 20-year-old daughter, "Micki," a bright and lovely young lady
who happens to have a disability. Micki shook my hand and greeted me. In the course of
casual conversation, I asked Micki a couple of questions. She started to reply, but Janelle
jumped in and answered! Micki could speak for herself, but her mother got in the way! Why
did Janelle do this? Was she afraid I wouldn't understand her daughter? Was she afraid I
would judge Micki by her words or oral abilities? Did she think her daughter is incompetent?
Or was she even aware she was doing this? I'm not sure. Janelle probably spoke for her
daughter when she was a very young child---like all parents do---and perhaps she hasn't
realized Micki is grown up and can speak for herself. I can't imagine the frustration Micki
must feel---and the anger.
    What's frightening is that parents, professionals, educators, and service providers are
supposed to be "on the same side" as the children and adults with disabilities they care
about, serve, and/or teach. But with friends like these, who needs enemies? When we
exhibit these poor manners, not only are we being downright rude, but we risk causing
long-term and severe emotional pain in others. Furthermore, we reinforce the notion (and
its accompanying prejudices) that our society has two sets of rules: one for people without
disabilities and another set for people with disabilities. And we wonder why inclusion,
dignity, and respect for all people continue to be just out of our reach. On a regular basis,
our words and actions set people up for exclusion.
    How can we do better? First, using People First Language is crucial. (See the People First
Language article at www.disabilityisnatural.com.) A person is not her disability, thus, she is
not "autistic"---she "has autism." A disability label simply represents a condition or a
characteristic; it does not define a person. And consider that a family member of a person
who has cancer does not say, "She's cancerous." So, why do we say, "He's disabled [or
retarded, autistic, or whatever]."? Saying, "She has cancer," is more appropriate, as is, "He
has a disability."
    Second---and just as important---we need to be careful about sharing information with
others. Howard's father might have shared that his son was "retarded" in order to "explain"
his son's behavior, speech, or something else. But the outcome of his good intention was
probably less than desirable: upon hearing "retarded," people most likely assumed the
worst about Howard. (What terrible things we do to people in our efforts to "do good!")


  PLUK eNews July 21-25, 2003                                                                   4
Once that first impression was formed, there was probably very little Howard could do to
change it. The same is true today, when we focus on a person's disability as a "problem."
   There are relatively few times when it's important to share a person's disability label with
others: in special ed meetings, with medical personnel, and/or with others in the service
system. Just as we wouldn't discuss the need for Viagra or the details about the boil on your
bottom with anyone other than medical personnel, we do not need to share a person's
disability label with anyone other than a few specific people under specific circumstances.
(And even then, there are more respectful ways of sharing information with others, as
described in "The Problem with Problem" article at http://www.disabilityisnatural.com - click
on the Revolutionary Common Sense icon.)
   Many people with disabilities are said to have "challenging behaviors." Perhaps we would
do well to look at our own behavior before judging others. Is it possible these individuals
may be reacting or responding to the vicious, verbal assaults they routinely experience
when they hear others talking about them? Do we think people don't hear or understand
what we're saying? How arrogant and uncaring can we be? Shouldn't we care about how
others feel? How would you feel if others talked about you?
   Third, we need to demonstrate our good manners by letting people with disabilities speak
for themselves and be themselves. They are our equals! We have no right to speak for
them, unless they have asked us to do so! To interrupt someone; to "explain" his behavior
or actions; or to "apologize" for his drooling, his speech pattern, or anything else is to rob a
person of his right to be who he is! How would you feel if your husband interrupted you
during a meeting and said to others, "My wife is quite the motor-mouth, isn't she?"
   The lives of people who have been labeled should not be part of the public domain. We
have no right to speak for them, to reduce them to med ical diagnoses, to share their private
information, to talk about them (in front of them or behind their backs) in ways we would
never talk about ourselves, and, in the process, strip them of every ounce of dignity. Have
they ever given us permission to do any of these things?
   Howard gave his permission to share his story. His experiences, as well as the
experiences of countless others, are continuing lessons that help me stay on top of my
manners. I hope they do the same for you.
   -----If you would like a hand-out version of this "Manners" article and/or for permission
to reprint in your newsletter or other publication, please write to:
kathie@disabilityisnatural.com
   -----The philosophies represented ab ove are included in "Disability is Natural:
Revolutionary Common Sense for Raising Successful Children with Disabilities" by Kathie
Snow, and in the "Revolutionary Common Sense" hard-copy subscription newsletter. Visit
http://www.disabilityisnatural.com or call toll-free 1-866-948-2222 for more information on
both.

