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					                   DRAFT PLAN




    COMPREHENSIVE
DISTRICT AGRICULTURE PLAN
          (C-DAP)




 DISTRICT MAHENDERGARH
        HARYANA



              1
COMPREHENSIVE DISTRICT AGRICULTURE
              PLAN
                      (C-DAP)

       FOR RASHTRIYA KRISHI VIKAS YOJANA
             OF XITH FIVE YEAR PLAN




                   CONTRIBUTORS

Dr. VED PAL SINGH, SR. COORDINATOR; KVK, MAHENDERGARH;
    DR. SUBE SINGH YADAV, SR. ES, KVK, MAHENDERGARH;
      DR. A.S. YADAV, SR. DES, KVK, MAHENDERGARH AND
    DR. JAI LAL YADAV, SR. DES, KVK, MAHENDERGARH AND
      DR. ANIL RATHI, AGRIL. ECONOMIST, KVK SONEPAT
                                &
           DISTRICT OFFICERS OF LINE DEPARTMENT




           DISTRICT MAHENDERGARH
                  HARYANA



                              2
                                CONTENTS

 Sr. No.                               Title                     Page No.


Chapter    Introduction                                            4-8
I
Chapter    General Description of the District                     9-19
II
Chapter    SWOT Analysis of the District                          20-27
III
Chapter    Development of Agriculture Sector                      28-67
IV
Chapter    Allied Agricultural Sectors                            68-99
V
Chapter    District Plan                                         100-163
VI
                Introduction                                      100
                Growth Drivers                                    100
                Innovative Schemes                              101-119

                Special Projects for Convergence of NREGA etc
                 with RKVY                                       120-161

                Vision of XIth Plan                               162

                Proposed Budget of XIth Plan                      163




                                           3
                                        CHAPTER-I

INTRODUCTION
        The economic reforms commenced in 1991 have successfully put the economy in a
higher growth orbit with more than 8 percent growth rate in total Gross Domestic Product
(GDP) especially during the recent years. However, the agriculture sector which accounted
for more than 30 percent of total GDP at the beginning of reforms, failed to maintain its pre-
reform growth. On the contrary, it witnessed a deceleration in growth after the mid 1990s, as
the per annum growth in agriculture sector dropped to 1.9 percent during 1996-97 to 2001-
2002 from 3.2 percent in the period 1980-81 to 1995-1996. This happened despite the fact
that agricultural productivity in most of the states was quite low, as it were, and the potential
for the growth of agriculture was high. The 10th five year plan target of growth of 4 percent
per annum in agriculture and allied sectors, set to reverse the sharp deceleration of 1996-
1997 to 2001-2002 has not been achieved. The approach paper to the 11th plan also
emphasized that reversal of the deceleration in agricultural growth witnessed after 1996, is a
pre requisite for the success of this plan. A sustained and wide spread agricultural growth is a
pre-condition of (rural) development in India, as more than 50 percent of country’s work
force still depends upon agriculture for its livelihood. This slow growth in agriculture
(including allied sectors) can be of great strain for the economy, as agriculture is not only an
important driver of macro- economic performance; it also is an essential element of the
strategy to make growth more inclusive. Concerned over this pace of growth in agriculture
and allied sectors, the National Development Council (NDC), in its meeting held on 29th May,
2007 resolved that a special Additional Central Assistance Scheme i.e. National Agriculture
Development Programme/Rastriya Krishi Vikas Yojana (RKVY) be launched with the
following main objectives.

    To incentivize the States for increasing public investment in agriculture and allied
     sectors
    To ensure that agricultural plans of Districts/States are prepared and are based on
     agro- climatic conditions, availability of technology and natural resources.
    To reduce the yield gap in important crops and increase production and productivity
     in agriculture and allied sectors through focused and holistic initiatives.
    To ensure that local needs/crops/priorities are better reflected in the agricultural plans
     of the Districts/States.
    To provide flexibility and autonomy to States in planning and implementation of
     agriculture and allied sector schemes.
    To maximize income of farmers in agriculture and allied sectors.

        The eligibility for assistance from the Centre under the scheme would depend upon
the State Government providing amounts in the Plan Budget of the State for agriculture and
allied sectors over the baseline expenditure.

       As per the NDC resolution, Government of India introduced a new Additional
Central Assistance Scheme to incentivize States to draw up plans for their agriculture sector
more comprehensively, taking agro-climatic conditions, natural resource issues and
technology into account, and integrating livestock, poultry and fisheries as a farming system



                                               4
approach. This involves a new scheme for Additional Central Assistance (ACA) to State
Plans, administered by the Union Ministry of Agriculture over and above its existing
centrally sponsored schemes, to supplement the state-specific strategies. In order to
rejuvenate the agriculture during XIth plan, a growth rate of 4 percent per annum has to be
achieved (as per NDC commitment) by reorienting development strategies that meet the
needs of the farmers. The agriculture growth being essential element of the strategy of
making growth more inclusive, the NDC advised the State Governments on preparation of
Comprehensive District Agriculture Plans (C-DAP), which includes allied agriculture sectors
with full and efficient utilization of available resources.

        The concept of integrated local area plans to raise living standard in rural area and
overcome food shortage based on specific endowments and needs of each area was initially
mooted in 1st Five year plan in 1951, which could not be materialized in true sense as only
sporadic efforts and isolated cases of such planning were practically attempted. For success
of local area or District level plans, the underlying constraints needed to be identified. The
required infrastructural investment, extension (and research system) revamping and market
reach with the system’s conduct and performance have to be synchronized through a holistic
policy approach. The Agriculture in the district can’t possibly achieve same growth as in the
past without recognizing the role of farmers’ participatory approach for formulating
strategies and finding solutions to new and emerging problems. Similarly due to
globalization, trade in agriculture will expand and the district like Mohindergarh can hugely
benefit, when the trade expands and our farmers start making best use of such changes by
becoming secondary producer rather than a primary producer of agriculture commodities.
Reforms based on globalization can now pave the way for commercial dairies and subsidiary
occupations. The demographic changes due to fast urbanization and slow down in the
population will bring greater prosperity in the middle class families. This will lead to some
diversification in food habits leading to more animals and requirement of more cereals for
animals. Food demand will go up, not purely because of population rise, but also because of
more requirement of cereals as animal feed. Although in Mohindergarh district where land
used for agriculture will decease, but still there is no reason to believe that agriculture
productivity has reached its plateau. New science like GM crops, and new approaches like
resource conserving technologies will always help us to face new challenges in agriculture
development.

        Keeping this in view, the C-DAP of district Mohindergarh is prepared on the basis of
primary and secondary data of the district for achieving sustainable agricultural growth with
improved farmers’ income through participatory process involving stakeholders and various
organizations. By establishing strong linkages with required institutional support services,
the plan will ensure optimum utilization of scarce natural, physical and financial resources.

Methodology

       The C-DAP was prepared as per the process and methodology suggested by the
Planning Commission, Government of India. The approach followed in preparation of the
document was necessarily of Participatory Rural Appraisal mode. CCS Haryana Agricultural
University, Hisar, Haryana was identified as Technical Support Institute (TSI). The TSI,



                                              5
under the guidance of Director, Extension Education, provided all necessary technical help to
planning units and support groups for preparation of this plan through participatory bottom-
up process. The TSI trained the Planning Units/ Groups in Participatory Rural Appraisal
techniques, designed formats for data collection, guided in data collection and analysis and
conducted regular workshops and meetings and did hand holding, wherever and whenever
needed for plan preparation.

       The responsibility of preparing C-DAP of Mohindergarh district was given to Krishi
Vigyan Kendra,Mohindergarh. The KVK team, after receiving proper training from TSI held
wide consultations with District/ Block/ Village Agriculture Planning Units of the District.
The TSI conducted two days orientation workshop-cum-training programme on 30.3.08 and
31.8.08 at CCSHAU, Hisar. The following specific aspects were covered in the programme.

      Issues and challenges in Agriculture Sector
      Planning concepts and District Planning
      Basic features and planning process of RKVY
      Vision, methodology and process of preparing C-DAP
      Participatory Rural Appraisal
      Farming system approach
      Farming situation based extension
      Integrated nutrient management(INM), Integrated pest management( IPM), Natural
       resource management (NRM),Human resource development( HRD), Marketing and
       other important aspects.

Data collection and consultation:

       The KVK team, after receiving proper training from TSI, held wide consultations
with District/ Block/ Village Agriculture Planning Units of the district (different
bodies/institutional arrangements under ATMA Scheme). Formal and informal meetings
with Agriculture and line department staff and Panchayati Raj Institution’s member and
farmers were conducted at different levels. Secondary data and related statistics needed for
planning from different departments and other sources, were collected

Primary Data:

        For in-depth farm/ village level study covering important aspects of agriculture and
allied fields, the district was divided into two distinctively Agro-eco-situations (AESs) as
was done for SREP preparation under ATMA Scheme. From each AES one representative
village (Rajpura from AES-I and Sigra from AES-II), was selected for collecting required
information on modified semi-structured schedules through PRA.

Con-current review and verification of data:

       The primary as well as secondary data collected, was cross-checked through
triangulations and verified from information available with different government
departments and PRA based exercises (earlier conducted by KVK and other agencies). The


                                             6
District Plan (draft), SREP and PLP of Mohindergarh district and other related
documents/reports of different departments were consulted for preparing the C-DAP.

Holding farmer meetings at villages selected for representing AESs in the district

        PRA was conducted covering the whole gamut of activities ranging from pre-sowing
to post-harvesting and marketing related to agriculture and allied activities being undertaken
by the villagers.

Work plan and activities before the preparation of plan-

      Meeting of resource team of KVK with line departments heads and officers and PRI’s
       representative
      Discussed the farmer participation evaluation, time frame, activities and
       responsibilities of all involved in the plan.
      Discussed the plan and expected output from five year plan in progress. The stake
       holders were made clear about subsidies for seed, fertilizer and other inputs.
       Gaps that exists in achieving the targeted productivity growth across the
       farmers categories were identified through participatory process. This provided
       sound basis for developing Comprehensive District Agriculture Plan (C-DAP).

Following discussion were held

        The current priorities were discussed with farmers. The promising new practices were
identified and agreed upon with them. Responsibilities of all stake holders and surveyors
were elaborated with staff.

Before meeting

       The PRA schedule, based on the past experiences and data required regarding the
farmers’ need, was prepared.

         Important points for discussion containing proposed change in the practices (of
management, varieties, site specific nutrient management, IPM, seed, soil health and allied
activities) were included and the proforma for Gram Panchayat given in C-DAP manual was
modified accordingly. The schedule was made simple and comprehensible.

During meeting-

        The meetings were ensured to be informal. The farmers were encouraged to
participate, interact and make their own fair appraisals in the meeting. Lecture type meeting
was avoided. Farmers were informed about the objective of the meeting. The dialogue was
started; the gap analysis and current scenario regarding productivity, profitability and risks
associated with different cropping systems were discussed.




                                              7
The possible changes targeted in the management practices were:

       Field preparation-zero tillage, bed planter, laser leveler , ridger seeder
       Crop establishment-plant population, seed rate etc.
       Nutrient management-N and P rate, time, source, use of organic manure, basal and
        top dressing of fertilizer, application of K and micronutrients.
       Important pests based on economic importance including insects, diseases nematodes
        and weeds.

       Measures which improve the efficiency of inputs including water (by improving
water productivity), energy (by reducing energy intensity like less fuel and less electricity)
and labour( mechanization ).It has to be a campaigning tool and also a guide to policy.

       To improve both productivity and profits and to generate rural employment, another
option might be to reset the system approaches from a commodity approach to cropping
system approach (Bajra-wheat cropping system rather than bajra or wheat as a separate
commodity) and from cropping system approach to a farming system approach ( Arable
Farming -Buffalo).

       Farmers and scientist arrived at general agreement on what to do, to fill the gaps on
crops and allied activities.

Discussed about the proposed design, trials, Front line demonstration (FLDs) and other
activities in a farming system approach, keeping in view the following points

(i)     Profitability of cropping system and the rate of return.
(ii)    Market infrastructure and marketing opportunities, custom hire services and some of
        the policy issues related to subsidy.
(iii)   Farmers’ inability to invest in the productivity improvement as majority of farmers
        belongs to resource poor category.
(iv)    Work plan and activities for landless and resource poor farmers.
(v)     Collected and discussed the feed back regarding On-Farm and Off- Farm activities.
(vi)    Crop insurance and cyclical assistance.




                                              8
                                    CHAPTER-II

                   GENERAL DESCRIPTION OF THE DISTRICT
2.1 Introduction

   (i) Map of the District

       Mahendergarh district (Fig. 1) was formed in 1948 by grouping different tracts of
erstwhile princely states, Narnaul and Mahendergarh tehsils from Patiala State. The
headquarters of the district are at Narnaul.




                     Fig. 1. General map of Mahendergarh district
                          (Source : website of Haryana Govt.)




                                           9
(ii) General Statistics

       The land utilization statistics (preceding 3 years average) of the district is given in
Table 1

Table 1. Land utilization statistics (000,ha)
 i) Geographical Area                                        194.160
 ii) Cultivable area                                         155.599
 iii) Irrigated area                                         122.973
 iv) Forest Area                                             2.035
 v) Land under non agricultural use                          21.463
 vi) Permanent pastures                                      1.421
 vii) Current fallow area                                    17.946
 viii) Net sown area                                         153.156
 ix) Gross cropped area                                      281.115
 x) Cropping intensity (%)                                   181.4%

(iii) Land holdings
        The details of land holdings in the district as per Agriculture Census 2001 are
presented in Table 2.

Table 2. Land Holdings (Agriculture Census 2001)
    Types of land holding*              No. of holdings                  Area (ha)
 Marginal Farmers                           36473                          15839
 Small Farmers                              15608                          20131
 Semi Medium Farmers                         7998                          33524
 Medium Farmers                              8488                          52218
 Large Farmers                               1809                          27662
 Total                                      74376                         149374
* 0-1, 1-2, 2-4, 4-10 and > 10 ha are marginal farmers, small farmers, semi medium farmers,
medium farmers and large farmers, respectively.

(iv) Forests

        The area under state forests in the district is 2.035 thousand hectares. There is 1.04 %
of total geographical area of district under forest cover. The xerophytic type of flora
dominates in the district. The district is inadequately wooded and some parts are practically
bare of trees. Tree species found are khairi, jand, pahari kikar, kikar, dhok, babool, rohera,
janti or reru, jai or van, beri, barh, pipal, lasura, imli, barna, shisham, siris, neem, farash,
henna, papri, gular, indokh, tut, gulmohar, simbal or samul, kandu, bakain, safeda, arind and
dhak. Kikar or pahari kikar is found all over the district. Jand and jai are the dominant
species of the sandy areas. Shrubs found in the district are pala, hins, Puthkanda, bansa,
panwar, karia, khip, Aak, phog and Nagphani. Amarbel is a common parasite climber. The
important grasses found in the district are anjan, dhaman, dub, kana, dabh palwa and chirya.
The palatable grasses like anjan, dhaman and dub have dwindled due to excessive grazing in



                                              10
village common land. Jand, neem bakain, khairi, mesquite or pahari kikkar, henna and
eucalyptus have been planted to increase the forest wealth.

(v) Crop/Breeds/Fisheries etc Activities in the District
(a) Agriculture
        Agriculture is a predominant activity for the district. The major sources of livelihood
are agriculture and related activities. The major crops cultivated in Kharif season are bajra,
guar and cotton. Likewise, the major crops grown in Rabi season are mustard, wheat, barley
and gram. The area, production and productivity of major crops grown in the district is given
in Table 3.

Table 3. Area, production, yield, gaps in yield and present seed replacement ratio (SRR)
of major crops (2006-07)
  Sr. No.       Name of Crops               Area(ha)           Production (000q)       Yield
                                                                                      (kg/ha)
     1               Bajra                  1,03,200                 1551              1596
     2               Guar                    20,000                  18.40             985
     3              Cotton                    1410                2313 (bales)         339
     1             Mustard                   96,121                  1371              1436
     2              Wheat                    43,627                  1726              4256
     3              Barley                     670                    13.2             2650
     4               Gram                     7,584                   67.7             991
Source : DDA, Narnaul ; 1 Bale = 170 kg


(b) Allied Sectors of Agriculture
         The important allied sectors of agriculture including horticulture, animal husbandry,
fisheries, watershed development, social forestry, food processing, agro-based industries,
agricultural marketing, agricultural credit, etc contributes significantly in the economy of the
district.
(i) Horticulture
         The agro climatic conditions of the district are favourable for fruits and vegetable
crops. The major fruit crops grown in the district are citrus, belgiri, guava, ber and aonla.
The major vegetable crops grown in an area of 3,787ha were tomato, carrot, cauliflower,
radish, chillies, brinjal, cucurbits and leafy vegetables etc with total production of 78,862
MT during 2006-07. The data on present status of horticultural crops including vegetables is
given in Tables 4 and 5. In order to increase the production of fruits and vegetables in the
district and for additional income, the farmers are required to adopt naturally ventilated poly
house/poly tunnels for nursery raising, drip Irrigation in fruits and vegetables, to cover more
area under hybrids of vegetables and less water requiring onion.




                                              11
Table 4. Area, productivity and NPK consumption in Horticultural crops (2006-07)
                                                                          NPK Consumption
                                                   Productivity
  Sr. No.      Name of Crops         Area (ha)                                (kg/ha)
                                                      (t/ha)
                                                                    N       P      K      Total
 1             Citrus species          260               12         550         275        275        1100

 2             Guava                    35               25         412         206        83         700

 3             Ber                      45               20         360         180        180        720

 4             Aonla                    40               15         360         180        180        720
Source : DHO, Narnaul

Table 5. Area, production and NPK consumption in vegetables (2006-07)
                                                                                NPK Consumption
                                          Area        Production                    (kg/ha)
     Sr. No.      Name of Crops
                                          (ha)          (MT)
                                                                          N           P          K     Total
       1          Carrot                     515          16250            60         30         30     120
       2          Cauliflower                500          15000           125         50         50     225
       3          Bhindi                     480           3905           100         60         60     220
       4          Chilli                     417           2060            --         --         --      --
       5          Radish                     395          14215            60         30         30     120
       6          Pea                        360           2970            --         --         --      --
       7          Brinjal                    340           7942            60         30         60     150
       8          Leafy vegetables           260           2825            --         --         --      --
       9          Cabbage                    240           7180            --         --         --      --
       10         Tomato                     150           5075            60         30         60     150
       11         Onion                       75           865             --         --         --      --
                  Others
       12                                    55               575         50          25         25     100
                  (Cucurbits etc)
Source : DHO, Narnaul
(ii) Animal Husbandry
        Livestock is an integral part of farming systems in Mahendergarh district. Good
entrepreneurship qualities in farmers of this district particularly land less farmers are basic
factors for the development of animal husbandry. The Department of Animal Husbandry
caters to the treatment, vaccination, de-worming, milk recording, sheep breeding, poultry,
piggery, self-employment for youth and other extension services. The animal population in
the district is 2,26,615 buffaloes, 30,785 cows, 38,734 sheeps, 69,628 goats and 1,97,327
poultry. Total Veterinary Hospitals and Dispensaries in the district are only 125.

(iii) Fisheries
        The fish cultivation in Mahendergarh district is done mainly in Gram Panchayat
Tanks spread over an area of 220.90 ha. The total fish production in the district was 262.10
tonnes.



                                                    12
(c) Other Occupations
(i) Vermi-composting
        It is established fact that use of vermicompost in crops promotes faster growth of
plants. It increases water-holding capacity of soil, reduces salinization and soil erosion,
induces resistance in plants against pest and diseases and increases soil productivity thereby
higher crop yields. Hence, it is required to promote the use of vermicompost for sustainable
crop production.
(ii) Beekeeping
        In order to maximise agricultural production, honeybee can be used as an important
input. About 85 per cent crop plants are cross-pollinated, as they need to receive pollen from
other plants of the same species with the help of external agents. One of the most important
external agents is the honeybee. A few colonies of honeybees are placed in the field when the
crop is in flowering stage. When pressed in to service they would make several thousand
forages for pollination. The abundance of pollinators helps in early setting of seeds resulting
in early and more uniform crop yield. Honeybees also produce honey, bee wax and royal
jelly thus giving additional benefits to the farmers. Majority of crops grown in the district are
bee dependent crops like fruits, vegetables and oilseeds. Therefore, it is required to
encourage farmers for the adoption of beekeeping enterprise along with cultivation of crops.
(iii) Small Scale Industries
        Mahendergarh is an industrially backward district and there is no big industrial unit in
the district. However, there are 1528 SSI units in the district which provided employment to
about 4778 people.

(d) Extension Activities
(i) Farmers organizations
       At present about 583 self help groups are functioning in 319 villages involving about
5930 members. However, no Farmers Clubs, Krishi Vigyan Mandals and Community Groups
are functioning in the district.

(ii) Service Centers (Agriculture & Allied Sectors)
        The Public, Private and Cooperative sector centers presently providing service to the
farmers in the field of Agriculture and its’ allied fields are given in Table 6.

Table 6. Service centers in the district (Agriculture and Allied Sectors)
  Name of Block      No. of service     Seed/ fertilizer         Farm             Agriculture
                        centers            supply           equipments and        consultancy
                                                              machinery
 Narnaul             4                IFFCO                 HAIC                IFFCO
                                      HSDC
                                      HAFED
                                      HAIC
 Nangal              1                Co-operative          ----                ----
 Choudhary                            Marketing Society
 Ateli               1                Co-operative          ----                ----
                                      Marketing Society
 Mahendergarh        3                HAFED                 ----                ----
                                      HSDC


                                               13
                                         HLRDC
 Kanina               2                  IFFCO               ----              ----
                                         Co-operative
                                         Marketing Society


(iii) Basic Marketing Infrastructure for Agriculture Produce (PHM)
        The details of basic marketing infrastructure for post harvest management of
agriculture produce are given in Table 7.

Table 7. Marketing infrastructure for post harvest management of agriculture produce
  Name of Block                   Rural Godowns                       No. of markets
                           Numbers              Capacity       Main Market      Sub Market
                                                (Tonnes)
 Narnaul                      1                   8000               1                ----
 Nangal                      ----                  ----             ----               1
 Choudhary
 Ateli                        1                   3440              ----               1
 Mahendergarh                 1                   5000              ----               1
 Kanina                       1                   3340              ----               1


(iv) Credit Institutions
        The details of number of credit institutions spread over the district are given in Table
8. The total loan distributed by these credit institutions to farmers and others during 2006-07
was Rs. 8730.45 lacs.


Table 8. Number of credit institutions spread over the district
    Name of                               Number of institutions                           Total
     Block
                  Commercial RRBs                Cooperative PACS          Others
                  banks
 Narnaul          11                4            3             3           1           22
 Mahendergarh 7                     5            6             5           1           24
 Ateli            3                 6            4             4           1           18
 Kanina           5                 3            6             6           1           15
 Nangal           3                 5            3             3           1           15
 Chaudhary
 Total            29                23           22            21          5           100



                                                  14
2.2 District at a Glance
2.2.1. Location and Geographical Units
         It is bounded on the north by Bhiwani and Rohtak districts, on the east by Rewari
district and Alwar district of Rajasthan, on the south by Alwar, Jaipur and Sikar districts of
Rajasthan, and on the west by Sikar and Jhunjhunu districts of Rajasthan. Spread-over an
area of about 1899 Sq. Km., this district is situated between 270 47’ to 280 26’ north latitude
and between 750 56’ to 760 51’ eastern longitudes.
2.2.2. Demographic Profile
       Mahendergarh district comprises of two sub-divisions (Narnaul and Mahendergarh),
two tehsils (Narnaul and Mahendergarh) and five development blocks (Ateli, Kanina,
Mahendergarh, Nangal Choudhary and Narnaul). The number of villages is 374 . Total
population of the district is 7,02,881 (as per 2001 census).

2.2.3. Topography and agro-Climatic Characteristics
(a) Soil Topography
        The district has suffered a prolonged period of aridity. The landscape of the district is
peculiar. It has varied topography comprising valleys, undulating lands, sand dunes and
alluvial plains. The Aravali ranges spread throughout the district. According to land
capability classification, the soils of the district varies from good (Class II) to fairly good
land (Class IV) suited for occasional cultivation. The Mahendergarh district is characterized
with the soils, which belong to two moisture regimes, i.e., Ustic (6.7%) and Aridic (1.4%).
Dominant soils of Ustic zone are deep, excessively sandy and alkaline. Soils of Aridic zone
are sandy and alkaline.
(b) Nutrient Status of Soils
        The majority of soils are low in nitrogen and phosphorus, and high in potash. In
respect to micro-nutrients, the majority of soils are severely deficient in iron and moderately
deficient in manganese and zinc. The amount of different fertilizers consumed in the district
during 2006-07 is given in Table 9.

Table 9. Amount of different fertilizers consumed and estimated requirement in the
district
 Name of Fertilizer       Estimated requirement during the plan period (tonnes)
 fertilizer consumed
             (tones)
             2006-07     2006-07        2006-07    2006-07     2006-07 2006-07
 Urea           30574          31644          36000          36000         38000       42000
 DAP            14252          15565          19000          20000         21000       23000
 MOP             220            172             200            200           250         300
 SSP             585            801            1000           1000          1200        1500
 Total            ---           605             700            800          1000        1500
 NPK
 Zinc            124            160            170            200           250          350




                                               15
(c) Ground water Quality
        The ground water quality in about 35 per cent area of the district is with in
permissible (C- 1) limits and safe for irrigation. However, the quality of ground water in
about 25 per cent area is unsafe (C-4) for irrigation. In rest of the area i. e. about 40 per cent
of the district, the ground water is either moderately safe (about 25% area) or unsafe (about
15 % area) for irrigation.
(2) Climate
        The climate is hot and semi-arid with annual rainfall about 300-500 mm (Atlas of
Haryana 2004). The average rainfall received during last year (2006-07) was 377.92mm
(Annexure IV). The year may be broadly divided into four seasons, viz. winter, summer,
monsoon and the post monsoon or the transit period. The winter starts late in November and
continues up to the beginning of March. The summer is from March till the end of June. The
period from July to mid September is the south west monsoon season. Mid September to end
of November constitutes the post monsoon or the transition period. Generally, bright
sunshine, scarcity and variability of rainfall and very high rate of evapo-transpiration are the
dominant climatic factors and it has been suffering from recurrent drought and famine
conditions. The dominant components of the climate are temperature, rainfall, humidity and
evapo-transpiration.

(3) Temperature
        From about the beginning of March, temperatures begin to increase rapidly even up to
   0
48 C in May and June. Therefore, May and June are the hottest months when the mean daily
maximum temperature is about 41°C. While days are little hotter in May than in June, Nights
are warmer in June than in May. From April onwards, hot dust-laden winds locally known as
loo blows and weather is unpleasant. The mean daily maximum temperature in January is
about 21° C and the mean daily minimum temperature about 7°C. The high temperature
coupled with high wind velocity and lack of soil moisture is the main characteristics of the
area.
(4) Rainfall
        The normal annual rainfall in the district is 553.00 mm. The rainfall in the district
increases from the west towards the east. About 77% of the annual rainfall in the district is
received during the south-west monsoon months.
2.2.4. Land Use Pattern and Land Holdings
       Out of total geographical area of 194.160 thousand hectares, the cultivable area is
155.599 thousand hectares, out of which the net sown area is 153.156 thousand hectares. The
percentage of net sown area to total cultivable area is 78.9% which is much lesser than State
Average of 93.1 %.
2.2.5. Irrigation and Ground water
(a) Irrigation
       Out of 155.599 thousand hectares of the cultivable area, 122.973 thousand hectares
(Annexure 11) is under irrigation, out of which 1.27 per cent is under canal irrigation and
remaining area (98.73%) is under tube well irrigation (sprinkler irrigation). The area covered
under drip irrigation in fruit plants was 9.5, 12.5 and 51 ha during 2005-06, 2006-07 and
2007-08, respectively. Similarly, the area covered under sprinkler irrigation in field crops



                                               16
namely bajra, guar, mustard, wheat and gram during 2006-07 was 1,00,000, 17,640, 95,080,
43,120 and 4000, hectares, respectively.
(b) Ground water level (m) in the soil
        The ground water level (m) recorded during 2006 in different developmental blocks
of the district is given in Table 10.

Table 10. Ground water level recorded during 2006
 Sr. No.       Name of Block                     Ground Water Level (m)
                                                      June 2006
 1             Ateli                                           43.56
 2             Kanina                                          24.55
 3             Mahendergarh                                    51.19
 4             Nangal Choudhary                                28.87
 5             Narnaul                                         46.92
Source: Website of Haryana Govt.

2.3 The Vision
        The development of advanced agro-technology and micro-irrigation has facilitated
substantial shifts in acreage in Mahendergarh district towards bajra, wheat, barley and
mustard with increased level of crop intensification. The significant increases in the
productivity (data discussed else where) of bajra, wheat and mustard were brought about by
technological improvements/interventions backed by effective price support and public
stocking policies. These developments put the region’s agriculture (Mahendergarh district
included) on high growth path resulting into fast increase in the area under bajra and mustard
crops not only by substituting other crops but also through horizontal and vertical expansion
in the cultivated area. The economic and ecological sustainability of the existing farming
systems of the district are in jeopardy. There are wide concerns about the depletion of ground
water level, degradation in soil fertility, increasing soil salinity, rising problems of insect-
pests and disease complex, decline in bio-diversity, stagnation in yields, rising costs and
diminishing economic returns, decline in factor productivity, declining and fragmented small
holdings and narrow economic base of the farmers.
        Keeping in view the unique situation of small fragmented holdings, lack of capital
investment, necessity of recycling, year round employment, risk avoidance, non availability
of quality irrigation water and concerns mentioned above, the farmers of the district started
attempting, especially during mid eighties, to enlarge the concept of crops and animal
husbandry (being practiced by them since long) by incorporating poultry, fish, vermiculture,
beekeeping, vegetables, fruits and mushroom etc.. This concept of multiple use of inputs and
recycling principle was inadvertently put in practice based on traditional knowledge, in
efficient integration and without proper market orientation. The success was achieved by
large number of farmers with the adoption of sprinkler irrigation and some farmers moved
towards integration of some other enterprises. Notables are instances of integration of food
crops with vegetables and fruit plants. Majority of the farmers are experiencing low
productivity and profitability because of less knowledge, in efficient integration without
farming system technologies which include modern farm management skills that enable
farmers to improve the efficiency, increased cropping intensity and to integrate and diversify
into more high value commodities/enterprises in conformity with market trends.


                                              17
         For vast majority of small holdings prevailing in the district Integrated farming
system approach especially with multiple crop husbandry in integration with one or two
allied enterprise with market potential in the sure way for optimum utilization of limited
resources with sustainable income in time with national interest/goal. Instead of single
enterprise the co-existence of multiple enterprises (crops and allied) in an integrated way
makes optimum utilization within crop husbandry the plank necessarily be the increased
efficiency especially of water, fertilizers and nutrients, human labour and machinery cooled
with cost reduction measures elaborated in plan document. The scientific integration of
certain enterprises is eco-friendly and imparts sustainability to the system with increased
income and employment generation.
         The ever increasing cost of production and dependency on purchased inputs can
effectively be reined in by adopting this approach through enhanced use efficiency of
different critical inputs and water in crop enterprises (multiple) with judicious combination of
one or more allied enterprises complimenting each other through effective recycling of
residues, wastes, by products or the products itself. The allied enterprises are important part
of the farming systems. Both price and income elasticity’s of demand for most of these
enterprise’s products are high. There is huge unfulfilled demand far these products. There
exists high potential for increasing the yield rates of these enterprises as the gap between
present productivity (in the district) and the achievable yield and potential yield is quite large.
The prevailing infrastructural facilities, easy access to big markets and up-coming processing
facilities in and around the district are added advantage for the farmers of this district.

Vision Statement
       “To meet the productivity growth targets, conserve the natural resources and
integrate the farming system to further boost the profitability of the farmers.”

(ii) Priority Settings
1.      Higher irrigation water use efficiency through (a) Micro-irrigation and more
        availability of irrigation water through (b) Soil recharge ponds
2.      Safe use of brackish water for irrigation
3.      Soil health improvement (green manuring, organic manures, vermi-compost, INM etc)
4.      Promotion of water stress tolerant crops (castor, ber, aonla etc)
5.      Enhanced rate of seed replacement of major crops
6.      Adoption of IPM for insects, pests, diseases and weed control
7.      Popularization of resource conservation technologies
8.      Shifting from mono-cropping/double cropping to intercropping
9.      Promotion of dairying and quality fodder production
10.     Intensive trainings of farmers for bridging production gaps of crops, animals and
        other enterprises.

        To attain the productivity growth targets, employment generation and natural
resources sustainability, agricultural diversification has emerged as an important strategy.
The studies conducted in developing countries as well as in India indicated agricultural
diversification as a major tool for economic growth. Different studies on diversification have
also shown that at micro level a shift towards high value crops had benefited not only the
farmers-grower but the poor also by directly raising agricultural productivity and generating



                                               18
additional employment. The pace of diversification in a district/region, however, depends
upon the opportunities for diversification and responsiveness of the farmers to these
opportunities.
         In Mahendergarh district with the adoption of sprinkler irrigation technology
provided strong motivation to diversify crop sector in favour of high yielding cultivars of
bajra and mustard. Now the problems resulting from the same technology and extensive use
of ground water etc are pressing for the adoption of drip irrigation in the district. Keeping in
view the present scenario of the district the average profits of farmers of mahendergarh
district can be increased with the adoption of drip irrigation in fruits/vegetable crops and
other allied enterprises. The steady pace of diversification within the crop husbandry and
other allied activities is an urgent need for a push.




