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CITIZEN LEADERSHIP FOR DEMOCRATIC GOVERNANCE

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					idasa
CITIZEN LEADERSHIP FOR
                     DEMOCRATIC
                     GOVERNANCE

                    CONSOLIDATED EVALUATION REPORT
                              2 November 2006


                        Funded by Sida

                                         : Developed by Intuthuko Business and Development Solutions
                                                                           Contact: Lindiwe Nkutha
                                                                           Cell number: 082 443 1746
                                                                         Email: motekut@mweb.co.za




Table of Contents


   idasa in partnership with Sida 2006
idasa: Citizen Leadership for democratic Governance


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idasa: Citizen Leadership for democratic Governance

Evaluation Report of the Citizen Leadership for
Democratic Governance Programme

Introduction
In November 2005 Idasa contracted Intuthuko Business and Development Solutions (IBDS), an
independent contractor, to conduct an evaluation of its Citizenship Leadership for Democratic
Governance Programme.


Scope of engagement
IBDS’s brief was to, in consultation with Idasa, evaluate the programme’s progress with regard to its set
objectives in the following manner:
    To evaluate the extent to which the Citizen Leadership Unit through the Citizen Leadership for
    Democratic Governance Programme has successfully or unsuccessfully met its overall objectives.
    To review how the training was implemented and to explore if there are any aspects of the course that
    could possibly be improved for future delivery
    To evaluate the extent to which the trainees have gained skills and knowledge in the areas of:
             o   leadership
             o   how government functions
             o   the role citizens can play in governance initiatives
             o   community organising and governance


    To evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of the mentoring system adopted in the courses
    To evaluate the extent to which citizenship participation in co-operative governance initiatives has
    been enhanced
    To evaluate the extent to which multi-agency approach has been enhanced
    To ascertain whether the design and facilitation of public participation processes have improved in
    the District Municipalities as a result of the training
    To select, under the guidance of Idasa, a representative sample of participants who underwent
    training, who would take part in focus group meetings as well as one-on-one interviews, as part of
    the evaluation process.
Overall methodology and engagement roll out plan
The evaluation process followed four phases as articulated in and agreed to in the terms of reference
as well as the engagement. Our brief as we understood it was to perform tasks:
    Desktop Study: Reviewing all project materials, including project proposal, training materials
    and participants’ course evaluation forms




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idasa: Citizen Leadership for democratic Governance
    Develop an evaluation and impact assessment tool: to guide and frame interview and focus
    group meetings with the citizen leaders, mentors, local municipality representatives as well as
    the Idasa project staff.
    Conduct interviews: with the course facilitators, material developers, citizen leaders, mentors and
    councillors.
    Report writing: the preparation and delivery of reports, to cover the various stages of the
    engagement, as well as a consolidated report, detailing comprehensive findings on all the phases.


          This report details all the work we have done while it offers our findings for all the various
phases.


Findings from desktop study

Methodology
The desk study was designed to get full understanding of the programme, from the conceptual
framework to its implementation, through its different phases.


In order to fully orientate ourselves with the programme, IBDS reviewed a number of documents
received from Idasa. All of which provided significant information on the programme and the ways
in which it was rolled out.


Our selection of the material for review, was influenced by and stemmed from our need to
understand how all the programmatic components fit into each other, as well as how they fed into
one another, to enhance the overall efficacy of the programme.


Amongst the documents reviewed were the:
o   founding documents: which included the project proposal, as well as a summary of the project
    description. The second type of data reviewed were
o   implementation documents: which included materials and tools developed for training purposes,
    agreements as well as the training schedules. Thirdly we appraised
o   review documents: amongst which were evaluation forms from participants,               fourthly we
    examined
o   reporting documents: made up of reports from the individual projects to Idasa, as well from
    Idasa to donors and management, and finally
o   logistical documents: such as participants list reviewed to ensure that the project reached the
    target numbers stipulated at conception.




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idasa: Citizen Leadership for democratic Governance
Findings from founding documents

About the Citizenship For Democratic Governance Programme
        In 2003, responding to research that pointed to the weakening in the way in which civil society
organised itself, post 1994, Idasa established within its democracy education programmes, the Citizen
Leadership for Democratic Governance Programme (CLDGP). The programme was designed to build
problem-solving capacity amongst citizen leaders in different provinces. Idasa was propelled its
endeavours by an awareness of the fact that despite all these “post-democracy” changes, there still
resounded a very audible voice of what it termed “the language of co-operative governance.” It was on
this basis that this project was conceived and implemented, with a major view to foster a spirit of full
and active citizen participation, amongst the still remaining citizen leaders.


        In its programme design, Idasa adopted a holistic three-pronged approach, patterned to facilitate
a three-way dialogue between newly trained leaders, established leaders and public officials. The
programme incorporated:
-   a leadership training component – for individual participants based in community organisations;
-   a mentorship training component – for established community leaders, whose responsibility it
    would be to support the new leaders; as well as
-   a component for the training of public officials– who would continue to work with the established
    leaders and establish contact with the newly trained community leaders.

The programme in detail
The programme’s objectives as stated in its founding documents are specified as, to:
    strengthen leadership capacity in civil society organisations, and thereby to build civil society
    build confidence and skill in citizens at grassroots level, so that that they are able to organise for
    change as well as to develop their own solutions to problems specific to their communities
        o    enhance citizen participation in a wide range of co-operative governance and
             development initiatives
        o    promote citizen-government partnerships aimed at addressing important social needs
        o    improve the design and facilitation of public participation processes
        o    contribute towards the ongoing renewal of leadership in civil society as well as
             government

Target audience

The areas targeted for implementation were two districts in the Northern Cape, namely, Namakwa
and Siyanda, as well as two in the Eastern Cape, namely OR Tambo, Chris Hani/Ukhahlamba. The
proposal stated its major beneficiaries as young and “middle-level” leaders, in the age groups 25 to



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   idasa: Citizen Leadership for democratic Governance
   45, based in civil society organisations, predominantly representing the interests of the youth,
   women. Also included in the target group were leaders in religious groups, cultural associations,
   sports clubs, as well as student organisations.