  ##


Government/Legal:

   Principal Submits Testimony to Capitol Hill
   Taking the fiscal needs message of our nation's schools to Capitol Hill, T.C. Williams High
School principal John Porter submitted testimony to the House Budget Committee
Democratic Caucus and the Senate Democratic Policy Committee on Friday, July 18th. The
event focused on the fiscal demands facing schools in light of No Child Left Behind (NCLB).
"We simply must have the financial resources necessary to complete the job. Without the
resources, the law merely sets schools up for failure, which most assuredly will guarantee
that many children will be left behind," stated Porter in his testimony. Senator Ted Kennedy



  PLUK eNews July 21-25, 2003                                                                 5
(D-MA) and Representative George Miller (D-CA) answered questions from the committee
and gave testimony emphasizing the Congressional responsibility to fully fund the No Child
Left Behind Act. NASSP supports increasing the federal investment in education!
      • To view Porter's testimony: www.principals.org/advocacy/pdf/nclb_testimony.pdf
      • To visit the House Budget Committee's website for more information on this
          event: http://www.house.gov/budget_democrats/hearings.htm
      • Use the Principal's Legislative Action Center (PLAC) to contact your elected
          officials on the importance of providing adequate resources to education!
   View the page at: http://www.principals.org/advocacy/frr/frr_current.cfm#art1

  ##

   Boy's suit against district settled
   Wednesday, July 16, 2003, By MATT KATZ, Courier-Post Staff, WOODLYNNE
   The family of an 11-year-old boy with a skin disease has settled its lawsuit against the
school district accusing it of violating a federal disabilities law by keeping the boy out of
class.
   Under the terms of the settlement, the Woodlynne school district has appropriated
$7,000 for the family of Steven Wark, according to Jack Kennedy, the district's attorney.
Kennedy would not release the additional amount of money the district's insurance company
is paying the family, and he did not specify other terms of the settlement.
   The Wark family and Wark's attorney, Jamie Epstein, declined comment on the details of
the settlement.
   Steven, who suffers from a skin disease called epidermolysis bullosa that causes open
wounds throughout his body, spent dozens of days this past school year at home instead of
attending his fifth-grade class.
   Read the complete article at:
http://www.southjerseynews.com/issues/july/m071603n.htm

  ##

    Thousands object to ED's proposed ERIC changes
    By Cara Branigan, Associate Editor, eSchool News, July 16, 2003
    As the U.S. Department of Education (ED) revamps its popular information clearinghouse
system as required by the Education Sciences Reform Act of 2002, many educators and
librarians fear the proposed changes will make it harder—and not easier, as ED intends—for
them to access important research on educational technology and other topics.
    The issue takes on added significance as educators struggle to incorporate “scientifically
based research” into their educational approaches, as is now required by the No Child Left
Behind Act.
    The Educational Resources Information Center (ERIC) currently operates through a
network of 16 separate, subject-specific clearinghouses, each responsible for acquiring,
selecting, indexing, and abstracting materials in its area of interest. Besides archiving
educational research and information, each ERIC clearinghouse offers quick eMail digests, or
summaries of the latest research, as well as electronic newsletters and listserves for users.
    Read the complete article at:
http://eschoolnews.com/news/ssunreg.cfm?ArticleID=4513&ul=%2Fnews%2FshowStory%2
Ecfm%3FArticleID%3D4513

  ##

  De Novo Review Standard for Cases Under IDEA
  Tuesday July 15, 2:00 am ET, Shannon P. Duffy, The Legal Intelligencer


  PLUK eNews July 21-25, 2003                                                               6
   In a decision that cuts across nearly all cases filed under the Individuals with Disabilities
in Education Act, the 3rd U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals has ruled that federal courts must
apply a "modified de novo review" of any state administrative proceedings.
   In S.H. v. State-Operated School District of the City of Newark, a unanimous, three-
judge panel reversed a decision in which a New Jersey federal magistrate judge found that a
state administrative law judge "simply got it wrong" when he ordered Newark to continue to
pay for an out-of-district placement for a profoundly deaf pre-school student.
   In doing so, the 3rd Circuit followed the leads of the 4th, 6th and 10th Circuits in holding
that a modified de novo review is the proper way to satisfy the IDEA's requirement that
courts give "due weight" to the factual findings that emerge from any administrative
hearings.
   Under such a standard, the panel said, a federal court must not "substitute its own
notions of sound educational policy."
   In cases where the federal court hears additional evidence, the 3rd Circuit said, it is "free
to accept or reject the agency findings depending on whether those findings are supported
by the new, expanded record and whether they are consistent with the requirements of
IDEA."
   Read the complete article at:
http://biz.yahoo.com/law/030715/50074c0089db5ea6c9e7e12a6a2749cd_1.html

  ##


News:

   NPR Report: Rural States Protest Demands of Bush's Education Law
   from All Things Considered, Tuesday , July 15, 2003
   Last year, President Bush signed into law the No Child Left Behind Act, which calls for
states to identify failing schools and make sure teachers are fully qualified. But opposition is
growing in rural states, where some lawmakers say parts of the law -- which takes effect
this fall -- are all but impossible to meet. Kathy Witkowsky reports.
   Listen to audio: http://discover.npr.org/rundowns/segment.jhtml?wfId=1337927
   View transcript at: http://www.pluk.org/eNews/NPR_Jul15_03.pdf