                                              19
                                        CHAPTER III

                          SWOT ANALYSIS OF THE DISTRICT

3.1: Introduction

        SWOT analysis is a basic, straightforward model that provides direction and serves as
a basis for the development of an enterprise. It accomplishes this by assessing an enterprise
strengths (what an enterprise can do) and weaknesses (what an enterprise can not do) in
addition to opportunities (potential favorable conditions for an enterprise) and threats
(potential unfavorable conditions for an enterprise). The role of SWOT analysis is to take the
information from the concerned agencies and separate it into internal issues (strengths and
weaknesses) and external issues (opportunities and threats).
In applying the SWOT analysis in agriculture, it is necessary to minimize both weaknesses
and threats. Weaknesses should be looked at in order to convert them into strengths.
Likewise, threats should be converted into opportunities. The strengths and opportunities
should be matched to optimize the potential production. Applying SWOT in this fashion can
generate income for the farmers.

3.2. SWOT analysis of the District
1. Major strengths of the farming systems
      Suitable agro climatic conditions for the cultivation of mustard, bajra, guar, barley,
       dryland horticulture (ber, aonla, guava, belgiri etc) and vegetable crops.
      Well connected by road, rail and villages have metallic roads.
      Dairy as an integral component of farming system
      MSP for mustard, bajra and wheat
      Developed grain and vegetable markets
      Availability of inputs like seeds, fertilizers, & pesticides etc in village cooperatives or
       nearby markets.
      Crop loans are available from cooperative and nationalized banks.
      One HAFED oil mill at Narnaul.
      Well adapted system of sprinkler in field crops
      A good network of extension services
      Farmers are progressive
      Milk coop. societies in rural areas.
      Good communication facilities in villages

2. Weaknesses of the farming systems

      Poor quality of ground water for irrigation
      Rapid decrease in water table.
      Lacking of poor plant population crops and intercropping
      No malt and gum industries in the district.
      Absence of high value crops in present cropping systems
      Unavailability of good quality seeds.
      Erosion of soil fertility due to increasing cropping intensity


                                               20
      Less application of organic manures.
      Lack of irrigation facilities by canal water
      Poor management of animal dung and crop residues.
      Increasing incidence of pests and diseases
      Unavailability of labour during peak period of farm operations.
      Decreasing area under gram.
      Non-adoption of IPM, INM and over dependence on pesticide and weedicides
      Less area under fruit and vegetable crops
      Poor management of animal dung and crop residues.
      Poor breeding, feeding and management of livestock
      Poor adoption of agro-technology
      Soils are becoming deficient in micro nutrients
      Lack of infrastructure facilities to avoid post harvest losses in fruits and vegetables.
      Rural unemployment due to lack of subsidiary enterprises.
      No big industry in the district.
      Farmers are not organized for marketing of vegetables and horticultural produce

Major Opportunities
     Suitable agro-climatic conditions for diversification of crops and dryland horticultural
      plants.
     Good scope of drip irrigation in horticultural and vegetable crops
     Agriculture wastes available for recycling to improve soil health
     Agro-technologies are available for suitable crops
     Demand for milk, milk products, and vegetables in nearby cities like Delhi
     Good information and communication system
     Rail and road connectivity is good.
     Good marketing infrastructure
     Agril. Processing units, oil mills and gum factories can be established for
      employment opportunities.

Threats to the Farming System
     Brackish ground water limiting the choice of crops
     Application of ground water in crops leading to soil salinity
     Lack of recharging of underground water.
     Imbalance use of fertilizers
     Lack of adoption of recommended technology
     Infestation of Orobanche weed
     Poor breeds of cow and buffaloes
     Lack of concentrates and mineral mixture in feed
     Insufficient green fodder and poor animal health services
     Lack of canal irrigation

3.3. Accomodating SWOT (addressing issues emerging out of the analysis)

(A) Field Crops




                                               21
(1)   Pearl Millet (Bajra)
      1.     Timely sowing of bajra depends on the arrival of monsoon rains.
      2.     Poor plant population of crops in fields
      3      Non adoption of bajra hybrids in some areas of all blocks
      4      No application of organic manures
      5      Less application of basal fertilizers
      6      No seed inoculation with bio-fertilizers
      7      No protective irrigation
      8      Poor adoption of INM and IPM

(2)   Guar
      1      Timely sowing in many areas depends upon rainfall
      2      Poor plant population
      3      Lack of varieties replacement
      4      Non adoption of improved varieties
      5      Less application of basal phosphorus
      6      Lack of protective irrigation

(3)   Mustard
      1     Poor adoption of recommended package of practices
      2     Poor plant population
      3     Late sowing of crop
      4     No application of basal nitrogen
      5     No protective irrigation
      6     Integrated pest management practices not followed
      7     Lack of sulphur application
      8     Infestation of orobanche weed
      9     Non adoption of IPM
(4)   Chick pea (Gram)
      1     Non adoption of recommended agro-technology
      2     Poor seed replacement of improved varieties
      3     Poor plant population
      4     No seed treatment with fungicides & bio-fertilizers
      5     No application of basal phosphorus
      6     No protective irrigation
      7     Non adoption of IPM

(5)   Wheat
      1     Less adoption of improved variety seeds
      2     Sowing of wheat on light to light medium soils
      3     Poor seed replacement
      4     No basal application of urea
      5     Non adoption of integrated nutrient management
      6     No water management as per critical growth stages
      7     Lack of weed management.
      8     Infestation of nematodes (molya disease)



                                          22
(6)    Barley
       1      Less adoption of improved variety seeds
       2      Poor seed replacement
       3      No basal application of fertilizers
       4      Non adoption of integrated nutrient management
       5      Poor water management
       6      Lack of weed management.

(B) Horticultural Plants

(1) Citrus
       1      Planting without soil testing
       2      Unavailability of good quality seedlings/cultivars
       3      Improper layout
       4      Lack of proper and efficient irrigation methods
       5      No proper care at initial stages of plant growth
       6      High incidence of termites
       7      Imbalanced fertilizer application and micronutrients
       8      Lack of proper training and pruning operations
       9      Non adoption of IPM
       10     No facilities for grading and packaging
       11     No short period storage and cold storage facilities

(2) Guava
      1       Planting without soil testing
      2       Imbalanced fertilizer application and micronutrients
      3       Lack of proper training and pruning operations
      4       Lack of proper and efficient irrigation methods
      5       Non adoption of IPM
      6       High incidence of termites
      7       No technical knowledge of rejuvenation
      8       No short period storage and cold storage facilities
      9       No fruit processing units

(3) Ber

       1      Planting without soil testing
       2      Imbalanced fertilizer application and micronutrients
       3      Lack of proper training and pruning operations
       4      Lack of proper and efficient irrigation methods
       5      Non adoption of IPM
       6      High incidence of termites
       7      No technical knowledge of rejuvenation
       8      No short period storage and cold storage facilities
       9      No fruit processing units




                                            23
(4) Aonla
      1       Planting without soil testing
      2       Imbalanced fertilizer application and micronutrients
      3       Lack of proper training and pruning operations
      4       Lack of proper and efficient irrigation methods
      5       Non adoption of IPM
      6       High incidence of termites
      7       High risk of frost damage
      8       No short period storage facilities
      9       No fruit processing units and proper market

(C) Vegetable Crops
      1      Poor seed quality
      2      Non availability of hybrid seeds from public sector
      3      High cost of hybrid seeds from private sector companies
      4      Non adoption of package and practices
      5      Non adoption of efficient irrigation methods
      6      Fluctuation in prices
      7      Non adoption of IPM
      8      Poor management of weeds
      9      Imbalance application of fertilizers
      10     No seed treatment against diseases
      11     Poor management of nurseries

(D) Soil Health Improvement
      1       Accumulation of salts in the soil after ground water irrigation
      2       Non adoption of soil and water testing
      3       No awareness about soil fertility index
      4       Poor technical knowledge about taking soil and water samples
      5       Poor technical knowledge for understanding the soil and water analysis
              reports
      6       Low carbon content in cultivable land
      7       Decreasing fertility of soil under cultivation
      8       Reduction of soil microflora in cultivable lands
      9       Poor quality of ground water for crop irrigation

(E) Seed production
      1      Lack of seed processing infrastructure to support seed production programme
      2      Lack of initiative by Private seed companies in seed production of crops
      3      Private Seed Companies focuses on yield rather than soil and climatic
             conditions
      4      Private seed companies neglecting farmer’s capacity development activities
             for disseminating production technology

(F) Dryland Agriculture Development
      1      Moisture conservation practices not followed



                                            24
       2      Poor crop planning as per soil type & depth and water availability
       2      Less adoption of improved drought resistant varieties
       3      Non availability of recommended intercropping systems
       4      No application of recommended organic manures
       5      No application of basal fertilizers
       7      No adequate inter-culturing
       8      Lack of soil mulching
       9      No optimum plant population
       10     No protective irrigation facilities
       11     Poor plant protection measures
       12     No alternative cropping pattern
       13     No application of bio-fertilizers
       14     No adoption of integrated nutrient management
       15     No adoption of integrated pest management

(G) Livestock

(a) Buffaloes
      1       Long inter-calving period due to inadequate care, imbalanced nutrition and
              poor management
      2       Deterioration of genetic status of buffaloes
      3       Low conception rate due to silent heat and mineral deficiencies
      4       Decreasing production due to scarcity and non availability of green fodder
      5       Poor facilities of health care

(b) Cows
      1       Repeat breeding due to malnutrition, inbreeding and infections.
      2       Poor Artificial Insemination service
      3       Poor housing management for milk cattle
      4       Inadequate green fodder production and its availability
      5       No balanced ration and feed supplement
      6       Frequent sickness during lactation period

(c) Goats/sheeps
      1       Slow weight gain and low productivity
      2       Non-availability of graded bucks for natural service
      3       Lack of concentrates, vitamins and minerals in ration/feeds
      4       Poor grazing facilities and reduced area under pastures
      5       High incidence of foot & mouth and foot rot diseases
      6       Poor preventive vaccination programmes

(d) Poultry
      1       Poor knowledge about housing and rearing
      2       High incidence of diseases
      3       Poor quality of watering
      4       Non availability of quality feed



                                            25
       5       Non availability of healthy chicks and hatcheries
       6       No organized marketing

(e)    Fisheries
       1      Poor technical knowledge of fish farming
       2      Poor management of existing fish farms
       4      No technical knowledge regarding pond construction
       4      Poor quality ground water
       5      No organized marketing

3.4: Sectoral/Regional Growth Drivers of the District

(a) Area Expansion
            Bring more cultivable area under fruits and vegetables cultivation

(b) Land improvement.
           Reclamation of alkaline soils

(c) Yield improvement
       1.    Maintenance of organic matter in the soil
       2.    Balanced use of fertilizers.

(d) Irrigation Management
             Drip irrigation for efficient use of water
             Rainwater harvesting
             Aquifer recharge
             Watershed development

(e) Seed Management
           Timely availability of quality seeds/seedlings
           Linkages with Private Seed Companies

(f) Farm Mechanization
           Availability of farm machinery through indigenous manufacturing

(g) Animal Husbandry
           Increase in dairy, sheep & goats and piggeries units
           Value addition and processing
           Production of green fodder

(h) Marketing and Post-harvest Management
           Developing rural market, modernizing existing market yards, setting up of
            private/ terminal markets, commodity specific requirements.
           Post-harvest Management /Value Addition

(i) Risk Management


                                              26
                 Coverage & simplification of claims
                 Premium subsidy for oilseeds, fruits, animals etc

(j) Price Support System
        MSP for mustard, wheat and gram

(k) Adoption of Agro-technologies
       Resource conservation technologies

(l) Institutional Support Services
1. Extension

       Public-private partnership in agriculture extension

2. Credit
             Easy availability of credit
             Location specific investment credit
             Long-term credit policy for farmers




                                             27
                                        CHAPTER IV

                             Development of agriculture sector

4.1: Introduction
        Agriculture is the major source of district economy. The land is sandy and alkaline.
After the introduction of sprinkler irrigation system, the irrigation for the uneven fields has
become very easy and the district has done remarkable progress in agriculture production.
The agricultural growth of the district can be increased further with the expansion of net
sown area under dry land horticultural crops and vegetables along with drip irrigation system.

4.2: Land Use
        Out of the total geographical area of 196.102 thousand hectares, the cultivable area is
155.599 thousand hectare. The net area sown during 2006-07 was 153.156 thousand hectares.
It shows that the cultivable area of the district has not yet been fully exploited. Hence, there
is further scope in the district to enhance area under cultivation by about 41 thousand
hectares.

4.3: Soil Health
        The soils of the district has varied topography comprising valleys, undulating lands,
sand dunes and alluvial plains. According to land capability classification, the soils of the
district varies from good (Class II) to fairly good land (Class IV) suited for occasional
cultivation. The majority of soils are sandy and alkaline in nature. Accumulation of salts in
the soil after ground water irrigation is very common. The carbon content in cultivable soils
is very low. With the adoption of intensive cultivation the soil productivity ha decreased
gradually.

4.4: Water Resources & Management
         The surface and ground water resources are very poor in the district. Some area of the
district is fed by the Jui canal. The irrigation water is very scarce input and has become a
major hurdle in the growth of agriculture. The major source of irrigation is tube wells thereby
ground water has been overexploited during recent years. The normal rainfall in the district is
also low and not able to recharge the lost ground water level. Therefore, it is essential to
manage ground water efficiently by adopting drip irrigation system particularly in
horticultural and vegetable crops.

4.5: Major Crops and Varieties in the District
         The major field crops cultivated in Kharif season are bajra and guar. Likewise, the
major crops grown in Rabi season are mustard, gram, wheat and barley. The Citrus, Guava,
Ber and Aonla are the best suited horticultural crops to the agro-climatic conditions of the
district. The vegetable crops namely cucurbits, bhindi, carrot, cauliflower, chilli, radish,
brinjal, pea, leafy vegetables, tomato, onion, etc are also grown in the district. The varieties
of various crops cultivated in the district are given in Table 11.




                                              28
Table 11. Major crops and their varieties cultivated in Mahendergarh district
 Crops                   Varieties
 Bajra                 Hybrids (Private), HHB 50, HHB 60, HHB 67 (Improved), HHB
                       67, HHB , HHB 94, HHB 117
 Guar                  HG 365 and HG 563
 Moong                 Asha, Muskan
 Fodder Bajri          Local, Pvt companies
 Cotton                HD 123, H 1098, H 1117, RG-8, Dhan Laxmi, Bt. Rasi 134
 Raya                  R.H. 30, T-59, Laxmi, RB 9901, Jadia, Pusa Jai Kihan and
                       varieties of private companies mainly, Pioneer, Proagro, Dev Seeds
 Wheat                 PBW-343, WH-711, PBW-502, Raj-3765, WH 283, C-306

4.6 : Input Management
         Besides improved seeds, the integrated nutrient, weed and pest management is
essential to accelerate agricultural growth. At present, there exists a gap between the actual
productivity and the attainable/achievable/potential productivity of the crops grown in the
district. The proper and timely management of following inputs for crops is required to fill
this gap.

(a) Good quality seed
        The most critical input is availability of good quality seed. The government agencies
are trying their level best for assured supply of good quality seeds during the season but the
farmers demand in the district always remain higher than it’s supply. Therefore, the reputed
private seed companies should be involved for making assured availability of good quality
seed. The seed replacement rate varies from just 15 per cent in case of wheat to nearly 95, 90,
80 and 20 per cent in case of cotton, bajra, mustard and gram, respectively (Table 12).

Table 12. Seed replacement rate of important crops in Mahendergarh district (2006-07)
  Sr. No.   Name of the crop    Area under crop                Present SRR ( %)
                                     (ha)
    1.      Wheat                   45000                              15
    2.      Bajra                   91000                              90
    3.      Gram                    13000                              20
    4.      Oil seed                91000                              80
    5.      Cotton                    1.4                              95
Source: DDA                      SRR = Seed Replacement Rate

(b) Fertilizers
(i) Fertilizer requirement
         Fertilizer is second most important input for the cultivation of high yielding varieties.
The farmers are well aware about the balanced fertilizer usage in different crops. However,
they are concentrating mainly on application of nitrogen, phosphorus and zinc nutrients
where as the deficiency of potash and micro-nutrients are badly affecting the productivity of
crops in the district. Therefore, location specific integrated nutrient management, use of bio-
fertilizers, FYM and vermi-composting are required to be popularized for wider adoption.
The projected requirement of fertilizers during the plan period is given in Table 13.


                                               29
(ii) Site specific nutrient management
          Fertilizer application will be based on the principles of SSNM which includes yield
gap analysis, guidelines for regional protocol etc. Higher nutrient use efficiency can be
achieved through innoculation with biofertilizers of bajra, guar, wheat and gram seeds.
Therefore, location specific integrated nutrient management is required to be popularized for
wider adoption.
For this purpose traionings and field demonstrations have been planned the project with
estimated budget outlay is given in Chapter VI

(iii) Green manuring
        To improve crops productivity and soil health, it is essential to cover about 25000 ha
area under green manuring of dhaincha. The project on this important aspect is planned for
demonstrations in the district and the details are given in Chapter VI

(c) Plant protection chemicals
        The crop diseases, pests and weeds are other major problems in realizing optimum
yield far all major crops in the district. The scrutiny of insect pests, diseases and weed control
measures being adopted by the farmers reveal gross negligence on the part of farmers. The
improper management of these control measures often results in to increased cost of
cultivation without corresponding increase in yield. The farmers are depending mainly on
chemical control with higher doses of chemicals. Hence, integrated measures for control of
insect/pests, diseases and weeds control which are required to be adopted for sustainability
and profitability of crops. However, the projected requirement of plant protection chemicals
in the district during the plan period is presented in Table 14.

(d) Integrated Weed Management (IWM)
        It is observed that farmers are using poor spraying techniques thereby low efficiency
of herbicides application. Hence, it is proposed to train farmers by organizing trainings on
spraying techniques and integrated nutrient management techniques. It will involve about Rs.
5.0 lacs during the plan period.

(e) Orobanchae in mustard
       Infestation of orobanchae in mustard is posing a great threat to the crop. It is needed
to show advantages of monoculture technology for the control of orobanchae in mustard
through about 50 field monitoring visits and about 50 demonstrations to farmers involving
cost about Rs. 5 lacs during the plan period .

(f) Timely seeding of crops
       It is proposed to organize 10 demonstrations and 5 field school each year during the
plan period on timely seeding of various crops with an objective to make the farmers
understandable for the benefits of sowing of crops at an optimum time. It is estimated that
such demonstrations will cost about Rs. 15 lacs during the plan period.




                                               30
4.7: Farm Mechanization/Farm Equipments
        The management of agriculture production system essentially involves effective
management of timely completion of production operations. The use of mechanical power is
thus becoming indispensable for making an optimal use of other resources and timely
completion of various farm operations. Though the use of efficient farm implements mainly
for soil tilling, sowing, threshing, zero-tilling, harvesting operations, etc is increasing but
with increasing cropping intensity in the district, there is a great scope for extensive use of
the existing as well as other machinery like rotavator and laser leveler etc for higher
production. The manufacturing units of farm machinery and implements are not adequate in
the district. Therefore, it is required to encourage manufacturing agencies for the
establishment of farm machinery manufacturing units in the district for making availability of
low cost farm machinery to the farmers. The available farm machinery and implements in the
district and projections for the plan period are given in Tables 15 and 16, respectively.

Table 13. Projected Fertilizer Requirement (tonnes) in Mahendergarh district during
           XIth plan

 Sr.    Fertiliser    Fertilizer   2007-08   2008-09   2009-10    2010-11     2011-12      Total
 No.    Grade*          used                                                             (tonnes)
                      (tonnes)
                       during
                      2006-07
 1      Urea           30574        31644    36000     36000        38000     42000          183644
  2     DAP          14252          15565    19000     20000        21000     23000           98565
 3      MOP           220            172       200       200          250      300             1122
 4      SSP           585            801      1000      1000         1200      1500            5501
 5      NPK            -             605       700       800         1000      1500            4605
 6      Zinc          124            106       170       200          250      350             1076
          Grand Total               48893    57070     58200        61700     68650          294513

Table 14. Projected requirement of Plant Protection Chemicals in the district during
          XIth plan

 Name of the         Pesticides                   Requirement (000, litres)
 Pesticides            used
                     (2006-07)     2007-08   2008-09      2009-10      2010-11     2011-12
 Endosulphan
 Chloropyriphos
 Malathion
 Metasystox            2100         2000       1900        1800         1700 .        1600
 Carbaryl
 Bavistin
 Others


Source : DHO



                                                31
Table 15. Availability of Improved Farm Equipments and Machineries

 Name of                                             Availability of Equipments and Machineries                         Farm Machinery
 Improved Farm                Narnaul                 Ateli              Nangal           Kanina       Mahendergarh     available in the
 Implement/                                                            Chaudhary                                        District
 Equipment/                   Block I                Block II           Block III        Block IV         Block V
 Machinery                Nos.    Farmers        Nos. Farmers Nos Farmers            Nos.    Farmers   Nos. Farmers     No.       No. of
                                                                      .                                                          Farmers
 Tractors                 90           90        988       988       657     657     1113      1113    1228      1228   4896      4896
 Harvester                 -            -         -         -         -        -       -         -       -         -      -         -
 Thresher                 341         341        934       934       439     439     526        526    576       576    2456      2456
Source : DDA




Table 16. Farm Machinery Status and Projection during the plan period
 Sr. No.     Name of farm                   Present Status    2007-08        2008-09        2009-10           2010-11         2011-12
             implements and farm                (Nos.)
             machineries                      (2006-07)
 1           Reaper binder                        63             70             80             90              100             125
 2           M. B. Plough                          1              2              3              4               5               6
 3           Rotavator                             1              2              3              4               5               6
 4           Seed-com-fertilizer drills           22             25             30             35              40              45
 5           Spray Pumps                         590            284            600            650              700             750




                                                                        32
4.8: Special projects/Programmes on-going in the district
(i) Watershed Development Project
(i)    Bhandor Unchi
       To check water flow & soil erosion and to percolate water
(ii)   Lawan
       To improve ground water level & to provide drinking water for animals
(iii)  Partal
       To control the soil erosion and to conserve the water table
(iv)   Nawan
       To improve ground water level & drinking water for animals
(v)    Jhook
       To increase income and to improve environment.
(vi)   Madhogarh
       To increase income and to improve environment.
(vii) Jhook
       To increase income of Panchayat and to increase water table

(ii) Special beneficiary oriented schemes
     The following special beneficiary oriented schemes, Wage employment programmes and
Area development programmes are being implemented in the district by DRDA, Narnaul :
1.       Swarnjayanti Gram Swarozgar Yojana (SGSY)
2.       Jawahar Gram Samridhi Yojana (JGSY)
3.       Rural Housing
         i) New Construction and up gradation of unserviceable houses under IAY
        ii) Credit-cum-subsidy Scheme for Rural Housing
4.       Desert Development Programme (DDP)
5.       Employment Assurance Scheme (EAS)
6.       Pradhan Mantri Gramodaya Yojana (PMGY)
7.       Members of Parliament Local Area Development Scheme (MPLADS)
8.       Decentralized Planning (DCP)
9.       Sampooran Gramin Rozgar Yojana (SGRY)
10.      N. Employed          (BGRC)

4.9 : Constraint Analysis

Yield gaps
        The reasons for the yield gaps and the interventions required are planned using
participatory/consultative processes involving stakeholders. The natural factors of production
including soil and water in Mahendergarh district are slowing down in their responses to
crops cultivation. The productivity of soils are deteriorating and ground water is lowering
down in many areas of the district. Moreover, the quality of ground water is not good being
brackish in nature. In recent years, the cropping intensity of the district has increased to
181.4 % thereby stress on soils increased for the supply of not only major nutrients but micro
nutrients too. The poor availability of nutrients in soils is having a direct bearing on crop
growth and finally on the quality of produce as grains, fruits, vegetables, fodder etc. It has
recently been documented that nutrients deficiency in food and fodder has an adverse affect



                                             33
on the health of human beings and animal. The major reasons of gaps in yield of crops are
poor carbon content in the soil, brackish ground water, increasing soil salinity and
environmental stresses during the growth period of crops etc. The analysis of sustainability
issues and reasons for gaps in the productivity of major crops grown the district are presented
in Tables 17 and 18.

(c) Reasons for low production and issues impeding growth
(i) Constraints in Agricultural Progress
    The major obstacles affecting the progress and productivity of the district as identified by
participatory approach are listed below.
       Non availability of good quality irrigation water
       Poor soil water retention capacity
       Soil salinity and alkalinity problems
       Declining water table in all the blocks
       Depleting soil fertility
       Inadequate availability of quality seeds
       Non-judicious use of fertilizers
       Low seed replacement rate
       Rising cost of agricultural inputs
       Rising problems of insect-pest and disease complex
       Infestation of weed flora
       Inadequate availability of quality fodder
       Problem in large and small ruminates
       Problems in agro-forestry
       Fragmented small holdings
       Narrow economic base
       Slow pace of diversification
       Farmers inability to invest.
       Lack of farm finance and marketing awareness.
       Lack of irrigation facility by canal water




                                              34
Sustainability issues and gap analysis of productivity of different crops and resources

 S.   Gaps             Factors/constrai     Strategies             Approach and             Performance           Sustainability
 N.                    nts leading to                              methodology              indicators            outputs
                       gaps
 (A) CROPS
 1.    Bajra
 1.  Major thrust to   New hybrids from     Main streaming of     Pre-breeding research     The entire district   Will meet the
     consolidate the   private sector       private sector and    at experimental                                 requirement of
     development of    have been            developing MOUs       stations                                        feed and fodder
     bajra hybrids     introduced with      with private sector                                                   at the cost of less
     with high yield   unknown                                                                                    resources
     potential         consequences
                       leading to disease
                       incidence
      Crop             Risk in crop         Use of ridger-     Necessary                    The entire district   Will lead to yield
      establishment    establishment        seeder             modification in the                                increase and
                       due to crust                            machine for easy                                   improved soil
                       formation                               adoption                                           health
      Non adoption     Lack of              Demonstration on P Farmers’ participatory       The entire district   Increase in yield
      of P             awareness            fertilization      approach                                           and P content in
      fertilization                                                                                               fodder as well as
                                                                                                                  grain
 2    Guar
      Poor or no       Lack of              Use of Phosphatic      Training and             The entire district   Will lead to yield
      fertilizer       awareness            fertilizer, Seed       demonstration                                  increase and
                                            treatment and spray                                                   improved soil
      BLB and                               against disease and                                                   health
      Aphid                                 insect
      roblem
 3     Mustard
 1.   Maximizing       Less use of          Research on            Basic research on seed   Whole district        The leading edge
                                                                  35
    the economic   sulphur nutrition,   integrated nutrient    bank recruitment of                             of Haryana can
    benefits to    no management        management             Orobanchae and INM                              be maintained by
    farmers        of Orobanchae,       specially when                                                         proper nutrition
                   no green             farmers are using                                                      and pest
                   manuring             more nitrogen                                                          management in
                                        $ phasphorus than                                                      Indian mustard
                                        recommendation,
                                        Research on
                                        management of
                                        Orobanchae.
3 Wheat
(i)  Timely         Unavailability      Zero tillage, short        Research,      extension    Sowing at optimum   Zero tillage
    seeding of      of irrigation,      duration varieties of      and        development      time after bajra    will help :
    wheat           Delayed             guar      and    cotton,   agencies should jointly     and cotton.         a) Improving
                    harvesting of       regulation of electric     approach in a farmers’      Selection of           soil health
                    guar, cotton        power      supply    for   participatory approach      suitable and high      including
                                        irrigation                 for each of possible        yielding variety       soil
                                                                   solution.                                          biology
                                                                   Testing     of     novel                        b) Improved
                                                                   seeders in preparation                             environme
                                                                   for                   its                          nt
                                                                   commercialization e.g.                          c) Less water
                                                                   Happy seeders.                                     use
                                                                                                                   d) More
                                                                                                                      productivit
                                                                                                                      y
                                                                                                                   e) Less
                                                                                                                      problem of
                                                                                                                      P. minor &
                                                                                                                      decreased
                                                                                                                      use of
                                                                                                                      herbicides

                                                              36
                                                                                                                                Reduced
                                                                                                                                cost of
                                                                                                                                cultivation
(ii)     Seed          Termites,           Seed treatment with          Awareness of farmers       In all the blocks of     Productivity
        treatment      fungal diseases     insecticides, fungicides     regarding importance       the district             growth on
                       like loose smut,    and bio-fertilizers.         of seed treatment by                                sustainable
                       flag smut and       Seed priming if sowing       the University and the                              basis
                       Karnal bunt         is delayed                   State Department of
                                                                        Agriculture
(iii)   Multiple       Imbalance use       Introduce more organic       Experimental research      Use of more              The residue
        nutrient       of fertilizers.     manures, more residue        in different cropping      fertilizers in all the   retention will
        deficiencies   Poor residue        retention on surface,        systems, re-look at soil   blocks.                  help
                       retention on soil   use of site specific         test values, change in                              improving
                       surface. No         micro-nutrient, use of       the recommendation of                               soil
                       basal               N in three splits and        practice                                            productivity,
                       application of      use of first split before                                                        improved
                       nitrogen,           1st irrigation, integrate                                                        water
                                           conjunctive use of                                                               retention in
                                           organic and inorganic                                                            soil, less
                                           sources of nutrients                                                             leaching of
                                           generate        fertilizer                                                       nitrogen
                                           recommendations
                                           based on the principle
                                           of site specific nutrient
                                           management.           The
                                           optimal use of existing
                                           (indigenous) nutrients
                                           coming from soil,
                                           organic amendments,
                                           crop      residue     and
                                           irrigation water. Apply
                                           fertilizer to fill the

                                                                  37
                                         deficit between crop
                                         needs and indigenous
                                         supply. Management of
                                         pest diseases and weed
                                         problems through more
                                         appropriate      nutrient
                                         management.
(iv)   Varietal        No variety to     Varieties with stay         Pre-breeding, work on   At least 75% area    More
       improvement     tolerate          chlorophyll in top          hybrid wheat.           should be covered    enhanced use
                       terminal heat,    leaves near maturity,       Improvement in the      with varieties       of natural
                       short duration    long duration varieties,    grain size of WH 542    which can yield      resources
                       variety           varieties which can fit                             equal or more than
                       produces less     early sowing staring                                WH 542 and PBW
                       yield             from 15th Oct. to                                   343
                                         manage terminal heat
                                         at maturity
4      Management      Indiscriminate    Avoid irrigation with       Bajra-wheat,      guar- Whole district       Long-term
       of salinity &   use of brackish   brackish     water     in   wheat,     pulses-wheat                      productivity
       alkalinity      water             drought years because       cropping        systems                      of wheat will
                                         it leads to secondary       should be studied for                        sustain by
                                         salinity,       wherever    long-term salinity and                       proper water
                                         available           make    sodicity build-up due                        management
                                         conjunctive use of          to water management                          in the system
                                         water. Tolerance of         in kharif season.                            as a whole
                                         current and improved
                                         varieties to salinity and
                                         sodicity needs further
                                         investigations.
                                         Work is also needed to
                                         adapt         agronomic
                                         practices,     especially
                                         the timing and amount

                                                               38
                                       of      fertilizer    and
                                       irrigation in order to
                                       increase        ecological
                                       sustainability,
                                       profitability and yield.
5     Weed           Complex weed      Improve the efficiency State level strategic In all blocks of the     Anticipated
      management     flora             of existing herbicides.    plan        for      the district          economic
                     predominately                                management            of                   benefits are
                     Chenopodium       Introduce new              Phalaris          minor                    increased
                     seriously         herbicides.                integrated.     Capacity                   profitability,
                     affects wheat                                building of extension                      increased
                     yield in the      Capacity building for      agencies and farmers                       yield and
                     district          spraying techniques.       for          appropriate                   increased
                                                                  spraying techniques.                       food security.
                     Wild oat and      Ecological approached On                      farm
                     Phalaris are      including zero-tillage     demonstrations of new
                     intruding with    crop rotation.             herbicides
                     a rapid pace
                                       Monitoring of
                                       resistance build up.

                                       Germplasm
                                       management for
                                       competitive varieties
6 Diversification
(i). Reduced bio-    High risk         Develop alternate            Growing of bajra and    Whole district   Improvement
     diversity due   associated with   strategy to introduce        guar as fodder during                    in soil health
     to large area   legume crops,     summer moong in the          summer                                   and
     under non       more insect-      multiple land use                                                     availability of
     legume          pest problems     system                                                                fodder for
     cropping        in pulses,                                                                              animal
     systems         availability of

                                                               39
                       high yielding
                       varieties of
                       crops other than
                       pulses
(ii)   Intercropping   Lack of          Use of bed planters for     Farmers’ participatory   Twenty five per       More
       of guar with    mechanized       castor sowing               approach                 cent guar area can    conservation
       castor          crop                                                                  be sown with castor   of resources,
                       establishment                                                         as an intercrop       multiple land
                       and threshing of                                                                            use, getting
                       castor                                                                                      more with
                                                                                                                   less
7 Water management
      Reduced        Poor rain and      Introduction of micro-      Demonstrations,          Whole district        Savings in
      water use      irrigation water   irrigation, water           development and                                water,
      efficiency     management,        harvesting,                 research                                       improved
                     brackish ground    introduction of                                                            water use
                     water,             watersheds,                                                                efficiency,
                     undulating land,                                                                              better water-
                     high rate of                                                                                  nutrient
                     evaporation                                                                                   interactions
8 Integrated pest management
(i)   Weed           Development of     Accelerated adoption of     Basic research on the  Whole district          Sustained
      management     resistance in P.   zero tillage, mechanized    mode and genetics of                           productivity
      in wheat       minor, cross       weeding using bed           resistance, release of                         of wheat,
                     resistance         planting system, more       competitive varieties,                         reduction in
                                        competitive varieties,      monitoring of                                  herbicide use,
                                        bringing 10% area at        resistance development                         better use of
                                        each farm level under                                                      natural
                                        alternate crops, rotation                                                  resources
                                        of herbicides of
                                        different chemistries,
(ii)   Orobanchae      The              Introduction of castor      Research on castor       Whole district        Oilseed
                                                              40
        in mustard     monoculture of    and barley                   hybrids and two-row                    sustainability
                       Indian mustard                                 barley, research on                    can be
                                                                      longevity of                           ensured
                                                                      Orobanchae                             through long-
                                                                                                             term approach
                                                                                                             leading to
                                                                                                             reduction in
                                                                                                             seed bank of
                                                                                                             Orobanchae
(iii)   Emergence of   Availability of   Intensive research on        Basic research on     Whole district   Avoid
        new pests      monoculture       crop ecology and             ecology, biological                    emergence of
                       systems and       biological control,          control                                new pest
                       intensive         research on bio-                                                    problems and
                       cropping          technology                                                          reduction in
                                                                                                             pesticide use




                                                                 41
Table 18 .Closing the gaps for realizing the vision-Agriculture.


 Sr . No.     Thrust Areas           Weaknesses               Solutions          Concerned        Approach              Cost
            (where gaps exist)                                                   Agencies                              (Rs. in
                                                                                                                        Lacs)
 Agriculture Sector
   1      Seed Production        1.Seed planning        Participatory         DDA            50 ha per year will       12.50
                                                        selection of improved                be undertaken
                                                        varieties of crops at                (50x5x0.05=12
                                                        farmers’ field.                      Lacs).

