Week One Youngstown State University by nikeborome

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									Who are these men?
Who are they portraying?
Why would Oliver Twist be showing
  up on a slide in a class about
     investigative reporting?
    What role did investigative
reporters play in the Vietnam War?
                The Jungle
Why are we
showing you
this picture?
Welcome to Advanced Reporting
 where you will think, challenge
yourself and possibly, challenge
            others.
                         Today
• News service explanation – Alyssa Lenhoff and Tim
  Francisco
• Syllabus review – Tim Francisco
• History and significance of investigative reporting –
  Alyssa Lenhoff
• Details –
   –   Textbook
   –   Equipment
   –   Website
   –   Lab hours
   –   Subscriptions
   –   Email and phone
              News Service
•   Concept
•   Stories
•   Expectations
•   Operating procedures and policies
•   Equipment lending
•   LINK:
      News service explanation
•   A lot of hard work.
•   One incredible opportunity.
•   Joint venture
•   Details critical
•   Professional networking to an extreme
       Syllabus Explanation
• Syllabus for Advanced Reporting – Tim
  Francisco
    Investigative reporting today
• investigative reporting changed over time..
• Sometimes mobilizing role by activating the public to take
actions against wrongdoings.
• Sometimes, just set the agendas without any activation
purpose.
• Current conditions forcing investigative journalism to take
different position today.
    - Financial necessities
    - corporate ownership
• Greater need today.
What is investigative reporting?

• Simply, investigative reporting is good
  reporting.
• It’s also reporting with a purpose with
  change or reform as the ultimate goal.
History of investigative reporting
• Benjamin Harris, the publisher of the first public
  newspaper, Publick Occurrences.
• In an only issue of Publick Occurrences on September
• 25, 1690, Harris portrayed the torture of French
  prisoners by Indians who were allies of the
• British Army. The British authorities took Harris’ printing
  license before he published his second issue.
• Harris highlighted specific evidence of misconduct, and
  questioned the established public policy.
     More history of investigative
              reporting
• In the 1700s, the New England Courant
  attacked the Puritan church authorities for
  beginning a smallpox inoculation program
  he opposed.
• In 1735, John Peter Zenger was tried and
  convicted for seditious libel for uncovering
  corruption in the administration of New
  York’s Royal Governor William Cosby.
            More history…
• Penny Press in 1930s made it easier for
  newspapers to spread their work.
  Investigative journalism grew during this
  time period.
• Partisan press changing; newspaper
  publishers began using their papers for
  their own ideals regardless of political
  party affiliation.
        And still more history
• Key time for investigative reporting was
  the 1900s in America.
• Industrial revolution
• Large number of immigrants
            And even more
• Muckrakers
  – Exposed corruption, crime, waste, and
    brutality
  – Had sense of social sensibility
  – Wanted public to take action
  – Often resulted in reforms
           And more history
• Back to our first slides for a moment:
                The Jungle
Why are we
showing you
this picture?
Why would Oliver Twist be showing
  up on a slide in a class about
     investigative reporting?
        Applying knowledge
• This is your first opportunity to apply what
  we’ve just been discussing.
• Take five minutes and write down why you
  think these slides – the meat packing plant
  and Oliver Twist would be in our first day’s
  lecture.
               Discussion
• The Jungle – What was it all about? What
  kind of journalism was this? What
  motivated it? How was it reported? Why
  did it matter?

• Oliver Twist – What about the plot of this
  story would have been appropriate and
  likely for investigative reporting? Why?
            Back to history
• One other development in the 1900s
  inspired media organizations to embrace
  investigative reporting:
  – Growing number of newspapers and readers
    and media executives’ desires to distinguish
    their product.
        Classic muckrakers
• Ida Tarbell – Standard Oil, The
  Rockefellers.
• What she did is the classic model.
• What did she do?
                 Ida Tarbell
•   Took on the powerful
•   Stood up for those without power
•   Exposed wrongdoing
•   Stood up to criticism
•   Called badly needed attention to incredible
    outrage
    History becomes definition
• Investigative reporting has earned its
  definition through practice
  - Some have called investigative reporting
  the “reporting of outrage.”
• Ned Chilton: “Sustained Outrage.”
  - Ashland Oil.
  - Consolidated Investment Scandal
  History shapes profession and
            individuals
• Vietnam War
• Watergate
   Applying theory and history
• So, back to this slide
    What role did investigative
reporters play in the Vietnam War?
             Vietnam War
• We were a little young, but this reporting
  still influenced us and clearly shaped a
  nation into action and social protest –
  reporting about injustices, missteps etc.
  associated with the war.
And now this slide
Who are these men?
Who are they portraying?
         Role of Watergate
• Motivated an entire generation of
  reporters.
• Changed society’s expectations for
  conduct of public officials.
         Personal motivation
• In work and life, we all are motivated by
  what we see, hear and experience.
• This is clearly true for you.
• You need to be reading, watching and
  listening to great investigative reporting in
  order to be successful in this class and in
  the profession of journalism.
            Suggestions
• Read. Read. Read. Read. Read. Read.
  Read. Read. Read. Read. Read. Read.
  Read. Read. Read. Read. Read. Read.
  Read. Read. Read. Read. Read. Read.
  Read. Read. Read. Read. Read. Read.
  Read. Read. Read. Read. Read. Read.
  Read. Read. Read. Read. Read. Read.
  Read. Read. Read. Read. Read. Read.
            Suggestions
• Read what?
 - Anything.
But at a minimum:
The Vindicator, The New York Times and
   any other newspapers.
              Suggestions
•   Watch. Watch. Watch. Watch.
•   Watch. Watch. Watch. Watch.
•   Watch. Watch. Watch. Watch.
•   Watch. Watch. Watch. Watch.
•   Watch. Watch. Watch. Watch.
•   Watch. Watch. Watch. Watch.
•   Watch. Watch. Watch. Watch.
            Watch what?
• Anything. But at a minimum: 60 Minutes.
               Suggestions
• Listen. Listen. Listen. Listen. Listen.
  Listen. Listen. Listen. Listen. Listen.
  Listen. Listen. Listen. Listen. Listen.
  Listen. Listen. Listen.
• Listen. Listen. Listen. Listen. Listen.
  Listen. Listen. Listen. Listen. Listen.
  Listen. Listen.
    Listen to What? And Whom?
•   Us.
•   Your neighbors.
•   Your family.
•   People you see in Kilcawley.
•   People you see anywhere.
•   NPR – All Things Considered.
                    Story
• By next week, you will be assigned one of
  these stories.
• You will be working in pairs of two.
• Your partner for the first story is the one
  sitting to your right.
• We will let you select which story you
  would like from the list. The list will change
  regularly. Check back often.
              Next week
• Come to class having read, watched and
  listened.
• You will be applying that knowledge. (No
  more clues.)

								
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