   Implementation
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   idasa: Citizen Leadership for democratic Governance

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idasa: Citizen Leadership for democratic Governance
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Comments on training material
Notes on the citizen leaders training materials and training programme
Both in design and presentation the materials sought to maintain a balance between the concepts of
citizenship from a theoretical background while providing useful and meaningful skills to support
the exercise of these.




The training material was split into two sections, one a trainer’s manual, which gave detailed tips to
the trainer on the subject matter as well as on suggested exercises, another a learners manual, which
included explanatory notes as well as useful handouts and was arranged in the following manner, to
cover the duration of the training:
Day        of      Training material covered                   Objectives
training
Week 1                   -       What is a Citizen?                -       Designed to introduce:
                         -       What is a leader?                 -       Various concepts of democracy, citizenship, as well as basic
                         -       Democracy                                 tenets of leadership and the responsibilities attendant to it.
                         -       Human rights                      -       Concepts of power, especially the power that lies in
                         -       Self interests                            individuals to effect change.
                         -       Power                             -       Concepts of power as they apply to external systems,
                         -       Public vs. private                        focusing on power relationships in their community.
                         -       Public speaking                   -       Key leadership skills, amongst which were public speaking
                                                                           and one-on-one interviewing skills.
                                                                   -       Establishing an agreement with their mentor.
Week 2                   -       Leadership styles                 -       Designed to help the leader:
                         -       Situational                       -       Describe and demonstrate different leadership styles, and
                                 Leadership                                identify appropriate leadership behaviour for different




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idasa: Citizen Leadership for democratic Governance
                -   Organising/                     situations.
                    Mobilising                  -   Use conflict situations to better understand community
                -   Gender                          issues and to practise everyday politics.
                -   Advocacy           and      -   Analyse how gender impacts on leadership at community
                    Lobbying                        level, & encourage women to be more actively involved in
                                                    community organising.
                                                -   Plan advocacy campaigns and community projects using an
                                                    organising approach.
                                                -   Think more strategically as leaders, especially by gathering
                                                    better information about community interests and resources.
Week 3          -   Local government            -   Designed to help the leader:
                -   Public participation        -   Think strategically about their relationship with local
                -   Accountability                  government, as citizen leaders.
                -   Local     government        -   List the powers and functions of local government and
                    and finance                     explain how it works, including the process of integrated
                -   Integrated                      development planning.
                    development plans           -   Propose ways of scaling up existing work on HIV/AIDS, or
                -   Proposal writing                mainstreaming HIV/AIDS in organisations outside the
                -   HIV/AIDS                        health & welfare sector.
                -   Presentation skills         -   Identify strategies for holding public officials to account.
                                                -   Identify the key elements of good proposals and reports, and
                                                    feel more confident about writing such documents
                                                -   Improve presentations through effective body language and
                                                    use of visual aids, in particular flipchart and overhead
                                                    projectors
Week 4          -   Project                     -   Designed to help the leader:
                    Presentations               -   Identify task and maintenance roles in groups, and
                -   Group dynamics                  appreciate the value of both of these.
                -   Personal goal setting       -   Work as a group to make a formal presentation on the
                -   Developing leaders              progress of their work.
                -   Leading          study      -   Give constructive feedback to one another.
                    circles                     -   Explain the core concepts of citizen leadership and
                                                    community organising.
                                                -   Provide examples of citizen action on a range of different
                                                    issues.
                                                -   Use study circle methods and materials to begin to develop
                                                    new citizen leaders and replicate the programme.




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idasa: Citizen Leadership for democratic Governance
Notes on mentor training materials and training programme
As with the citizen leadership training programme, the mentor training workshops were also
structured to strike a balance between theoretical concepts and practicable strategies. These were
arranged to cover the following subjects, in the three-day programme.
Day     of   Training material covered                               Objectives
training
Day 1            -   Define the concept of mentoring                     -   Designed to facilitate the process of:
                 -   Explain what is expected of mentors                 -   Getting     to    know        one      another   in
                     and mentees                                             mentoring pairs
                 -   Identify    concrete    ways     in    which        -   Talking together about work
                     mentors can support mentees                         -   Building       trust     in      the    mentoring
                 -   Make a firm commitment to their                         relationship
                     mentoring relationship – as guided by               -   Covering               different          learning
                     the mentoring workbook                                  methodologies
                                                                         -   Introducing the central tenets of what
                                                                             makes an effective mentor
                                                                         -   Establishing       mentoring           relationship
                                                                             guidelines, in terms of what each party
                                                                             can reasonably expect out of mentoring
                                                                             relationship
                                                                         -   Fostering an understanding on giving
                                                                             effective feedback
                                                                         -   Helping the mentee with goal setting
                                                                         -   Developing a mentoring agreement
Day 2            -   Propose     ways       of   dealing      with       -   Designed to introduce the mentor to the
                     mentoring challenges                                    world of the mentee, by highlighting
                 -   Distinguish between public and private              -   Differences between private and public
                     relations                                               life
                 -   Identify some of the key steps in                   -   Fostering        an       understanding          of
                     organising a community around a                         community participation, formation as
                     difficult                                               well as structures
                 -   Explain     the     difference        between       -   An     appreciation        for      differentiation
                     organising and mobilising                               between community organising and
                 -   Have an example of the type of group                    mobilising
                     project their mentee will be involved in            -   Different world views, between the
                 -   Name new ways in which they can help                    mentor and their mentee
                     their mentee see the world and asses
                     their resources



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idasa: Citizen Leadership for democratic Governance
Day 3             -       What is citizenship?                             -    Reflection on the day before
                  -       Skills and habits of citizen leaders             -    Mentor’s way of seeing
                  -       Helping each other meet mentoring and            -    Sharing in groups
                          citizenship goals                                -    Questions and issues arising from private
                                                                                and public life, knowing communities,
                                                                                organising vs. mobilising and mentor’s
                                                                                way seeing.