  ##

    A DREAM DENIED
    Aspiring chef rethinks her future as Falmouth school board bows to state pressure on
MCAS, By K.C. MYERS
    A special-needs student will not receive her high school diploma after the Falmouth
School Committee last week reversed a decision to grant local diplomas to students who
failed the Massachusetts state graduation test. For Tracey Newhart, an award-winning cook
who has Down syndrome, the vote is the latest in a series of broken promises starting back
when she was in eighth grade and it threatens her dream of attending culinary school. Last
year, the 20-year-old won a local "sauce off" by making the best spaghetti sauce in an
amateur cooking competition. Newhart has a chromosome disorder that causes mental
retardation, but she beat caterers in the competition. Newhart planned to apply for a
Johnson & Wales University non -academic degree program, which would take the average
student one year. She could take as long as six years, but Newhart's plan is to get a degree
and open her own restaurant. Her plans have been put on hold by the school board's
decision.
    Read the complete article at: http://www.capecodonline.com/cctimes/adream16.htm



  PLUK eNews July 21-25, 2003                                                                  7
  ##

   Questions on Data Cloud Luster of Houston Schools
   July 11, 2003 • Washington Post • Diana Jean SchemoWhen Jerroll Tyler, a sophomore
at Sharpstown High School here, turned 18, he met the full force of Texas' no-nonsense
approach to education. He received an attendance contract, warning that if he missed more
than two days of school, he was out permanently. By week's end, Mr. Tyler had caroused
his way past the limit.
   Months later, when he showed up to take a state math exam needed for graduation, a
dean at Sharpstown told him he was no longer enrolled. "I went home, and I never looked
back at school again," Mr. Tyler said.
   Which was why Mr. Tyler and his mother, Karen Gamble, were shocked to see that
Sharpstown High claimed it had no dropouts at all last year. It reported, instead, that Mr.
Tyler had transferred to Southwest High, a charter school he had never even visited. Some
462 other students left the school that year, and Sharpstown claimed that not one had
dropped out.
   Sharpstown was not alone. A recent state audit in Houston, which examined records from
16 middle and high schools, found that more than half of the 5,500 students who left in the
2000-1 school year should have been declared dropouts but were not. That year, Houston
schools reported that only 1.5 percent of its students had dropped out.
   Read the complete article at:
http://www.childrenfirstamerica.org/DailyNews/03Jul/0711033.htm

  ##

   By Telecommuting, the Disabled Get a Key to the Office, and a Job
   By EVE TAHMINCIOGLU
   JANET PEARCE, a producer at NBC News, was diagnosed with muscular sclerosis nearly a
decade ago. But she has rarely missed a day of work even as her illness has progressed,
making her unable to walk. A vital reason she has remained gainfully employed is
telecommuting.
   About two years ago, NBC gave Ms. Pearce the option of working at home when she
needed to, and today she splits her time, spending three days a week at the office and two
at home. After 36 years at NBC, Ms. Pearce said she could not imagine leaving her job, even
when she found herself overwhelmed by her disease, her medical appointments, the
physical therapy and the adjustment to a wheelchair.
   Read the complete article at:
http://www.nytimes.com/2003/07/20/business/20JMAR.html?ex=1059278400&en=f62d2cb
02b682a11&ei=5062&partner=GOOGLE

  ##

   Looking for students to field test new curriculum on "Managing Spasticity"
   Free Training Opportunity!! On-line Learning Help Field Test a New Distance Learning
Course on: Managing Spasticity
   The Eunice Kennedy Shriver Center at the University of Massachusetts Medical School
has developed an on -line course entitled "Managing Spasticity." This course is one of several
courses being developed as part of a Maternal and Child Health Bureau grant,
"Developmental Disabilities On Line."
   Spasticity is a frequent and often disabling clinical aspect of children with physical
disabilities. Without intervention, functional deformity due to the imbalance of muscle
activity around the joints will eventually progress to musculoskeletal contracture. Spasticity


  PLUK eNews July 21-25, 2003                                                               8
contributes to impairments such as secondary musculoskeletal deformity throughout the
body, inhibition of muscular and long bone growth, decreased strength, limitations in
functional skill and independence as well as pain.
   The purpose of this four-week, on line course is to give service providers an overview of
current treatment options available for children/youth with spasticity, as well as to define
the role of healthcare specialists on the spasticity management team. This course is
specifically designed for occupational, physical and speech therapists, nurses and teachers
working with children/youth who have physical limitations due to spasticity.
   Managing Spasticity will be field tested in September 2003 before it is finalized. Field
test participants will take the course just as regular students would, but will be asked to
comment briefly from time to time on course content and format. At the end of the course
students will receive an attractive certificate of completion. No college or CEU credit will be
offered for this field test. If you are interested in participating in the field test please contact
Anncy Marangoly at for more information. anncy.marangoly@umassmed.edu

   ##

   Companies firing disabled workers in record numbers
   July 15, 2003 -- A story in yesterday's Wall Street Journal notes that rising health-
insurance costs are pushing many companies to fire disabled workers and terminate their
coverage. A survey of 723 companies in 2003 by Mercer Human Resource Consulting found
that 27 percent dismiss workers as soon as they go on long-term disability. Almost a fourth
of the companies surveyed were found to fire workers after a set period on long-term
disability, usually six to 12 months. Only 15 percent maintain benefits until disabled workers
turn 65, which not long ago was general practice, says the Journal.
   The article is the sixth in the Journal's series "Left Behind: Casualties of a Changing Job
Market."
   Read complete article at: http://www.accessiblesociety.org/topics/economics-
employment/firingdiswkrs-wsj.html

   ##




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your privacy is guaranteed.
   Joining and shopping is easy! Visit http://www.iGive.com/PLUK now!