                                                        Motivating farmers    DDA            Monitoring @ Rs.          10.00
                                                        to produce the seed                  0.5 lac per crop.
                                                        of best varieties                    (0.5x5x4= 10 Lacs)
                                                        (wheat, mustard,bajra
                                                        & guar)

                                                        Surveying the yield     KVK          Institutional fee @       10.00
                                                        performance of                       0.5 lac per
                                                        varieties/hybrids in                 crop/variety/ season.   Tables-
                                                        each crop. Presenting                (0.5x5x4=10 Lacs)       57,58,65
                                                        data of best
                                                        performed variety.

                                 2. Best quality seed   Deleting varieties/     KVK          Demonstrations             2.50
                                                        hybrids with low                     10x5x0.05= 2.5 Lacs
                                                        yields in any current
                                                        season.

                                                        Mandatory testing of    KVK          Demonstrations            2.50
                                                        new variety hybrids                  10x5x0.05= 2.5 Lacs

                                                                   42
                                        through KVK’s.

                  3. Seed treatment     Chemical and non-       KVK                 Demonstrations           2.50
                                        chemical treatment                          10x5x0.05= 2.5 Lacs

                                        Capacity building       DDA                 Exposure visits            2.50
                                        resource
                                        person/extension        (Data for all the
                                        agencies/seed           above activities
                                        companies/farmers       will be
                                                                presented in the
                                                                AOs workshop)


2   Wheat seed    Low productivity/     To motivate farmers     KVK                 Farmers’ Trainings       2.00
    replacement   production of wheat   to purchase seed of                         (5 x 5 0.4 = 2 Lacs)
                  due to sowing of      high yielding                                                      Teble-58
                  low yielding          varieties
                  varieties in larger
                  areas
                                        HSDC should make        HSDC
                                        the availability of
                                        seed of high yielding
                                        wheat varieties.

                                        DDA will develop
                                        strong linkages with
                                        private seed
                                        companies for the
                                        assured supply of
                                        good quality seed of
                                        high yielding

                                                   43
                                                 varieties.

                                                 DDA will ensure for
                                                 the replacement of
                                                 wheat seed in about
                                                 15 thousand hectare
                                                 area during the plan
                                                 period

3   Reclamation of       About 50% area is       Reclamation will be     DDA   2000 ha x 5 x 2t/ha x   180.00
    saline/sodic soils   affected by salinity/   done by farmers in            1800 = 360/2 =180       Table59
                         sodicity. Low           about 10 thousand             Lacs
                         productivity of         hectare area by
                         crops in saline/        gypsum to be
                         sodic soils             purchased on 50%
                                                 subsidy through co-
                                                 operatives. DDA will
                                                 make necessary
                                                 arrangements/
                                                 linkages with
                                                 gypsum supplying
                                                 agencies for timely
                                                 availability of
                                                 gypsum in co-
                                                 operatives etc.

4   Laser leveling       Poor use of Laser       KVK will provide        KVK   Trainings (5x5x0.05      1.25
    (canal irrigated     land leveling for       technical guidance to         = 1.25 lacs)
    areas)               water saving, land      farmers by                    Demonstrations           2.50
                         saving and              organizing trainings          10x5x0.05= 2.5 Lacs
                         improved yields of      and field
                         bajra, wheat and        demonstrations

                                                              44
barley crops

               DDAs will lay out       DDA   Demonstrations            2.50
               demonstrations on             10x5x0.05= 2.5 Lacs
               bajra, raya and wheat                                 Table-83
               in each block. DDAs
               will also record data
               on water saving and
               yield penalty if any
               will also be recorded
               while recording data
               on yield.

               DDAs will organize      DDA   50 units x 3.6 lac =     90.00
               and monitor the               180/2 = 90 lacs (50%
               distribution of laser         subsidy)
               leveler specially on
               custom hire services.
               (The data will be
               discussed in joint
               meeting of KVK and
               DDAs. The
               presentation of final
               data will be made by
               DDA).


               DDA will also ensure DDA      Exposure visits = 2.5     2.50
               the exposure visit of         Lacs
               farmers on sites
               already demonstrated
               by KVKs.

                          45
                                            (Two way subsidy to
                                            farmers who are
                                            using custom hire
                                            services, may be
                                            given subsidy on the
                                            charges on hour
                                            basis. The service
                                            provider can be given
                                            subsidy if it is passed
                                            on to the user
                                            farmers).


5   Green manuring   To improve crops       DDA will ensure the HSDC/DDA/       15000 ha x Rs.          281.25
                     productivity and       timely availability of HAFED/HLRD   500/ha x 5 = 375/2/3=
                     soil health.           dhaincha seed at 75% C              281.25 Lacs             Table 61
                                            subsidy. About 40                   (75 % subsidy on
                                            per cent of net sown                seed)
                                            area will be covered
                                            during the plan
                                            period of five years.

6   Water            (i) Poor adoption of   Popularization of in-     DDA/KVK   Demonstrations           2.50
    management       in-situ rain water     situ rain water                     10x5x0.05= 2.5 Lacs
                     harvesting             harvesting through
                     techniques             broad beds and
                                            furrows method etc

                     (iii) Non judicious    Popularization of         KVK       Demonstrations            2.50
                     utilization of         judicious us of                     10x5x0.05= 2.5 Lacs
                     brackish water for     brackish water

                                                        46
                    irrigation              through
                                            demonstrations on
                                            alternate use of
                                            brackish water


7   Site specific   Basal application of    Fertilizer application DDA         Demonstrations          2.50
    nutrient        fertilizers and top     will be based on the               10x5x0.05= 2.5 Lacs
    management      dressing of N with      principles of SSNM                                        Table64
                    reference to            which includes yield
                    irrigation              gap          analysis,
                                            guidelines         for
                                            regional protocol etc.

                    Bio-fertilizers         Efficient use of         DDA/KVK   Demonstrations          2.50
                                            innoculant bio-                    (10x5x0.05= 2.5
                                            fertilizers. Higher                Lacs)
                                            nutrient use
                                            efficiency through
                                            innoculation with
                                            biofertilizers of bajra,
                                            guar, wheat and gram
                                            seeds.

                    Soil application of                          DDA/KVK       10x5x0.05x2 = 5 lacs    5.00
                    zinc in wheat and
                    mustard

                    P fertilizer in bajra                        DDA/KVK       10x5x0.05x2 = 5         5.00
                    and guar                                                   lack



                                                      47
                                                                                         Demonstrations          10.00
                                                                                         (10x5x0.05x4 crops=    Table 23-
                                                                                         10 Lacs)                  24

8   Integrated Pest   Poor management       Monitoring of           DDA/KVK              Demonstrations           2.50
    Management        of insect-pests and   resistance                                   (10x5x0.05= 2.5
    (IPM)             diseases in cotton,   development.                                 Lacs)
                      bajra, gram and
                      vegetables.

                      Management of         Strengthening of        KVK                  Demonstrations           2.50
                      molya disease in      chemical control and                         (0.5 lac x 5 years =
                      wheat                 agronomic                                    2.5 Lacs)
                                            management.
                                            Resistant varieties

                      Quantification,      Plant clinic labs for    KVK
                      characterization and KVK
                      management of
                      resistance of key
                      pests against
                      insecticides in
                      vegetables.

9   Integrated Weed   Poor spraying         Improving spraying       DDA/concerned       10 ha demonstrations   2.50
    Management        techniques and low    techniques for           departments in      will be laid out on
    (IWM)             efficiency of         increasing efficiency of consultation with   bajra, wheat and       Tables 23-
                      herbicides            herbicides through       KVK                 gram                   24 and 28
                                            survey &                                     (10 ha x 5 x 0.05 =
                                            demonstrations                               2.50 lacs)
                                            Demonstrations


                                                       48
                             Monitoring of          Survey &               KVK        10 ha demonstrations     2.50
                             herbicide resistance   Demonstrations                    will be laid out on
                                                                                      bajra, wheat and
                                                                                      gram
                                                                                      (10 ha x 5 x 0.05 =
                                                                                      2.50 Lacs)

     10   Timely seeding of Non availability of     Research, extension,   DDA/KVK/   Demonstrations           .50
          crops             assured good            development            HSEB       (10 ha x 5 x 0.05 =    Table-28
                            quality irrigation      agencies and HSEB                 2.5 Lacs)
                            water and untimely      should jointly work
                            rains and irregular     in a farmers’
                            supply of electricity   participatory
                            supply for tube         approach for each of
                            wells                   possible solution.

                             Non adoption of in-    (The technology need DDA/KVK      5 field schools x5 x   12.50
                             situ rain water        to be further                     0.5 = 12.5 Lacs
                             conservation and       developed for bajra-
                             zero tillage           raya, bajra-wheat,
                             technology             guar-raya and bajra-
                                                    barley cropping
                                                    systems)


11        Intercropping of   To increase            Popularization of      DDA/KVK    Demonstrations          2.50
          castor + guar      cropping intensity,    agro-technology of                (10 ha x 5x 0.05 =
                             use efficiency of      castor + guar                     2.50 Lacs)
                             water and nutrients    intercropping for                                        Table-61
                             and higher             adoption by the
                             production per unit    farmers
                             area.

                                                               49
12   Zero-tillage in     Increasing cost of      DDA/KVK will               DDAH/KVK   Demonstrations          30.0
     bajra, guar and     cultivation of crops,   motivate farmers for                  (120 ha x 5 x 5000 =
     cotton based        falling water table     the adoption of zero                  30 Lacs)             Tables
     cropping system     and deterioration in    tillage technology                                         55,56
                         soil productivity.      through participatory
                                                 research/demonstrati
                                                 ons on bajra, guar
                                                 and cotton based
                                                 cropping systems for
                                                 the saving of tillage,
                                                 irrigation water,
                                                 fertilizers, pesticides.

13   Fodder              Non availability of     DDA will monitor           DDAH       Drip irrigation          250.00
     Production          green fodder for        the subsidy (50%) on                  (200 ha x 5 years x
     (Napier grass)      animals.                drip irrigation system                0.5 lac/ha drip =
     with drip                                   and also arrange the                  500/2 = 250 Lacs          Table -
     irrigation          .                       source and supply of                  with 50% subsidy)        67
                                                 napier grass root
                                                 cuttings for planting
                                                 in about 1000 ha area
                                                 during the plan
                                                 period.

                         Scarcity of             Popularization of          DDA/KVK    Demonstrations            2.50
                         irrigation water for    technology of napier                  (10 ha x 5 x 0.5 = 2.5
                         fodder production       grass cultivation for                 Lacs)
                                                 adoption by the
                                                 farmers

14   Sulphur nutrition   Application of          To create awareness        DDA/KVK    Gypsum requirement         450.0
     in mustard          sulphur through         among the farmers                     (10000 ha x 5 years x     Table-60

                                                             50
                     gypsum in 50          for timely application         0.5t/ha x Rs. 1800 =
                     thousand              of gypsum for the              450 Lacs)
                     hectarearea of        supply of sulphur for
                     mustard during the    higher oil and seed
                     plan period.          yields of mustard.


15   Orobanchae in   Mono cultivation of   DDA will ensure for      DDA   Monitoring               Table 23,
     mustard         mustard               the introduction of            (10 visits x 5 years x   24
                                           castor and barley in           Rs. 5000 = 2.5 Lacs)          2.50
                                           rotation
                                                                          Demonstrations
                                           KVK and research               (10 ha x 5 x 0.5 = 2.5
                                           scientists will study          Lacs                         2.50
                                           the effects of castor
                                           hybrids and two-row
                                           barley on longevity
                                           of Orobanchae

                                                                               Sub Total         2778.00 Lacs




                                                      51
4.10 : Recommended interventions for the district with detail action plan with cost.

        The natural resources like depleting water table, development of soil salinity and sodicity, increasing population of insect pest
and poor disease management, decreasing soil health and lack of natural resources management etc are the major constraint which
play an active role in the production of the crops. Trainings, conducting demonstration, farmer’s field schools are the major Extension
activity tool through which farmers can be make aware for increasing the productivity of the crops.

Table 19 . Training Infrastructure Proposed for Capacity Building of Agriculture and Allied Department Staff

   District                                                                                            Recurring Non      Total
                                          Year wise no. of staff to be trained
                                                                            Training Training No of funds/year recurring (Lacs)
                           Name of
                Name of                                                      Halls Equipments training (Rs. In   funds
                           Training 2007-08 2008-09 2009-10
                  the                                                                          faculty lacs)     (Rs. In
                           Institute                        2010-11 2011-12
               Department                                                                     required           lacs)
                          (Location)

                                                                                             LCD,
Mahendergarh Agric.          KVK          -      30       35       40       45       1      Computer       5        2.0      15.0    17.0
                                                                                              etc




Source : DDA




                                                                   52
Table 20 . Proposed Plan to Improve Agriculture & Allied Training Facilities for Farmers at Sub-Division Level
 Sub-division New Agro Govt./       Funds for      Capacity Renovation of             Requirement of Funds for renovation of old /
               polyclinics Non       overall       generated     Old Agro                 establishment of new agro polyclinics
                proposed Govt. establishment        (No. of       Polyclinic
                                  (Rs. In Lacs)    farmers)         (No.)       Type of Facility Financial        Additional Capacity
                                                                                   Required       Requirement      generated through
                                                                                                  (Rs. In Lakh) farmers training (No. of
                                                                                                                        farmers)
Mahendergarh        I      Govt.        10          50/Trg.           -         Trg. Hall , LCD,        10                  -
                                                                                 Computer etc

   Narnaul          I      Govt.        10               50/Trg.        -      Trg. Hall , LCD,       10                   -
                                                                                Computer etc

                                             Total Rs.       20 Lacs                                                       -




                                                                   53
1. Water Management

(i) In-situ rain water harvesting

         In water harvesting the rain water is collected and stored either directly in the soil
through in-situ methods or through special structures. The rainfall in any area is the primary
source of water for agricultural and other activities. In Mahenedrgarh district the farmers
depend mainly on underground water due to insufficient rains. Since water table is lowering
in larger areas of the district due to increased lifting of ground water through tubewells for
irrigation, purposes, therefore, in-situ rain water harvesting is importance for sustainable crop
production. The annual rainfall of the district is about 377.9 mm (Table 30). This rainfall
occurs during short spell of about 25 to 43 days. Because of short duration of rain and
undulating soil surface, most of the rain water tends to flow away rapidly from the fields
leaving very little for the recharge of ground water. Therefore, it is imperative and need of
the hour to adopt in-situ water harvesting measures for conserving rain water into the soil as
fully as possible for use by the crops.
         In canal irrigated areas, fields are required to be leveled with laser leveler for efficient
use of water etc and this technology will be demonstrated to the farmers which will cost is
given in chapter-6..

(ii) Conjunctive use of irrigation water
        Since the ground water in majority of areas of Mahendergarh district is brackish,
therefore, in situations where canal water is available the pre-sown irrigation must be
accomplished with canal water for sustainable crop production. Thereafter, it is advantageous
to use groundwater for post-sown irrigations alternately with canal water.

Popularization of IPM
         The crop diseases, pests and weeds are other major problems in realizing optimum
yield far all major crops in the district. The scrutiny of insect pests, diseases and weed control
measures being adopted by the farmers reveal gross negligence on the part of farmers. The
improper management of these control measures often results in to increased cost of
cultivation without corresponding increase in yield. The farmers are depending mainly on
chemical control with higher doses of chemicals. Hence, integrated measures for control of
insect/pests, diseases and weeds control which are required to be adopted for sustainability
and profitability of crops. However, the projected requirement of plant protection chemicals
in the district during the plan period is presented in Table 14. The projected IPM extension
activities during the plan period are given in Table 21




                                                 54
Table 21. IPM extension activities during the plan period
  Year                Cotton                                     Gram                           Vegetables           Total
                                                                                                                    (Lacs)
              Area     Demons Extensi        Area    Demonstrat    Extension     Area   Demonstrat    Extension
              (ha)      tration     on       (ha)     ion cost      activities   (ha)    ion cost      activities
                       cost (Rs. activitie             (Lacs)      cost (Lacs)            (Lacs)      cost (Lacs)
                       in Lacs)   s cost
                                  (Lacs)
 2007-08       50          2        1.2      100            4           1.2      100        4            1.2        13.6

 2008-09       50         2         1.2      100            4           1.2      100        4            1.2        13.6

 2009-10       50         2         1.2      100            4           1.2      100        4            1.2        13.6

 2010-11       50         2         1.2      100            4           1.2      100        4            1.2        13.6

 2011-12       50         2         1.2      100            4           1.2      100        4            1.2        13.6

  Total       250         10         6       500            20          6        500       20                6       68




                                                                  55
Table 22 : Training Proposed for Capacity Building of Agriculture Staff (at District level)

                                                        (Phy- No. , Fin. – Rs in lacs)

Name of the                                                Year wise no. of staff to be trained
Department 2007-08               2008-09                   2009-10            2010-11                      2011-12                Total
             Phy         Fin      Phy             Fin       Phy      Fin       Phy         Fin               Phy     Fin    Phy           Fin
Agriculture  400          2.4      400            2.4          400          2.4         400        2.4      400      2.4    2000          12.0
Cooperative     200       1.2      200            1.2          200          1.2         200        1.2      200      1.2    1000          6.0
& NGOs
PRI Staff &     50        0.3         50          0.3          50           0.3         50         0.3       50      0.3    500           1.5
   Others
Total          650       3.9     650              3.9          650          3.9         650        3.9      650      3.9    3500          19.5
Cost norms – Rs 600/ trainee/day


Table 23 : Training Proposed for Capacity Building of Farmers at block level
                                                                                       Phy- No. , Fin. – Rs in lacs
Name of the Block                                            Year wise no. of farmers to be trained
                      2007-08              2008-09             2009-10           2010-11           2011-12                      Total
                       Phy      Fin         Phy          Fin    Phy      Fin      Phy      Fin      Phy       Fin            Phy      Fin
MAHENDERGARH           500      1.0         500          1.0         500          1.0        500     1.0      500     1.0   2500          5.0
KANINA                 500      1.0         500          1.0         500          1.0        500     1.0      500     1.0   2500          5.0
NARNAUL                500      1.0         500          1.0         500          1.0        500     1.0      500     1.0   2500          5.0
ATELI                  500      1.0         500          1.0         500          1.0        500     1.0      500     1.0   2500          5.0
N.CHODHARY             500      1.0         500          1.0         500          1.0        500     1.0      500     1.0   2500          5.0
TOTAL                  2500     5.0        2500         57.0         2500         5.0     2500       5.0      2500    5.0   12500         25.0


                                                                        56
   Table 24 : Training Proposed for Capacity Building of Farmers at district level on different technologies
                                                                                    Phy- No. , Fin. – Rs in lacs
Name of                                                Year wise no. of farmers to be trained
technology to
be                  2007-08             2008-09              2009-10               2010-11               2011-12              Total
transferred
                 Phy       Fin      Phy        Fin       Phy        Fin        Phy         Fin       Phy         Fin   Phy         Fin
INM             1000       4.0      1000       4.0       1000       4.0        1000       4.00       1000        4.0   5000      20.0
Soil/Water
                 500       2.0       500       2.0        500       2.0         500        2.0        500        2.0   2500      10.0
Mgt.
IPM             1000       4.0      1000       4.0       1000       4.0        1000       4.00       1000        4.0   5000      20.0
RCTs              500        2.0       500        2.0       500         2.0      500       2.0        500       2.0    2500      10.0
Water
                 1000        4.0      1000        4.0      1000         4.0     1000       4.00      1000       4.0    5000      20.0
management
Seed
                  700       2.80       700       2.80       700        2.80      700       2.80       700       2.80   3500      14.00
Production
Vermi-
                  200       0.80       200       080        200        0.80      200       0.80       200       0.80   1000       4.0
composting
Green
                  700       2.80       700       2.80       700        2.80      700       2.80       700       2.80   3500      14.00
Mannuring
Bee keeping      1000        4.0      1000       4.0       1000        4.0      1000       4.0       1000       4.0    5000      20.0
Total            6600      25.60      6600      25.60      6600        25.60    6600      25.60      6600      25.60   33000     132.0




                                                                  57
Table 25 : Varietal Demonstration in Next Five Year

 Name of Average                                      Varietal Demonstration Projection (year wise)
 crop    Area per                                     (Phy Area covered in ha)   Fin – Rs. In lakh)
         demon-
         stration (ha.)

                                2007-08          2008-09              2009-10          2010-11               2011-12
                           Phy.       Fin.    Phy.    Fin.         Phy.    Fin.    Phy.     Fin.      Phy.        Fin.
Mustard         0.4        700         35.0    700     35.0         700     35.0    700      35.0      700         35.0
Wheat           0.4        400         20.0   400      20.0         400     20.0    400      20.0      400         20.0
 Gram           0.4        180          9.0    180      9.0         180      9.0    180       9.0      180          9.0
 Barley         0.4        130          6.5    130      6.5         130      6.5    130       6.5      130          6.5
 Moong          0.4         50         2.50     50     2.50          50     2.50     50      2.50       50         2.50
 Cotton         0.4          50         2.5     50      2.5          50      2.5     50       2.5       50          2.5
 Castor         0.4          50         2.5     50      2.5          50      2.5     50       2.5       50          2.5
Bajara          0.4         200        10.0    200    10.0          200     10.0    200      10.0      200         10.0
  Guar          0.4          80        4.00     80     4.00          80     4.00     80      4.00       80         4.00
  Total                    1840       92.20   1840    92.20        1840 92.20      1840     92.20     1840        92.20


              Total Area =9200 ha                                   Total Cost =461 Lakh




                                                              58
Table 26 : INM Demonstrations in Next Five Years
  Crop       Area                   Varietal Demonstration Projection (year wise)
             under
              each        (Phy Area covered in ha)                    Fin – Rs. In lakh)
            demon.
                      2007-08          2008-09        2009-10         2010-11        2011-12          Total
                   Phy.     Fin.    Phy.     Fin.   Phy.    Fin. Phy.       Fin.    Phy. Fin.     Phy.      Fin.


 Mustard     0.4     250    12.5     250    12.5     250        12.5   250   12.5    250   12.5   1250     62.5
 Wheat       0.4     200     10.0    200    10.0     200        10.0   200   10.0    200   10.0   1000    50.0
  Gram       0.4     100     5.0     100     5.0     100         5.0   100    5.0    100    5.0    500    25.0
 Bajara      0.4     100     5.0     100     5.0     100         5.0   100    5.0    100    5.0    500    25.0
  Guar       0.4      25    1.25      25    1.25      25        1.25    25   1.25     25   1.25    125    6.25
  Total              675    33.75    675    33.75    675        33.7   675   33.75   675   33.7   3375    228.7
                                                                  5                          5




                                                           59
Table 27 : Demonsratins on Resource Conservation Technologies
                                                     (Phy Area covered in ha)     Fin – Rs. In lakh)
  Technol     Area                               RCTs Demonstrations Projection
    ogies    under
              each
            demon.
                       2007-08       2008-09         2009-10        2010-11        2011-12        Total
                      Phy Fin.      Phy.    Fin.    Phy.     Fin. Phy. Fin.       Phy. Fin.      Phy.      Fin.
                    .
 Laser      0.4                                                                                 500       12.5
 leveling          100     0.5    100      0.5     100     0.5    100   0.5       100    0.5
 Bed        0.4                                                                                 500       12.5
 plantig           100     0.5    100      0.5     100     0.5    100   0.5       100    0.5
 Green      0.4                                                                                 500       12.5
 manuring          100     0.5    100      0.5     100     0.5    100   0.5       100    0.5
 Zero-      0.4                                                                                 500       12.5
 tillage           100     0.5    100      0.5     100     0.5    100   0.5       100    0.5
 Summer 0.4                                                                                     500       12.5
 moong             100     0.5    100      0.5     100     0.5    100   0.5       100    0.5
                   500     2.5    500      2.5     500     2.5    500   2.5       500    2.5    2500      62.5




                                                         60
Table 28 : Farmer Field Schools covering identified critical technologies in Next Five Years

                                                              (Phy – No. of field school, Fin – Rs. In lacs)

         Crop
                                                      Farmer Field Schhols Projection
                        2007-08          2008-09            2009-10              2010-11         2011-12        Total
                        Phy   Fin.   Phy.      Fin.      Phy.         Fin.   Phy.     Fin.   Phy.     Fin.     Phy.      Fin.
                    .
Wheat               15        3.0    15        3.0                                                             75       15.0
                                                        15         3.0       15       3.0    15       3.0
K. Pulses           10        2.0    10        2.0                                                             50       10.0
                                                        10         2.0       10       2.0    10       2.0
Cotton              5         1.0    5         1.0                                                             25       5.0
                                                        5          1.0       5        1.0    5        1.0
Bajra               10        2.0    10        2.0                                                           50         10.0
                                                        10         2.0       10      2.0     10      2.0
Jowar               10        2.0    10        2.0                                                           50         10.0
                                                        10         2.0       10      2.0     10      2.0
Gram                2         0.4    2         0.4                                                           10         2.0
                                                        2          0.4       2       0.4     2       0.4
Oil Seeds           10        2.0    10        2.0                                                           50         10.0
                                                        10         2.0       10      2.0     10      2.0
Total               87        17.4   87        17.4                                                          435        87.0
                                                        87         17.4      87      17.4    87      17.4




                                                             61
Table 29. Group formation /Commodity interest groups formation for specific activities

                                                      Phy – No. of groups to be formed, Fin – Rs. In lacs)

  Interest                                        Group Formation Projection Plan
  Group(s)
                   2007-08           2008-09             2009-10               2010-11         2011-12         Total
                   Phy   Fin.    Phy.      Fin.      Phy.          Fin.    Phy.     Fin.   Phy.     Fin.   Phy.         Fin.
               .
 Seed                            10        2.0
               10        2.0                         10        2.0         10       2.0    10       2.0    50          10.0
 production
 Beekeeping    10        2.0     10        2.0       10        2.0         10       2.0    10       2.0    50          10.0
 Biogas        2         0.4     2         0.4       2         0.4         2        0.4    2        0.4    10          2.0
 Mashroom      1         0.2     1         0.2       1         0.2         1        0.2    1        0.2    5           1.0
 Specific                        5         1.0
               5         1.0                         5         1.0         5        1.0    5        1.0    25          5.0
 Crop group
 Total        57      11.4     57        11.4      57        11.4 57        11.4     57     11.4 140         28.0
Cost norms- Rs.0.20 lacs/group (for capacity building, input assistance, marketing andfor group specific activities )




                                                                          62
Table 30. Average annual rainfall of Mahendergarh district

 Sr. No.     Blocks                                             Rainfall
                                                                     Average rainfall (mm)
                                           No. of rainy days
   1.        Narnaul                               43                           547.3
   2.        Nangal Chaudhary                      39                           409.5
   3.        Ateli                                 29                           380.9
   4.        Mahendergarh                          32                           318.4
   5.        Kanina                                25                           233.5
                                                                               377.92
Average annual rainfall of the district             -
Source : DDA


Table 31. Proposed area (ha) to be covered under in-situ water harvesting during XIth
           plan
Methods of          Area      2007-       2008-    2009-       2010-   2011-     Total   Cost
water             covered      08          09       10          11      12               (Rs.
harvesting         during                                                                 in
                  2006-07                                                                Lacs)
                    (ha)

Contour               -         1000      1500      2000       2500    3000      10000   100
cultivation
Dead Furrows          -         1000      1500      2000       2500    3000      10000   100

Ridges &         -       1000    1500    2000    2500   3000 10000     100
Furrows
Soil             -       1000    1500    2000    2500   3000 10000     100
compaction
(Planking)
Total Area       -       4000    6000    8000   10000 12000 40000      400
Cost (Rs. in              40      60      80      100    120    400     -
Lacs)
______________________________________________________________________

Safe use of brackish water

        Increasing the productivity of water and making safe use of poor quality waters in
agriculture will play a vital role in easing competition for scarce water resources, prevention
of environmental degradation and provision of food security. Driven by the pressure to
produce more, the saline water being increasingly diverted to irrigated agriculture in
Mahendergarh district. Development of salinity/sodicity problems in soils not only reduces
crop productivity and quality but also limit the choice of crops. There is major approach to
improving and sustaining productivity in a saline environment i.e. modifying the


                                              63
environment to suit the plant. This option is mediated through the management of
crops/sequences, irrigation water, chemical/amendments and other cultural practices but all
must be integrated as per the site specific needs.

Ground Water Recharge Structures
       The ground water exploitation is reaching at alarming stage with its over-exploitation
in unsustainable manner in Mahendergarh district. The data indicate that more than 90 per
cent irrigated area in the district is under tube well irrigation thereby causing more
exploitation of underground water than recharge.
       There is no proper attention for recharging of underground water. Hence, it is
necessary to take immediate steps for judicious use of ground water for irrigation and
recharging of ground water. Water recharging has to be taken up on community level by
constructing community ponds and by bringing additional water in the district. In this way
recharge scheme will not only check decline in soil water level but also check soil erosion
through winds to some extent by bringing more area under irrigation.

Zero-tillage in bajra, guar and cotton based cropping system
       Increasing cost of cultivation of crops, falling water table and deterioration in soil
productivity needs to be tackled by adopting zero tillage technology in bajra, guar and cotton
based cropping systems. This technology is required to be shown to farmers at their fields by
conducting about 200 demonstrations of each bajra, guar and cotton based cropping systems
which costs about Rs. 30 lacs during the plan period.

Projected growth rate and financial requirement for agriculture sector during the plan
period
        The year-wise projected outcome and growth rate of agriculture sector during the plan
period is targeted as 4.8 per cent. For achieving targeted growth rate, the details of financial
requirement are given in Table 32.




                                              64
Table 31: Area,Production and Productivity Trend of Main Crops in the District (Area –000 ha, Production – 000 ton,
         productivity – q/ha)

                                                                      2008-09                  2009-10                2010-11
                Normal 2004-05 to 2006-07 2007-08 (Projected)                                                                               2011-12
                                                                     (Projected)             (Projected)          (Projected)              (Projected)
Sl.
      Name of                      Product
No
       Crop      Area Production
 .                                  ivity    A     P      Y     A        P         Y     A        P        Y     A       P      Y     A         P        Y
                 (A)      (P)
                                    (Y)

1          2      3        4         5       6     7      8     9        10        11   12        13       14    15     16      17    18       19        20

1. Wheat         41.0     162      39.53     45   184   41.10   44      187     42.70   43.0     189     44.0 44        200 45.8 45           209    46.6

2. Mustard        99      124      12.57     96   124    13.0   95      128     13.50   95       133     14.0 96        134 14.6 96           145    15.2

3. Gram           07      06        7.70     06   05     8.0    08       07     8.65    0.75      07       9.0   07     07      9.4   08       08        9.8

4. Bajra          95      123      12.92     99   132   13.40   98      136     13.95   97       136     14.0 98        142 14.6 98           148    15.2




                                                                65
Table 32. Financial Requirement (Agriculture) Proposed under CDAP during XIth Plan
Sr. No.         Thrust Areas/                                Budget Required (Rs. in Lacs)                                 Total
                    Gaps                2007-08    2008-09            2009-10              2010-11           2011-12   (Rs. in Lacs)
Agriculture
1        Water management                 1.0        1.0                 1.0                1.0                1.0         5.0
2         Seed Production                 8.5        8.5                 8.5                8.5                8.5         42.5
3         Wheat seed Replacement          4.4        4.4                 4.4                4.4                4.4         22.0
6         Reclamation of saline/sodic    36.75      36.75               36.75              36.75              36.75       183.75
          soils
7         Laser leveling of fields       19.0        19.0                19.0               19.0              19.0         95.0
          (canal irrigated)
8         Site specific nutrient          9.0        9.0                 9.0                9.0                9.0         45.0
          management
9         Green manuring                 93.75      93.75               93.75              93.75              93.75       468.75
10        Sulphur nutrition               90.0       90.0                90.0               90.0               90.0        450.0
          in mustard
11        Orobanchae in mustard           1.0        1.0                 1.0                1.0                1.0         5.0
12        Intercropping of                0.5        0.5                 0.5                0.5                0.5         2.5
          castor + guar
13        Zero-tillage in bajra, guar    23.5        23.5                23.5               23.5              23.5        117.5
          and cotton based cropping
          system
14        Fodder Production (Napier      40.4        40.4                40.4               40.4              40.4        202.0
          grass) with drip irrigation
15        IPM                             16.6       16.6                16.6               16.6               16.6        83.0
16        IWM                              1.0        1.0                 1.0                1.0                1.0         5.0
17        Timely seeding of crops          3.0        3.0                 3.0                3.0                3.0        15.0
18        Seed treatment                 172.5      172.5               172.5              172.5              172.5       862.5
19        Training infrastructure          7.4        7.4                 7.4                7.4                7.4        37.0
20        Training cost for staff          3.9        3.9                 3.9                3.9                3.9        19.5
21        Training cost for farmers        37         37                  37                 37                 37         185
22        Varietal demonstrations         92.5       92.5                92.5               92.5               92.5       461.0
23        Demonstration cost on RCT       12.5       12.5                12.5               12.5               12.5        62.5
                                                                                                     Total             3369.5 Lacs




                                                                66
Research, extension and development agencies should jointly approach in a farmers’
participatory approach for each of the following issues for possible solution.
    1. Water management ((drip irrigation study in relation to water saving)
    2. Reclamation of saline/sodic soils
    3. Green manuring in relation to soil health.
    4. Orobanchae in mustard
    5. Integrated Pest Management (IPM)
    6. ntegrated Weed Management (IWM)
    7. Site specific nutrient management (micronutrients).
    8. Zero-tillage in bajra, guar and cotton based cropping system
    9. Intercropping of castor + guar
    10. Fodder Production (Napier grass) with drip irrigation




                                       67
                                        CHAPTER V

                         ALLIED AGRICULTURAL SECTORS

5.1 : Introduction
        Allied agriculture sectors continues to occupy a significant role in the district. The
allied sectors of agriculture which is a combination of different activities like horticulture,
animal husbandry, fisheries, watershed development, social forestry, food processing, agro
based industries, agricultural marketing, agricultural credit, etc contributes significantly in
the economy of the district. The allied sectors indicates good potential to continue to
contribute in the development of over all economy of the district.