Notes on local councilor training materials and training programme
Similar to the other two training components, this one also took the approach of balancing
theoretical concepts against practicable strategies. The integral component here was the opportunity
afforded to both the councillors and the participants, to meet face-to-face, and begin dialoguing on
issues, in general.


For some citizen leaders, this afforded a first encounter with their representatives, which, outside the
programme would not have taken place.
Day        of   Training material covered               Objectives
training
Day 1                 -     Democracy and citizen           -    Designed to introduce councillors to:
                            participation                   -    Thoughts on democracy and community participation
                      -     What is a citizen?              -    Invite them to reflect on their challenges and
                      -     Customer         vs.   co            achievements with regard to citizen participation
                            creators,                       -    To invite them to share their leadership insight with
                                                                 the leadership trainees
Day 2                 -     Face to face session            -    In order to begin dialogue on upcoming projects and
                            with            community            around issues of common interest.
                            leadership trainees
                      -     Understanding Power             -    To help councillors gain insight into power relations
                                                                 that exist in their societies
Day 3                 -     IDP Success Story:              -    Provide workable examples of successful models that
                                                                 can be adapted to speak to their own needs.


Comments on complementary tools
Learning journal
The learning journal was a useful instrument, which raised some really useful questions meant to
structure the course on an on-going basis. Our sense is that properly applied, and summarised it




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   idasa: Citizen Leadership for democratic Governance
   would have been a key instrument in ensuring that the course stayed on track and subject matter
   learned was constantly reinforced into the participant’s minds.


    The learning journals for all the weeks asked the following questions, which will be incorporated
   into the interviewing questionnaire.


Week 1                        Week 2                          Week 3                      Week 4
What did you learn about      What was the most useful        What do you want to         What did you learn
yourself?                     knowledge       that     you    remember from today’s       about yourself as a
                              gained today? How will          training?                   citizen and as a leader
                              you apply it?                                               today?
What did you learn about      Do you new ideas about          Do you have thoughts        What did you learn
other people?                 leadership after today’s        about           community   from     your    fellow
                              training?                       organising that can apply   participants today?
                                                              to your work?
What did you learn about      What        questions      or   What questions do you       What ideas do you have
democracy and citizenship?    thoughts                about   have on your mind?          now about how you
                              community organising are        What do you still need to   want to change your
                              on your mind?                   know?                       world?

   Mentor agreement
   The mentor agreement gave guidelines on how to conduct the mentoring relationship and gave
   specifications about how to review and reformulate the relationship. It does not look like Idasa
   received any of the completed copies detailing proceedings of these meetings. Again our sense is
   that had these been kept, they would have pointed right from onset, to potential problems, which as
   this report will detail later, were evident even at the beginning.

   Findings from evaluation and review documents

   Summary of findings per province
   On the whole these documents showed that the training programmes were well received, with
   responses pointing to a general level of satisfaction with both the content covered as well as the
   facilitation styles used by facilitators to bring the message across.




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    idasa: Citizen Leadership for democratic Governance

    Findings from interviews and focus group meetings with citizen
    leaders, mentors and councillors
    Report back on individual sessions conducted in the two provinces
    For the most part the contact visits and interviews with the participants were conducted as focus
    group meetings, where the designed questionnaire was used, mostly as a means to frame the
    dialogical format that the meetings assumed.


    The objective of both the questionnaire and the meetings were primarily to get the participants
    views and takes on the entire programme and were framed to solicit the following information:
Citizen leader’s impressions of the:        Local councillors impressions          Mentors impressions of the:
                                            of the:
Overall project – focusing on:              Overall project – focusing on:         Overall project – focusing on:
-   the most important lesson learned       -   the most useful aspect of the      -   the most useful aspect of the
-   most striking component of the              training                               training
    course                                  -   the most important lesson          -   the most important lesson
-   most useful skill gained                    learned                                learned
-   the ways in which the programme         -   most striking component of         -   most striking component of
    has impacted on their work                  the course                             the course
-   impressions on the programme            -   impressions          on      the   -   impressions           on        the
    material                                    programme material                     programme material
-   impressions on the facilitation         -   impressions          on      the   -   impressions on the facilitation
    methodologies                               facilitation methodologies             methodologies
-   suggestions     on       how      the   -   suggestions     on    how    the   -   suggestions      on    how      the
    programme     could      be    framed       programme could be framed              programme could be framed
    differently for maximum effect.             differently    for    maximum          differently     for    maximum
                                                effect.                                effect.


Views on the projects/ assignment           Views on the face to face              Views on the relationship with
undertaken in line with Idasa’s action-     encounters with citizen leaders        the mentee
learning methodology, focusing on:



-   what the projects were                  -   experiences of the face to         -   general        experiences      of
-   how they decided on them                    face interactions                      relationship



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    idasa: Citizen Leadership for democratic Governance
-   their experience of working as part          -   opportunities        created   and   -   how   the    relationship    was
    of a team, as well as their general              taken forward                            conducted
    experiences of working on the                -   feelings on meeting other            -   challenges and obstacles
    projects                                         councillors                          -   what gifts given to mentee
-   indicators for the success of the                                                     -   what gifts gained from mentee
    projects                                                                              -   impact of relationship on own
-   lasting opportunities for future                                                          leadership
    collaboration      with      their   local
    municipalities
Views on the mentoring component                 Thoughts on opportunities to             Thoughts on collaborating with
of the course and relationship with              collaborate, during and after            the mentee on assigned project
mentors       –     focusing      on     their   the programme
relationships      with     mentors      with
regards to:
-   general nature of the relationship           -   experiences of collaborating         -   was this opportunity available
    and how it functioned                            with leaders on their projects       -   how it worked
-   their efficacy                               -   opportunities to cooperate           -   impact on project
-   benefit derived                                  after the programme
-   challenges            and       obstacles    -   noticeable changes working
    encountered                                      with leaders before and after
                                                     training
Views on the local government                    Experience of Idasa trained
interaction - focusing on:                       citizen leaders vs others in
                                                 general
-   results       derived       from     these   -   differences between working
    engagements                                      Idasa      trained     community
-   perceptible changes in the relation              leaders and others
    before and after the course                  -   noticeable changes in how
-   whether opportunities were taken                 you approach your work
    advantage of to create long and
    lasting collaborative relationships
    beyond the course
-   whether these have             continued
    beyond the life span of the project,
    and if so, how?