   ##




   PLUK eNews July 21-25, 2003                                                                    9
Transition/Employment/Housing/Advocacy:

   Supported Employment Webcourse: Begins August 11, 2003
   This webcourse provides an extensive overview of supported employment and how to
facilitate competitive jobs for individuals with significant disabilities. The following topics will
be covered: federal policy, history of supported employment, develop a marketing plan,
components of a customer profile, develop a job search plan, job site training strategies,
features of high quality long term support plan, and funding sources. Certificates will be
awarded to participants who complete all course work assignments (CEUs and CRCs will be
available for those who complete the coursework. The next section of the course will begin
August 11, 2003 (14 weeks to complete 6 sessions) More information -
http://www.vcu.edu/rrtcweb/cyberu/webcourse/secourse.html

   ##

   Increasing Opportunities for Older Youth in After school Programs (2003)
   This report, written by Carla Herrera and Amy J.A. Arbreton, documents the successes
and challenges of serving older youth. Few after school programs have developed successful
strategies for attracting large numbers of teens, especially older and harder-to-serve youth.
In response to the great need for teen programming, three of the eight clubhouses with
Madison Square Boys & Girls Club in New York City, and all five clubhouses with Boys &
Girls Clubs of Boston participated in a three-year initiative to provide and enhance services
to underserved teens. This report details the experiences of the clubs during the three-year
period. http://www.ppv.org/content/reports/boysgirls.html

   ##

   Teleconference: Youth Leadership Forums: Developing Leadership Skills in
Youth with Disabilities
   July 31, 2003 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM Central Time - This teleconference highlights the Youth
Leadership Forum (YLF) developed by the California Governor¹s Committee for
Employment of Disabled Persons in 1992, and currently replicated in states across the
nation with the support of the Office of Disability Employment Policy. The presenters will
share an overview and history of YLF and how national efforts can impact and influence the
further development of YLFs to continue on an annual basis. In addition, two examples of
states that have implemented YLFs will be presented, as well as their successes, challenges,
and lessons learned. Presenters include Alicia Epstein, Policy Advisor, Office of Disability
Employment Policy, U.S. Department of Labor; Angeline Pinckard, Alabama YLF
Coordinator, Alabama Governor's Committee on Employment of People with Disabilities,
Department of Rehabilitation Services; and June Hermanson, Project Coordinator, Montana
YLF. To join the call, dial 703-871-3092 and refer to the "NCSET Teleconference Call" if
asked by the operator. http://www.ncset.org/teleconferences/

   ##

   Transition and Technology: Independence and Beyond, Aug 1, Minneapolis, MN
   This technology and transition conference, sponsored by Parent Advocacy Coalition for
Educational Rights (PACER) Center, will help families find ways to use technology in their
child’s transition from high school to post secondary school or work. It also focuses on how
technology will help youth succeed after high school whichever path they choose. The
conference is free. Register by August 1, 2003. Brochure available in PDF (2 pages).
http://www.pacer.org/tatra/TatraTech.pdf



   PLUK eNews July 21-25, 2003                                                                   10
  ##


Technology/Web/Resources:

   New National Resource Center on AD/HD
   The National Resource Center on AD/HD: A Program of CHADD has been established with
funding from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) to be a national
clearinghouse of information and resources concerning this important public health concern.
The Web site answers many questions about AD/HD and provides direct links to other
resources. http://www.help4adhd.org/

  ##

   Symposium Series on Assistive Technology, Aug 11-15, Chicago, Illinois
   The Center on Disabilities at California State University, Northridge (CSUN) is pleased to
announce the third year of the "Symposium Series on Assistive Technology." This series of
workshops will address specific areas of assistive technology (AT) through in-depth one and
two-day training workshops. In order to meet your own specialized training needs, this
program was developed on an "a la carte" system, where you can combine sessions (which
do not run concurrently) that will specifically address your needs. No prerequisites are
needed for any of our workshops and all are invited to attend who have an intermediate
understanding of the topic area.
   Find more information on the conference Web site,
http://www.csun.edu/codtraining/brochure/symseries/.

  ##

   Helping Hand Blind Wear
   http://www.blindwear.com/
   The clothing of Helping Hand Blind Wear was created to help those who are blind or
afflicted with low-vision in receiving helpful assistance in public situations. The purpose of
the clothing and its special logo is to help those who have been stuck in awkward social
situations such as not being able to navigate an elevator, navigate a sidewalk, or locate
items in a store, to name but a few. By wearing the Blind logo with the caption, "Please
Lend a Helping Hand", those around you will be more likely to assist you. In many cases,
people are unsure whether to lend a helping hand because they do not want to offend that
person. By breaking down this barrier, others will gladly offer assistance where it is needed
and desired.