5.2 : Horticulture
        The agro climatic conditions of the district are favourable for fruits and vegetable
crops. The major fruit crops grown in the district are citrus, belgiri, guava, ber and aonla
covering only 380 ha area. The major vegetable crops grown in an area of 3,787 ha were
tomato, carrot, cauliflower, radish, chillies, brinjal, cucurbits and leafy vegetables etc with
total production of 78,862 MT during 2006-07. The data on present status of horticultural
crops including vegetables is given in Tables 4 and 5. It is proposed to increase the area
under fruit and vegetables to 5700 ha during the plan period (Table 33). The existing
orchards are also proposed to be rejuvenated (Table 34) for obtaining higher production. In
order to increase the production of fruits and vegetables in the district and for additional
income, the farmers are required to adopt naturally ventilated poly house/poly tunnels for
nursery raising, drip Irrigation in fruits and vegetables, to cover more area under hybrids of
vegetables and less water requiring onion. The proposals on the following activities of
horticulture are projected for achieving targeted growth rate during the XIth plan.
    1. Naturally ventilated poly house/poly tunnels for nursery raising
    2. Area under less water requiring onion
    3. Drip Irrigation
    4. Fruit plants
             Vegetable Crops
    5. Area Under Hybrids of Vegetables
             Kharif Season Vegetable Hybrids
             Rabi Season Vegetable Hybrids

Table 33. Area Expansion Plan (ha) of Horticultural Crops (including vegetable crops)
          (2006-07)        2007-08 2008-09       2009-10     2010-11       2011-12
Crops              Area    Area       Area       Area        Area          Area
Fruit & Vegetables 4167    5200       5350       5500        5600          5700
Source: DHO




                                              68
Table 34. Rejuvenation plan of fruit crops during XIth plan
  Area brought under Rejuvenation
                                      2007-08 2008-09 2009-10             2010-11     2011-12
             (2006-07)
     Crops              Area            Area      Area     Area             Area       Area
   Aonla                  -               5         5       10               15         35
   Ber                    -               5         5       10               15         35
   Citrus                 -               5         5       10               15         35
   Guava                  -               5         5       10               15         35
   Total                  -              20        20       40               60        140

5.3 Vermi-composting
        It is established fact that use of vermicompost in crops promotes faster growth of
plants. It increases water-holding capacity of soil, reduces salinization and soil erosion,
induces resistance in plants against pest and diseases and increases soil productivity thereby
higher crop yields. Hence, it is required to promote the use of vermicompost for sustainable
crop production. Hence, it is proposed to start 100 units of vermin-compost hatcheries during
the plan period (Table 62-63).

5.4 : Beekeeping
        Decreasing size of land holdings and increasing cost of production is a great concern
for farmers. In order to increase the income of farmers, beekeeping has become quite popular
as side business with agriculture. Mustard crop has proved to be good resource for the bee
keepers of this district. Therefore, this profession can increase both income and production of
mustard crop to 10-15% by cross pollination. Hence, it is proposed to encourage farmers for
starting beekeeping (Table 35) along with crop production.

Table 35. Proposal for starting beekeeping units during XIth plan
Year        No.     *Unit     Cost of  No. of        Cost per     Cost                Total
            of      cost     units     Trainings     Training     of trainings        (Lacs)
            units             (Lacs)                 (Lacs)          (Lacs)
                    (Lacs)
2007-08     50      0.30     15        05            0.30         1.5                 16.5
2008-09     60      0.30     18        05            0.30         1.8                 19.8
2009-10     75      0.30     22.5      05            0.30         2.25                24.75
2010-11     90      0.30     27        05            0.30         2.70                29.70
2011-12     110     0.30     33        05            0.30         3.30                36.30
                                                                   Grand Total        127.05
 *One unit = 10 boxes                    Honey production per unit = 250 kg
Proposed subsidy per unit = 50%




                                              69
5.5 : Mushroom cultivation
        Presently only 7 units of mushroom are functioning with an area of 1400 trays.
However, farmers of the district are interested to adopt mushroom farming as a subsidiary
occupation for additional income generation. Therefore, it is proposed to start 100
units(table-36) of mushroom farming during the plan period.
Table 36. Proposed Physical and Financial Targets (Rs. in lacs) for Mushroom XI Plan\

Name of       Unit  2007-08  2008-09   2009-10  2010-11    2011-12  Total
Activity      cost
                    Phy. Fin Phy. Fin Phy. Fin Phy. Fin Phy. Fin Phy. Fin
              (Rs)
Mushroom      50000 10    5  15    7.5 20    10 25    12.5 30    15 100 5.0



5.6 : Animal Husbandry
        Livestock is an integral part of farming systems in Mahendergarh district. Good
entrepreneurship qualities in farmers of this district particularly land less farmers are basic
factors for the development of animal husbandry. The Department of Animal Husbandry
caters to the treatment, vaccination, de-worming, milk recording, sheep breeding, poultry,
piggery, self-employment for youth and other extension services. The animal population in
the district is 2,26,615 buffaloes, 30,785 cows, 38,734 sheeps, 69,628 goats and 1,97,327
poultry (Table 36). Total Veterinary Hospitals and Dispensaries in the district are only 125.
Proposal for starting new units of dairy, goattery and piggeries during XIth plan is given in
Table 52. The projected proposal for offering trainings to farmers for starting dairy, goattery
and piggeries units during the plan period is given in chapter6..




                                              70
Table 36. Livestock Information (2006-07).

                Area under                               Buffaloes                  Sheep                Goats(                     Poultry
                                Cattle (Nos.)
               Fodders (ha)                               (Nos)                     (No.)                 No.)                       (Nos)
       .       Fodde
                      Grazi       Indige-
    Blocks       r          Cross           Total Improve Indi –            Impro Indige –       Impro Indigen
                       ng           nous                           Total                   Total                  Total   Broiler   Layer     Total
               crops        Bred                     d    genous             –ved   nous          ved    ous
                      Land

Narnaul        22.76   -     543    3786   4329    18896   17109   36005     592    53416   5938    X   12849     12849   16503      423      16926
                                                                                                                                                    )
Ateli          25.26   -     1233   5156   6389    32460   14032   46492     203    4653    4856    x   9022      9022    47560      249      47809 -
                                                                                                                                                    -
Nangal
               31.61   -     505    2038   2543    28144   11648   39792     381    9482    9863    X   18407     18407   25403      265      25668
Chaudhary.

Mahendergarh   99.58   -     867    10331 11198 49771      7762    57533     1219   10833 12052     X   23784     23784   45410        -      45410

Kanina         65.94   -     927    5399   6326    31619   15174   46793     535    5496    6031    X   5566      5566    61518        -      61518

               245.4
Total                14.21    -       -    30785     -       -     226615     -       -     39040   -     -       69628      -         -      197331
                 5
Source: Deputy Director, AH&D, Narnaul




                                                                        71
5.8 : Piggeries - There is good scope to start sheep and goat units in the district as per
the climatic conditions of the soil. The landless farmers can increase there income by
adopting this professon.
        The proposals for starting new units of goattery, piggeries and farmers trainings
during the plan period is given in table 37.

Table:- 37 Projected budget for sheep,goat and pig units.

Sheep/Goats/Pigs
20      0.50
                 30   15.0     30   15.0   35    17.50   35   17.50     40      20.00   170   85.00
Sheep
20      0.50
                 30   15.0     30   15.0   35    17.50   35   17.50     40      20.00   170   85.00
Goat
6 Sows 0.4
&                10      4.0   10   4.0    11    4.40    11   4.40      12      4.80    54    21.60
2 Boars

                                                                               Grand Total 1631.60
         Total cost @50%subsidy=816.0.

5.10 Fisheries
        The fish cultivation in Mahendergarh district is done mainly in Gram Panchayats
Tanks spread over an area of 220.93 ha (Table 38). The total fish production in the district
during 2006-07 was 262.10 tones. The projected fish production, seed to be stocked and
infrastructure development for fish rearing is given in Table 54 .

Table 38. Water Spread Area (WSA) for fish farming in the District

                                                     Gram Panchayat Tank
Block                                                      < 40 ha
                                No. of units                         W.S.A (ha)
Narnaul                              26                                26.38
Ateli                                22                                23.90
Nangal Chaudhary                     31                                51.55
Mahendergarh                         14                                22.10
Kanina                               64                                97.00
Total                               157                               220.93


5.11 : Social Forestry
       The area under state forests in the district is 2.035 thousand hectares. There is 1.04 %
of total geographical area of district under forest cover. The xerophytic type of flora
dominates in the district. The district is inadequately wooded and some parts are practically
bare of trees. Tree species found are khairi, jand, pahari kikar, kikar, dhok, babool, rohera,


                                                72
janti or reru, jai or van, beri, barh, pipal, lasura, imli, barna, shisham, siris, neem, farash,
henna, papri, gular, indokh, tut, gulmohar etc are found all over the district. Jand and jai are
the dominant species of the sandy areas. Shrubs found in the district are pala, hins,
Puthkanda, bansa, panwar, karia, khip, Aak, phog and Nagphani. Amarbel is a common
parasite climber. The palatable grasses like anjan, dhaman and dub have dwindled due to
excessive grazing in village common land. Jand, neem bakain, khairi, mesquite or pahari
kikkar, henna and eucalyptus have been planted to increase the forest wealth. The planting
material production plan during XIth plan is presented in Table 39.
Table 39. Planting Material Production during XIth plan.

                Existing     2007-08   2008-09         2009-10    20010-11   2011-12    Total
                (2006-7)
No. of          2            3         3               3          3          3          3
Nurseries
Area under      4            4.5       7.5             7.5        7.5        7.5        38.5
mother plants
(acre)
Production of   50,000       81,354    1,41,100        1,50,100   1,55,100   1,60,100   687754
seedlings/
grafts
Investment      -            3         3.5             3.5        3.5        3.5        17
for
development
(Lacs)
Source: DFO                Area in acre, production of plants grafts in numbers

5.12 : Development of rural industries
        Mahendergarh is an industrially backward district and there is no big industrial unit in
the district. However, there are 1528 SSI units in the district which provided employment to
about 4778 people. It is proposed to organise trainings of 100 SSI units during the plan
period which cost Rs. 50 lacs.
5.13 : Agricultural marketing
        The details of basic marketing infrastructure for post harvest management of
agriculture produce are given in Table 7.
5.14 : Agricultural credit
        The details of number of credit institutions spread over the district are given in Table
8. The total loan distributed by these credit institutions to farmers and others during 2006-07
was Rs. 8730.45 lacs
5.15 : Farmers organizations
        At present about 583 self help groups are functioning in 319 villages involving about
5930 members (Table 40). However, two Farmers Clubsare working in the district but no
Krishi Vigyan Mandals and Community Groups are functioning in the district.




                                                  73
Table 40. Group Organizations in the District
Sr. Block                 Farmers Clubs       Self Help Groups            No. of villages
No.                                                (SHGs)                    covered
                        Nos.      Members     Nos.      Members
1    Narnaul            2           100        121       1235                   58
2    Ateli              -            -         115       1172                   65
3    Nangal Chaudhary -              -          86        870                   62
4    Mahendergarh       -            -         129       1310                   77
5    Kanina             -            -         132       1343                   57
      Total             -            -         583       5830                  319

5.16 : Service Centers
       The Public, Private and Cooperative sector centers presently providing service to the
farmers in the field of Agriculture and its’ allied fields are given in Table 6.

5.17: Special projects/Programmes on-going in the district
 (i)   Watershed Development Project
(i)    Bhandor Unchi
       To check water flow & soil erosion and to percolate water
(ii)   Lawan
       To improve ground water level & to provide drinking water for animals
(iii)  Partal
       To control the soil erosion and to conserve the water table
(iv)   Nawan
       To improve ground water level & drinking water for animals
(v)    Jhook
       To increase income and to improve environment.
(vi)   Madhogarh
       To increase income and to improve environment.
(vii) Jhook
       To increase income of Panchayat and to increase water table

(ii) Special beneficiary oriented schemes
        The following special beneficiary oriented schemes, Wage employment programmes
and Area development programmes are being implemented in the district by DRDA,
Narnaul :

1.     Swarnjayanti Gram Swarozgar Yojana (SGSY)
2.     Jawahar Gram Samridhi Yojana (JGSY)
3.     Rural Housing
4.     New Construction and up gradation of unserviceable houses under IAY
5.     Credit-cum-subsidy Scheme for Rural Housing
6.     Desert Development Programme (DDP)
7.     Employment Assurance Scheme (EAS)
8.     Pradhan Mantri Gramodaya Yojana (PMGY)
9.     Members of Parliament Local Area Development Scheme (MPLADS)


                                            74
10.              Decentralized Planning (DCP)
11.              Sampooran Gramin Rozgar Yojana (SGRY)

5.18 : Constraint Analysis
         The reasons for the yield and production gaps and the interventions required are
planned using participatory/consultative processes involving stakeholders. The natural
factors of production including soil and water in Mahendergarh district are slowing down in
their responses to crops cultivation. The productivity of soils are deteriorating and ground
water is lowering down in many areas of the district. Moreover, the quality of ground water
is not good being brackish in nature. The poor availability of nutrients in of prsoils is having
a direct effect on crop growth and finally on the quality fruits , vegetablesand fodder etc. It
has recently been documented that nutrients deficiency in fruits, vegetable and fodder has an
adverse affect on the health of human beings and animal. The major reasons of gaps in yield
are poor carbon content in the soil, brackish ground water, increasing soil salinity and
environmental stresses during the growth period of crops etc. The analysis of sustainability
issues and reasons for gaps in the productivity of major fruit and vegetable crops grown the
district and subsidiary occupations are presented in Table 41-42.




                                              75
Table 41 : Sustainability issues and gap analysis of productivity of allied sectors
S.      Gap       Factors /                 Strategies         Approach and              Performance        Sustainability outputs
N.                constraints                                   methodology                indicators
                  leading to gaps
1
    Vegetables
    New           Availability of      Supply and quality Improved                  Vegetable based         Will help diversifying
    managemen hybrid seeds, cost of hybrid seed,            germplasm               infrastructure in the   agriculture for
    t strategies  of hybrid seeds,     marketing            research, farmers’       dis trict              transforming the system
    among         availability of low enhancement of        participatory                                   into income generating
    small         water requiring      vegetables,          research on                                     activities through
    holders       vegetable            improved             intercropping,                                  improved productivity
    vegetable     varieties,           germplasm for        technical and                                   and marketing
    farmers       intercropping of     garlic and onion,    market information
                  vegetables and       management of        from different
                  multiple land use, apical virus in        sources to farmers,
                  vegetable based      potato               relaying of
                  cropping system                           production
                  with intervening                          information from
                  cultivation of                            farmers to
                  flowers,                                  researchers,
                  intercropping of                          physical
                  potato with                               infrastructure for
                  mustard                                   grading, processing
                                                            and storage,
                                                            electricity charges
                                                            on the basis of
                                                            agriculture for
                                                            small unorganized
                                                            food processors



                                                                  76
S.      Gap          Factors /                  Strategies          Approach and           Performance         Sustainability outputs
N.                   constraints                                    methodology             indicators
                     leading to gaps
2
     Fruit
     plants
a    Planting        Availability of       Supply and quality     Establishment of     Research, extension     Will help diversifying
     material        planting material     of quqlity, planting   fruit nurseries at   and development         agriculture for
                                           material               block level          agencies should         transforming the system
                                                                                       jointly approach in a   into income generating
                                                                                       farmers participatory   activities through
                                                                                       approach for each of    improved productivity
                                                                                       possible solution,      and marketing
                                                                                       Discouraging sellers
                                                                                       of non-descript
                                                                                       planting material
b    Water           Poor availability     Supply of drip         Demonstrations on                            Saving of water
     management      of irrigation water   irrigation system      drip irrigation
     in vegetables   and non adoption
     and fruits      of micro
                     irrigation system.
c    Area            Small holding         Adopting Agri-horti Demonstration on                                More productivity and
     expansion       size                  system of farming   Agri-horti system                               profitability per unit area
     of fruit                              by growing                                                          of land
     trees                                 karonda-                                                            Efficient land and water
                                           interspersed with                                                   use
                                           Bael on field                                                       Conservation of soil by
                                           boundary of field                                                   the trees/hedge on
                     Price slump in        crops/ orchard                                                      boundary as wind break
                     Aonla                                     Depttof horticulture    90 ha of Aonla
                                                               and developmental       plantation in the       Income generation of the
                                           Agro-processing     agencies to work in     district                farmers
                                                                     77
                                    units for value        the direction of
                                    addiotion              establishing Agro-
                                                           processing units
                                                           for value addiotion
                                                           of Aonla for edible
                                                           and medicinal and
                                                           other products
3                Only 1.3% per      Afforestation of the   Massive               Grrening of the   Healthy environment
    Forestry     cent area under    denuded land           afforestation and     denuded           and conservation of soil
                 forest cover                              development of
                                                           social forestry
                                                           program

4
    Animal Husbandry / Buffalo farming
a   Imbalanced Lack of green       Cultivation of green Demonstration,                             Better animal health
    feeding     fodder             fodders              trainings supply of                        with higher productivity
                                                        seed of fodder
                                                        crops to the
                                                        growers
b   Mineral     Poor nutrient      Mineral mixture      Supply of mineral                          Better animal health
    deficiency  /micronutrient     supplementation of mixture to the                               with higher productivity
    induced     status of soil as  the animal feed      buffalo /cattle
    disorders   well as feeds                           farmers
c   Breed       Natural mating     Strengthening A.I.   Extension and                              Breed improvement
                with non-descript facility,             development                                Enhanced productivity
                bull               Community Bulls      agencies A.H deppt
                                                        should jointly
                                                        approach in a
                                                        farmers
                                                        participatory
                                                        approach
                                                              78
S.     Gap      Factors /                Strategies       Approach and           Performance         Sustainability outputs
N.              constraints                               methodology             indicators
                leading to gaps
5     Poultry  Feeding, Housing     Lack of awareness   Impart training                              Increased productivity
               Disease
6    Vermi-composting
     Poor soil  Low organic         Vermi-composting    Demonstration,       Mustard residue from    Improved soil health
     health     carbon, low P                           trainings and        70,000 ha and huge      Reduced environmental
                and micronutients                       exposure visits on   animal wealth to        pollution
                                                        vermin-composting    supply biological
                                                                             waste
7    Bee
     keeping
     Poor        Lack of            Scientific bee      Demonstration,       Mustard grown over      Increased production of
     adoption    awareness          keeping             trainings and        an area of 70,000 ha    mustard due to pllnators
                                                        exposure visits on   is a excellent souece
                                                        vermin-composting    of flora to the bees    Better health of people
                                                        Development of                               due to honey
                                                        bee keeping by                               consumption
                 Non availability                       establishing new
                 of flora during    Shifting to other   units
                 summer             places




                                                           79
Table 42. Closing the gap for realizing the vision – Allied Agricultural Sectors

(a) Horticulture & Vegetables
  1    Nursery      Insufficient     Naturally         DHO        Establishment       200
       raising      number of        ventilated poly              of nurseries in
       in poly      nurseries and    house/poly                   poly
       houses/poly less area         tunnel                       houses/poly       Table-68
       tunnels      under mother     nurseries : DHO              tunnels
                    plants to        will motivate                (16 units x 5
                    meet the         farmers for                  years x 5
                    demand of        raising nurseries            lacs/unit =
                    grafts/seedlin   in naturally                 400/2 = 200
                    gs of fruit      ventilated poly              Lacs (50%
                    and              houses/poly                  subsidy).
                    vegetables in    tunnels of
                    the district.    crops/vegetables
                                     . DHO will also DHO                              40
                                     regulate and
                                     monitor 50%
                                     subsidies on
                                     poly                         Trainings
                                     houses/poly
                                     tunnels.

                                     DHO and lead        DHO/KV                       40
                                     bank will           K
                                     provide
                                     guidance to
                                     farmers for                  Trainings
                                     seeking loans
                                     from credit
                                     institutions for
                                     poly
                                     houses/poly
                                     tunnel nurseries

                                     KVK will
                                     organize
                                     farmers
                                     trainings for
                                     providing
                                     technical
                                     guidance and
                                     maintenance of
                                     nurseries in poly
                                     houses/poly



                                             80
                                    tunnels.
02   Onion (low     The water       DHO/KVK will        DHO     Demonstration      7.00
     water          requirement     demonstrate low             s
     requiring      of existing     water requiring             (28 ha x 5 x
     varieties)     onion           varieties of                0.5 = 7 Lacs)    Table69
                    varieties is    onion with drip
                    high.           irrigation to
                                    replace existing
                                    ones.               KVK                        2.20
                                                                Trainings
                                    KVK will
                                    organize
                                    farmers
                                    trainings for
                                    providing
                                    technical
                                    guidance
03   Fruit plants   Low             DHO/KVK will        DHO/K   Demonstration
     ( under drip   production      demonstrate and     VK      s and
     irrigation)    and less area   impart trainings            training@24x5    9.30
                    under fruits    for the                     0x400
                    plants due to   cultivation of
                    poor            fruit plants with
                    availability    drip irrigation              (240 ha x 5     204.0
                    of irrigation   for sustainable             years x 0.34
                    water and       production and              lacs = 408/2 =
                    non adoption    higher income.              204.0 Lacs.
                    of micro                            DHO     (50% subsidy)
                    irrigation                                                   Table-70
                    system.         The DHO will
                                    make efforts for
                                    covering about
                                    100 hectare area
                                    under k fruits
                                    plants under
                                    drip irrigation
                                    system during
                                    the plan period.
                                    The subsidies of
                                    50% on drip
                                    system in fruits
                                    will be
                                    regulated/monit
                                    ored by DHO.

                                    (DHO will make


                                            81
                                   necessary
                                   linkages with
                                   credit agencies
                                   and
                                   public/private
                                   agencies for
                                   arranging
                                   saplings of
                                   kinow plants).
04   Vegetables    The             DHO/KVK will       DHO/K
     (under drip   production      demonstrate and    VK      Demonstration
     irrigation    and area        impart trainings           s and              22.60
     system)       under           for the                    training@24x5
                   vegetables is   cultivation of             0x400
                   very less due   vegetables with
                   to poor         drip irrigation            Drip irrigation
                   availability    for sustainable            with 50%          420.00
                   of irrigation   production and             subsidies
                   water and       higher income.             (1050ha in 5
                   non adoption                       DHO     years x 0.80
                   of micro                                   lacs = 840/2 =
                   irrigation      The DHO will               420 Lacs.
                   system.         make efforts to
                                   cover about                                  Table-71
                                   1000 hectare
                                   area under
                                   vegetables with
                                   drip irrigation
                                   system during
                                   the plan period.
                                   The subsidies of
                                   50% on drip
                                   system in
                                   vegetables will
                                   be regulated/
                                   monitored by
                                   DHO.

                                   (DHO will also
                                   make necessary
                                   linkages with
                                   credit agencies
                                   and public/
                                   private seed
                                   agencies for
                                   arranging high



                                          82
                                    yielding
                                    varieties/
                                    hybrids of
                                    important
                                    vegetables).
5(a)   Vegetable   The              Participatory
       hybrids     production       selection of
       (Kharif     and area         kharif season       DHO &   Farmers’Traini      1.10
       season)     under hybrid     vegetable           KVK     ng cost
                   vegetables in    hybrids at
                   kharif season    farmers’ field
                   is very low      and to organize                               Table-72
                   due to non       trainings.
                   availability
                   of suitable
                   hybrids.                                     Demonstration      12.00
                                                        DHO
                                    To lay out
                                    demonstration
                                    for popularizing
                                    the hybrids

5(b)   Vegetable   The              Participatory
       hybrids     production       selection of rabi
       (Rabi       and area         season              DHO &   Farmers’Traini      1.10
       season)     under hybrid     vegetable           KVK     ng cost
                   vegetables in    hybrids at
                   rabi season is   farmers’ field
                   very low due     and to organize                               Table-73
                   to non           trainings.
                   availability
                   of suitable
                   hybrids                                      Demonstration      20.45




Forestry
 06 Agro &         Deficiency       Forest           District   Surveys &
       Social      in natural       Department will Forest      monitoring
       Forestry    forest area      make survey to   Officer    (10 surveys x 5
                   i.e. only        put community,              years x Rs.
                   1.3% of the      panchayat and               5000 = 2.50       2.50 lacs
                   total            other wastelands            Lacs
                   geographical     under tree
                   area of          plantations in


                                            83
                   Mahendergar order to increase
                   h district. the forest area
                               about 5000 ha     District
                               during the plan   Forest
                               period.           Officer
                                                              Subsidy on
                                  Forest                      seedlings
                                  Department of               (10 lac
                                  the district will           seedlings x 5
                                  ensure to supply            years x Rs. 5 =    187.50
                                  seedlings of                250 Lacs (75%
                                  prosopis,                   subsidy) =
                                  Ailanthus,                  37.50 Lacs)
                                  Neem, Albizia,
                                  Shisham,
                                  Savadora etc to
                                  farmers on
                                  subsidized rate.
Subsidiary Occupations
 7    Mushroom Mushroom           DDA/KVK will        DDA/K   Trainings
      farming      farming is     provide             VK      (10 x 5 years x
                   not adopted    trainings on                Rs. 6000 = 3        3.00
                   as a           layout of a                 lacs)
                   subsidiary     spawn
                   activity due   laboratory,
                   to poor        equipments                                    Table-44
                   knowledge .o   required for
                   f farmers      spawn
                   about          laboratory,
                   management     culture
                   of spawn       preparation and
                   laboratory,    its’ storage,
                   Culture        preparation of
                   media          mother and          DDA                       2.50
                   preparation,   planting spawn,             Exposure visits
                   spawn          qualities of a              = 2.5 Lacs
                   planting,      good spawn etc.
                   quality
                   control etc.
                                  DDA will
                                  explore the
                                  possibilities of
                                  credit facilities
                                  for mushroom
                                  units, marketing
                                  opportunities


                                          84
                                through private
                                agencies and
                                exposure visits
                                of the farmers.
8   Vermi-       Demand for     DDA/KVK will        DDA/K     Trainings            7.50
    composting   vermicompo     provide             VK        (10 x 3 days x 5
                 st is          trainings on the              years x Rs.5000
                 increasing     efficient                     = 7.5 lacs)
                 but            methods of
                 availability   vermicompost                                      Table-
                 of             preparation.                                      62,63
                 vermicompo
                 st is very                         DDA       Exposure visits
                 poor.          DDA will                      = 2.5 Lacs           2.50
                                explore the
                                possibilities of
                                credit facilities
                                for commercial
                                mushroom units,
                                marketing
                                opportunities
                                through private     DDA/K     5000 units x
                                agencies and        VK/Gra    200 = 100 lack      100.00
                                exposure visits     m
                                of the farmers.     panchay
                                                    at
                                DDA,
                                University
                                scientists, gram
                                panchayats will               1 lack ton rock
                                come together to              phosphate @
                                discourage the                Rs.5000 per ton
                                trend of burning              to treat           18750.00
                                mustard bhusi                 1000000 ton
                                for brick kiln                bio-mass @
                                industry                      75% subsidy =
                                                              18750 lacs
                                Seventy five
                                percent subsidy
                                on rock
                                phosphate for
                                enriching the
                                vermicompostin
                                g and free
                                distribution of
                                earthworms will



                                        85
                                 be ensured by
                                 DDA so as to
                                 start 50000
                                 vermicompostin
                                 g units during
                                 plan period
10   Beekeeping   Farmers are    DDA/KVK will        DDA/K   Training and         3.30
                  having poor provide                VK      visits
                  knowledge      trainings for
                  about the      starting
                  role of honey successful units
                  bees as        of honey bees.              77 units x5 x0.3    57.75
                  pollinator in                              = 115.50 lacs
                  fruit,                                     (50% subsidy)
                  vegetable                          DDA                         Table-
                  and field      DDA will                                       78
                  crops.         explore the
                                 possibilities of
                                 credit facilities
                                 for starting
                                 honey units,
                                 marketing
                                 opportunities
                                 through private
                                 agencies and
                                 exposure visits
                                 of the farmers.
11   Dairy        Lack of        DDAHs , lead        DDAH/   Training           3.0
     Farming      farming        bank and KVKs       KVK     (100 x 5 x .06
                  systems        will initiate               = 3.00 Lacs)
                  units. Need    action for
                  to establish   establishment of            Dairy Units
                  commercial     dairies by                  85x20.0 lacs       425.0
                  dairy          selecting                   =1700 lacs
                  farming units appropriate sites            (subsidy 25%)
                  along with     depending on
                  suitable       market
                  cropping       strategies.                                    Table-86
                  systems
                  Improving
                  the
                  infrastructure
                  facilities for
                  procurement
                  of milk.




                                         86
                                      DDAH    Chilling plants   125.0
Strengthenin                                  (5 lacs each x
g of facilities                               5 blocks x 5 =
for creation      To extend                   125 Lacs)
of milk           existing
processing        acilities of milk           Processing
units.            procurement                 units              250.0
Facilities for    and chilling        DDAH    5 units x 50
availability      plants in all the           lacs =250 Lacs
of seed for       villages.
green fodder
production                                    Demonstrations
and hay           Milk processing     DDAH    200x 0.10 = 20
making            units may be                Lacs               20.00
                  created/
                  strengthened at
                  block level.                80x5x0.1=40La
Creation of                           DDAH    cs                 40.00
facilities for
drinking          Demonstrations
water for         for economical              Mobile A. I.
animals.          and sustainable     DDAH/   Units
A.I. and          fodder              KVK     5 units x 5
natural           production and              Blocks x 8 lacs
service           hay making in               = 200 Lacs         200.0
through           proposed 200        DDA/K
community         commercial          VK
bulls (Private    dairies
Public
Interface)        Desilting of
                  village ponds,              Facilities for
Reduction of      rain water                  Disease
inter calving     harvesting                  Diagnostic Lab.
period – by                                   5 labs x 5 x 5
adopting          Private Public              lacs = 75 lacs     75.00
mineral           linkages and
mixture           synergies be
feeding and       created. Retail
balanced          outlets may also            Diagnostic kits
feed, de-         be associated       DDAH/   for Govt. Vety.
worming,          with                KVK     Hospital &
summer            productivity                Govt. Vety.
management,       improvement                 Dispensary
unestrus          through A.I. and            120x 5 x 0.05 =
management,       natural services.           30 Lacs
free hormone



                          87
               therapy for
               repeat
               breeder of     Creation of                                    30.00
               resource       facilities for    DDAH
               poor.          cattle feed and
                              mineral mixture
               Diagnostic     through co-
               kits for       operatives.
               diseases,      DDAH and
               vaccination    disease
               as regular     diagnostic labs
               feature,       to formulate
               survey and     common
               surveillance   strategies for
               of diseases    disease
               and creation   forecasting and
               of drug        management.
               banks for
               common
               ailment.