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    idasa: Citizen Leadership for democratic Governance

General comments –these although            General      comments       –these   General      comments            –these
initially not part of the questionnaire     although initially not part of the   although initially not part of the
came up so often in discussion that         questionnaire came up so often in    questionnaire came up so often in
they were subsequently included.            discussion    that   they    were    discussion    that       they        were
                                            subsequently included.               subsequently included.
-   Idasa as a partner                      -   Idasa as a partner               -   Idasa as a partner
-   Idasa’s public image                    -   Idasa’s public image             -   Idasa’s public image
-   Possible future interventions that      -   Possible future interventions    -   Possible future interventions
    might      possibly   galvanise   and       that might possibly galvanise        that might possibly galvanise
    sustain the effects of the course           and sustain the effects of the       and sustain the effects of the
                                                course                               course


    What follows is a consolidated report of the two provinces reports. Amalgamated because by and
    large responses received by participants were in a lot of ways similar, to the point that even
    projects undertaken were almost identical. The projects undertaken are shown in tables, as a way
    of drawing attention to similarities and differences in these issues the leaders chose to engage
    with. An attempt is made at the end of this section to draw similarities and differences in these
    regions.



    Findings from meetings with citizen leaders
    Citizen leader’s impressions on the:
        Overall project – focusing on:
               The most important lesson learned
               Asked to highlight the most important lessons they culled from the programme citizen
               leaders overwhelmingly pointed to the leadership component of the course and
               highlighted the many ways in which the programme has:
                   Impacted on their life styles and introduced a mind shift in the way they approach
                   their roles as community leaders.
                   Fore grounded for them as individuals, the importance of self-development as a
                   necessary trait for anyone who aspires to citizen leadership.
                   Expanded their horizon to possibilities they never knew existed before. This in
                   relation to the maximum benefits they now know can be achieved in any intervention,




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idasa: Citizen Leadership for democratic Governance
           if proper and concerted efforts are made to plan and organise, before plunging into
           execution.
           Enhanced in them the ability to take initiative, to the extent that some of the leaders
           started organisations, where none existed before, to address needs they identified
           themselves. Examples of this include:
           •    A man who established an association for disabled people in the Namakwa
                district, amongst whose success can be counted managing to influence local
                government to build ramps in schools, and provide new specialised shoes to
                people with disabilities.
           •    A young woman who established a child protection forum in the OR Tambo
                district, in Umtata – which continues to be in operation, and is also used to take
                other issues as well.
           One of the leaders remarked about the satisfaction she felt after successfully chairing
           her first meeting, using principles she learned from the course.
           Most of the women remarked about the boost in their confidence that has allowed
           them to overcome their fear of speaking and making their voices heard at meetings.


       The most striking component of the course
       In this regard the participants emphasised the benefit they received from a garnered
       understanding of the interrelatedness of the concepts of citizenship, power, self-interest
       and the importance of active participation citizens.
           These leaders repeatedly referred to a quotation by one of the facilitators, to the effect
           that :
           “although community work may be a muddy affair, it is made easier when one approaches it from the
           perspective of a conscious citizen”
           For most leaders who did not consider themselves politically inclined, the
           appreciation was more for the expansive definition of the word “politics” itself and
           how, regardless of their previous proclivities, began to feel like an all encapsulating
           term, that included also them.
           A greater number still remarked about the usefulness and significance of the contact
           sessions with their local councillors.


       The most useful skill(s) gained




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idasa: Citizen Leadership for democratic Governance
           Here leaders pointed to their new gained ability to make links, and cross-references
           between the many community roles that they occupy, so that they were better able to
           apply more integrated strategies to the work they did.
           Most commented on the benefit of the leadership concepts as a whole to other aspects
           of their life, other than their community work.
           •      For instance those who belonged to church groups and social clubs found that
                  they were able, without even consciously thinking about it, to apply their newly
                  acquired skills in those sub-communities as well.
           Technical skills such as communication, presentation, proposal and report writing
           were also highlighted.
           Dealing with communities and getting buy-in, before implementation of projects.
           The ability to create projects that dovetail into each other. This was mentioned in
           relation to integrating HIV/AIDS in all programmes undertaken.


       Ways in which the programme has impacted on their work
       In response to this question, citizen leaders reported a generally improved attitude and
       outlook, which allowed them to approach their work with an increased sense of
       confidence.
                  For most of the citizens the improved way in which they did their work resulted
       in promotions and being elected into positions into which they felt, without the course (1)
       they would have not felt themselves confident to assume, (2) they would never have been
       offered.


       Amongst some of the new appointments to new positions were:
           a woman who was elected to the Chair of her women’s league
           a young man who was appointed to the Chair of his youth group, with whom he
           shared the leadership strategies he learned, as part of his youth leadership
           development programme.
           several elections to local government structures, either as councillors or ward
           committee representative.


       Impressions on the programme material
       There were mixed reactions to the format, but never to the content of the material. This
       was largely due to the fact that the leaders possessed differing levels of formal education.



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idasa: Citizen Leadership for democratic Governance
             Some, and these were the ones who with little formal education, found that it was text
             intensive and at first intimidating.
                     These same ones struggled with understanding the language itself1. This
             however, was a problem that was overcome by the facilitation methodology, integral to
             which was group work – with a view to foster leader to leader interaction, and to ensure
             everyone’s full understanding and participation.