  ##


Training/Workshops/Conferences:

Social, Emotional and Academic Skill Development for Children, August 4-5, Grand
Forks, ND
       “Dual Tracks for Asperger Syndrome and Classical Autism” will be held in Grand
Forks, North Dakota August 4-5, 2003, at the Ramada Inn and Conference Center.
       Speakers: Jeanette McAfee, M.D., Amelia Davies, M.F.A., Elisa Gagnon, M.S.Ed.,
       Cynthia VanHorn, M.S.Ed., Michele Mullendore, M.S.Ed.


  PLUK eNews July 21-25, 2003                                                               11
Conference goals:
      •       Understand the implications of social and communication skills inadequacies
      •       Develop and apply ABA techniques at school and at home
      •       Develop strategies to strengthen imagination and visual thinking
      •       Design appropriate classroom strategies to improve social understanding and
      acceptance in the classroom
      •       Implement interventions to support the social/emotional development of
      individuals with ASD and improve relationship building skills
For more information, visit http://www.asperger.net/conferences.htm

##

  CSPD Region I August workshops:

   “6 Trait Writing”, August 4-5, Glendive & August 6-7, Miles City
   This training focuses on basic understanding of the popular 6 trait writing model.
   This training is pertinent to all grades K-12. It will give many hands on activities and
strategies about how to teach the 6 traits to all students and will show how to get them
involved in the assessment process.
               Presenter: Diana Knutson
                       8:00 – 4:30
                       August 4,5 – Dawson Community College in Glendive
                       August 6,7 – Miles City Community College

   “CRISS” Creating Independence through Student Owned Strategies, August 13-
15, Glendive
   This workshop is directed to all content area teachers. Project CRISS represents an
integration of research-based practices in reading comprehension, vocabulary instruction
and in the models of teaching. Teachers will learn various strategies to present material to
help students learn content information. Through application of the strategies, students will
gain the ability to apply processes of learning to new experiences. Visit
www.projectcriss.com for more information.
                Presenter: Maureen Danner
                       8:30 – 3:00
                       August 13, 14, 15 (1/2 day) at the Carney Center (Glendive Medical
Center) in Glendive, MT           (Glasgow site was cancelled)

   “Bully Proofing Your Program and Teaching Students How to Stop Bullies”,
August 15-16, Glasgow & August 18-19, Miles City
   This workshop is very important for teachers, childcare providers and parents to be
aware of the characteristics of a bully and the warning signs of a victim. It will provide
research on the prevalence of bullying in our country. Bullies that are not stopped and
taught new ways to deal with differences will grow up to use these same behaviors in
relationships and workplace settings. Every student has a right to an environment that is
free from harassment and physical harm.
   The objectives of this workshop are: 1) Identify the characteristics and warning signals of
a bully. 2) Identify the characteristics of a victim. 3) Identify the emotional trauma caused
from bullying. 4) List techniques to teach children to use to stop bullying. 5) Identify
strategies to bully proof the building.
               Presenter: Terry Becker-Fritz
                       8:00-4:00
                       August 15, 16 – Glasgow High School Auditorium
                       August 18,19 – Miles City Community College (rooms 106 & 107)


  PLUK eNews July 21-25, 2003                                                                 12
   For more information or to register, please contact:
              Helen Murphy at 406-485-2143 (H) or dmurphy@midrivers.com

##

   REGION V CSPD ROUNDUP
Severe Communication /Autism Conference, August 11-13, Whitefish
Together We’re Better, August 13-15, Missoula
Paraeducator Academies, August 18-19, Kalispell
         Region V has an online registration website. Sign on at http://www.cspd.net. Once
you have signed on, you will receive information about upcoming trainings.
                August 11–13 • Severe Communication /Autism Conference • Grouse
Mountain Lodge in Whitefish. This second annual conference includes workshops on
TEACCH, Sensory Integration Toolkit, Assistive Technology, and Asperger Syndrome.
Sponsored by NWCASE.
                August 13–15 • Together We’re Better • Region V CSPD ’s sixth Annual
August Institute, UM Education Building, Missoula. Get geared up for the new year with
strategies to help you work with all students. Workshops on Reading & Literacy, low
incidence disabilities, behavior, differentiated learning, legal issues, early childhood, social
skills, paraeducator academies, transition, and more.
                August 18–19 • Paraeducator Academies • Kalispell 2-day Academy:
Choice of Behavior Management, Instructional Strategies, or Student Supervision.
         Interested? Register at the Region V CSPD Online Registration Web site:
http://www.cspd.net or contact Nancy Marks at nmarks@mcps.k12.mt.us or 728-2400 ext
5036 for more information.