                            Procurement of
                            special kits like
                            crytoscopes,
                            mastitis
                            diagnostic kit,
                            foot and mouth
                            diagnostic kit
                            etc.
11             Mineral      The animal feed     DDAH      10000 x 50 g x     450
               mixture      will be             will      300 days with
               supplementat supplemented        ensure    50% subsidy
               ion of feed  with 50 g           supply    for 5 years
                            mineral mixture     of                           Table-74
                            per day per         mineral
                            animal for 300      mixture
                            days. In the        at 50%
                            plan period         subsidy
                            50000 lactating
                            animals will be
                            targated @
                            10000 during
                            each year.
12   Sheep &   Low          DDAH and            DDAH/     Trainings
     goats     production   KVK will            KVK       (5 trainings x 5
               due to poor  organize                      years x Rs.          1.25


                                     88
                 management,      trainings for              5000 = 1.25
                 slow weight      better                     Lacs)
                 gain, non        management
                 availability     and higher
                 of natural       production.
                 service, lack
                 of
                 ration/feed,                        DDAH
                 reduced area                                Surveys &            1.25
                 under                                       Exposure visits
                 pastures,        DDAH will                  (5 visits x 5
                 high incident    make linkages              years x Rs.
                 of diseases      with private               5000 = 1.25
                 and poor         agencies for               Lacs)
                 preventive       starting
                 vaccination      facilities of
                 programmes.      marketing and
                                  availability of
                                  feed through co-
                                  operatives.
13   Poultry     Low              DDAH and           DDAH/   Trainings
                 production.      KVK will           KVK     (5 trainings x 5
                 High             organize                   years x Rs.
                 incident of      trainings for              5000 = 1.25          1.25
                 diseases,        better                     Lacs)
                 poor quality     management
                 of drinking      and higher
                 water, non       production.                                   Table-50
                 availability
                 of quality
                 feed and
                 healthy
                 chicks and
                 unorganized
                 marketing.
14   Fisheries   Less             DFO/KVK will       DFO/K   Trainings &
                 production       organize           VK      demonstrations        7.5
                 of fish due to   trainings/demon            (10 trainings x
                 poor             strations for              5 years 3 day x
                 technical        fisheries                  Rs. 5000 = 7.5     Table-80
                 knowledge        development                Lacs)
                 of fish          during the plan                                 2.5
                 farming,         period                     5
                 poor                                        demonstrations
                 management                                  x 5 years x
                 of fish farms,                              Rs.10000 =


                                          89
poor quality        2.55 Lacs)        2.5
of ground
water and
unorganized         5 exposure
marketing.          visits5 years x
                    Rs.10000 = 2.5
                    Lacs)




               90
5.19     Interventions recommended for the district with detailed costing

(A). Horticulture

Table 43 : Training Proposed for Capacity Building of Allied sectors Staff on different aspects covered under Plan (at District level)

                                                      (Phy- Nos. , Fin. – Rs in lacs)
Name of the                                             Year wise no. of staff to be trained
Department
                                    2008-09             2009-10             2010-11                                       Total
                2007-08                                                                        2011-12
                 Phy        Fin      Phy        Fin      Phy       Fin       Phy       Fin      Phy       Fin       Phy           Fin
Horticulture        50      0.30      50       0.30       50       0.30      50       0.30       50       0.30      250           1.5
Animal            500       3.0       500       3.0      500       3.0       500       3.0      500        3.0      500           15
husbandry
Fishery             50      0.30      50       0.30       50       0.30      50       0.30       50       0.30      250           1.5
Credit            100       0.60      100      0.60      100       0.60      100      0.60      100       0.60      500           3.0
institutions
Total             700       4.2       700       4.2      700       4.2       700       4.2      700        4.2     3500           21
                                                 Cost norms – Rs 600/ trainee/day




                                                                   91
Table 44. Planning for Farmers Training for Capacity Building and Skill Upgradation Related to Allied fields (at district level)

 Sr.      Name of technology to               No of farmers to be trained and fund requirement (in Lakh)            Total
 No.      be transferred                2007-08     2008-09            2009-10       2010-11         2011-12    Phy      Fin
                                     Phy    Fin     Phy      Fin       Phy Fin       Phy     Fin     Phy Fin
    1     Seed Production              100    0.40     100     0.40     100 0.40       100     0.40   100 0.40     500 2.0
    2     Green House/Poly house        50    0.20      50     0.20      50 0.20         50    0.20     50 0.20    250 1.0
    3     Micro Irrigation             100    0.40     100     0.40     100 0.40       100     0.40   100 0.40     500 2.0
    4     IPM                          100    0.40     100     0.40     100 0.40       100     0.40   100 0.40     500 2.0
    5     Fruit tree cultivation       100    0.40     100     0.40     100 0.40       100     0.40   100 0.40     500 2.0
    6     Credit and marketing         150    0.60     150     0.60     150 0.60       150     0.60   150 0.60     750 3.0
          management
    7     INM                          200    0.80      200    0.80    200   0.80     200    0.80    200   0.80     1000 4.0
    8     Weed management              500    2.00      500    2.00    500   2.00     500    2.00    500   2.00     2500 8.0
    9     Bee Keeping                  500    2.00      500    2.00    500   2.00     500    2.00    500   2.00     2500 8.0
   10     Modern dairy                1000    4.00     1000    4.00   1000   4.00    1000    4.00   1000   4.00     5000 20.0
          management aspects
   11     Poultry management           100    0.40      100    0.40    100   0.40     100    0.40    100   0.40      500    2.0
   12     Sheep, goat and pig          100    0.40      100    0.40    100   0.40     100    0.40    100   0.40      500    2.0
          rearing
                 Total                3000    12.0    3000     12.0   3000   12.0    3000    12.0   3000   12.0   15000    60.0




                                                              92
Table 45 : IPM Demonstrations in Horticultural crops Next Five Years
                                                                                (Phy Area covered in ha, Fin – Rs. In lacs)
   Crop         Area                                        IPM Demonstrations Projection
              under each
              demon.(ha)
                              2007-08       2008-09           2009-10          2010-11         2011-12        Total
                            Ph Fin.        Phy.    Fin.      Phy.     Fin.    Phy. Fin.       Phy. Fin.      Phy.      Fin.
                           y.
Vegetable     0.4
crops                      150    7.5      150      7.5       150     7.5     150    7.5      150    7.5      750       37.50
Horticultur   0.4
e                           50    2.25     150      2.25      150     2.25    150    2.25     150    2.25     750       11.25
Total                      200     3       200       3        200       3     200     3       200      3     1000      38.75


Table 46 : INM Demonstrations in vegetable crops in Next Five Years
                                                                               (Phy Area covered in ha, Fin – Rs. In lacs)
  Crop        Area under                                    INM Demonstrations Projection
                 each
              demon.(ha)
                                2007-08          2008-09          2009-10          2010-11        2011-12             Total
                            Phy.    Fin.     Phy.    Fin.      Phy.   Fin.     Phy.    Fin.    Phy. Fin.       Phy.      Fin.
Bhindi              0.4      20     1.0       20      1.0       20     1.0      20     1.0      20    1.0      100         5
Tomato              0.4      30     1.5       30      1.5       30     1.5      30     1.5      30    1.5      150        7.5
Cucurbits           0.4      20     1.0       20      1.0       20     1.0      20     1.0      20    1.0      100         5
Onion               0.4      30     1.5       30      1.5       30     1.5      30     1.5      30    1.5      150        7.5
Brinjal             0.4      30     1.5       30      1.5       30     1.5      30     1.5      30    1.5      150        7.5
Cole                0.4                                                                                        150        7.5
 Crops                       30     1.5       30      1.5        30     1.5     30     1.5      30     1.5
Total                       160     8.0      160      8.0       160     8.0    160     8.0     160     8.0     800        40



                                                              93
Table 47. Varietal Demonstrations in Next Five Year
                                                                                  Phy =Area covered in ha & Fin =Rs. in lacs
                                                    Varietal Demonstration Projection
                 2007-08             2008-09             2009-10            2010-11             2011-12            Total

              Phy.      Fin.      Phy.      Fin.      Phy.      Fin.     Phy.       Fin.     Phy.     Fin.       Phy.     Fin.

 Tomato        20          2       20          2       20        2        20         2        20         2        100       10
 Brinjal       20          2       20          2       20        2        20         2        20         2        100       10
  Chilli       20          2       20          2       20        2        20         2        20         2        100       10
 Bhindi        20          2       20          2       20        2        20         2        20         2        100       10
  Peas         20          2       20          2       20        2        20         2        20         2        100       10
Cucurbits      20          2       20          2       20        2        20         2        20         2        100       10
& others
  Total       120        12       120        12       120       12     120          12        120       12        600       60
                                                      Source : DDA & DHO


 Table 48: Exposure visits on important aspects identified in the Plan in allied sectors/ enterprises
                                                                                       (Phy – No. of visits Fin – Rs. In lacs)
                                                                Demonstrations Projection
Allied Sectors/ enterprise   2007-08          2007-08              2007-08           2007-08          2007-08          2007-08
                              Phy.    Phy.     Phy.      Phy.       Phy. Phy.         Phy. Phy.        Phy. Phy.        Phy. Phy.
 Dairy                          20     4.0        20       4.0        20      4.0       20     4.0       20     4.0       100   40
 Poultry (including             10     2.0        10       2.0        10      2.0       10     2.0       10     2.0        50   20
 backyard)
 Mushroom                       10     2.0        10       2.0        10      2.0       10     2.0       10     2.0        50   20
  Fishery                       10     2.0        10       2.0        10      2.0       10     2.0       10     2.0        50   20
 Bee keeping                    10     2.0        10       2.0        10      2.0       10     2.0       10     2.0        50   20
 Vermi-compost                  20     4.0        20       4.0        20      4.0       20     4.0       20     4.0       100   40
Total                           80    16.0        80      16.0        80 16.0           80 16.0          80 16.0          400 80.0




                                                                94
Table 49 : Farmer Field Schools covering identified critical technologies in Next Five Years
           (Phy – No. of field school, Fin – Rs.In lacs)
Fields                                                     Farmer Field Schhols Projection
                  2007-08            2008-09              2009-10           2010-11            2011-12                         Total
                 Phy.     Fin.      Phy.      Fin.       Phy.     Fin.     Phy.      Fin.    Phy.      Fin.             Phy.      Fin.
Dairy             20         4.0       20       4.0        20       4.0      20        4.0      20       4.0             100      20.0
Poultry
(including        10         2.0       10       2.0        10       2.0      10        2.0      10       2.0              50      10.0
back yard)
Goatry and
                  10         2.0       10       2.0        10       2.0      10        2.0      10       2.0              50      10.0
Piggery
Bee Keeping       10         2.0       10       2.0        10       2.0      10        2.0      10       2.0              50      10.0
Vegetable                                                                                                                250      50.0
crops             50        10.0       50      10.0        50      10.0      50       10.0      50      10.0
Total           100          20       100        20       100       20      100        20    100         20              500      100.0

Table 50: Group formation /Commodity interest groups formation for specific activities

                                                                 Group Formation Projection Plan

     Interest Group(s)            2007-08           2008-09          2009-10             2010-11            2011-12           Total
                                 Phy.     Fin.     Phy. Fin.        Phy.     Fin.       Phy.    Fin.       Phy.      Fi Phy.           Fi
                                                                                                                    n.                n.
Dairy                             20      4.0      20      4.0       20         4.0     20         4.0      20       4.0     100       20
Poultry (including backyard)      5       1.0      5       1.0        5         1.0      5         1.0       5       1.0      25        5
Fish Farming                      5       1.0      5       1.0        5         1.0      5         1.0       5       1.0      25        5
Bee Keeping                      10       2.0     10       2.0       10         2.0     10         2.0      10       2.0      50       10
Vegetable crops                  20       4.0     20       4.0       20         4.0     20         4.0      20       4.0     100       20
Horticultural crops              20       4.0     20       4.0       20         4.0     20         4.0      20       4.0     100       20
Total                            80        16     80       16        80         16      80         16       80       16      400       80
       Cost norms- Rs.0.20 lacs/group (for capacity building, input assistance, marketing and for group specific activities )
        Source: DDA & DHO



                                                                   95
Beekeeping
               The projected proposal for starting 110 units of beekeeping during the plan
period is given in Table 51.

Table 51. Proposal for beekeeping units during XIth plan

Year         No.     *Unit      Cost of     No. of        Cost per      Cost           Total
             of      cost      units        Trainings     Training      of trainings   (Lacs)
             units              (Lacs)                    (Lacs)           (Lacs)
                     (Lacs)
2007-08      50      0.30      15           05            0.30          1.5        16.5
2008-09      60      0.30      18           05            0.30          1.8        19.8
2009-10      75      0.30      22.5         05            0.30          2.25       24.75
2010-11      90      0.30      27           05            0.30          2.70       29.70
2011-12      110     0.30      33           05            0.30          3.30       36.30
                                                                               Grand Total
*One unit = 10 boxes                         Honey production per unit = 250 kg
Proposed subsidy per unit = 50%

(E) Aimal Husbandry
       The projected proposals for starting dairy, goattery and piggeries units and trainings
to farmers during the plan period is given in Tables 53 and 54.


2. Bio-gas plant
        Bio gas is a clean unpolluted and cheap source of energy in rural areas. Bio gas is
produced from cattle dung in a bio gas plant commonly known as gobar gas plant through a
process called digestion. A bio gas plant helps in obtaining both cooking fuel and enriched
manure from the same quantity of cattle dung. Besides, women and children are saved from
hardship and drudgery like collection and head loading of heavy bundles of firewood every
day. Environmental conditions are upgraded as the forest cover is protected by saving the
fuel wood.
Another important advantage of bio-gas plant is to improve sanitation in villages by linking
sanitary toilets with bio gas plants. Therefore, it is projected to install about 500 bio-gas
plants in the district. The estimated cost for the plan period is given in the project in chapter
VI
The year-wise projected outcome and growth rate of allied agriculture sectors during the plan
period is targeted as 4.8 per cent. For achieving targeted growth rate, the details of financial
requirement are given in Table 52.




                                                 96
Table 52. Financial Requirement (Agriculture) Proposed during XIth Plan

Sr.      Thrust Areas                  Budget Required (Rs. in Lacs)            Total
No.                            2007-    2008- 2009-10 2010-            2011-   (Rs. in
                                08       09                   11        12      Lacs)

_______________________________________________________________
Horticulture & Vegetabls

1     Fruit plants (Citrus,
      Ber, Aonla & Bel
                              42.66     42.66       42.66   42.66      42.66   213.30
      under drip
      irrigation)
2     Nursery raising in       56.0      56.0       56.0    56.0       56.0    280.0
      poly houses/poly
      tunnels
3     Onion (low water         1.84      1.84       1.84    1.84       1.84     9.20
      requiring varieties)
4     Vegetable hybrids        2.62      2.62       2.62    2.62       2.62    13.10
      (Kharif season)
5     Vegetable hybrids        4.31      4.31       4.31    4.31       4.31    21.55
      (Rabi season)
6     Vegetables (under        88.50    88.50       88.50   88.50      88.50   442.60
      drip irrigation
      system)
7.    Staff Training Cost     0.30       0.30       0.30    0.30       0.30     1.50

8.    Farmers Training        5.60       5.60       5.60    5.60       5.60    28.00
      on different aspects
9.    Training of specific    16.0       16.0       16.0    16.0       16.0    80.00
      group formation
10.   Demonstration in        19.75     19.75       19.75   19.75      19.75   98.75
      horticulture &
      vegetable
11.   Farmers’field           16.0       16.0       16.0    16.0       16.0    80.00
      school
12.   INM (Hort/Veg)          8.0        8.0         8.0     8.0        8.0     40.0
13.   IPM                     7.6        7.6         7.6     7.6        7.6    38.00
      Total                                                                    1346

                                                1
Animal Husbandry
14. Dairying                   85.6    85.6         85.6    85.6       85.6    428.0
15. Mineral mixture            37.5    37.5         37.5    37.5       37.5    187.5
16. Deworming                  18.0    18.0         18.0    18.0       18.0     90.0


                                               97
17.    Fisheries               12.0     12.0         12.0     12.0    12.0     60.0
18.    Poultry                 0.30     0.30         0.30     0.30    0.30     1.25
19.    Sheep & goats            0.5      0.5          0.5      0.5     0.5      2.5
20.    Milk Chilling plants    25.0     25.0         25.0     25.0    25.0    125.0
21s.   Capicity builders        3.0      3.0          3.0      3.0     3.0     15.0
       training
22.    Farmers training         4.8      4.8          4.8     4.8     4.8      24.0

23.    Farmers field           20.0     20.0         20.0     20.0   20.0     100.0
       school
       Total                                                                  1033.
                                                                              2

Subsidiary occupations
12    Bee-keeping              13.36    13.36       13.36    13.36    13.36   66.80
13     Mushroom farming         1.1      1.1          1.1     1.1      1.1    5.5
14     Vermicomposting         22.0     22.0         22.0     22.0    22.0    110.0
       Total                                                                  182.3


Others
15     Agro & Social          38.0     38.0         38.0    38.0     38.0     190.0
       Forestry
16     Bio-gas plants         50.0     50.0         50.0    50.0     50.0     250.0
17     Solar photovoltaic     198.0    198.0        198.0   198.0    198.0    990.0
       pumps
18     Infrastructure         7.4      7.4          7.4     7.4      7.4       37.0
       development
19.    Food preservation      0.6      0.6          0.6     0.6      0.6        3.0
       Total                                                                  1470

Sub-Total

Grand Total                                     1346+1033.2+182.3+1470 =      4031.5 Lacs




                                               98
4.12 : Researchable Issues
        Research, extension and development agencies should jointly approach in a farmers’
participatory approach for each of the following issues for possible solution.

Horticulture
                        Fruit plants (Citrus, Ber, Aonla & Bel under drip irrigation)
                        Nursery raising in poly houses/poly tunnels
                        Onion (low water requiring varieties)
                        Vegetable hybrids(Kharif season)
                        Vegetable hybrids(Rabi season)
                        Vegetables (under drip irrigation system)
Animal Husbandry
                        Dairy
                        Fisheries
                        Piggeries
                        Poultry
                        Sheep & goats
Subsidiary occupations
                        Beekeeping
                        Mushroom farming
                        Vermicomposting
Others
                        Agro & Social Forestry
                        Agro-based small scale industries
                        Bio-gas/gobar gas plants
                        Group Organizations of farmers




                                            99
CHAPTER VI
                                      DISTRICT PLAN

6.1    Introduction
           In Mahendergarh district with the adoption of sprinkler irrigation technology
provided strong motivation to increase the yield of their crop. Now the problems resulting
due to over exploitation of underground water and continuous decreasing the soil health it
has become difficult to sustain the productivity of the crops. Keeping in view the present
scenario of the district the average income of farmers of the district can be increased through
higher water use efficiency irrigation methods (drip irrigation, in fruits plants, vegetable
crops & other wildly spread crops, safe use of blackish water, improving the soil health and
promoting the less water requiring crops.
6.2 Growth Drivers
       Followings are the growth drivers of agriculture and it”s allied sectors in the district :-
(a)    Area Expansion
      Bring more cultivable area under fruits and vegetables cultivation
(b)    Land improvement.
      Reclamation of alkaline soils
(c)    Yield improvement
           3. Maintenance of organic matter in the soil
           4. Balanced use of fertilizers.
(d)    Irrigation Management
      Drip irrigation for efficient use of water
      Rainwater harvesting
      Aquifer recharge
      Watershed development
(e)    Seed Management
      Timely availability of quality seeds/seedlings
      Linkages with Private Seed Companies
(f)    Farm Mechanization
      Availability of farm machinery through indigenous manufacturing
(g)    Animal Husbandry
      Increase in dairy, sheep & goats and piggeries units
      Value addition and processing
      Production of green fodder
(h) Marketing and Post-harvest Management
            Developing rural market, modernizing existing market yards, setting up of
               private/ terminal markets, commodity specific requirements.
            Post-harvest Management /Value Addition
(i)    Risk Management
                Coverage & simplification of claims
                Premium subsidy for oilseeds, fruits, animals etc
(j)    Price Support System
        MSP for mustard, wheat and gram
 (k)   Adoption of Agro-technologies


                                               100
         Resource conservation technologies
(l)     Institutional Support Services
        1      Extension
             Public-private partnership in agriculture extension
        2      Credit
             Easy availability of credit
             Location specific investment credit
             Long-term credit policy for farmers
6.3 Innovative Schemes
        In order to achieve targeted growth rate of 4.8 per cent in agriculture and its allied
sectors, the innovative schemes on the following thrust areas have been proposed and
included in the district plan.
(A) Agriculture
         Zero-tillage in Mahandergarh district

    The increase in energy cost has accrued the cultivation cost leaving the farming least
paying or unprofitable. About 25% of the total variable cost of wheat production is incurred
on the tillage operations. Therefore, in the present era of globalization, it has become
obligatory to reduce the cost of cultivation to make farm produce competitive in the
international market Experiences on zero tillage (ZT) and its success in rice-wheat sequence
have established that there is no need of preparatory tillage for wheat sowing, and Rs. 2000-
2500 per hectare can be saved through ZT, simply by cutting the cost of cultivation.
Moreover, continuous use of heavy machineries used during conventional tillage causes
mechanical compaction and deterioration of soil structure, whereas ZT improved physical
and biological health of soil. The technology, besides being socio-economic and eco-
friendly, has multifarious benefits in terms of saving fuels, energy, labour, water, wear and
tear / maintenance cost etc. It controls environmental pollution by reducing 125 Kg CO2 /ha
(assuming 2.6 kg CO 2 production / litres of diesel burnt), which is one of the major causes of
global warming. The results of preliminary studies on Zero Tillage Technology with farmers,
participatory mode in Southern Haryana are quite encouraging, wherein zero-tilled wheat in
rotation with rice and other traditional crops viz., clusterbean, pearlmillet and cotton, as well
as zero tilled barley after rice and pearlmillet proved better or equivalent to CT.
        Trials on farmers’ field were also conducted during 2005-06 in south-western
Haryana to validate the feasibility of zero-tillage technology in wheat grown in rotation with
the prevalent kharif crops like pearlmillet, clusterbean, groundnut, arhar and cotton. Based
on multi-location trials in different districts (Mahendergarh, Gurgaon and Rewari) of SW
Haryana, it was realized that on an average the grain yields of wheat under ZT were
comparable to CT




                                              101
Table 53: Comparison of ZT vis a vis CT
 Description                                        Conventional Zero               Saving with
                                                       Tillage   tillage            ZT over CT
                                                        (CT)      (ZT)
Tillage operations (nos)                                 2          0
 -Dry harrowing before pre-sowing irrigation
 -Harrowing + cultivator after pre sowing irrigation    2              0
 - Drilling Fertilizer                                  1              0            5 tillage + 2
 - Planking                                             2              0              planking
 - Sowing                                               1              1
Total tillage cost (Rs/ha): @ Rs. 500 /acre / run of 3500             500              3000
 cultivator / harrow / drill, and Rs.250/-/planking
Consumption of diesel (litres/ha):                     55              7.5              47.5
   @ 6.25 L/h/run of cultivator harrow /drill
   and 33.125 L /.125 L/Planking
Cost of diesel (Rs./ha) @ Rs. 312 Litres             1815             247.5           1567.5
CO2 Emission (Kg) @ 2. 6 Kg / litre of diesel burnt   143              19.5            123.5


Table 54: Yield performance of wheat under ZT as compared to CT during 2006-07
    District          No. of village   No. of Trials    Grain yield of wheat (q/ha)
                                                           ZT                CT

    Rewari                      6             18              46.95                  44.83
    Mahendergarh                7             65              50.77                  49.79
    Gurgaon                     1              1              42.00                  42.00
    Mean                                                      46.57                  45.54

             Therefore, for sustainable growth of agriculture in this region, Zero Tillage
technology which is resource conserving, cost effective and environmentally safe need to be
promoted for adoption at the farmers’ field in the district. The glaring success of this
technology through numbers of field demonstration with farmers participatory approach in
the district during 2007-08, speak of its accelerated promotion for wheat sowing.
Table 55: Proposal for Zero Tillage Machine
           Description              2007-08 2008- 2009-10 2010-11 2011-12                Total
                                             09

 No. of Zero tillage machines         50      50       50        50           50          250
 required

 Cost @ 50,000     ( Rs. In lac)      25      25       25        25           25         125

 Subsidy required @ 50 % (Rs.        12.5    12.5     12.5     12.5          12.5        62.5
 In lac)




                                            102
Table 56: Proposal for demonstrations on Zero Tillage in wheat
 Cost of critical inputs                       2007-08 2008-          2009- 2010- 2011-         Total
                                                        09             10    11    12

 No of demonstrations                            100           100     100       100    100      500

 Total cost @ Rs 5000/ha                             5          5        5        5       5       25

        . Wheat Seed Replacement Rate
        Seed form the basic and crucial input for sustained growth in farm production. The
role of seed sector is to ensure adequacy in seed quality, quantity and to ensure varietal
diversity. Although several public and private seed companies have been established before
independence, accelerated growth of the private sector began only after the introduction of
new seed policy in 1988. Few seed companies have taken up seed research and development,
and are able to evolve about large number of varieties/hybrids. However, still there is a big
gap between production and requirements of quality seeds. The seed replacement rate of
wheat in Mahendergarh district has been far below as compared to other crops (Table 21)
grown in the district during 2006-07. It is primarily due to non availability of high yielding
quality wheat seeds of suitable varieties. For attaining desired growth rate of 4 per cent in
agriculture, it is required to increase the wheat seed replacement rate from existing 15 % to
about 70 % (Table 22) during the plan period. The farmers trainings are also proposed on
wheat seed replacement rate to motivate the farmers for wheat seed replacement as per
details given in Table 22.
Table 57 . Seed replacement rate of various crops in the District (2006-07)

 Sr. No. Name of the crop         Area under crop (ha)                       Present SRR %

   1.    Wheat                           45000                                    15
   2.    Bajra                           91000                                    90
   3.    Gram                            13000                                    20
   4.    Oil seed                        91000                                    80
   5.    Cotton                           1.4                                     95
Source: DDA                             SRR = Seed Replacement Rate

Table 58 . Projected seed replacement area of wheat and extension activities during XIth plan.

  Year          Area        Seed requirement             No. of trainings/        Cost of trainings
                (ha)               (q)                   Demonstrations                (Lacs)
 2007-08        5000              5000                          80                        4
 2008-09        5500              5500                          80                        4
 2009-10        6000              6000                          80                        4
 2010-11        6500              6500                          80                        4
 2011-12        7000              7000                          80                        4
  Total        30000             30000                         400                       20
Persons per training : 25


                                               103
Reclamation of Saline/Sodic Soils

        In Mahendergarh district about 50% area is affected by salinity/sodicity due to high
salt content in the parent material, poor internal drainage conditions and high amounts of
salts being applied with poor quality irrigation water. Saline/sodic soils are relatively easy to
reclaim if adequate amounts of low-salt irrigation water is available and internal drainage has
been established. Reclamation consists of applying enough high-quality water to leach
through the soil. Generally, about 15 cm of water is required to remove 70 to 80 per cent of
salt for each 15 cm of soil. To ensure that salt accumulation does not reoccur, an excess
amount of water must be added so that the amount of salt added is equal to the amount of salt
leaving the root zone.

        However, due to non availability of sufficient amount of high quality ground/canal
water in the district the leaching of salts is not possible Since majority of soils in
Mahendergarh district does not contain calcium (gypsum or free carbonates), therefore,
application of gypsum is required for obtaining sustainable production. The fine gypsum
particles react more quickly in the soil to replace sodium because they are more soluble than
the coarse gypsum usually applied. The proposal for the reclamation of saline/sodic soils in
the district is given in Table 59.

Table 59. Proposal for reclamation of saline/sodic soils during XIth plan.

      Year               Area (ha)           Requirement of             Cost of Gypsum
                                            gypsum (Tonnes)                  (Lacs)
     2007-08                1000                 1000                        36.00
     2008-09                1000                 2000                         36.0
     2009-10                1000                 2000                         36.0
     2010-11                1000                 2000                         36.0
     2011-12                1000                 2000                         36.0
      Total                 5000                 9000                        180.0


Sulphur Application in Mustard Through Gypsum


        Sulphur plays an indispensable role in mustard for protein formation and important
for a high protein content in rapeseeds. Under conditions of sulphur shortage plants produce
lesser amounts of S-containing amino acids and thus the composition of protein is also
influenced. Thus, under conditions of sulphur deficiency, protein synthesis is inhibited. Low
sulphur supply impairs the quality of rapeseeds because the oil content decreases. Since the
soils of Mahendergarh district are deficient in sulphur, therefore, it is not possible to obtain
high yields of mustard without sulphur application. The easily available source for the supply
of sulphur in mustard is gypsum. Therefore, it is proposed to make about 50 thousand tonnes
gypsum available for covering about 50 thousand hectare area during the plan period.




                                              104
Table 60. Projections for the application of sulphur through gypsum in mustard during
         XIth plan


        Year                    Area             Gypsum requirement           Cost of gypsum
                              (000ha)                 (Tonnes)                    (Lacs)

      2007-08                   10.0                     5000                         90.0
      2008-09                   10.0                     5000                         90.0
      2009-10                   10.0                     5000                         90.0
      2010-11                   10.0                     5000                         90.0
      2011-12                   10.0                     5000                         90.0
       Total                    50.0                    25000                        450.0


 Soil Health Maintenance
1 Green Manuring
The soils of Mahendergarh are low in organic carbon, available phosphorus and most
essential micronutrients. Being coarse textured, the soils are poor in nutrient retention. On the
other hand, the physical condition of the soils is deteriorated due to continuous and
indiscriminate use of underlain brackish water. Therefore to retain the soil health and regain
crop productivity, it is necessary to adopt the concept of green manuring.

Table 61: Budget proposal for green manuring
 Description                   2007-08 2008-09 2009-10 2010-11 2011-12                   Total

 Area to be covered (ha)        10000      10000      10000      10000      10000        50000

 Seed requirement (tons)         250       250        250        250        250         1250

 Cost of seed (Rs in lakh)       50            50         50           50       50       250

 At 75 % subsidy (Rs in            37.5       37.5      37.5       37.5       37.5       187.5
 lakh)

2: Mustard residue management to maintain soil health and environmental safety

          The organic content of the soils in Mahendergarh district has fallen below 0.2% due
to high temperature of soil and removal of above ground plant parts of wheat, and pearlmillet
to meet the fodder requirements. Secondly, Indian mustard, is the major rabi crop of this
district, grown over an area of 90000 hectares. Its residue in the form of stalk and bhushi,
which is about four times of its seed yield, presently goes waste, as its stalk is largely burnt
as poor quality fuel in the household, and bhusi is sold for burning as fuel in brick kiln
industry This mal-practice is increasing environmental pollution by releasing CO2, thus
leading to global warming, which is already threatening sustainability. Under this situation,
the organic matter content and fertility levels of the light textured soils of Rewari district can


                                               105
be maintained by effectively harnessing it through incorporating either directly into the soil
or after turning it into compost or vemi-compost with the animal shed waste and enriching
with rock phosphate.
         Thus, 4 lakh tons of residue obtained from mustard crop grown over 90,000 ha, and
7.5 lakh tons of dung received from 226615 buffaloes and 30785 cattle in the district,
combined together gives 11.5 lakh tons of biomass. If all of this is recycled and enriched
through composting / vermi-composting and applied to field @ 15 tons / ha, it can meet the
manurial requirement of 75000 ha land, which accounts for 60 % of the cultivated area in the
district. It will restore soil fertility and improve soil, crop and environmental health.
Table 62: Budget proposal for vermi-compost trainings
 Description                       2007-08 2008-09 2009-10        2010-11 2011-12         Total

 Number of Trainings for 3 days       4           4         4           4         4        20

 No. of Trainees (25/ training)      100       100       100           100      100       500

 Cost in Lakhs @ Rs.                 0.6       0.6          0.6        0.6        0.6      3.0
 200/Trainee X 3 days

Table 63 : Budget estimate for the projected 25,000 vermi-composting units in the
         district at the pace of 5000 units per annum (Rs in Lakhs)
 Critical inputs                    200-08 2008-09 2009-10 2010-11 2011-12 Total
 Earthworms cost @ Rs. 200 /          10     10        10         10         10            100
 unit
 0.1 lakh ton Rock phosphate @ 375           375       375        375        375          1875
 Rs 5000/ton, to treat 1 lakh ton
 biomass at 50 %subsidy
                                   385       385       385        385        385          1925


Site Specific Nutrient Management for maintaining soil health and sustainable crop
           productivity

         The process of agriculture intensification took a heavy toll on the natural resources.
The deficiency of secondary and micro-nutrients has become quite widespread in the state
due to excessive mining of essential nutrients from the soils. Productivities of principal crops
of the region have almost leveled off. Moreover, the coarse textured soil of Mahendergarh
district are poor in inherent fertility and have poor retention of nutrients. The soil analysis
report of the district indicate that almost 100 % of the soil samples analyzed are low in
organic carbon and phosphorus, whereas 63 % soils are low in zinc. Moreover, the startling
proportion of soils the district are low in Fe and Mn. Sulphur is another secondary nutrient
recommended for mustard as well as wheat. But this technology is still not adopted by the
farmers and is one of the reason for low yield at farmers’ field. This calls for an integrated
approach for crop nutrition and soil health maintenance by adopting following approaches:



                                              106
   T1     -       Use of bio-fertilizer in field crops during rabi (wheat and mustard) and kharif
                  (bajra and guar) season
   T2     -       Soil application of micronutrient Zinc in rabi crops (wheat and mustard)
   T3     -       Green manuring with Dhaincha in kharif fallows (preceding mustard, wheat)
                  (preceding mustard , wheat)
   T4     -       Phosphorus fertilization of guar and bajra

   Table 64: Budget for 10 demonstrations in each crop with each activity each year @ Rs
           5000 /ha
                                                                           (Rs. in Lakhs)
    Technological approaches 2007-08 2008-09 2009-10 2010-11 2011-12              Total
               T1               2         2         2        2          2          10
               T2               1         1         1        1          1           5
               T3               2         2         2        2          2          10
               T4               1         1         1        1          1           5
             Total              6         6         6        6          6          30

   C. Increasing Productivity of Field Crops

1 Seed treatment in field crops
   Seed treatment of wheat in rabi and clusterbean in kharif is of greater significance. The main
   strategic issue bridging yield gap in wheat is seed treatment with insecticide against termite,
   and with fungicide against diseases and with biofertilizers Azotobacter and PSB to increase
   fertilizer use efficiency. Biofertilizer Rhizobium and PSB play significant role in guar
   production. Guar seed is treated with Streptocycline and Emisan to control BLB. Therefore
   entire area of wheat (50000ha) and guar (10000) will be covered under seed treatment for all
   the years during plan so that farmers are fully sensitized for future adoption of the
   technology.


   Table 65: Budget requirement for seed treatment of wheat and guar

    Seed treatment 2007-08 2008-09             2009-10     2010-11     2011-12      Total
 Wheat (area, ha)     50000        50000        50000       50000       50000      250000
   Cost (Rs. Lakh) at 162.5        162.5        162.5        162.5      162.5       812.5
   50 % subsidy
 Guar (area, ha)      10000        10000        10000       10000       10000       10000
   Cost (Rs. Lakh) at     10         10           10           10         10         50
   50 % subsidy
 G. Total              172.5       172.5        172.5        172.5      172.5       862.5
  Cost of seed treatment for I ha seed (1q) with Azotobacter, PSB, Chlorpyriphos and Bavistin/
  Raxil =Rs 650
  Cost of seed treatment for I ha seed (15 kg) with Rhizoboum, PSB, streptocycline and
  Emisan =Rs 200



                                                 107
 Popularization of castor + guar intercropping system
        In order to utilize available land and water resources efficiently and for obtaining
desired growth rate, it is required to introduce and popularise intercropping of guar in castor
in the district. Besides this, it will produce higher yields per unit area, offer great stability in
production under adverse weather conditions and with disease and insect infestation. This
will also meet the domestic needs of the farmers and provide employment opportunities to
the farmers. Therefore, it is proposed to introduce and popularise the castor + guar
intercropping system in the district during the plan period (Table 26).