             The majority of the leaders said about the material that they found it so useful, that to
             date they still refer to it, to brush up on their knowledge.


             Others still mentioned how they had used excerpts of it, in the training that they
             themselves have been called on to make, citing the effectiveness in the manner in which
             the material grounded theoretical concepts, in real life experience, as demonstrated by
             case studies.


             Impressions on the facilitation methodologies
             The amiability and approachability of the facilitators was lauded. With most leaders, even
             those who were reticent in the beginning, ascribing to it, the ease to which they came to
             engage with and understand the material.


             Also highlighted was the fact of how abreast on the ever-changing landscape of local
             government the facilitators were. This not only in terms of legislation and by-laws, but
             also as it pertained to general developments in the said municipalities. The leaders felt
             that this encouraged their faith in the facilitators.


             Overall the facilitators were extolled for their demonstrated knowledge in all the
             components of the course, affording the leaders a well-rounded and holistic experience of
             the programme.


             Suggestions on how the programme could be framed differently for maximum effect
             Most of the participants felt that the programme was framed to their satisfaction. Others
             however felts that one of two things could be changed:


1
    &       !-                   "0   !          !           .-
0       !


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idasa: Citizen Leadership for democratic Governance
           One, an increase in contact time with the leaders. In other words an increase in the
           duration of the course
           Two, an increase in the lag times between one contact encounter and another, to
           allow for increased impact. In other words a more spread out programme.
       There were also comments, which even though not directly related to the existing
       structure of the current programme, are worth mentioning, in that they were recurring and
       raised suggestions on how gains made by this course could be sustained and galvanised.
           In this regard participants spoke of a need for integration into the current course, or
           perhaps the design of a stand-alone course that would help them make the transition
           between acquisition of new skills and their sustained implementation. Especially
           concerning acquiring and managing resources, mostly funding. Comments made such
           as:
                 “sometimes we feel like we were made and dropped” or we to “at the best of times we
                 feel like we are over trained but under resourced” and “sometimes we feel like teabags
                 waiting for boiling water”
       were made by some leaders, alluding the perceived gap in continuity.


       Although it must be said that these leaders, having said this, did recognise that the
       programme’s mandate was to impart the knowledge it did.


   Views on the projects/ assignment undertaken in line with Idasa’s action-learning
   methodology, focusing on:
       What the projects were
       Projects undertaken in the Northern Cape included the following:
    Namakwa                                         Siyanda
        HIV/AIDS                                        Domestic violence
        Women and child abuse                           Unemployment
        Drug and alcohol abuse                          Drug and alcohol abuse
        Nuclear waste management                        Child abuse
        Crime awareness                                 Foetal alcohol syndrome
        Teenage pregnancy                               Teenage pregnancy
        Municipal services – the state of               Child rape
        Recreational facilities for the youth –         Moral regeneration
        and the lack thereof




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idasa: Citizen Leadership for democratic Governance
        School drop out                               Social grants


       Projects undertaken in the Eastern Cape included the following
    OR Tambo                                      Chris Hani
        Domestic violence                             Rape
        Orphans                                       Poverty alleviation
        Drug abuse                                    Drug abuse
        Crime                                         Child support grant
        HIV/AIDS                                      Youth and development
        Cholera                                       Teenage pregnancy
        Teenage pregnancy                             Crime
        Poverty alleviation                           Unemployment


       How these were decided on
       The leaders referred to the instructions they had received during their training, relating to
       community organising and mobilising, garnering public participation and buy in, as some
       of the vital steps that guided them in the process of deciding which issues to tackle, as
       well as what strategies to adopt.
                 Highlighted were strategies pertaining to area mapping and identifying
       community assets and needs, exploring the customer –service mindset as well as
       importance of integrated planning.


       Experience of working as part of a team, as well as their general experiences of working
       on the projects
       For most of the leaders for whom working in a team was not a new phenomenon,
       comments were restricted to working in the specific teams, and concerned mostly the new
       experience of working in coherence with other people who were leaders in their own
       rights.
           On the downside traits attendant to general team dynamics were highlighted, amongst
           which were lack of coherence, sometimes, the uneven distribution of tasks, and
           wavering levels of commitment, at various points in the project.
           On the upside the opportunity to learn and observe from others, the different styles of
           leadership executed, was stated as a benefit most received, in working in said teams.




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       Indicators for the success of the projects
       Although most of the programmes the leaders worked on, were in the form of once-off
       campaigns, a great number of the leaders prided themselves in their lasting effect as a
       means of opening up, where none existed before, opportunities for on-going dialogue and
       engagement around the issues on which their projects touched on.


       Lasting opportunities for future collaboration with their local municipalities and other
       stakeholders
       Amongst some of the more lasting relationships that were established in the Northern
       Cape through the process of project implementation were:
 Namakwa                                                    Siyanda
 Project                 Established relationships          Project                  Established relationships
 •   HIV/AIDS            •   Schools,         voluntary     •   Domestic             •   Social              services
                             counselling and testing            violence                 department,                the
                             centres       and      local                                magistrate’s courts, other
                             municipalities                                              NGO’s in the gender
                                                                                         violence sector, Men’s
                                                                                         groups        and         local
                                                                                         councillors


 •   Women         and   •   Social              services   •   Unemployment         •   Department of labour,
     child abuse             department,           other                                 local business, and local
                             NGO’s in the gender                                         municipalities
                             violence sector, Men’s
                             groups        and      local
                             councillors
 •   Drug          and   •   Nicro, and other NGO’s         •   Drug and alcohol     •   Nicro, and other NGO’s
     alcohol abuse           in the field, as well as           abuse                    in the field, as well as
                             well local councillors                                      the local municipality
 •   Nuclear    waste                                       •   Child abuse          •   Social              services
     management                                                                          department,         FAMSA,
                                                                                         PPSA, and other NGO’s
                                                                                         working on children’s
                                                                                         issues, as well as the
                                                                                         local municipality.
 •   Crime               •   The police, the Justice        •   Foetal     alcohol   •   Department of heal, local