##

Seminar on "The Management and Control of Refractory Seizures Utilizing VNS
Therapy™ in People with Mental Retardation and Developmental Disabilities,
Particularly Those Who are in Independent Care Facilities (ICF’S).”
        This seminar is scheduled for August 14, 2003, from 7:00 PM until 9:00 PM.
Continuing Medical Education (CME) accreditation will be offered, and a blue-ribbon panel of
experts will be presenting and moderating these sessions. And, you will be able to interact
with these experts on line to respond to any questions you might have.
        You can register through EP (http://www.eparent.com) to participate. To view more
details of the seminar, please click on this link: http://www.eparent.com/webinar/

   ##

Autism Montana! 2003, August 15, Butte
Speakers:
       Raun Melmed, M.D. a nationally recognized Pediatrician will consider “Diagnosis,
Treatment, Toilet Training, Sleep, Behavior, Medication Challenges”
       Eustacia Cutler, the mother of Temple Grandin, brings insight into “Raising Temple
Grandin.”
For more information/registration contact:
Future Horizons, 721 W. Abram St., Arlington, TX 76013 Tel 800-489-0727
Register on line at: http://www.FutureHorizons-autism.com

##




   PLUK eNews July 21-25, 2003                                                                 13
Integrating SETT into the Assistive Technology Plan, August 18, Helena
       Terry Lankutis, Education and Technology Consultant, and Leslie Mullette, MonTech
Technology Coordinator will present the basics of the SETT process (student, environment,
tasks and tools) as a team -based approach to make assistive technology decisions. The
session will be from 9am -4pm at the Front Street Learning Center. For information, contact
Cheri Larson at 447-8585 or 431-9246.

##

Positive Approaches to Solving Severe Behavior Challenges, Billings, Aug 19-22
       The IABA and Bitterroot Valley Education Co-op, MSU-Billings and OPI are sponsoring
four seminars to promote positive practices in the field of challenging behavior. Visit
http://www.iaba.com/brochures/billings_flyer.pdf for more information.

##

National Down Syndrome Congress, August 22-24, Philadelphia PA
http://www.ndsccenter.org/newsAndEvents/convention03/convention.html
        As you think about your summer plans, I hope that high on your list is participating
in the National Down Syndrome Congress’ 31st annual convention in Philadelphia.
When I look back over the past thirty years at the life of my son, Todd, I see that my
dreams and hopes for him were often conceived or shaped by individuals I met and heard at
national events. In addition, those occasions were key in helping me figure out concrete
next steps and strategies to make the dreams become reality.
        his year’s NDSC convention features outstanding speakers including self-advocates,
parents with professional expertise, and committed professionals. Their presentations will
cover the life span. Whether your child is an infant, toddler, school age, young adult, or
mature adult, there will be many choices for you.
        Participants tell us they are especially inspired by the involvement and example of
the self-advocates whom you will see as leaders in all parts of the convention.
        The NDSC is committed to making the convention as affordable as possible for
families. By carefully managing our costs and through the generosity of our speakers who
donate their time, we are able to keep the cost of registration low for a national convention
of this scope and quality.
        Whatever the age of your family member or student with Down syndrome, you are
sure to find both information and inspiration at our convention August 22-24.
I hope to see you there!

Sincerely,
Judy Mart, President

  ##

   “Choices”: Montana’s Senior and Long-Term Care Conference, Sep 3-5, West
Yellowstone
   The Community Services Bureau (part of the Senior and Long Term Care Division of the
Department of Public Health and Human Services) is having its fifth annual conference in
West Yellowstone on September 3, 4 and 5, 2003. The theme of the conference is
"Choices", emphasizing that Montanan's have the right to choose how to live in their
communities. On a professional, or a personal level, the sessions are designed to
encourage and excite you with their content and presentation!
   Some of the session topics include: a multi-disciplinary panel discussion on ethical
dilemmas; the benefits of laughter and music to improve mood and reduce pain; cultural


  PLUK eNews July 21-25, 2003                                                             14
competence; the New Freedom Initiative; burnout and compassion fatigue; Children's
Special Health Services; Sexuality and Aging; Medicaid eligibility; the long term care
ombudsman program; and challenges of caregiving and Alzheimer's.
   The keynote speaker is Fred Cowie, whose theme will be "Caregiving, Collapsing, and
Continuing On." Fred has a varied background in disaster and emergency services, and is
currently a consultant with Montana Department of Justice regarding meth lab conferences.
He is an entertaining and highly sought after speaker, having spoken at many conferences
and training sessions on topics such as stress management, emergency preparedness, and
personal development. Fred is also an artist, and the father of a young man with Duchenne
Muscular Dystrophy. In recent years he has gone from his role as parent, to caregiver, to
paid caregiver, and now has once again reverted to his role as "Dad."
   For more information, or to register for the conference, call Karen Antonick at 406-444-
6995.

  ##

Addiction, Recovery and the Family, September 11-13, Whitefish
       8th Annual Rocky Mountain Mental Health Symposium, Sponsored by Pathways
Treatment Center & Kalispell Regional Medical Center.
       This symposium will provide a forum for exploring the most up-to-date information
on addiction issues facing families, as well as the treatment applications facilitating
recovery.
       For information & registration, call 866-755-4658, or visit
http://www.mtreservations.com or http://www.krmc.org.