Table 66. Proposed demonstrations and extension activities for the popularization of castor
               + guar intercropping during XIth plan

       Year                                   Castor + Guar                                 Total
                          Area to be         Demonstrations cost         Extension           Cost
                           covered                 (Lacs)              activities cost     ( Lacs)
                             (ha)                                          (Lacs)
     2007-08                  50                        3.5                  1.2             4.7
     2008-09                  50                        3.5                  1.2             4.7
     2009-10                  60                        4.2                  1.4             5.6
     2010-11                  70                        4.9                  1.6             6.5
     2011-12                  80                        5.6                  1.8             7.4
      Total                   310                      21.7                  7.2            28.9

. Popularization of napier grass as green fodder crop under drip irrigation
    Napier grass or elephant grass due to its vigorous vegetative growth under light soils
with high pH conditions can be exploited with micro irrigation system for fodder production
in Mahendergarh district. It’s cultivation will increase the availability of green fodder round
the year for animal. Therefore, it is proposed to cover about 1050 ha area with drip irrigation
system during the plan period (Table 27).

Taable 67. Proposal for cultivation of Napier grass for fodder under drip irrigation during XI
           plan.

   Year        Area        Drip          Total       No. of       Cost       Cost of       Total
               (ha)     Installation     Cost      trainings        of         root         Cost
                          cost/ha        (Lac)                  trainings    cuttings      (Lac)
                           (Lac)                                  (Lac)       (Lac)
 2007-08       100          0.80         80.00          2          0.40         4           80.44
 2008-09       100          0.80         80.00          2          0.40         4           80.44
 2009-10       100          0.80         80.00          2          0.40         4           80.44
 2010-11       100          0.80         80.00          2          0.40         4           80.44
 2011-12       100          0.80         80.00          2          0.40         4           80.44
                                                                        Grand Total        402.20
 *No. of farmers in each training = 5
  Cost of 28000/ha root cuttings for planting = 400/ha


                                                 108
B). Horticulture
         1. Naturally ventilated poly house/poly tunnels for nursery raising
            The agro climatic conditions of the district are favourable for the cultivation
of fruits and vegetables. In order to increase the production of fruits and vegetables in the
district and for additional income, the farmers are required to adopt naturally ventilated poly
house/poly tunnels for nursery raising, drip Irrigation in fruits and vegetables, to cover more
area under hybrids of vegetables and less water requiring onion. The.Projected proposal for
aturally ventilated poly house/poly tunnels for nursery raising is given in Table 68.
Table 68. Proposal for starting naturally ventilated poly house/poly tunnel for nursery
            raising of vegetable crops during XIth plan
Year           No. of     Unit     Total     No. of       Cost per      Cost           Total
               units      cost* cost         trainings    Training      of training    Cost
                                                          (Lac)         (Lac)          (Lac)
2007-08        10         5.0      50.0      2            0.055         0.11           50.11
2008-09        15         5.0      75.0      2            0.075         0.15           75.15
2009-10        15         5.0      75.0      2            0.075         0.15           75.15
2010-11        20         5.0      100.00    2            0.095         0.19           100.19
2011-12        20         5.0      100.00    2            0.095         0.19           100.19
                                                         Grand Total                   400.79
 * 1 Unit = 500 square meter ; No. of farmers in a training = 5 ; Proposed subsidy = 50% .

       2. Area under less water requiring onion
       Projected proposal for Area under less water requiring onion is given in Table 69.

Table 69. Proposal for area expansion under less water requiring onion crop (Variety
          Savloda Selection)

     Year           Area (ha)     Seed cost        No. of       Training cost     Total Cost
                                    (Lac)        trainings          (Lac)           (Lac)

   2007-08             40             2.0            2                 4400          2.44
   2008-09             40             2.0            2                 4400          2.44
   2009-10             30             1.5            2                 4400          1.94
   2010-11             20             1.0            2                 4400          1.44
   2011-12             10            0.50            2                 4400          0.94
                                                         Grand Total                 9.20
Note:- 1. No of participants in each training-50
       2. Seed rate @ Rs.500 kg.
       3. Expected production= 150 qt/ha
       4. Period of maturity= 120-130 days
       5. Irrigation with sprinkler @ 2 hr./irrigation

       3. Drip Irrigation
                   Fruit plants
                   Vegetable Crops



                                              109
Table 70. Proposal for drip irrigation area expansion under fruit plants during XI plan.

 Year      Area     Installation    Total        No. of     Cost per    Total cost    Grand
           (ha)       cost/ha        cost      trainings*   Training         of        total
                       (Lac)        (Lac)                    (Lac)       training     (Lac)
                                                                           (Lac)
2007-       200         0.34         68            4          0.22          0.88      68.88
 08
2008-       200         0.34         68            4          0.22         0.88       68.88
 09
2009-       250         0.34        85.0           5          0.22         1.10       86.10
 10
2010-       250         0.34        85.0           5          0.22         1.10       86.10
 11
2011-       300         0.34        102.0          6          0.22         1.32       103.32
 12

           1200        0.34        408**
Grand Total                                                                           413.28
 *No. of farmers in each training = 50
**50 per cent subsidy = 408/2 = 204 lacs
Training and demonstrations’ cost =9.30 lacs

Taable 71. Proposal for drip irrigation are expansion under vegetable crops during XI plan.

 Year       Area     Installation   Total         No. of    Cost per        Cost       Total
            (ha)       cost/ha       cost       trainings   training         of         Cost
                        (Lac)       (Lac)                     (Lac)      trainings     (Lac)
                                                                           (Lac)
 2007-      150          0.80       120.00         3          0.22          0.66      120.66
  08
 2008-      200          0.80       160.00         4          0.22         0.88       160.88
  09
 2009-      200          0.80       160.00         4          0.22         0.88       160.88
  10
 2010-      250          0.80       200.00         5          0.22         1.10       201.10
  11
 2011-      250          0.80       200.00         5          0.22         1.10       201.10
  12
                                                                     Grand Total      844.62

                                       *No. of farmers in each training = 50




                                             110
 5.Area Under Hybrids of Vegetables

                Kharif Season Vegetable Hybrids

 Table 72. Proposal for expansion of area under hybrids of bhindi and bottle guard in kharif
          season during XIth plan.
  Year               Bhindi              Bottle gourd                Trainings        Total
            Area*      Seed cost      Area      Seed cost       No. of     Cost of     Cost
              (ha)       (Lac)        (ha)         (Lac)      trainings trainings     (Lac)
                                                                            (Lac)
  2007-        50          2.5         50            1.5          1          0.22      4.22
   08
  2008-        40          2.0         40            1.2          1          0.22      3.42
   09
  2009-        30          1.5         30           0.90          1          0.22      2.62
   10
  2010-        20          1.0         20           0.60          1          0.22      1.82
   11
  2011-        10         0.50         10           0.30          1          0.22      1.02
   12
                           7.5                       4.5          5          1.10
                                                                                      13.10
                                    Grand Total
                   Seed rate : Bhindi = 0.5 kg/ha ; Bottle guard = 1.250 kg/ha
                   Seed cost : Bhindi = rs. 800-1000/kg ; Bottle guard = Rs. 2500/kg

                       Rabi Season Vegetable Hybrids

 Table 73. Proposal for expansion of area under hybrids of tomato, brinjal and chilli in rabi
          season during XIth plan.
                Tomato            Brinjal           Chilli             Trainings          Total
 Year        Area     Seed    Area     Seed     Area      Seed    No. of Training Cost
              (ha)    cost     (ha)     cost    (ha)      cost trainings       Cost       (Lac)
                     (Lac)             (Lac)             (Lac)                (Lac)
2007-08        50      2.5      50      0.60     50       3.50       1         0.22        6.82
2008-09        40      2.0      40      0.50     40       3.00       1         0.22        5.72
2009-10        30      1.5      30      0.40     30       2.25       1         0.22        4.37
2010-11        20      1.0      20      0.30     20       1.50       1         0.22        3.02
2011-12        10     0.50      10      0.15     10       0.75       1         0.22        1.62
                       7.5              1.95             11.00                 1.10
                                                                                          21.55
                                    Grand Total
 Seed rate : Tomato = 250g/ha ; Brinjal = 225g/ha ; Chilli = 250g/ha
  Seed cost : Tomato = Rs. 20000/kg ; Brinjal = Rs. 5000/kg ; Chilli = Rs. 25000/kg




                                              111
(C) Animal Husbandry :         Mineral mixture feeding

          Due to over exploitation of land with extensive cultivation and poor recycling of
farm wastes the soils have become deficient in plant nutrients. Deficiency of micro nutrient
particularly Ca and P. etc. have severely affected the health and breeding efficiency of dairy
animals. Reproductive problems vi.z age at first heat, age at first calving, calving interval,
conception rate, abortion and vaginal prolepses and other deficiency syndrome have severely
affected the breeding ability of dairy animals. Retarded calf growth and poor animal health
are another severe threat associated with mineral deficiency in feeding straw, fodder and
other feed stuffs. Encouraging results have been obtained by supplementing 50 grams of
quality mineral mixture per day per lactating animals in the ration. Since, milk in the main
constituents of human diet in Mohindergarh district the deficiency of mineral in milk
obtained by feeding deficient fodder has become a great cause of concern to human health.
To overcome the deficiency problem in dairy animals it is proposed to made available be 900
MT good quality mineral mixtures with a grant of Rs. 450.0 lacs during the 11th plan period.

Table 74. Proposal for mineral mixture feeding

Description                      2007-    2008-09     2009-     2010-11    2011-12      Total
                                  08                    10
No. of Lactating animals(L)       0.8        0.8       0.8        0.8        0.8        4.0
No.(%) of animal to be           4000       8000      12000      16000      20000      60000
Covered under MM
                                 (5%)      (10%)      (15%)      (20%)      (25%)
MM req. @ 50g/day/animal          60        120        180        240        300         900
for 300days (MT)
Cost @ Rs. 50000/MT              30.0       60.0       90.0      120.0       150.0       450
(Lacs)

Deworming

            In Mohindergarh district 165000 calves are born every year. The calf mortality
ranges from 20-30 % up to one year of age. Such a high rate of calf mortality is cause of
concern for every rightful mind. Untimely, over and low quantity of colostrums feeding,
worm infestation at young age, extreme climatic conditions coupled with poor general care of
calf at young age are some of the valid reasons responsible for this high rate of mortality.
Continuous deworming of calves up to 1 year of age with first dose at day 15 can reduce 60%
of the calf mortality. These internal parasites not only cause economic losses to the dairy
keepers due to death of calf but poor or retarded growth of calves is the biggest matter of
concern. It is very easy to calculate the losses occurred due to the depth of calf but difficult
to assess the losses caused due to retardation of growth. The sexual maturity of female calf
in determined by its body weight and not by age. In the district the average age at first
calving is very high (48 month) posing serious economic burden to the livestock keepers.
Use of dewormers enhances the gain in body weight with usual diets the calves are fed
thereby reducing the age at first calving. Therefore, it has become the compelling reasons to
include the deworming campaigns, training and demonstration programme in 11th five year


                                              112
plan with grant in aid of Rs.90.0 lac for training and demonstration.

Table 75. Proposal for deworming in calves

Description                    2007-     2008-09     2009-     2010-      2011-      Total
                                08                    10        11        2012
No.      of     Lactating       0.8        0.8        0.8       0.8        0.8        4.0
animals(L)
No.(%) of calves to be          4000      8000      12000      16000      20000     60000
Covered under deworming
                                (5%)      (10%)     (15%)      (20%)      (25%)

Cost of DW req. @                6.0       12.0      18.0       24.0      30.0       90.0
Rs.150/ calf/ yr (Lacs)

Commercial Dairy Farming

        In Mohindergarh district, farm families of various land holding sizes, more and more
number of farmers are coming into the category of marginal and small farmers due to
division of land holdings. Buffalo is the main milch animal in the district. The cost of the
good animal has increased more than Rs. 30,000 per animal. Due to the small land holdings
high cost of animal, *9++it has become very difficult to maintain dairy animals. The demand
for milk is continuously increasing from urban areas. The milk price in the area reaches up
to Rs. 30/- per liter particularly during the lean periods. Milk being an important component
of diet is becoming a scarce commodity for the low and middle class families in the urban
and rural areas of Mohindergarh district.

         The reasons stated above have demanded the introduction of large commercial dairy
farms, which can be run on economy of scale. The automation of this enterprise can being
down the cost of milk production, thereby making a good scope for commercially viable
large sized dairy farms. Therefore, the proposal is submitted for introduction of 85
commercial dairy farms with a subsidy help of Rs. 425 lac and training grant of Rs. 3 lac
during the proposed plan period.

Table 76. Proposal for commercial dairy trainings

Description                   2007-08    2008-09     2009-10    2010-11   2011-12     Total
Number of Trainings for           4          4          4           4        4         20
three days
No. of Trainees 25/ trg.        100         100        100        100       100        500
Cost/ training @ Rs.             0.6        0.6        0.6         0.6      0.6        3.0
600/Trainee for 3 days




                                             113
Table 77. Proposal for Commercial Dairy Units to be established
Description               2007-08 2008-09 2009-10 2010-11                       2011-12    Total
Number                           10         15          20          20             20          85
Cost @ 20 lac/unit              200        300         400          400           400       1700
Subsidy @ 25%                   50.0       75.0        100.0     100.0           100.0     425.0



Subsidairy Enterprizes

5.4 : Beekeeping
        Decreasing size of land holdings and increasing cost of production is a great concern
for farmers. In order to increase the income of farmers, beekeeping has become quite popular
as side business with agriculture. Mustard crop has proved to be good resource for the bee
keepers of this district. Therefore, this profession can increase both income and production of
mustard crop to 10-15% by cross pollination. Hence, it is proposed to encourage farmers for
starting beekeeping (Table 33) along with crop production.

Table 78. Proposal for starting beekeeping units during XIth plan

Year         No.     *Unit     Cost of     No. of        Cost per         Cost            Total
             of      cost                  Trainings     Training         of trainings    (Lacs)
                               units
             units                                       (Lacs)              (Lacs)
                     (Lacs)    (Lacs)
2007-08      50      0.30      15          05            0.30             1.5             16.5
2008-09      60      0.30      18          05            0.30             1.8             19.8
2009-10      75      0.30      22.5        05            0.30             2.25            24.75
2010-11      90      0.30      27          05            0.30             2.70            29.70
2011-12      110     0.30      33          05            0.30             3.30            36.30
Tatal        385

                                                          Grand Total            127.05 Lacs

*One unit = 10 boxes                        Honey production per unit = 250 kg
Proposed subsidy per unit = 50%

6.4 : Vermi-composting

        It is established fact that use of vermicompost in crops promotes faster growth of
plants. The benefits of vermicomposting are multifarious. Hence, it is required to promote the
use of vermicompost for sustainable crop production. Hence, it is proposed to impart training



                                             114
to farmers so that they can recycle their crop residue and animal shed wastes into nutrient
rich compost.

Table 79: Nutrient contents of vermi-compost
 Nutrient                                                      Availability (%)
 Nitrogen                                                           1.5-2.5
 Phosphorous                                                        0.9-1.7
 Potash                                                             1.5-2.4
 Calcium                                                            0.5-1.0
 Magnesium                                                          0.2-0.3
 Sulphur                                                            0.4-0.5

Benefits of vermi-compoting:

      Vermi-compost is rich in all essential plant nutrients.
      Provides excellent effect on overall plant growth and improves quality and shelf life
       of produce.
      It is easy to apply, handle and can be stored in or near dwellings
      It improves soil structure, aeration and water holding capacity of prevents of soil
      It is rich in beneficial micro flora such as N fixers, P solublizers, cellulose
       decomposing microflora.
      It contains earthworm cocoons and increases the population and activity of
       earthworms in soil.
      It is suitable specially for fruit and vegetable cultivation


Table 80: Budget proposal for vermin-composting trainings

 Description                            2007-08 2008-09 2009-10 2010-11 2011-12         Total

 Number of Trainings (for 3 days)          10        10       10      10       10        50

 Cost of trainings @ Rs.                   1.5      1.5      1.5      1.5      1.5       7.5
 5000/traning per day


(F) Fisheries
       The fish cultivation in Mahendergarh district is done mainly in Gram Panchayats
Tanks spread over an area of 220.93 ha). The total fish production in the district during 2006-
07 was 262.10 tones. The projected fish production, seed to be stocked and infrastructure
development for fish rearing is given in Table 80 .




                                             115
Table 81 . Projections for Fish Production, Seed to be Stocked and Hatchery Requirement
           for XI Plan

   a) Fish Production ( in Tonnes)
                           Production at different yields from different areas
           @2000kg/ha for 500                                      @100kg/ha
Year                                @500kg/ha for 2000 ha                          Total
                    ha                                               6000 ha

Present                                           -                    -          262.10
                    262.10
                    262.10
2007-08                                           -                    -          262.10

                    360.00
2011-12                                           -                    -          360.00


 b) Seed to be stocked advance fingerlings 50 mm size in lacs
                      5.0                                                           5.0
Present                                         -                      -
                      5.0                                                           5.0
2007-08                                           -                    -

                    10.00                                                          10.00
2011-12                                           -                    -

c) Hatchery required (Assumption 0.6 ha of hatchery can produce 20 lakh fingerlings and 40
lakh fingerlings required per ha)
                                                                                    NIL
Present               NIL                       -                     -
                                                                                    NIL
2007-08                                           -                    -
                             NIL
                                                                                 Cost Rs 50
2011-12      ONE HATCHERY                               -                  -
                                                                                 lacs
Source : Fisheries Officer, Narnaul




                                            116
 (G). OTHERS

        1) Installation of Solar Photovoltaic Pumps (SPV) for popularising non-conventional
           energy usage in farming

        The cost of pumping irrigation water is becoming costlier day by day. The rising cost of
diesel and rationalizing of power tariffs and deepening water level has further aggravated the
problem for the farmers. Moreover, the use of diesel is unsafe for environment causing global
warming. To overcome such situation and to efficiency of water use, the only viable of solution
left with the farmers seems to switch towards harnessing renewable energy i.e solar energy
usage through SPV pumps for pumping out the irrigation water.. The technology is available for
converting the abundant sunshine into electricity for farm and home usage. With slight addition /
modification the system can produce and output even during non sunshine hours.

        Advantages of SPV water pump

               Cutting cost of on diesel and electricity as it operates on abundantly available in
                solar energy.
               Negligible operational and maintenance cost.
               Environmentally safe and pollution free
               No fear of power cuts.

Table 82.: Proposals for XI plan for SPV installation

 Description            2007-08     2008-09    2009-10     2010-11      2011-12         Total
 No. of Units              40          40         40          40           40            200
 Cost @ Rs 5.5 lakh       220         220        220         220       220              1100
 /unit
 Subsidy @ 90 %           198         198         198         198          198          990
 (Rs in Lakh)


    2) Establishment of biogas units

     In district mahandergarh either burnt in the form of dung cakes for cooking food or used as
FYM. But the FYM, being not properly decomposed, is of very poor quality. Due to partial
decomposition, when applied to soil it invites termite problem in the field as well as horticultural
crops. Biogas is an important alternate source of energy which converts the dung into enriched
manure. The end product is well decomposed and free from viable weed seeds. In addition to this,
it gives out gas which used for cooking in the household. In District Mahandergarh, 7.5 lakh tons
of dung is produced annually from 226616 buffaloes and 30785 cattle. If all of this is recycled
and enriched through composting / vermi-composting and applied to field @ 15 tons / ha, it can
meet the manurial requirement of 50000 ha land, which accounts for 40 % of the cultivated area
in the district. It will restore soil fertility and improve soil, crop and environmental health.



                                                117
     ]Benefits of biogas:
      Renewable source of energy
      Environmentally safe, pollution free
      Rich in nutrients
      Wee decomposed, free of weed seeds, termite problem

Table 83. : Proposals for XI plan for Biogas establishment

  Description            2007-08       2008-09   2009-10     2010-11         2011-12         Total
  No. of Units             500           500       500         500             500           2500
  Cost @ Rs .20 lakh       100           100       100         100             100           500
  /unit
  Subsidy @ 50 %            50           50        50             50           50            250
  (Rs in Lakh)


  3. Fruit and vegetable preservation:

           In sequel to area expansion under horticultural crops much emphasis was given in Aonla
  plantation in Mohindergarh district. Today Aonla is grown over an area of merely 90 ha, but due
  to non-availability of suitable prices the farms are discouraged. Similarly, in there is in
  perishable vegetables, the rates stump down at the time of excess production. To overcame such
  situation, it is necessary to take steps for value addition of these vegetable & fruits by
  preservation so as to fetch higher prices. To accomplish this capacity building of unemployed
  youth is necessary.

  Table 84: Budget proposal for trainings on fruit and vegetable preservation

   Description                                    2007-082008-092009-10 2010- 2011- Total
                                                                         11    12

   Number of Trainings (for 3 days)                    4      4         4       4       4        20

   7878No. of Trainees 25 / training                100      100       100     100     100      500

   Cost/ training (Rs. In Lakh) @ Rs.                  0.6   0.6       0.6     0.6     0.6      3.0
   200/Trainee X 3 days


  4. Resource conservation through laser leveling

          Depleting the watertable continiously due to over exploitation of ground water in
  Mohindergarh district threaten the maintenance of agricultural productivity. To arrest this
  dangerous trend of ground water exploitation, there is an urgent need to conserve irrigation water
  through various on-farm water conservation practices. Leveling the fields through laser leveler
  is one of the proven technologies that are highly useful in conservation of irrigation water. Duet


                                                 118
to mismanaged practices, a large amount of water is lost during its application at farm due to
poor farm designing and unevenness of fields. The fields that are not leveled have uneven crop
stands, due to water scarcity on one side and excess water problem in other side. Moreover, the
traditional methods of leveling are cumbersome, time consuming, expensive, less efficient and
unreliable. Whereas laser leveling leads to optimum water use efficiency, improved crop yield
and reduces the application time of irrigation.

Benefits of the laser leveling

      Saves water 25-30 %
      Improves crops establishment
      Uniform maturity of crop
      Decreases the time of irrigation application
      Reduces the amount of water required for irrigation
      Farm operations are made easy
      Saving of diesel/ electricity


Table 85: Budget for land leveling through laser leveler

 Description                        2007-08 2008-09 2009-10 2010-11 2011-12 Total

 Machines required (no.)               10       10           10     10        10       50

 Cost @ 3.6 Lac / machine              36       36           36     36        36      180

 Subsidy required @ 50% per            18       18           18     18        18       90
 leveler




                                             119
       6.5. SPECIAL PROJECTS FOR THE CONVERGENCE OF
               NREGA & OTHER SCHEMES WITH RKVY
                        (2008-09 & 2009-10)

(A).    Agriculture
   (i) Strategies


        Agriculture is the backbone of Indian economy and contributes about 33 % of national
income. Seventy five percent (75 %) of the total Indian population produces food grains for
themselves and 25 % for non-farming community. Economically there are great disparities
between agriculture and non-agriculture workers in India. The per worker income of Rs. 25,832/-
in agriculture whereas in non-agriculture sector the per worker income is Rs. 1,05,926/- in 2003-
04. This is a matter of serious Socio-economic concern for people working in agriculture sector.
India needs a new strategy to complement the agro-economic reforms. A strategy designed to
take full advantage of the country’s agro-climatic advantages, huge tract of cultivable land and a
large internal market to stimulate a rapid development of the rural economy. What is needed now
is a national agriculture movement to realize the goal of national income.
        Basing on the topography and climatic conditions of the state and strive for achievement
in food self-sufficiency, priority will continue to be given to food grains productions. Though
area expansion under food-grains is limited, the main strategies will be to further develop the
existing fields with irrigation facilities for multiple cropping, raise the level of productivity per
unit area through efficient use of fertilizers and organic manure, more area coverage under high
yielding varieties, adequate and need-based plant protection measure and adoption of improved
crop production technology. Let us, therefore, examine the opportunities and activities that can
be explained to achieve our overall growth and development of agriculture sector.
        The following priority areas of RKVY are required to be converged with NAREGA and
other schemes for attaining targeted growth rate of agriculture sector in Mohindergarh district..
The proposed priority areas of agriculture along with their estimated cost for the convergence of
NAREGA and other schemes are as under.




                                                120
(ii). Proposed Action Plan for the Convergence of NAREGA Scheme with
      RKVY for Sub-Division Narnaul

 Sr.                              Priority Areas                                 Estimated Cost
 No.                                                                                  (Rs.)
1      Strategic interventions through timely delivery of agriculture inputs            -
       and efforts to encourage the farmers to go in for timely sowing of
       seeds and judicious use of other materials.
2      Raising the level of productivity per unit area through increased,          2,50,000/-
       judicial and timely use of Plant growth regulators (Hormone),               per season
       Nitrobenzene and Thiourea as recommended for different crops.                (D-plots)
       There is great use of these chemicals in developed countries like
       America, Japan, China etc. to increase the productivity of field crops.
3      Encouraging farmers for production of organically produced crops            2,50,000/-
       through use of organic manure, Bio-fertilizers like – Rhizobium,            per season
       Azotobacter, Azospirillum, Aspergillus, Mycorrhiza, Pseudomonas,             (D-plots)
       Blue-green algae etc. recommended as for different crops. Organic
       material for plant protection should also be made available timely
       like – Trichogramma, Nuclear Polyhydrosis Virus, Trichoderma,
       Nimarin etc.
4      Fridging system or cold storage should also be made available at             1,00000/-
       block level for safe and efficient use of Bio-ingredients as describe
       above. So that farmer can use them without deterioration.
5      Dhaincha and lobia should be provided on large scale for green              1,20,000/-
       manuring. Area – 200 hectare.                                             summer season
                                                                                    (D-plots)
6      Boron and Sulphur should be available on 90 % subsidy and                   8,00,000/-
       especially Sulphuric acid (Gandhak) during rabi crops to protect the        every year
       crop from extreme cold.
7      For crops of dark zone various hormones like – Cycocel, Abscisic             50,000/-
       acid, Boric acid, NAA etc. and chemicals like “Jal Shakti” (which           every year
       are capable of capture moisture 100 % of its weight from the
       environment) should be made available to replenish water needs of
       the crops. These chemicals should be available free of cost for
       demonstration.
8      Use of Rain gun under rain fed farming would also be practice and            1,00000/-
       50 % subsidy should be provided on rain gun. Required per year –
       20 per block.
9      Providing material for construction of infrastructure over tube well          50,000/-
       for Schedule Cast on 75 % subsidy in collaboration with NREGA.            per construction
10     Eradication of congress grass from river side, road side etc. in             4,00,000/-
       collaboration with NREGA. Total estimated area under eradication            for 4 years
       programme – 160 Km (both side) and 4 labour @ 150/day/Km
11     Amendment of saline and alkali soil by adding 15 cm sand layer + 15         10,00000/-
       ton FYM in collaboration with NREGA.        Area – 100 acre                  per year



                                              121
12   Undulating land reform especially Panchayat land for judicious use          5,00000/-
     of land in collaboration with NREGA. Area – 100 acre                         per year
13   Fencing of Panchayat land and farmers land on subsidy in                   30,00000/-
     collaboration with NREGA. Area – 200 acre@ Rs. 30,000/-per acre              per year
14   Storage structure of 25 x 40 feet for farm produce should be               20,00000/
     constructed for needy farmer provided on 100 % labour cost in
     collaboration with NREGA.
15   Under water harvesting system small ponds of 2 canal provided on           20,00000/-
     100 % labour cost should be made on farmer’s field for storage of           per year
     rain water in collaboration with NREGA.
16   Subsidy of Biogas and Vermicompost units will be increased from                -
     Rs. 3500/- to Rs. 7500/- and Rs. 1200/- to Rs. 3000/- per unit,
     respectively.
17   Increasing the availability of proper agricultural machineries through         -
     at least 50% subsidy for mechanization of agriculture and
     popularization of power tillers, small tractors, reaper binders, MB
     plough, laser leveler, hand tools and other farm implements.
18   The number of demonstration plots for Kharif and Rabi crops (50            2,50000/-
     each) should be increased.                                                  per year
19   Electricity is the main problem for farmers so Diesel pump set or          5,00000/-
     Generator set should be provided through 50 % subsidy. Set required         per year
     – 10
20   Target of metallic bins should be increased up to 250 per block                -
     through 50 % and 75 % (SC farmer’s) subsidy.
21   Today television is the main media for dissemination of information.           -
     Department of Agriculture should prepare district wise a half hour
     programme related to the agricultural works in the current months.
     The programme will be telecasted on Haryana News channel.
22   Literature like – Haryana Kheti, Modern Kheti, Vishwa Krishi                   -
     Sanchar, Farmers and Food, Krishi Digdarshika (for Delhi + Haryana
     + Punjab), Krishi Amrit and other magazines having recent
     agricultural information should be made available to each extension
     worker for transfer of advance technology to the end users.
23   Strengthening and modernization of the extension wing by the use of            -
     information technology through providing Mobiles and setting up of
     computer network (with internet facility) for imparting wide publicity
     and improving efficiency in transfer of technology to farmers in
     aspects of package of practices, new techniques and improved
     cultivation methods so that production and productivity can be
     increased beside providing marketing intelligence systems.
24   Exposure visit of farmers and Extension worker (ADO) within and            2,00000/-
     inter state, ICAR research stations, universities etc. Exposure Visits –    per year
     2 (25 farmers) for one week
25   Farmer’s training camp (2), Kishan Goshti (10) should be organized         1,50000/-
     during every season.                                                        per year
26   The agriculture implements required for demonstration at block level       6,25000/-


                                             122
       as :-
       (i)Zero Tillage – 2 Total Cost – 50,000/-
       (ii)Reaper Binder – 1 Total Cost 2,75,000/-
       (iii) Laser Leveler – 1Total Cost 3,00000/-
27     Roof top water harvesting system should be covered under all            10,00000/
       government buildings. Government buildings – 20 @ 50,000/-
28     Field man should be appointed on daily wages through NREGA for          3,16800/-
       each Agriculture Development Officer.Total field man required – 8
       @ Rs. 3300/=per month per field man per year.
29     Government buildings (office cum store) should be constructed at        50,00000/-
       each ADO head quarter. Total head quarter – 5 @10,00000/- per
       ADO HQ.
                     Total estimated budget of Sub-Division Narnaul         4,39,85400
                                                                           (439.85 Lacs)



(iii). Proposed Action Plan for the Convergence of NAREGA Scheme with
       RKVY for Mohinderagrh Block (No. of villages 91)

 Sr.            Priority Areas (work to be done)                 Estimated cost (Rs.)
 No.
1      Compost pits 90                                      910 x 610          = 546000/-
       No. of Pits 10 x 91 = 910
2      Eradication of Congress Grass                  5000 x 150       = 750000/-
       Total Exp. area 150 ha
3      Demonstration Plost for BT Cotton              2000 x 2.5 x 100 = 500000/-
       Total D. Plot 100 ha (Rasi - 134) @ 2000/- per
       Acre


4      Awareness Camps for Agril. Activities                20 x 10000         = 200000/-
       20 Camps


5      Providing mini-mandies facilities for the farmers                   -
       at eight focal points
       1. Akhoda 2. Pali 3. Khatodara 4. Malra 5. Nangal
       Sirohi 6. Nimbi 7. Mandola , 8.Dalanwas

6      Reclaimation and Bunding of Panchyat Land at 10000 x 90                 = 900000/-
       the following 9 villages


                                           123
      1. Bhurtaj 2. Bassai 3. Akoda 4. Pali 5. Khatodara
      6. Nangwas 7. Kurhawata 8. Riwasa 9. Jant
      Total area : 200 Acre
      Total Quantity Zypsum : 500 MT = 10000 Bal


7     Bunding Total Area : 200 Acres                                          = 200000/-
            Total estimated cost of Block M. Garh                             = 30,96000/-

                                                                              (30.96 Lacs)



(iv). Proposed Action Plan for the convergence of NAREGA Scheme With
      RKVY for Kanina Block


Sr.   Work                                                  ____________Expected Budget _

1.    Compost pits total No. of Villages = 59
      No. of pits 20 per village = 60 x 20 = 1200 No.
                             Total Exp. Cost 1200 x 600             =      720000/-

2.    Metalic bins 500 per block
                             Subsidy up to                                    75%

3.    Erracdication of Congress Grass
      Total Exp. Area = 100 ha.
      Villages to be Covered = Unhani, Dhanunda, Sehore,
      Baghot, Sehleng,Syana, Partal, Notana, Sundrah, Koka etc.
      Rs. 5000 per hact. Total cost 5000 x 100                      =       500000/-

4.    Awareness Comps for Agricultural Activities
      10 Camps Total Cost 10 x 10000                                 =       100000/-

5.    Neromatic plant for cotton sowing one for the block

6.    Demonstration Plots for BT Cotton, 100 hact (RASI-134)
      Rs. 2000 per Ac.          Total Cost 2000 x 2.5 x 100          =        500000/-


                                             124
7.    Wall painting throughout Block Around ADO Head Quarters
                                     Exp. Cost.                   =   100000/-

8.    Village level extension helper per ADO H.Q.
      for 100 Days in year
9     Vermi Compost beds - 100 No. in block.
       Subsidy Rs. 2500 per bed. Total Cost = 2500 x 100          =   250000/-
10.   Fertilizer Sprayer Mechine
      25 Nos. on subsidy for the block                            =     75
11.   One computer for the block office for office record.                -
      Maintenance.
12.   Providing mini-mandies facilities for the farmers at the
      following points: Bhojawas, Dongra ahir, Buchawas,
      Bawania, Sehland
      Problem of - Marketing & Food grains
      Solution - Mini Mandi & vegetables
      Exp. cost Rs. 500000/- per Mandi
      Total Cost = 500000 x 6                                     =    3000000/-
13.   Reclamation and Bunding of Panchayati Land at the
      following villages :
      Problem - Saline & Sodic Water
      Solution - Application of Zypsum & Bunding
      Dhanoda - Panchayati Land - 150 Ac. 1000 MT Zypsum
      Total Cost - 1000 x 90                                      =    900000/-
      Bunding = 10000
      Problem - Soil Erosion & Wild Animals.
      Bhuchawas - 150 Ac Bunding
      Exp. Cost                                                   =    150000/-
      Reclamation and Bunding of Panchayati Land at Pota, Syana
      Problem - Soil Erosion & sodic
      Solution - Bunding, Soline Water & Zypsum application
      50 Ac. 300 MT
      Total Cost = 3000 x 90                                      =    270000/-
      Bunding = 100000/-
14.   Fencing of Panchayati Land of various village
      Area 500 hact. Exp.
      Problem - Wild Animal


                                          125
     Solution - Fencing, Cost = 500 x 2000             =         1000000/-

     Total estimated cost of Block Kanina              =         76,00000/-

Total of Sub. Division Mohindergarh                =       1,06,96000/-
                                                            (106.96 Lacs)




                                             126
(B).    Horticulture

Special Project for the Cultivation of Fruit Crops/ Medicinal Plants with Drip
                  Irrigation system (5 villages in each block)

   (a) Total area in a village
       Total area under Citrus                          =   5 Acre
       Total area under Ber                             =   2 Acre
       Total area under Guava                           =   2 Acre
       Total area under Alove-Vera                      =   1 Acre
       Total area of a village                          =   10 Acre




(b) Cost of plantation of fruits & medicinal plants in one village


Total cost of Plantation of Citrus      =     5 Acre        = 12000x5       =           60000
Total cost of Plantation of Ber         =     2 Acre        = 12000x2       =           24000
Total cost of Plantation of Guava       =     2 Acre        = 12000x2       =           24000
Total cost of Plantation of Alove-Vera =      1 Acre        = 30000x1       =           30000
Total cost of Cultivation (Rs.) in one Village                              =      1,38,000/-


       Rates (Rs.) per acre as approved by NHM norms, Govt. of India
       Citrus, Ber and Guava : Rs. 12,000/acre and Alove-Vera : Rs. 30,000/acre

(c). Cost of Drip System
The estimated cost of drip system/ha for fruit plants            = Rs. 46000/- (18400/- per acre)
(as per Micro Irrigation norms)

Total cost of drip for fruit plants in one village = Rs. 18,400 x 9 acre = Rs. 1,65,600
Cost of Drip System for Alove-Vera Rs.           = Rs. 70000/acre
Total cost of drip system for 10 acre in one village                   = Rs. 2,35,600




                                                 127
(d) Cost for the creation of water facilities for drip system
       Since there is no assured facility of water in villages, therefore, it is required that a plastic
tank be installed on the site bearing capacity of 10,000 L and for filling of this tank a tractor
mounted iron tanker also be provided and the drip system be connected to that plastic tanks .
Estimated cost of a 10,000 L plastic tank                               =      Rs. 1,00,000/-
Estimated cost of a tanker                                             .=      Rs. 1,00,000/-
Cost of plantation, drip system, plastic tank & Iron tanker             =      Rs. 573600/-


Cost of five villages selected in one block =          573600 x 5       =      Rs. 28,68,000


Total cost required for five blocks : 28,68,000,x,5                     =      1,43,40,000/-
                                                                               (143.40 Lacs)



(C). Animal Husbandry & Dairying


(i). Livestock Sector

       The livestock farming system in India has largely been considered as subsidiary to
farmers main avocation of crop production, however, during the last two – three decades, dairy
cattle and buffalo production has undergone a major transformation.
       Of late, dairying in our country has emerged as an important sub-sector, accounting for
nearly two – thirds of the total `livestock contributor` to GNP (Gross National Product).
Moreover, at the present price level, the single largest commodity contributing maximally to the
GNP of the country happens to be `Milk` which is contributing more than Rs. 450 billion and is
ahead of both rice and wheat.
       District Mahendergarh is predominantly occupied by agriculture as primary economic
activity and animal husbandry is predominantly adopted as a subsidiary occupation by the Below
Poverty Line Families/IRDP beneficiaries and other farmers, to achieve higher and more
stable income. The Mahendergarh District livestock system is the Endeavour of smallholders, a
substantial number of which are below poverty line; there are no big players in it. Traditionally,


                                                 128
farmers keep livestock in proportion to the `free` crop residues and family labour available in
there own household production systems and convert these into food, fuel and farm power_
making each household a virtually self – contained production system with few purchased inputs
along with few marketed outputs. But now this age old trend is changing. Although the
organization of livestock production in small units persists, household production systems are
increasingly becoming integrated into input as well as output markets. As a result of gradual
transition for subsistence to market system, the economic dimensions of livestock keeping have
assumed increasing significance in household behaviour. Thus livestock sector needs to be
viewed as a sector linked with the livelihoods of rural households_ who depend on livestock
farming for supplementary incomes.
       For the health care, disease surveillance & genetic improvement through Artificial
Insemination of the local livestock, the Department of Animal Husbandry and Dairying District
Mahendergarh has a network of 53 Veterinary Hospitals manned by qualified Veterinarians and
83 Veterinary Dispensaries with VLDAs under the supervision of Veterinary Professionals. This
technical manpower provides services of health care & genetic improvement not only round the
clock but even at the door-step of farmers.