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    idasa: Citizen Leadership for democratic Governance
          awareness                 department, and local                 syndrome                clinics, as well as the
                                    councillors                                                   local municipality
      •   Teenage              •    Schools, local clinics,           •   Teenage         •       Schools, local clinics,
          pregnancy                 youth groups and the                  pregnancy               youth groups and the
                                    local municipality                                            local municipality
      •   Municipal            •    Resident          committees      •   Child rape      •       Social             services
          services – the            the             and     local                                 department, CDW’s, the
          state of                  municipality                                                  ANC –Youth League,
                                                                                                  other NGO’s working on
                                                                                                  children’s issues, as well
                                                                                                  as the local municipality
      •   Recreational         •    Schools, youth groups,            •   Moral           •       Cultural groups, youth
          facilities for the        and          the        local         regeneration            groups, and the local
          youth – and the           municipality                                                  municipality
          lack thereof
      •   School drop out      •    Schools, youth groups,            •   Social grants   •       Social             services
                                    and          the        local                                 department, and the local
                                    municipality                                                  municipality


    Amongst some of the more lasting relationships that were established in the Eastern Cape
    through the process of project implementation were:
OR Tambo                                                              Chris Hani
Project               Established relationships                       Project                 Established relationships
•   Domestic          •   Radio stations, advice offices, the         •   Rape                •     Social           services
    violence              police,    local       chiefs,     local                                  department,      CDW’s,
                          government                                                                other NGO’s working
                                                                                                    on children’s issues, as
                                                                                                    well      as   the        local
                                                                                                    municipality
    Social grants     •   Departments            of         social •      Poverty             •     Departments of social
    for orphans           development,         social     services,       alleviation               development,          social
                          home      affairs,     chiefs,     local                                  services, home affairs,
                          municipality, local media                                                 chiefs,                   local
                                                                                                    municipality
    Drug abuse        •   Rehabilitation centres, NICRO,              •   Drug abuse          •     Rehabilitation centres,
                          local government                                                          NICRO,                    local




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idasa: Citizen Leadership for democratic Governance
                                                                                              government
Crime            •   The        police,     the       Justice   •   Child       support   •   Social         services
                     department, and local councillors              grant                     department, and the
                                                                                              local municipality
HIV/AIDS         •   Schools, voluntary counselling             •   Youth          and    •   Schools, youth groups,
                     and testing centres and local                  development               local municipality, and
                     municipalities                                                           local business, advice
                                                                                              centres
Cholera          •   Department       of     Health      and    •   Teenage               •   Schools, local clinics,
                     sanitation, advice centre, rural               pregnancy                 youth groups and the
                     communities, local business, local                                       local municipality
                     media
Teenage          •   Schools,     local    clinics,    youth    •   Crime                 •   The police, the Justice
pregnancy            groups and the local municipality                                        department, and local
                                                                                              councillors
Poverty          •   Social services department, and            •   Unemployment          •
alleviation          the local municipality
     Views on the mentoring component of the course and relationship with mentors –
     focusing on their relationships with mentors with regards to
          General nature of the relationship and how it functioned
          A great number of the mentoring relationships were a continuing of already established
          relationship. Some leaders chose their bosses to also act as their mentors; others still
          approached influential leaders in their communities. This meant that even before they
          started there were already elements of commonality between the mentor and their
          mentee.


              Ironically most of these relationships, according to both mentors and mentees did not
              manage to function to their optimum levels, sometimes because of these very
              reasons.
              In cases where there was a boss/subordinate relationship, the high demands of work,
              often stood in the way of the mentor/ mentee relationship. Making it hard for the
              relationship to yield the kind of results it was designed to.
              Where leaders approached influential community leaders, and time, distance (because
              of the nature of the lay of the land in these two provinces) often derailed progress.




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idasa: Citizen Leadership for democratic Governance
       The efficacy of the relationships
   From the onset it appears as if there were some of these relationships that were not going to
   be successful, due to the many odds that were stuck against them even before they even
   began. A level of unsuccessful mentor/ mentee relationships were reported in the Northern
   Cape, and stemmed mostly from logistical obstacles, more than lack o f commitment. Three
   of the factors most cited as contributing factors to this failure were geography, lack of
   resources, and time constraints
           geography/ distance – the Northern Cape as a province is such that at the least, towns
           sit at minimum of 70 kms from each other, sometimes up to 400 kms. A great
           number of mentors with the necessary skills came from other cities, making it
           difficult for regular meetings to take place, and to keep abreast of progress.
           lack of resources and time – the nature of work that leaders in these communities, is
           often done on little or no budget at all, calling for frugality in their use. The
           mentoring relationships if they were to function would have in some instances eaten
           in to the already unavailable resources that, determined though they were, mentors
           could not afford.
           However, some did work, and their functionality depended largely on the creative
           ways, adopted by both the mentor and mentee, to transcend present obstacles.
           Of the ones that worked, also owed their success to a mixture of adherence to the
           guidelines offered in the course, and the latitude given to the relationships to grow
           organically.


       Benefit derived by leaders from mentoring relationships
   A number of leaders mentioned the following as benefits they derived from the mentoring
   relationships:
           A sense of being supported
           Confidence booster
           Encouraged to develop a sense of accountability
           Guidance
           Opportunity to work with some one who served as a sounding board
           Increased chances for growth as a leader
           Access to resources and logistical support
           The satisfaction of working with some one with a similar
       General comments raised



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idasa: Citizen Leadership for democratic Governance
       Participants felt that the low rate of success of most these relationships, could have been,
       or could be avoided in the future, if
           More attention is given to the calibre of leaders recruited into mentorship programme
           The mentorship programme was made a bit more extensive, both in terms of
           democratic governance issues, but also on principles of mentoring. Participants and
           sometimes mentors themselves felt, that perhaps the course, assumed that they knew
           a lot more than they did.
           The mentor’s lack of knowledge on leadership and democratic governance issues was
           raised as the biggest source of frustration. Some leaders went so far as to leaders
           saying, that for them sometimes it felt as if their roles had been reversed, with them
           assuming the role of mentor, in a relation that was designed to support them, not the
           other way around.