##

Conference on Social, Emotional and Academic Interventions for Students with
High-Functioning Autism and Asperger Syndrome With a Special Session on
Bullying Preventions, October 3-4, Boise, ID
http://www.asperger.net/conferences.htm
Speakers: Brenda Smith Myles, Ph.D. & Rebekah Heinrichs, MSN, M.S.Ed.
CONFERENCE OUTCOMES
As a result of attending this conference, participants will be able to:
       •       Understand the characteristics of Asperger Syndrome
       •       Understand and implement sensory interventions Implement academic, social
       and behavioral interventions that facilitate school success
       •       Teach hidden curriculum items to their students
       •       Understand how to prevent bullying from occurring in schools

##

Augmentative Communication Workshops in the Rockies, October 2, Billings
       This CAMA sponsored session will present a number of the leading manufacturers of
AAC hardware and software at the Billings Hotel and Convention Center on October 2.
For complete information, go to http://www.aacproducts.org

##

  Fourth annual conference on Autism and Asperger’s: Mapping The Journey,
October 17 & 18, Edmonton, Alberta
  http://www.keystotreasures.com/
  Take advantage of our early registration special by September 15, 2003.


  PLUK eNews July 21-25, 2003                                                            15
   Oct. 17, 2003, Carol Gray
   Carol is the editor of the Jenison Autism Journal, and is a consultant to students with
ASD through the Jenison Public Schools (Jenison, Michigan). She is also the president of the
Gray center, a facility dedicated to individuals with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) and
those who work alongside them to improve mutual understanding.
   Oct. 18, 2003, Dr. Tony Attwood
   Dr. Attwood is a world-renowned expert on Asperger's Syndrome and author of the best-
selling book of that name.
   "The most significant issue that parents face is a lack of understanding and inappropriate
attitudes towards those with Asperger's Syndrome." -Dr. Attwood

  ##

Echoes of Abuse: Traumatic Brain Injury, October 30-31, Billings
         The Brain Injury Association of Montana and Billings Area Family Violence Task Force
are sponsoring the 14th annual McGuire Memorial Conference on Family Violence to be held
in Billings October 30-31.

##

   Workshops on Communication Strategies for Children with Severe and Multiple
Disabilities: August 4 - October 6, 2003
   Presented by Oregon Health & Science University, in association with Oregon Institute on
Disability & Development (UCEDD). These two-day workshops, designed for professionals
and parents, addresses Pre- symbolic Communication and Tangible Symbol Systems. A
special half-day seminar for parents is also offered, free of charge. Strategies are especially
appropriate for children with low-incidence disabilities including severe cognitive limitations,
deaf blindness, autism spectrum disorders and multiple disabilities. Academic, continuing
education credit and ASHA credit will be available. Presented at three locations this summer
and fall:
   For more information contact: Alexandra Dorinson, 1-800-410-7069 ext. 102,
dorinson@ohsu.edu. Visit the website at http://www.designtolearn.com .

  ##

Technology Conferences, August - October
Distance Teaching and Learning, Madison, WI, August 13-15.
See http://www.uwex.edu/disted/conference/

Information Technology: "From the Classroom to the Boardroom," Philadelphia, PA, August
13-17
http://www.bdpa.org/ccentral2003.cfm?CFID=710318&CFTOKEN=38639016

“Making Information Technology Work for Rural Communities: High Speed
Telecommunications Services are the Future Building Blocks of Rural America.” Washington,
DC, September 28-October 1. See http://ruraltelecon.org/RTC03/rtc03.htm

Closing The Gap: Computer Technology in Special Education and Rehabilitation,
Minneapolis, MN, October 14-18. See http://www.closingthegap.com/

##




  PLUK eNews July 21-25, 2003                                                                16
Announcing: A Series of Conference Calls on the Social-Emotional Development of
Young Children
       The Georgetown University Center for Child and Human Development, with support
from the Ewing Marion Kauffman Foundation, is launching a series of 10 conference calls
focusing on the social -emotional development of young children (birth through five years
old). The target audience for these calls includes early care and education providers,
agency administrators, technical assistance providers and others working with young
children and their families.

THESE CALLS WILL TAKE PLACE FROM 1:00-2:30 pm (EST)
ON THE LAST WEDNESDAY OF EVERY MONTH, BEGINNING JULY 30TH, 2003.

  TOPICS WILL INCLUDE:

  Date              Topic
  7/30/03              • What is Early Childhood Mental Health (ECMH)?
                       • Designing an ECMH System of Care: From Promotion
                          through Prevention and Intervention
  9/24/03              • Ensuring Cultural Competence in Practices with Young
                          Children and Families
  10/29/03             • Brain Research
                       • Attachment
  *11/19/03            • Curricula for Promoting Healthy Social -Emotional
                          Development
  *12/17/03            • Screening & Assessment for Infants, Toddlers and
                          Preschoolers
  1/28/04              • The Impact of Maternal Depression and/or Substance Abuse
                          on Young Children
  2/25/04              • Addressing the Mental Health Needs of Young Children
                          Involved with Child Welfare
  3/31/04              • ECMH Consultation Models
  4/28/04              • Relationship-based Interventions
  5/26/04              • Children & Trauma


        National experts will serve as presenters, as will practitioners who are involved in
promising practices. Presentations will highlight effective strategies for delivering family-
driven, culturally appropriate services in community-based settings.
Up to 200 individuals per call will be able to participate on a first-come-first serve basis.
Handouts, including PowerPoint presentations, will be provided to people who register for
the calls.
****Please send an email to mk73@georgetown.edu (MelKisha Knight) if you want to be
added to the list for the first call.
Materials will be emailed to you. More information to come!