(ii). Cattle & Buffaloes : The Milk Production Stock


       District Mahendergarh has 30500 heads of cattle and 226549 buffaloes as per livestock
census 2007. The livestock population of District Mahendergarh and the percentage composition
of the population by species in 2007 are presented in Table 96.


    Table 96. Livestock population of District Mahendergarh

                        Species                                   Population
    Cattle                                           29773
    Buffaloes                                        226530
    Sheep                                            43561
    Goats                                            78721
    Camels                                           5503
    Equines                                          1087
    Pigs                                             731
    Dogs                                             3109
    Total                                            389015


                                               129
          Cattle population declined by 27% during the last decade between 1993 and 2007 due to
mechanization of agriculture. In contrast, buffalo population almost doubled over the same
period. The share of animals in farm power has decreased drastically and male to female ratio in
the population is progressively moving in favour of the female. All these factors herald a
perceptible shift in the priority of farming community from production of work animals to
production of milch animals. The buffalo is the main stay of the dairy industry and the growth in
buffalo population is demand driven. Buffalo population trends are in favour of an overall
consolidation of the population as the predominant dairy stock for milk production.

(iii). Sheep & Goats : The Main Stay of Scheduled Castes Employment

          In addition to buffaloes, the main stay of Scheduled Caste families’ economy is sheep
and goats. These families are generally resource poor and approximately 44% of these are
exclusively dependent upon Animal Husbandry & Agriculture, having 19% of the total livestock.
Scheduled Caste families contribute substantially in the Animal Husbandry sector and it is the
major occupation of these families.
           So assistance granted to the Animal Husbandry sector would not only benefit the
livestock owners in general but scheduled caste & below poverty line families of District
Mahendrgarh will be specifically benefited to gain useful employment to raise their economical
status.


(iv). Proposed Action Plan for the Convergence of NAREGA and other
          Schemes with RKVY for the Devlopment of Animal Husbandry &
          Dairying

 Sr.                     Plan/Scheme                      Amount             Submitted As
 No.                                                     Required
                                                        (Rs in Lacs)
  1        Strengthening the infrastructure of             41.04         Annexure-I
           storage/transportation of liquid nitrogen/
           semen straws for genetic improvement
           to increase milk production
  2        Proposal for supplementation of                 32.25         Annexure-II
           minerals for livestock health



                                                  130
  3     Proposal for strengthening the                     15.00          Annexure-III
        infrastructure of animal disease
        diagnostics for accurate & prompt
        diagnosis of animal diseases to
        undertake better disease control
        measures

  4     Proposal for provision of restraining              20.40          Annexure-IV
        aids (cattle travis) for newly opened
        government veterinary hospitals and
        dispensaries

  5     Assistance for extension activities                04.50          Annexure-V

                  Grand Total                          113.19 Lacs




       The required assistance from the Rashtriya Krishi Vikas Yojna (RKVY) is hereby
submitted as Annexure-I to Annexure-V.




Annexure-I          : Proposal for Strengthening the Infrastructure of
                   Storage/Transportation of Liquid Nitrogen/Semen Straws for
                   Genetic Improvement to Increase Milk Production

         It can easily be inferred & understood that to fulfill increased demand of high yielding
milch animals, the genetic up gradation of existing livestock is mandatory, which requires an
ultra modern infrastructure support.
State Breeding Policy

       Breeding policy of the state has been framed in such a way that it not only increases milk
production, but reduces the age of sexual maturity, service period, dry period and calving
interval. All these will lead to higher economic returns to farmers. Following breeding strategies
have been developed for improving the productivity of different types of farm animal
populations on large scale by the Department of Animal Husbandry & Dairying, Government of
Haryana particularly under village conditions



                                                131
      1) Improvement of non-descript cattle by grading up with the help of well known
            indigenous breeds like Sahiwal, Haryana, and Tharparkar.
      2) Improvement of non-descript Zebu cattle by cross breeding with breeds like Holstein
            and Jersey.
      3) Improvement of indigenous Zebu cattle breeds by selective breeding within the breed.
      4) Improvement of non-descript buffaloes by grading up through mating with superior
            sires of Murrah.
      5) And lastly there is one good old saying ``even the best can be improved!``. Therefore
            there is the policy of improvement of buffalo breeds by selective breeding. Existing
            top quality buffaloes of Murrah breed are not only maintained but further improved by
            selective breeding with proven Murrah sires.
Present Status Of Infrastructure
      For the genetic improvement through Artificial Insemination of the local livestock, the
Department of Animal Husbandry and Dairying District Mahendergarh has a network of 53
Veterinary Hospitals manned by qualified Veterinarians and 73 Veterinary Dispensaries with
VLDAs. This technical manpower provides services of artificial insemination not only round the
clock but even at the door-step of farmers.
          The semen straws (frozen semen) from proven bulls are procured from Sperm Station
Gurgaon and for their transportation & storage, semen straws are always placed in liquid
nitrogen at -196.0C At this extreme low temperature sperms can remain alive for many years and
be used for artificial insemination whenever required. Liquid nitrogen is stored in special
containers named cryocans, which are available in varying capacities from 2 lt to 55 lt,
depending upon the requirement. For procurement/storage at District and Block level 55 lt
cryocans are used, for the storage at hospital/dispensary 20 lt and for artificial insemination
facility at the door-step of farmer 2 lt cryocans are in practice. Thus cryocans become mandatory
for artificial insemination.
Progress in Artificial Insemination Work

          From the table given below, it is clear that popularity of artificial insemination in District
Mahendergarh is increasing, thus higher milk production and making additional income to the
farmer.




                                                   132
Year              2003-04         2004-05        2005-06         2006-07       2007-08



No. of             17986           37333          50817          60221          63315
Artificial
Inseminations



Strengthening of Infrastructure
                       Presently approximately 40% of breedable population in cows and
buffaloes is being covered with the technique of artificial insemination. Future plans in this field
are to achieve the target of 80% coverage of breedable livestock, gradually, with in next five
years. It requires strengthening of infrastructure in terms of increasing storage capacity of liquid
nitrogen & semen straws by adding more cryocans of varying capacity for efficient distribution
of the liquid nitrogen. Because every veterinary hospital/dispensary has to be refilled with liquid
nitrogen at fortnightly interval. Additionally the number of new Government Veterinary
Hospitals have grown up from 30 to 53 and 11 new Veterinary Dispensaries have been added to
the existing numbers during the year 2008-09, the need for cryocans has grown drastically.

Supplementation of Cryocans

   To cover maximum number of cattle & buffaloes under artificial insemination programme
and to replace the leaked/defective cryocans, jars of following capacity are required for District
Mahendergarh.
   a) Cryocan 50 L capacity…………………………… 050 numbers.
   b) Cryocan 20 L capacity…………………………… 050 numbers.
   c) Cryocan 02 L capacity…………………………… 100 numbers.
   d) Jumbo Jar for Frozen Semen Storage……….......... 002 numbers


       The address for the purchase of cryocans is as under :-
                       M/S IBP Co. Ltd.
                       Business Group (Cryogenics)
                       Sewri East, Mumbai – 400 015
                       Phone 022-24146714/715/742




                                                133
Tentative Rates/Costs Involved for the Purchase of Cryocans for Sub- Division Narnaul, District
Mahendergarh

Sr. Type of      Quantity   Rate     Total                            Remarks
No. Cryocan)     Required    Per   Amount
                (Numbers) Cryocan   (INR)
                           (INR)
 1   Cryocan       50     28594   1429700             Rates of Cryocan
     50 lt                                            Include Excise
                                                      @16.32%, VAT @ 12.5%, ST @4% against
                                                      Form D
 2   Cryocan        50      28634     1431700         Rates of Cryocan
     20 lt                                            Include Excise
                                                      @16.32%, VAT @ 12.5%, ST @4% against
                                                      Form D
 3   Cryocan       100      11595     1159500         Rates of Cryocan
     02 lt                                            Include Excise
                                                      @16.32%, VAT @ 12.5%, ST @4% against
                                                      Form D
 4   Jumbo          02      41754     83508           Rates of Jumbo
     12 lt                                            Include Excise
                                                      @16.32%, VAT @ 12.5%, ST @4% against
                                                      Form D
                   Grand Total        41,04,408/-

        Total amount required         41.04 Lacs



Annexure-II : Proposal for Supplementation of Minerals for
                   Livestock Health

       Trace elements are required for numerous metabolic functions in livestock, and optimal
production and performance require adequate intake of balanced trace minerals. As trace mineral
status of the animal declines from adequate to marginal, immunity and enzyme function are
compromised followed by the loss of performance and reproduction. Animals in a subclinical or
marginal deficiency status are often difficult to identify; however, changes in a trace mineral
program can result in improved production. Immunity, growth and reproduction are influenced
by trace minerals. Formulation strategies should account for mineral forms, levels and for
possible synergistic combinations such as zinc to copper ratios. Trace mineral nutritional
supplementation for the livestock of District Mahendergarh would go a long a way in not only
protecting animal health but would also ensure a better production and reproduction.




                                                134
                  (Effect of Declining Mineral Status on Animal Performance)

       Mineral supplementation @ Rs 10 per cattle/buffaloe and @ Rs 05 per sheep/goat for the
2.6 lac cattle/buffaloes and 1.25 lac sheep/goats is hereby proposed.




          Total Amount Required            :                   INR 3225000 =       32.24 Lacs



Annexure-III: Proposal for Strengthening the Infrastructure of Animal
                    Disease Diagnostics for Accurate & Prompt Diagnosis of
                    Animal Diseases to Undertake Better Disease Control
                    Measures

       The economy of District Mahendergarh is basically agrarian and livestock occupy an
important place in the social fabric of rural population. The vast potential of livestock, poultry
and fishery in income generation, providing employment and gender empowerment is now well
recognized.
       The District livestock comprise of 226759 buffaloes, 30785 cattle, 38740 sheep, 69628
goats along with a substantial number of camels, equines and swines. Apart from these, there are
more than 150 small poultry farms in the District rearing more than 4 lac birds. With the help of
a well equipped disease diagnostic laboratory the losses due to diseases have been drastically
reduced by adopting appropriate and timely measures for their prevention, control and
eradication, besides treatment. In addition to providing disease diagnosis at local level, the




                                               135
laboratory also dispatches materials to advanced centers to establish or rule out the prevalence of
infectious diseases of animals and birds.
Disease Diagnostic Laboratory Mission :
       The District Animal Disease Diagnostic Laboratory Narnaul provides vigilant, accessible
and accountable diagnostic service for the livestock & poultry count of District Mahendergarh
along with organizing farmers awareness camps to educate them about benefits of Disease
Diagnostics.
       The District Animal Disease Diagnostic Laboratory Narnaul is playing an important role
in advancing the quality of life of livestock & poultry owners through protection of animals &
birds against diseases that result in economic loss, emotional distress or may be transmissible to
humans (such as Tuberculosis, Brucellosis, Anthrax, Rabies, Bird Flu etc.). The District Animal
Disease Diagnostic Laboratory Narnaul also aims to:


    Develop and deliver state-of-the-art diagnostic testing.
    Maintain requirements for day to day advances in Animal Disease Diagnostics.
    Maintain requirements for quality assurance.
    Meet or exceed commitments in terms of extension activities not only to protect their
       livestock wealth but to protect human health from diseases which can be acquired from
       livestock or birds to humans.
    Serve as the sentinel for disease prevailance/surveillance/or monitoring the known health
       problems alongside keeping an eye on newly emerging, zoonotic, and foreign animal
       diseases.
    To establish database for disease prevalence so as to improve and protect the animal –
       agricultural economy of District Mahendergarh through disease detection, containment
       and prevention.

Diasese Diagnostic Laboratory Services Provided:
         District Disease Diagnostic Laboratory at Narnaul has a unique performance record past
as well as current in analysis of the following :-
     1. Fecal Material Analysis.
     2. Blood Analysis.
     3. Urine Analysis.



                                                 136
     4. Milk Analysis.
     5. Skin Analysis.
     6. Foot & Mouth Disease Monitoring.
     7. Bird Flu Surveillance.
     8. Surveillance of Zoonotic Diseases.
     9. Ante Mortem and Post Mortem Examinations.
     10. Farmers Awareness Camps.

      Comparative graphical representation work done disease diagnostic laboratory
                                   YEARWISE PROGRESS
                           14000

                           12000

                           10000

                            8000

                            6000

                            4000

                            2000

                               0
                                      2005-6         2006-07          2007-08
           Fecal Analysis             12963            9374               9048
           Blood Analysis              1290            1381               1108
           Milk Analysis               1896            1770               1625
           Urine Analysis              1459            1406               1127
           Skin Analysis               746              607               576
           Bird Flu Surveillance        33              146               462




Diasese Diagnostic Laboratory Vision :

       While traditional testing methods are still widely used in veterinary diagnostic laboratory
at Narnaul, however exciting new technologies, such as biosensors and microarray techniques,
are being developed. Nucleic acid diagnostic techniques such as polymerase chain reaction (PCR)
have become routine diagnostic tools in veterinary laboratories not only to make specific typing
determinations but also to rapidly screen large numbers of samples during disease outbreaks. In
addition, nanotechnologies, although not yet implemented in veterinary laboratories, hold the
promise of screening for numerous pathogens in a single assay. Other biotechnologies are likely
to be widely used in the future as they can improve diagnostic capabilities while reducing the
time and perhaps, the costs, associated with conventional technologies.
       To match the future challenges Disease Diagnostic Laboratory has to be equipped with
the infrastructural advancements which include not only the laboratory reagents, equipments,
machinery, man power but a suitable building too to house the technical inputs. Therefore a


                                               137
sum of INR 1,500,000 is required for renovation of building, provision of deep cold storage
system and continuous/emergency power supply system for existing District Disease
Diagnostic Laboratory at Narnaul. The renovation of Disease Diagnostic Laboratory will go a
long way in not only prevention & treatment of livestock diseases but also improve economy of
all sections of society including scheduled caste livestock owners which own a substantial
number of cattle, buffaloes, sheep & goats in the District Mahendergarh.


Total Amount Required :                          INR 1500000                  =     15.00 Lacs



Annexure-IV: Proposal For Provision of Restraining Aids (Cattle Travis)
                   for Newly Opened Government Veterinary Hospitals and
                   Dispensaries

               Restraining livestock is necessary for examination of health and disease. Animals
need to be restrained for general health examination, age determination, treatment, prophylaxis,
insemination and most of the day to day work in any Veterinary Institution. For restraining cattle
crushes are required along with shed so as to examine animals in adverse climatic conditions
(summers, rains, dust storms etc.) and in odd hours (shed with electrical fittings help to attend
emergency cases at night time).
                So provision of cattle crush with shed in 34 newly opened veterinary institutions
(23GVH & 11 GVD) will be of immense help for the benefit of livestock health. The tentative
cost of construction of cattle crush with asbestos shed is 60000 INR.


Total Amount Required :                    INR 2040000             =              20.40 Lacs




Annexure-V: Assistance for Extension Activities
      Extension activities are one of the important activities of Animal Husbandry & Dairying
Department. The schemes/programmes which directly benefit the livestock owners are as under :
     A. Prophylaxis against the infectious diseases of livestock & poultry.
     B. Genetic improvement through Artificial Insemination.


                                               138
      C. Livestock health care camps.
      D. Farmer’s orientation camps.
      E. Women awareness camps.
      F. Disease Diagnostics.
      G. Employment generation through Mini Dairy.
      H. Special scheme of calf rearing for SC livestock owners.
      I. Special scheme of establishing sheep units for SC livestock owners.
      J. Special scheme of establishing piggery units for SC livestock owners.
      K. Special scheme of establishing goat units for SC livestock owners.
      L. Special scheme of establishing 2 milch animals units for SC livestock owners.
      M. Free livestock insurance scheme for SC livestock owners.
      N. Top quality milch animal identification programme.
      O. Top quality buff male calf purchase scheme.
      P. Holding mini dairy training programmes for livestock owners.


      To make contact with livestock owners through multimedia equipments will provide a
boon in the extension programmes of the department. This will help farmers immensely to
understand the schemes & services provided by the department. The equipments and their
approximate cost which may help in boosting the extension activities of the department in public
interest are as under :


      1. Laptop ……………………………………… INR                                  60,000
      2. LCD Projector (with screen)………………... INR                   2,50,000
      3. Power Generator Set ……………………….. INR                         60,000
      4. Sound System ……………………………….INR                               30,000
      5. Handy Cam…………………………………. INR                                 50,000


     Total Amount Required :             INR           4,50,000    (04.50 Lacs)




                                               139
(D). Fisheries :

        Project for Assistance to Fish Farmers for the Supply of Areators, Nets,
        Motor Vehicles and Convergence of NAREGA and other Schemes for
        the Construction of Channels for Linking the Supply of Canal Water in
        Panchayat Village Ponds for Overall Growth and Development of
        Fisheries in Mohindergarh District
     A. ASSISTANCE FOR NETS :


        1.    Total Number of Farmer’s in           =   50 No.
              Distt. Mohindergarh

        2.    Cost of Nets as per Fisheries         =   Rs. 0.15 Lacs
              Deptt. Norms

              Cost 50 x 0.15                        =   Rs. 7.50 Lacs

     B. ASSISTANCE FOR AREATORS :


        1.    Total Number of Ponds where           =   50 No.
              Areators to be installed in
              Distt. Mohindergarh

        2.    Cost of Areators as per Fisheries     =   Rs. 0.50 Lacs
              Deptt. Norms

              Cost 50 x 0.50                        =   Rs. 25.00 Lacs

     C. ASSISTANCE OF MOTOR VEHICLE :


        1.    Assistance of Mahendra Pick-up        =   2 No.
              Jeep for Transportation of Live
              Fish Seed stocking and Marketing
              Of Live Fish to the Fish Market
              One for Fisheries Officer, Narnaul
              & Second Fisheries Officer, M’Garh

                Cost                                =   12.00 Lacs

D.      CONSTRUCTION OF WATER CHANNEL
        FOR LINKING CANAL WATER TO


                                              140
       VILLAGE PANCHAYAT PONDS :
       1.    Block Narnaul                                   =       10 No.

       2.      Block Nangal Choudhary                        =       07 No.

       3.      Block Kanina                                  =       06 No.

       4.      Block Ateli                                   =       14 No.

       5.      Block Mohindergarh                            =       20 No.

               All Block Total                               =       57 No.

       Average Cost of Construction of Water
       Channel for linking Canal Water to
       Village Panchayat Ponds                               =       Rs. 200.00 Lacs


       Total Cost of the Project                             =       RS. 244.50 LACS



(E). Soil Conservation (2008-09 & 2009-10)

(a). Introduction

       Land and water are essential per-requisites for the primary production system as well as
for meeting essential needs such as food, fodder, fibre, shelter, communication etc. we have,
therefore, to consider seriously whether the natural resources base particularly land, would be
able to support the likely increase in population and provide better standard of living.
       The total geographical are of the country and Mahendergarh district are 329 million
hectares and 0.194 Million hectares respectively. Out of this, about 173.64 million hectares (53
Percent) and 0.161 Million hectors (50%) respectively face degradation problem rising from
water and wind erosion and through various processes or land degradation like water logging,
salinity, alkalinity, ravines, shifting cultivation, de-afforestation and so on. These problems are
aggravating the incidence of drought and flood, which in turn, are seriously affecting the
productivity and production.
       Land is not only in-elastic but heterogeneous in different parts and regions of the country
with definite set of capabilities and suitabilities for different uses. This non-expandable land



                                                141
resource has to accommodate the completing demands for production of food, fodder, fibre and
fuel, minerals, urbanisation, non-agricultural lands use etc. for increasing both human and animal
population.
         On account of various forms of degradation, it has been estimated that in the county a
loss of about 600 million tones of top soil occurs annually which is equivalent to about 7 million
tonnes of plant nutrients; in monetary terms, it is equivalent to annual loss of about Rs. 2800
Crores even on conservative estimate. It is estimated that 1/3rd of the arable land is likely to be
lost within next 200 Years, amounting to loss of about 5ha per minute, if the present trend is
allowed to continue. In terms of annual food grain production loss on account of soil erosion, it
is equivalent to about 40 million tones of food grains.
         To minimize the soil erosion an land degradation hazards and thereby reducing the
siltation of the reservoirs an moderating the flood hazards, only soil conservation programmes
are taken up under the Central and State Government schemes like Rashtriya Krishi Vikash
Yojna ( RKVY) & National Rural Employment Guarintee Yojna ( NAREGA) on village are
basis.
Location
         The Mahendergarh district located in the south-western part of the Haryana State
boarding Rajasthan (Alwar district) in the South-East Jaipurand Siker- Jhunjhunu districts in
South and South-West. Bhiwani and Rohtak district (Haryana) in the North and Rewari district
in the East. These districts are situated between 28027' – 30" to 270-50' N and 57050' to 760-50'
Comprising a total area of about 372 villages.
         The district have two sub-divisions- Narnaul and Mahendergarh sub-division with 2
Tehsils viz.(i) Narnaul (222 Villages) (ii) Mahendergarh (150 Villages). In Narnaul sub-division
there are two sub tehsil namely Ateli and Nangal Choudhary and two sub Tehsil in
Mahendergarh Sub Divison namely Kanina and Satnali.
         The Climate of the area is arid to semi-arid with extreme of temperature in summer and
winter. Hot and dry wind laden with sand particles during summer is the common feature
generally bright sun-shine, scarcity and variability of rainfall and a very high rate of evapo-
transpiration are the dominal climatic factors and it has been suffering from recurrent drought
and famine conditions the dominant component of the climate are as under:-




                                                 142
Temperature :The temperature states rising from March ( 29o to 37o) to June and maximum
temperature during summer season in day time reaches upto 46oC where as during night the
minimum temperature is 17 to 20oC during this period. In the winter season the lowest
temperature comes down to 0oC in the month of January and highest during the same period is
20-27oC whereas the mean temperature is      o
                                              C.
Rainfall : The rainfall pattern is very erratic and precipitation received are low also. The rainfall
is of monsoon type and starts in the last week of June and lasts upto 15th of September about 70-
80% of the total annual rainfall is received during the winter season some rainfall is also received
which is not sufficient to me the Rabi crop water requirement. Therefore, irrigation is essential to
raise good Rabi crops. Uncertain and irregular rains cause drought in 2 Years out of 10 Years
and drought like conditions in 4 years.
Mean Wind Speed : The Mean wind velocity is being recorded at Narnaul station and it varies
from 2.oo Km/Hours in January to 6.00 KM/Hours in June. The high wind velocity considerable
hampers the growth of vegetation.
Geology : Geologically, most of the alluvial aeolian plain is of recent age and its surface has
been built up by the sitting action and aeolian activity. Some of the parts of the area fall in the
Aravalis, belonging probably to the Pre-cambrian age the residual hills which reasonable in
selberg on pediplaine are mainly composed of quartzites sand-stones, phyllites and slates. The
hills (N-5 direction) of the west consists of grainites, crystalline limestones quartzites, belong to
the Delhi system. These rocks are traversed by the intrusive-pegmatitis and quartaveins. Some of
them are impregnated with valuable minerals. The bedding of these rocks are almost vertical
resulting from slope retreat.
(b). Proposed Soil Conservation Activities and Approach-Treatment for
     Convergence of NREGA & Other Schemes for the Integrated
     Devlopment of the Area Under RKVY in Narnaul Sub Division

Objectives :-
         The main objectives for the preparation of the RKVY project is for the integrated
development of the entire area of Narnaul sub-division of District Mahendergarh and proposed
treatment would be oriented to serve the following primary and secondary objectives:-
   (i)      To tackale the man made ecological degradation that has been occurring since long.




                                                 143
   (ii)      To conceive and develop proper soil and water use to up lift economic condition of
             community by way of improving productivity of these lands.
   (iii)     To protect the farm land flooding and erosim hazards and to enhance yields in the
             rained cultivation through soil and moisture conservation in situ.
   (iv)      To recharge ground water potential and recycling it for agricultural purposes through
             tubewells and bringing more area under irrigation to raise the assured crops.
   (v)       To minimize the conveyance and field losses of scarcely available irrigation potential
             and maximizing its use on scientific basis.
   (vi) To educate the people regarding social fencing, stall feedings,
            distructive effect of grazing.

Approch
          Until now the developmental programme are planned on the baale of administrative units,
like; Block, Tehsils and specially the District. In this project planning could not be possible as
the watershed is not necessarily confined to the administrative boundaries. So in most of the
cases the benefits of the investment in the lower catchment could not be maximised for want of
treatment of the upper catchments. Pre-mature silting or many surface water reservoir, breaches
of the embankments, roads, bridges, habitation etc. and by sand and gravel disposition making
the agricultural lands, un-productive etc. are sows of the examples to be cited.
Treatments/Measures
          For the integrated development of the catchment area the entire Sub Div. Area has been
divided into following three major groups i.e.
    Hilly area
    Gullied and foot-hill area
    Agricultural lands.

      For the development of the area of above groups in an integrated manner the following
measures would be adopted:-

     1- Preventive measures:
                   Social fencing, ii- Under statutory law the entrance, grazing, browzing and
                      quarrying is prevented.
     2- Protective measures :
                      Fencing the area.


                                                 144
      3- Vegetative measures
                  Biological measures.
                         Planting the area with suitable species
                         Constructing vegetative structures.

 4-    Mechanical measures:
      Constructing earthen and masonry structures, fielding bundling.
 5-    Agronomical measures:
             i-            Growing suitable crops of short duration, high yielding, drought resistant,
                           less water requirement crops.
 6-    Water management measures:
      For scientific use of available irrigated water the irrigation through sprinkler sets, drip
                  irrigation at proper time and manner in case of canal irrigation.
 7-    Reclamation of Ravines areas and salt affected soil and water:-
                  i-       Land leveling in Ravines areas.
                  ii-      Reclamation the sodic water and land with the application of gypsum.
Development of Hilly Areas
        The hilly areas is totally deprived of vegetative cover due to excessive grazing and illicit
 felling of trees and quarrying of stones from all over the hills which accelerated the soil
 erosion. Being the naked rocks the most of rainfall water comes down with high speed in the
 shape of surface run-off, damaging the foot-hills and enters the cultivated fields. The fertile
 fields are converted into un-productive lands. At some places the run-off water passes through
 the habitation and damages the houses causing great loss to the habitants. More-over the
 natural resources available is not being used for betterment of human, animal vegetation and
 soil rather causes the devastation of these. The following measures would be adopted for its
 development.
(c). Preventive Measures
        Planting of the area is very difficult as hilly areas being the common lands and free
grazing is allowed so the protective vegetative over could to be allowed to establish and in the
absence of protective over the top-soil is washed away from the surface of the rocks. So it is very
essential to adopt the preventive measures in the shape of effective closures of the area under
some statutory rule or through social fencing by motivating the inhabitants
(i). Land Leveling
        Land leveling is most important for the efficient use of irrigation water. It is equally
important in rainfed agriculture to minimise the problem of soil erosion and to increase in situ
moisture conservation during rainy season. It has been estimated that in un-dulating fields the
uniform application of water is not achieved so the crop production in fields suffer great set
back. Moreover, in case of un-even topography the field losses of irrigation water are much


                                                   145
higher than the leveled fields. Similar is the position under rainfed condition. To get the more
production with same available irrigation potential or rainfall water, the land leveling is very
essential part of cultivation. Planned leveling will be done and irrigation slope will be provided
as per type of soils given below:

         Type of Soils                                         Irrigation slopes

1.       Sandy loan to sandy soil                                       0.6%
2.       Medium loan soil                                               0.4%
3.       Clay to clay loan soil                                         0.2%



         The area under various slope groups in different river catchments is given in Table 86.

    Table 86. Area under different slope groups in different river catchments are as under

Sr.       Name    of Total                                 Slope Group
No.       River      Area
          Catchments
                                     0 to    0.5%      1% to   2% to    3% to   4% to Above
                                    0.5%    to 1%       2%      3%       4%      5% 5%
                                    slope
1         Krishanwati   83284.8     20819    19279     21382    9095     4813    4048 3849
2         Dohan         80907.0      9708     8578     18219   15614    10124   10196 8469
                 Total 266407.6     30527    27857     39601   24709    14937   14244 12318



     Table 87. Area proposed for land leveling block wise as under

Sr.     Name of Block                           2008-09                    2009-2010
No.                                           Area    Act                 Area    Act
 1      Narnaul                                  --                --        50      6.00
 2      Ateli                                    --                --       200    24.00
 3      Nangal Choudhary                        22              2.60         40      4.60
        Total                                   22              2.60        290    34.60

(ii). Field Bunding
         The land resources are more as compared to the water resources and the hilly areas are
predominantly rainfed cultivated areas but the rainfall pattern is erratic and irregular and low
rainfall is received. The surface slope is against the general slope of the state. So gravitational
canal water is not possible. In case lift canal the problem of in-sufficient power supply hampers




                                                 146
the smooth supply of the irrigation water. So, it is very essential to retain most of all the rainfall
received in the individual fields by constructing the bunds and preserving it for crops cultivation.
Table 88. Proposed area for field bunding in different blocks
Sr.    Name of Block                            2008-09                    2009-2010
No.                                          Area       Act              Area      Act
 1     Narnaul                              --           --               50       6.00
 2     Ateli                                --           --               60       7.00
 3     Nangal Choudhary                     16          2.00              50       6.00
              Total                         16          2.00             160      19.00

(iii). Irrigagtion Through Sprinkler Sets
          About 11020 Nos. of sprinkler sets have been installed in the area and it is beyond doubt
that the sprinkler irrigation is very effective in conserving the water, increasing the area under
irrigation with a limited quantity of water, improving the soil fertility increasing the yield,
application of fertilizer with no additional cost and serving as an economical alternative to land
levelling in respect of highly undulating areas.
          Sprinkler irrigation is more feasible in water scarcity and dry areas where small capacity
tube-wells are the major source in irrigation and the ground water is moderate to high salinity.
This will ensure uniform and early germination of seedlings as well as optimum plant growth.
Through sprinkler irrigation. The application of water in the filed during night is feasible
whereas through surface irrigation system it is very difficult and would be costly. The subsidized
rate applicable to the farmers will be as per Haryana Govt. or G.O.I. terms & condition i.e. 50%
upto 5 ha.
Table 89. Block wise proposed targets for drip irrigation.
Sr. No.          Name of Block               2008-09                2009-2010
                                          Area     Act             Area    Act
   1         Narnaul                      --         --           10         2.50
   2         Ateli                        --         --          100        25.00
   3         Nangal Choudhary             --         --           20         5.00
                Total                     --         --          130        32.50

(iv). Laying of Under Ground Pipe Line/ Surface Channel
          Laying of under ground pip line/ Surface Channel of PVC/HDPE pipe for conveyance of
irrigation water from the M.I. Unit to the fields to save the seepage losses.