   Views on the local government interaction - focusing on:
       General impressions on working with local government
           Leaders expressed that on the whole their experience of working with councillors,
           where they did manage to get collaboration were generally good and productive.
           The leaders however felt that there perhaps existed a scope to broaden the
           councillor’s course, to make it as extensive as the leaders courses, in order to ensure
           that both councillors and leaders were aware of the same information, in equivalent
           details.
           Also as a way of dispelling whatever fears councillors might have of leaders trying to
           usurp their authority, given that the leaders seemed to have a deeper theoretical
           understanding of the workings of local government.
           Resoundingly all the leaders expressed that they felt relations would improve if both
           the leaders and councillors made an effort to meet with each other as often as was
           possible.


       Results derived from these engagements
           These are detailed in the section that reviews the projects undertaken by the leaders.


       Perceptible changes in the relationship before and after the course
           Like the councillors, the leaders experienced the councillors as more receptive after
           the course.



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idasa: Citizen Leadership for democratic Governance
              Also given their new understanding of the challenges faced by the councillors and
              armed with a better understanding of how things worked in the council, they were
              able to meet the councillors from a place of understanding.
              The leaders did however express the need for the programme to reach a wider section
              of councillors, because as they stated problems, mostly of understanding still
              remained when they worked with councillors who had not been part of the course.



Similarities and differences in the provinces
What is interesting to note is that even though at the design phase of the programme, the Northern
Cape was chosen for its need to address Drug and Substance abuse that HIV/ AIDS and Gender
Violence came up more than was expected, whereas the Eastern Cape was thought to be the
province grappling the most with HIV/AIDS and Gender violence, tackled more the issue of Drug
Abuse. This perhaps speaks to an interlink or even a crisscrossing for that matter of these issues,
which perhaps requires further thought on, with a view to devising a concerted strategy that looks
at the relationship between these issues.


The only difference highlighted, especially in the Eastern Cape, concerned the added layer of
traditional leadership in the local governance structures, with whom the citizen leaders also have
to consult.

The existence of this layer of governance has its own challenges, in the sense that sometimes
there exists differences between local municipalities and traditional leaders, which sometimes has
negative effects on the progress that citizen leaders make.


Findings from meetings with local councillors
Local municipality representatives impressions of the:
    Overall project – focusing on:
        The most useful aspect of the course
              Almost all the councillors cited the face-to-face encounter with the community
              leaders as the most important and useful aspect of the course for them.          They
              expressed a sense of satisfaction not only at meeting leaders from their communities,
              but also at the opportunity the encounter presented, to listen, and gather lessons from
              other councillors.




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idasa: Citizen Leadership for democratic Governance
       The most important lesson learned
           Most of the councillors attending this course had already undergone in some form or
           another, training to help the get to grips with their responsibilities.
           They lauded the course for its different approach that of allowing for their full
           participation, instead of the lecture format used by other institutions.
           A majority of councillors commented on the case studies used in the training as
           providing inspiration for strategies that they could see themselves adapting to their
           situations.
           Overwhelmingly councillors commented on the course’s usefulness helping them
           refresh on the information they already had.


       The most striking component of the course
           A great number of the councillors were grateful for the opportunity to have met with
           other councillors, to exchange ideas, best practices, cross pollination of skills, and
           also to share their experiences. These were mostly councillors who came from small
           municipalities, where they often work in isolation from other councillors, and only
           get to meet and interact during council meetings.
           The councillors in the Northern Cape had also gone so far as to make attempts to
           establish a network of councillors, which although they had wanted to formalise as a
           face-to-face structure, now unfortunately, now only exists as virtual structure. The
           benefit coming out of this is that councillors now know that they can access support
           and help from peers they already know, if and when they should need it.


       The most useful skill(s) gained
           Out of the exercises used in the course, the councillors cited the puzzle exercise –
           with its aim of fostering an appreciation for coherence and working together as a
           means to finding solutions, as being the most useful.


       The ways in which the programme has impacted on their work
           The councillors who had the chance to meet with leaders from their communities
           expressed an increased understanding of the issues that they needed to prioritise.
           They also expressed an increased appreciation of extending themselves to be
           accessible to the community as a whole, but specifically the community leaders.




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idasa: Citizen Leadership for democratic Governance
                The councillors who did not have a chance to meet leaders from their communities,
                stated the same awareness, but also added that in addition they went back to their
                communities to seek community leaders, to enter into discussion with them.
                All the councillors cited an increased awareness and appreciation to working together
                with community leaders, and not so much in isolation, as one of the most noticeable
                changes they effected on their approach to their work.


           Impressions on the programme material
                Almost all the councillors commented on the usefulness on the material, especially
                commenting on its inter activeness, but also expressed a desire for an extended
                course.
                Some remarked that for them it felt as if the course ended just when they thought it
                was beginning.


           Impressions on the facilitation methodologies
                All the councillors commended the facilitation for its insistence on inter-activity, so
                that they were in part responsible for their learning.


           Suggestions on how the programme could be framed differently for maximum effect
                The timing2 of the course was a matter most councillors referred to, stating that it was
                important for these courses to be given at the beginning rather than towards the end
                of the councillor’s tenure. Although this might be outside the scope of this
                programme’s objectives, but a big number of councillors asked for an in-depth
                coverage of technical skills such as3:
                •    Change management and local government
                •    Financial management – with an emphasis on budgeting and reporting
                •    End user computer training
                •    Effective communication for leaders
                •    Detailed course on the functions of local government and how these interface
                     with the work done by provincial and national government.