##

  Online Workshops from Reed Martin, July 2003
  http://www.reedmartin.com/onlineworkshopshoppingcart.htm
  These 90 minute phone conferences are $40. Visit the link above for registration.
      • July 23 9:00 - 10:30 PM, EST - The Least Restrictive Environment - It's a Service
         Not A Place And It Applies To Every Child



  PLUK eNews July 21-25, 2003                                                                   17
  ##


Fun Events
Winter Carnival, July 26, Billings
        PLUK and the Centennial Ice Arena are planning the second annual Winter Carnival
for the afternoon of July 26 from 1 - 4pm. Activities include: free skate, ice painting
activities and event, snowman making contest, and others. It will be great fun coming in out
of the heat and enjoying the coolness of ice and snow. For details on the event or if you
would like to volunteer, call PLUK’s office at 255-0540.

##

Blue Jack Band Benefit, September 20, Bozeman
       The Bozeman area Associate Board is planning a benefit concert on September 20
featuring The Blue Jack Band. The Blue Jack Band plays a wonderful mix of jazz and blues
and has broad national recognition. In recent years they opened for legendary blues
performer B.B. King and others. Further details on locations, times and other
announcements will come soon. Call PLUK’s office if you are interested in being involved,
255-0540.

##

Missoula Children’s Theatre Tour, October 5-11, Kalispell
       The Flathead Valley Associate Board is working on a fall event. They have been
meeting regularly and finalizing details at this time. It will involve a weeklong project for
children to perform a play in the Kalispell area. The dates are October 5 though the 11th.
This event will link up with the Missoula Children’s Theatre. The Theatre will send staff to
Kalispell to handle the auditions, training and direction for the entire week. For more
information or to be involved with the event, call Stephanie Luehr, PLUK’s representative in
Kalispell at 881-4421. Details and plans on the event will be provided and there are
presently positions to be filled on the planning committee. Volunteers are needed.

##

Dinosaur Day with Jack Horner, October 11, Billings
       Jack Horner, Paleontologist from Montana State University in Bozeman will join PLUK
on October 11 in Billings for two events. Kids can “get their hands dirty” in learning about
the world of Paleontology through many fun activities are being planned during the day.
       That evening, a dinner (with limited seating) is planned and Mr. Horner will speak
about “Dinosaurs in Montana.”
       For information on the event, call PLUK’s office at 255-0540. Participation in both the
workshop for kids, and the dinner, is limited --tickets must be purchased to attend.

##

Halloweek, late October, Billings
        Halloweek is sponsored by the Billings Associate Board and includes a weeks worth of
activities leading up to Halloween. If you would be interested in planning or volunteering,
contact Bernice Hash at the PLUK office, 255-0540.




  PLUK eNews July 21-25, 2003                                                               18
##

Magical Tymes Party, November 11, Missoula
        The Missoula Associate Board third annual “Magical Tymes Party” has been scheduled
for November 11. Deborah Hayes Hyde is the Chair of the event and Ramona Holt is
chairing the Sponsorship Sub-Committee. For the last two years, this event has been held in
conjunction with a play at the Missoula Children’s Theatre. In addition to the play,
participants may attend a “wine and cheese party” and a silent auction.
        This year the play is Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat. Companies and
groups are now lining up to sponsor the event and the committee assures us that it will be
the best to date, by far! For more information on how to become involved, call PLUK’s office
at 800-222-7585 and we can put you in touch with the planning committee.

Be sure to mark your calendar with these future events:
•    Kids at Heart Banquet, February 7, 2004, Billings
•    Sports Festival, March 2004, Billings

##

Selected Sources:
1.     Monday Morning in Washington, DC, http://www.inclusionresearch.org
2.     Rocky Mountain DBTAC, http://www.adainformation.org
3.     Transition Newsflash, Montana Center On Disabilities,
http://www.msubillings.edu/transition
4.     PEN Weekly NewsBlast, http://www.publiceducation.org
5.     Reference Points: Transition updates from the TATRA Project,
http://www.pacer.org/tatra/tatra.htm
6.     Lisa Simmons, The Ideal Lives Express: http://www.ideallives.com
7.     The American Indian Disability Technical Assistance Center Training Calendar
http://aidtac.ruralinstitute.umt.edu/TrainingCalendar.htm

##

PLUK eNews is published by:

Parent's, Let's Unite for Kids – PLUK
516 N 32nd St
Billings MT 59101-6003
800-222-7585; 406-255-0540; 406-255-0523 (fax)
plukinfo@pluk.org
http://www.pluk.org

Mission Statement: Parent’s Let’s Unite for Kids unites parents, professionals, families and
friends of children with special needs to support one another, and share information for the
benefit of their children.

Vision Statement: Given information and support, individuals with disabilities and their
families will feel empowered to advocate for themselves and participate fully in educational
and community opportunities.




  PLUK eNews July 21-25, 2003                                                              19
Statement on accessibility: Today, we endeavor to be consciou s of the need for making all
electronic information accessible, because we are aware of physical accessibility issues in
our communities. For design guidelines visit: http://ncam.wgbh.org/cdrom/guideline/.




  PLUK eNews July 21-25, 2003                                                             20

				
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