                                                   147
       The area lies in the semi-dry region. The rainfall pattern is erratic is erratic and the
precipitation received are low. Similarly the ground water potential is limited and useable water
is also available in certain patches at a very high depth with a meager quantity. The type of soil
is light and the topography of the area is undulated so the percolation losses in the fields are very
high and the seepage losses in transit in transit in case of Katcha water channel are about 30%
due to which the total pumped water is not utilized and about 30% goes waste through deep
percolation. Accordingly less area is irrigated. The seepage losses in transit can be minimized by
using the PVC/HDPE pipe for conveying the water to the fields and so, the area under irrigation
with the same quantity of pumped water will be increased by 30%. The rate of subsidy to the
farmers will be as per Haryana Govt. Terms and Conditions:-
Sr.    Name        of                    UGP                                WCS
No.    Block                  2008-9          2009-10              2008-9           2009-10
                          No       Amt      No     Amt         No       Amt       No     Amt
 1     Narnaul             --       --       5      2.50        --        --       50     7.50
 2     Ateli               --       --      10      6.00        --        --       50     7.50
 3     N/ Choudhary        --       --      10      6.00        --        --       50     7.75
       Total               --       --      25     14.50        --        --      150    22.50

(v). Gully Plugging
       The gully erosion is the advanced stage of soil erosion through water and in this type of
soil erosion not only the surface soil is removed but in alluvial soils very deep gullies are formed
and if their further development is not checked then they assumed the shape of Ravines which is
a menace to the development of civilization. In this area, the following three types of gullies are
existing:-

 Gully Types            Bed width          Depth            Side Slope      Over land slope
  1. Shallow            Below 10               0-3              2:1                0-8
  2. Medium              10-15                 3-9              3:1               8-15


       The gullied lands in all the watershed areas would be developed by constructing the gully
plugs of local materials of a suitable size and by this way the grade of gully bed and side slope of
gullies would bestabilised and in situ, the soil and moisture would be conserved and thereby the
vegetative cover will improved in quality and quantity.




                                                     148
          The height of the gully plug would vary from site by site but generally it will be kept
from 2m to 6 m. the No. of gully plugs to be constructed with benefited area and amount to be
constructed block wise are as under :-


Sr.            Name of Block                       2008-09                       2009-2010
No.                                          Ha           Amt               Ha           Amt
 1        Narnaul                           60             7.50            100            12.00
 2        Ateli                             --              --              --              --
 3        Nangal Choudhary                  --              --              20             2.50
                 Total                      60             7.50            120            14.50

(vi). Constructing P.E./W.H Masonry Structures
          The available natural resources which damage the areas will be controlled by
constructing some suitable structures of local materials. As per suitable sites where the Nallah
slope is reduced and sufficient space is available to retain the water at reasonable cost on the up-
stream side. The masonry structure will be constructed to retain the water and allow it to
recharge the ground water potential or this stored water will provide to some areas down below
one protective irrigation to the agricultural crops. With the storage of water, the water regime in
the circumferencial area of the pondage, will improve and the improved quality of vegetative
cover will be establised. Moreover the Fish-culture would be introduced. In addition to the
benefit of flood control the watering to the plants during the dry period at the time of needs will
be done and the wild life will use it for drinking purposes as the entire area is totally devoided
of water storage.
Table 90. Block wise proposed programme for the construction of PE/WHMasonary Structures.
Sr. No.          Name of Block                     2008-09                       2009-2010
                                              Ha         Amt                Ha           Amt
      1      Narnaul                         50             6.00           150            18.00
      2      Ateli                           45             5.45            --              --
      3      N/ Choudhary                   540            64.63            --              --
                Total                       635            76.08           150            18.00

(vii). Construction of Check Dams
          To conserve the moisture and soil in situ and to stablise the gullies bed and bank at none-
erosive grade the check dam of dry masonry type explained under the previous head for the




                                                   149
treatment of hill areas would be constructed. The Number of Check dams to be constructed and
the area to be treated with expenditure to be spent block wise is given in Table 91.


Table 91. proposed area to be treated with check dams block-wise.
Sr.          Name of Block                       2008-09                       2009-2010
No.                                         Ha         Amt                Ha           Amt
 1    Narnaul                              65             7.50            --              --
 2    Ateli                                16             2.00            20             2.00
 3    Nangal Choudhary                     44             5.25            50             4.00
             Total                         85            14.75            70             6.00

(viii). Construction of Diversion Bund/Channel


       During rainy season the surface run-off from the hilly areas flow with a high speeds and
carry with it the loose materials. The loose materials including Boulders, Stones and pebbles are
deposited into the Agricultural fields and render them less productive. Similarly along the Nallah
where the agricultural fields directly drain into the Nallah and with the flow of water the Nallah
bank are eating the agricultural land and extending into the Agricultural fields and widening their
course similarly the gully heads are extending into the Agricultural fields and fields are being
converted into gullied land. So, to save the agricultural lands from the damages of the surface
run-off, the diversion bund or channel as per site demands, would be constructed at suitable sites.
The number of diversion bunds/channels to be constructed with benefitted area and amount to be
spent block-wise is given as below.
(ix). Construction of Stock Ponds/ Recharge Ponds

        The water table in the areas is going down and down every year due to the facts that the
re-charge did not match with the draft of the tube-wells existing in the areas. If the down ward
trend of the water level is not checked then there is every likely-hood of failure of shallow tube-
wells existing in the area which would create a grave situation. So, to augment the ground water
potential, it is proposed that re-charging ponds will be constructed, which during rainy season
these will be filled with the rainy water and this stored water will percolate into the soil and re-
charge the ground water potential. These re-charging ponds would be constructed in common of
lands. Some stock ponds (Table 92) would be constructed in the dry farming areas to store the
surplus run-off water of the fields for percolation as well s live-stock purposes.




                                                 150
Table 92. Proposed block-wise stock ponds/recharge ponds.
Sr. No.         Name of Block                   2008-09                      2009-2010
                                             Ha       Amt                  Ha        Amt
   1        Narnaul                         15           2.00             40           5.00
   2        Ateli                           20           2.21             --            --
   3        Nangal Choudhary                60           7.13             --            --
                  Total                     95          11.34             40           5.00

(x). Retaining Wall
          The stock ponds which are on bank of road side, Katcha path these retaining walls are
constructed to protect these banks sides. Proposed budget plan is under :-
Sr. No.          Name of Block                   2008-09                     2009-2010
                                            Ha             Amt            Ha         Amt
   1        Narnaul                         --               --           --            --
   2        Ateli                           --               --           --            --
   3        Nangal Choudhary                8              10.50          17          19.50
                Total                       8              10.50          17          19.50

(xi). Under Ground Pipe Line from Canal to Stock Pond
          To fill up the stock pond already constructed in village for cattle drinking water or
underground recharge purpose from the canal it is purposed to bury the underground pipe line
the proposal is as under:-


Sr.          Name of Block                    2008-09                         2009-2010
No.                                Length in Km       Amt            Length in Km     Amt
 1     Narnaul                            --             --                3            30.00
 2     Ateli                            4.25           42.00               2             9.00
 3     Nangal Choudhary                 2.00            9.00               --             --
             Total                      6.25           51.00               5            39.00

(xii). Marginal Bunds
          These would be constructed to treat the isolated areas lying between the gullies head and
agricultural lands or along the bank of Nallah where the field water directly drain into the
agricultural lands/ fields, cross section would vary depending upon the drainage area but
generally it will be kept between 1.5 sqm to 2.00 sqm. The side slope would be 1.5:1 to 2:1 as
per type of soil. The proposed plan is as under :-




                                                 151
Sr.          Name of Block                     2008-09                     2009-2010
No.                                      Ha              Amt           Ha          Amt
 1    Narnaul                            30               3.50         100          12.00
 2    Ateli                               --               --           --            --
 3    Nangal Choudhary                   60               7.10          54           6.40
            Total                        90              10.60         154          18.40

(xiii). Drop Structure
       The rain water from high ridges which falls 5' or more at the very site these drop
structures are constructed to save the area from soil erosion. The proposed budget plan is as
under :-
Sr.          Name of Block                     2008-09                     2009-2010
No.                                           Ha    Amt                   Ha      Amt
 1    Narnaul                                    --              --          40            5.00
 2    Ateli                                      --              --           --              --
 3    Nangal Choudhary                           --              --            3           4.50
      Total                                      --              --          43            9.50

(xiv). Treatment of Sodic Water
       These pumping set/ T. Wells which are not having fresh water and having marginal and
brackish water there discriminate use without the knowledge of their quality will deteriorate the
soil and affecting crops growth and yields.
       For efficient and economic utilizing of different group of water in relation to soil, crop
and management practices the following targets are proposed years wise as under :-
Sr.          Name of Block                     2008-09                     2009-2010
No.                                       Ha             Amt            Ha         Amt
 1    Narnaul                             --              --           100           4.50
 2    Ateli                               --              --           200           9.00
 3    Nangal Choudhary                    --              --            --            00
             Total                        --              --           300          13.50




                                               152
      Table 93. Summary of Proposed Soil Conservation Activities for Convergence of NAREGA & Other Schemes with RKVY in Narnaul Sub
                 Division during 2008-09

Sr.      Name of       Retaing   Check   Under    Marginal       Field            Land           Gully     Drop          Subsidy        Farmers        Sub     Injection         Land       Stock   P.E.    G. Total
No.       Block         Wall     Dam     Ground    Bund        Bounding         Levelling        Plug    Structure         to on         under       Subsidy     Bore         Reclamation   Pond
                                          pipe                                                                           sprinkler      ground          to
                                          line                                                                              set           pipe       Farmer
                                                                                                                                          line
                         No      Ha      Canal     Ha           Ha               Ha               Ha          No              No           No         No            No        Ha     M.T.   Ha      Ha       Phy
                         Amt     Amt     Stock    Amt          Amt              Amt              Amt          Amt             Amt         Amt         Amt           Amt             Amt     Amt     Amt      Amt
                                         Pond
                                          KM
                                         Amt
1      Narnaul            --      65       --     30           --          --   --          --   60      --         --   --         -   --       -     --      --         -    --      --   15      50       220 Ha
                          --     7.50      --     3.50                                           7.50                          -             -         --            -                      2.00    6.00      26.50
2      Ateli              --      16     4.25     --      --   --          --   --          --     --    --         --   --         -   --       -     --      --         -    --      --   20      45      4.25KM
                          --     2.00    42.00                                                     --                          -             -         --            -                      2.21    5.45      36 Ha
                                                                                                                                                                                                              51.66
3      Nangal             8       44     2KM      60                 16               22          --     --         --   --         -   --       -     --      --         -    --      --   60      540     2KM
       Choudhary        10.50    5.25    9.00     7.10              2.00             2.60         --                           -             -         --            -                      7.13    64.63   742
                                                                                                                                                                                                            108.21
4      G. Total           8       85     6.25     90                 16               22          60     --         --   --         -   --       -     --      --         -    --      --   95      635     6.25KM
                        10.50    14.75   51.00    10.60             2.00             2.60        7.50                          -             -         --            -                      11.34   76.08   1058Ha
                                                                                                                                                                                                             186.37

               Note : Execution of above works will be possible if labour and Machinery (Tractor/ Dozer) both will be allowed for proper execution of the scheme




                                                                                                         153
Table 94. Summary of Proposed Soil Conservation Activities for Convergence of NAREGA & Other Schemes with RKVY in Narnaul Sub-
           Division during 2009-10.

Sr.    Name of   Retaing   Check   Under           Marginal       Field    Land     Gully     Drop       Subsidy    Farmers     Sub     Injection         Land            Stock   P.E.     G.
No      Block     Wall     Dam     Ground           Bund        Bounding   Leveli   Plug      Struct      to on      under    Subsidy     Bore           Reclamat         Pond            Total
 .                                  pipe                                    ng                 ure       sprinkle   ground       to                        ion
                                    line                                                                   r set      pipe    Farmer
                                                                                                                      line      for
                                                                                                                               WCS
                                                                                                                               Pipes
                  No       Ha       Canal          Ha           Ha         Ha       Ha            No      No         No         No           No               Ha          Ha      Ha      Phy
                  Amt      Amt      Stock          Amt          Amt        Amt      Amt           Amt     Amt        Amt       Amt           Amt              M.T.        Amt     Amt     Amt
                                    Pond                                                                                                                      Amt
                                     KM
                                    Amt
1     Narnaul      --       --        3            100          50         50       100            40      10          5        50      5     5.00            100         40      150    110
                   --       --      30.00          12.00        6.00       6.00     12.00         5.00    2.50       2.50      7.50                           4.50        5.00    18.0   Nos
                                                                                                                                                                                  0      590 Ha
                                                                                                                                                                                          116.0
2     Ateli        --       20            2        --      --      60       200       --           --      100        10        50           10               200         --      --     170
                   --      2.00         9.00                      7.00     24.00      --           --     25.00      6.00      7.50         10.00             9.00        --      --     480 Ha
                                                                                                                                                                                          99.50
3     Nangal       17       50     --          -   54              50        40       20           3       20         10        50      --          --   --          --   --      --     100
      Choudha     19.50    4.00          -         6.40           6.00      4.60     2.50         4.50    5.00       6.00      7.50                                       --      --     214 Ha
      ry                                                                                                                                                                                  66.00
4     G. Total     17       70        5            154             160      290      120           43      130        25        150          15            300            40      150    380
                  19.50    6.00     39.00          18.40          19.00    34.60    14.50         9.50    32.50      14.50     22.50        15.00         13.50           5.00    18.0   1284Ha
                                                                                                                                                                                  0      281.5

      Note : Execution of above works will be possible if labour and Machinery (Tractor/ Dozer) both will be allowed for proper execution of the scheme




                                                                                            154
Table 95. Proposed Soil Conservation Activities for Convergence of NAREGA & Other
           Schemes with RKVY to be done in different villages of Mahendergarh Sub-
           Division during 2008-09 & 2009-10.

Øa0      xkao dk uke                         dk;Z dk uke                   vuqekfur jkf'k
l[;k                                                                #0
1.       tk¡V                           MkbZojru pSuy                            47818/-
2.       HkwjtV                         MksykCkUnh d`f"kQkeZ
                                        ipak;r Hkweh cuh                         82832/-
                                        iksUM                                   222332/-
                                        deikSLV fiV                             172045/-
                                        lkS[rk xM<s                              32260/-
                                        MkbZojlu psuyxako ls
                                        cuh okys tksgM+ rd                      147155/-
3.       ikyM+h ihugkjk                 ipka;r d`f"k QkeZ MksycUnh               56000/-
                                        ipka;r cuh MksycUnh                     112000/-
4.       flrkSB                         MksycUnh ipka;r cuh                      81690/-
                                        MkycUnh fllkSB ipk;ar
                                        cuh-2                                   167138/-
5.       fjoklk                         MksycUnh ipka;r Hkwfe
                                        d`f"k QkeZ u0- 1                         58240/-
                                        MksycUnh ipka;r Hkwfe
                                        d`f"k QkeZ u0- 2                      62720-00/-
                                        MksycUnh ipka;r Hkwfe
                                        d`f"k QkeZ u0- 3                         26880/-
6.       [kk;jk                         iksUM                                   629423/-
7.       tk¡tM+h;kokl                   iksUM                                    58587/-
                                        MksycUnh iapk;r cuh                      25600/-
8.       Nkft;kokl                      iksUM                                    83158/-
                                        ipka;r d`f"k QkeZ MksycUnh               68606/-
9.       dqdlh MksycUnh d`f"k QkeZ ipka;r                                         85760
                                        iksUM                                    83158/-
10.      xqykoyk                        MksyoUnh d`f"k QkeZ u0- 1                 8576/-
                                        MksycUnh d`f"k QkeZ u0- 2                60032/-
                                        MksycUnh d`f"k QkeZ u0- 3               171520/-
11.      Mksjksyh tkV                   MksycUnh cuh                             75040/-
                                        lkS[rk x<                                16954/-
12.      xgkfu;k                        iksUM                                    83158/-
                                        MksycUnh d`f"k ipka;r QkeZ               49312/-
                                        MksycUnh d`f"k ipka;r cuh                42880/-
13.      csjkokl                        iksUM                                   231162/-


                                       155
                                    MksycUnh ipka;r d`f"k QkeZ    154368/-
14.   iky                           MksycUnh xkspj Hkwfe           85760/-
                                    MksycUnh ipka;r d`f"kZ QkeZ    34304/-
                                    iksUM                         216741/-

15.   iYy                           iksUM                         103755/-
                                    MksykcUnhipka;r d`f"kZ
                                    QkeZ u0- 1                     36480/-
                                    QkeZ u0- 2                     21440/-
                                    QkeZ u0- 3                     30080/-
                                    MksykcUnh ipka;r pjkxkg
                                    Hkweh                         364480/-
16.   fuEcsgMk                      iksUM                         216741/-
                                    MksykcUnh d`f"kZ QkeZ          20352/-
                                    MksykcUnh cuh                  25728/-
17.   ikyh                          MksykcUnh cuh                  48000/-
                                    MksycUnh d`f"kZ QkeZ          297280/-
                                    lkS[rkx<                       32260/-
18.   ukaxy                         MksykcUnh ipka;r Hkwfe         12500/-
                                    MksycUnh cuh                   72000/-
                                    LkkS[rkxM<s                    30000/-
19.   eksguiwj                      ipka;r Hkwfe MksykcUnh         10000/-
                                    cuh MksykcUnh                  79000/-
                                    lkS[rkx<                       28000/-
20.   pSykokl                       lsDrkxM<s                      12000/-
                                    ipka;r Hkwfe MksykcUnh         40500/-
                                    MksykcUnh ipka;r Hkwfe         15400/-
                                    MksykcUnh cuh                  53000/-
21.   <ka.kh                        cuh dh MksycUnh               241700/-
                                    lkSDrk xM<s                    12000/-
                                    iDdh ukyh vfrfjDr ikuh        240000/-
22.   lssgyax                       LkkSDrkxM<s                   200000/-
                                    ipka;r Hkwfe MksykcUnh         90270/-
                                    MksykcUnh cuh                 193500/-
23.   ryikuk ipka;r Hkwfe MksykcUnh 36225
                                    cuh dh MksykcUnh              193500/-
24.   mP;r                          MksykcUnh ipka;r Hkwfe         44100/-
                                    ugj ls tksgM rd ikbZi
                                    ykbZu                         150000/-
                                    lkSDrkxM<s                     20000/-
                                    ikbZi ykbZu                   156300/-
                                    vfrfjDr ikuh fudklhukyk       111294/-
25.   fNrjkSyh                      MksykcUnh ipka;r Hkwfe         26800/-


                                 156
                      MksykcUnh cuh                   289000/-
                      ukykxako ls tksgM rd            122000/-
                      lkSDrk xM<s                     200000/-
26.   >kMyh           LkkSDrk xM<s                     40000/-
                      ctaj Hkwfe MksykcUnh            396000/-
                      Ckuh MksykcUnh                  247500/-
                      tksgM [kqnkbZ                   189000/-
                      ugj ls tksgM rd ikbZi ykbZu     191000/-
                      tksgM dh pkjfnokjh              816900/-
27.   /kukSUnk        ipka;r Hkwfe MksykcUnh          126000/-
                      LkkSDrk xM<s                    500000/-
                      tksgM [kqnkbZ No.-2             625128/-
                      ukyk ugj ls tksgM rd            216000/-
28.   dSeyk           ipka;r Hkwfe MksykcUnh           28350/-
                      lkSDrk xM<s                     200000/-
                      ukykxko ls tksgM rd             154440/-
                      tksgM [kqnkbZ                   100800/-
29.   l&jlwyiqj       ipka;r Hkwfe MksykcUnh           92100/-
                      Ckuh MksykcUnh                  190000/-
                      lkSDrk xM<s                       8000/-
                      tksgM [kqnkbZ                   177744/-
                      ukykckcafl;k ls ctaj Hkwfe rd   216000/-
30.   xq<k            ipka;r Hkwfe MksykcUnh          157500/-
                      lkSDrk xM<s                     240000/-
                      tksgM [kqnkbZ                   237600/-
                      ukyk vfrfjDr ikuhfudklh         304500/-
31.   [kjdMk ckl      ipka;r Hkwfe MksykcUnh           60000/-
                      ukykvkuk ekbZuj ls nwykMh
                      tksgM rd                        110250/-
                      cuh MksykcUnh                    72468/-
                      lkSDrk xM<s                      16000/-
32.   ddjkyk          ipka;r Hkwfe MksykcUnh          107000/-
                      cuh MksykcUnh                   724680/-
33.   lMd             gjhtu cLrh ls tksgM
                      rd vfrfjDr ikuh fudklh          237600/-
34.   yjhjk           MksykcUnh cuh                   304290/-
                      lkSDrk xM<s                     400000/-
                      ipka;r Hkwfe MksykcUnh           24066/-
                      tksgM [kqnkbZ                   226800/-
                      vfrfjDr ikuh fudklh
                      gjhtu cLrh ls 'ke'kkuHkwfe rd   340200/-
35.   dkSfV;k         tksgM [kqnkbZ                   226800/-
                      cuh MksykcUnh                    56700/-


                   157
36.   tUgkuh             ipka;r MksykcUnh                 38430/-
                                                          24980/-
                         cuh MkykcUnh                    178000/-
                         u0-3 jSEi                       450000/-
                         tksgM [kqnkbZ                   288900/-
37.   es?kuokl           iksUM [kqnkbZ                   823284/-
                         iqjkus tksgM [kqnkbZ            421848/-
                         MksykcUnh es?kuokl ls bykuk
                         lhek rd                          64491/-
                         MksykcUnh es?kuokl ls cqpkSyh
                         dkdM rd                          25457/-
38.   cqpkSyh            tksgM [kqnkbZ                   823284/-
                         iqjkuk tksgM [kqnkbZ            196020/-
                         MksykcUnh                        89000/-
39.   dyokMh             tksgM [kqnkbZ                   617463/-
40.   Hkk.MkSj uhph      dPpk ukyk [kqnkbZ                44640/-
41.   fpryakx            Hkwfe lery                      660000/-
42.   nsokl              dPpk okVj psuy usgj
                         ls tksgM rd                      54000/-
43.   >xMkSyh            jkLrs MksykCkUnh                 49798/-
44.   vkukokl            tksgM [kqnkbZ                   300000/-
                         MksycUnh                        475992/-
                         MksykcUnh 'ke'kku ?kkV           15048/-
45.   cphuh              tksgM [kqnkbZ                   425250/-
                         tksgM [kqnkbZ                   567000/-
46.   xkxMokl            tksgM [kqnkbZ                   425250/-
                         MksycUnh                        153000/-
                         tksgM [kqnkbZ                   283500/-
47.   flxMh              feVVh HkjkbZ duhuk
                         egsUnzx< jksM ls 'ke'kku
                         ?kkV                            381857/-
48.   flxMk              tksgM [kqnkbZ                   283500/-
49.   cokuk              tksgM [kqnkbZ                   518400/-
50.   nksxMk vghj        MksykcUnh                       133650/-
                         MksykcUnh Hkky[kh ls            146379/-
                         ukuxokl dkjkLrk
51.   cklMh              MksycUnh                        300000/-
                         tksgM [kqnkbZ                    75000/-
52.   chjflgokl          MksykcUnh                       300000/-
                         tksgM [kqnkbZ                    24000/-
53.   cyk;pk             tksgM [kqnkbZ vfrfjDr
                         ikuh fudklh                     435000/-
54.   lkSgyk             izdksyS'ke Mse] xyh cUn


                      158
                                         tksgM [kqnkbZ] MjkbZojlu           2370000/-

                                         TOTAL                           2,86,80,581/-



(F). Agricultural Engineering

  Proposed Action Plan for Providing Assistance to Farmers under
      RKVY for procurement/use of Agricultural Implements
   gfj;k.kk jkT; esa ftyk egsUnzx< Hkwfe gkykr nwljs ftyks dh vis{kk fHkUu
gSA D;ksafd bl ftys dh Hkwfe jsrhyh feV~Vh rFkk maph fuph gS vkSj bl ftys
esa ugjh ikuh dk mi;ksx Hkh T;knk ek=kk esa ugha gksrk gSA tcfd nwljs ftyks
dh Hkwfe lery feV~Vh rFkk nkseV feV~Vh gS vkSj mu ftyks esa ugjh ikuh Hkh
mfpr ek=kk esa d`f"k flapkbZ gsrw iz;ksx fd;k tkrk gSA tcfd ;gka ij iwjh rjg ls
cjlkr ij fuHkZj jguk iM+rk gSA
   bl ftys dh d`f"k Hkwfe gkykrksa dh ctg ls bl ftys esa d`f"k ;U=k Hkh nwljs
ftyks dh vis{kk vyx fdLe ds mi;ksx fd;s tkrs gSaA bl ftys esa dYVhosVj]
fMLdgsjks] lhM&de&QVhZykbZtj Mªhy] FkSzlj yS.M ysoyj] ,e-ch-Iykm rFkk
fjijckbZUMj vknh d`f"k ;U=k mi;ksx esa vkrs gS tcfd vU; ftyks esa tSls thjks
Vhyst] jksVkosVj] LVªkbZcj iksLV gksYM Mhxj o vU; d`f"k ;U=k mi;ksx fd;s tkrs
gSA vr% vkils vuqjks/k fd;k tkrk gS fd ftyk egsUnzx< dh dqf"k Hkwfe gkykrks
dks e/; utj j[krs gq;s bl ftys esa vuqnku ij dYVhosVj] fMLdgsjks] ,ech Iykm]
lhM&de&QVhZykbZtj Mªhy] ystM ysoyj o VSªDVj ekmUVsM Lisz;j dks vkj-ds-
b-ch-okbZ- Ldhe esa vuqnku ij d`"kdks dks fnyokus dk izko/kku j[kk tk;sA
   ftyk egsUnzx< dh Hkwfe gkykrks dks ns[krs gq;s vuqekfur yxHkx 810
d`f"k ;U=kksa dk izko/kku j[kus dk izLrko rS;kj fd;k x;k gS rFkk ftu ij vuqekfur
d`f"k ;U=kksa dh yxHkx dher 3,28,75000/- :i;s gSA gfj;k.kk jkT; esa
d`f"k ;U=kksa dks vuqnku ij miyC/k djokus ckjs dbZ Ldhe py jgh gS ftuesa
d`f"k ;U=kk ij 50% vuqnku jkf'k fdlkuksa dks nh tk jgh gSA blh izdkj        ftyk


                                      159
egsUnzx< esa mi;ksx gksus okys d`f"k ;U=k ij Hkh 50 izfr’kr jkf'k dk vuqnku
izok/kku fd;k tk;sA fjijckbZUMj dks NksM dj vuqekfur yxHkx 760 d`f"k ;U=k ij
50 izfr’kr jkf'k vuqnku ij yxHkx 95,62,500/- :i;s gS tcfd fjijckbZUMj ij vkj-ds-oh-
okbZ Ldhe ds vUrxZr igys ls gh 1,15,000/- :i;s vuqnku jkf'k nh tk jgh gSA blfy;s
fjijckbZUMj ij vuqekfur yxHkx jkf'k 57,50,000/- :i;s gSA vr% vkils vuqjks/k gS fd
ftyk egsUnzx< ds fy;s mijksDr d`f"k ;U=kksa dks vkj-oh-okbZ Ldhe esa 50
izfr'kr vuqnku jkf'k ij fdlkuksa dks fnyokus dk izko/kku fd;k tk;s rkfd vU; ftyks dh
rjg bl ftys ds fdlkuks dks Hkh d`f"k ;U=kksa dh vuqnku jkf'k dk ykHk fey ldsa
rFkk d`f"k mRiknu esa c<ksrjh dh tk ldsaA
   vr% d`f"k ;U=kksa dh dqy la[;k 810 gS rFkk budh vuqekfur dher yxHkx
3,28,75,000/- :i;s gS ftldk iq.kZ fooj.k lyXu lwfp esa mYys[k fd;k gqvk gSA




                                        160
                 Lwfp 96- ftyk egSUnzx< esa mi;ksx gksus okys d`f"k ;U=kks dk fooj.k


Øa0 la0                                         d`f"k ;U=k dk ykHk                 d`f"k ;U=k dh
      d`f"k ;U=k dh                             d`f"k ;U=k dh dqy
                                                                                   jkf'k :i;s
1.    dYVhosVj (9,11,13 VkbZu)                20.000/-              200              40,000,00/-
2.    fMLd gSjks (12,14,16 VkbZu)             27,000/-              200              54,000,00/-
3.    lhM&de&QVhZykbZtj Mªhy] eYVhdks”k] lhM cksDl20.000/-          200              40,000,00/-
4.    ,e-ch-Iykm                              20,000/-                25              5,000,00/-
5.    yS.M ysoyj] xksMh                       16,000/-              100              16,000,00/-
6.    fjijckbZUMj                           2,27,000/-                50           1,37,50,000/-
7.    gMEck FkSzlj                          1,50,000/-                20               30,0000/-
8.    VSªDVj ekmUVhM Lis;j                    25,000/-                10               2,50000/-
9.    jksVkosVj                               75,000/-                 5              3,75,000/-
                                                dqy               810              3,28,75,000/-

             uksV % lHkh d`f"k ;U=kksa dh 50 izfrsssslr vuqnku jkf'k 1,53,12,500/- :i;s curh gSA




                                               161
6.5 Vision of XIth Plan

Conclusion:
Adoption of improved technology for increasing the productivity as well as income of the
farmers is the major issue. In late sixties, the state as well as the whole country, the gross
domestic product in agriculture was maximum with the advent of high yielding varieties.
High yielding varieties responds to good amount of water, fertilizer and pesticides which was
available in good amount during that period. In early periods, because of reduced water
facilities and undulating sandy soils, the area under crop cultivation was less in
Mahendergarh district. Maximum area was under rain fed condition in bajra and mustard.
With the era of sprinkler irrigation in late seventees,the area under crop cultivation started
increasing and it reached to maximum in acreage and production and provided strong
motivation to diversify crop sector in favour of high yielding cultivars of bajra,wheat and
mustard.
         During the last few years, the growth in cereal production has been due to better
agronomic management and better market prices / minimum support price policy of
government. Now the farmers of district have become important competitor in all sorts of
agriculture produce, in production of milk, honey and vegetables,etc.Living standard of the
farming community have increased with the increase in farm income. But, higher
productivity model would require more pesticide, hybrid technologies require more inputs.
The development of resistance in pests and weeds need to be monitored with the increasing
use of insecticides. The knowledge and skill of our extension agencies, scientist and farmers
will help to understand our farming system better.
         The recent trend on falling water table in the district and deteriorating soil health have
forced to rethink to sustain the production and productivity. The scientist and extension
agencies are now advising the farmers to move away from frequent cultivation, excess water
use, imbalance use of fertilzers and excess use of pesticides. Efficient use of irrigation water
through micro irrigation ( drip irrigation in fruit and vegetable crops),improving soil health
through green manuring and selection of less water requiring crops can increase the
economy of the farmer. Adoption of dairying,bee-keeping ,honey production, more area
under fruit and vegetable cultivation, mushroom cultivation can help farmers to get daily
income.
         Our goal is to increase productivity at the rate of 4 per cent per year, reduce water use
and energy consumption by 10 per cent through reduced fuel consumption in farming system.
Technologies like zero-tillage for conservation agriculture are available that can reduce the
energy consumption and increase profits. The increased targets of eleventh five year plan
could be met only by adopting the efficient higher technology in all the cropping systems.
This would require large scale machinery use for land leveling through laser laveller in
surface and zero tillage machines and bed planter in case of vegetables (for ridge sowing)
and seed cum fertilizer drill for precise placement of seeds and fertilizer at the appropriate
depths. The exercise of monitoring yield levels in each district must be done through KVK,s
for planning before the start of next season. With the projected physical targets and estimated
budget proposals, it is envisaged to achieve targeted growth of 4 percent in the district
Mahendergarh.




                                               162
                   Proposed Budget for XIth Plan
                      Mohindergarh District
Sr.                      Sector/Scheme                       Proposed
No.                                                           Outlay
                                                           (Rs. In Lacs)
 1    Agriculture                                             3369.50
 2    Horticulture                                           1346.00
 3    Animal Husbandry                                       1033.20
 4    Subsidiary Occupations                                  182.30
 5    Others                                                 1470.00
                  Sub-Total                                  7401.00

Special Projects for Convergence of NREGA etc with RKVY
  1    Agriculture : Sub-Divisional Narnaul                   439.85
 2    Agriculture : Sub-Division Mahendergarh                 106.96
 3    Horticulture                                            143.40
 4    Animal Husbandry                                        113.19
 5    Fisheries                                               244.50
 6    (a). Soil Conservation : Narnaul Sub-Division
         (i) 2008-09                                          186.37
         (ii) 2009-10                                         281.50
      (b).Soil Conservation : Mahendergarh Sub-Division       286.80
 7    Agricultural Engineering                                328.75
                  Sub-Total                                  2131.32

               Grand Total                                9532.32 Lacs




                                    163

				
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