2
    Most of the councillors received this training during the last year of their term in office
3
    These were highlighted against the backdrop that local government, as it operates currently, is a relatively new
phenomena, which most of the new councillors still have not grasped fully




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idasa: Citizen Leadership for democratic Governance
           The councillors in the Eastern Cape expressed a desire to have courses that help them
           understand and make the best of the dual – traditional leadership and local
           government system under which they work. This in order to bring about coherence
           between community leaders, traditional leaders and local government.
           Some suggested a course designed for business, who the councillors also felt did not
           understand how local municipalities functioned and as a result inhibited progress in
           matters affecting them.


   Views on the face-to-face encounters with citizen leaders
       Experiences of the face-to-face interactions
           Although a lot of councillors said they came to these feeling that they would have to
           defend themselves from the barrage of questions they felt they would get from the
           leaders, in the end they walked away with a sense of relief.
           All the councillors mentioned that in addition to the session being a space for
           dialogue, it was also useful for the opportunity it provided for them to explain
           themselves how they operated. A problem, which according to most councillors, has
           been the cause of conflict and hampered progress.


   Thoughts on opportunities to collaborate, during and after the programme
       Experiences of collaborating with leaders on their projects and Opportunities to
       cooperate after the programme
           Most of the councillors who had the opportunity to meet leaders from their
           communities, worked successfully with these leaders when they carried out their
           programmes.
           And for some of the projects that had a life beyond the awareness raising campaign,
           these relationships continue.
           For most councillors just knowing about these leaders has meant that since the
           course, they have planned a lot of their interventions with these leaders in mind as
           potential partners.


       Noticeable changes working with leaders before and after training and Differences
       between working Idasa trained community leaders and others
       Although most of the leaders and councillors present had never really worked with each
       other before the programme, the councillors stated that it was all the easier working with


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idasa: Citizen Leadership for democratic Governance
       the leaders who had undergone the training as opposed to those who had not. The reasons
       given for this was that these leaders:
           understood the structures and channels through which different issues needed to be
           raised, which in itself made life easier for all involved.
           had an appreciation of the processes that matters go through between them being
           raised and the time of their implementation.
           had, for most issues they brought to the attention of the councillors, already done
           sufficient enough ground work, so that the issues were clearly articulated, and
           resulted in time saving and more concerted strategies for implementation.



Findings from meetings with mentors
Mentors impressions of the:
   Overall project – focusing on:
       The most useful aspect of the course
           Mentors highlighted their appreciation for gaining a new skill that helped them to
           improve and expound on their own leadership skills in that it forced them to think
           about what it is they do as leaders, as they helped nurture young talent.
           They also cited the part of the course that dealt with local governance and its
           functions as being useful in helping them distinguish between participation in and
           involvement in politics.


       The most important lesson learned
           For most mentors, this programme opened up possibilities that they otherwise would
           not have had to collaborate not only with the citizen leaders but also with local
           government in seeing to fruition effectual projects. Thereby fostering the much
           needed spirit of cohesion between government and civil society organisations.
           For others still it was the chance to use the expanded skills gained to in their own
           organisations, thereby improving the functionality of their own organisations.


       The most striking component of the programme
           Most mentors highlighted the chance to work with young leaders, as the most striking
           part of the programme. They mentioned that this gave them comfort knowing that
           they had been able to lend their skills to groom the next generation of leaders.



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       The most useful skill(s) gained
           Again mentors mentioned the technical aspects of what is involved in a mentoring
           relationship, as useful, not only for their relationship with the citizen leaders in the
           programme, but found that they could apply it even in their organisations, as well as
           in other structures they belonged to – such as their churches and the social clubs to
           which they belonged.


       The ways in which the programme has impacted on their work
           For mentors who are also involved in community work, the programme helped them
           gain an appreciation of not only their responsibilities as citizens, but also the
           processes involved in moving issues through the local government structures.
       Impressions on the programme material
           Like the councillors the mentors commented on the usefulness on the material,
           especially commenting on the interactive approach that ensured that they tapped into
           their already existent knowledge pool, as part of extending their learning.
           Similar to the councillors the mentors expressed a desire for an extended course,
           which they hoped in the first instance would deepen their practice of this newly
           acquired skill, but also one that would delve deeper into issues of local governance,
           bringing them up to par in their understanding as the citizen leaders.


       Impressions on the facilitation methodologies
           All the mentors commended the facilitation for its insistence on inter-activity, so that
           they were in part responsible for their learning.


   Views on the relationship with the mentee
       General experiences of relationship
           Of the relationships that worked, mentors found them productive and helpful, in both
           directions, for both parties involved.
           Of the ones that did not work – mentors stated that it provided them with the
           opportunity to think of creative ways to overcome the hindrances that affected
           success of the relationships, for future reference.
       How the relationship was conducted




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idasa: Citizen Leadership for democratic Governance
           Most of the mentors who had relationships that worked met their mentees at their
           places of work, either through setting time aside, or working meetings into part of the
           work related meetings. These happened at least once a month, where the procedures
           suggested in training were used, with allowances made for the meetings to unfold
           organically to address the issues raised.
           Others used opportunities presented by other forums away from the work place to
           meet. These happened less regularly but, like the more regular meetings but sought to
           address, within given constraints the issues raised by the mentee.
           The remainder of the mentors where resources allowed conducted their relationships
           mostly over the phone and for the most part were limited to dealing with the most
           urgent issues presented by the mentee.


       Challenges and obstacles
           Time constraints were cited as the biggest obstacle, followed by
           Geographical issues, especially in the Northern Cape where towns lay such a long
           distance away from each other.
           Another challenge was what the mentors called “inconsistency in accountability.”
           Some mentors stated that some of the breaks between them and their mentees could
           easily be marked by lack moments when mentees were supposed to report back on
           their progress, which they did not do as consistently as they should have. In this
           regard mentors suggested that perhaps it would have been useful had a three way
           reporting structure been established. One that would require that the mentee report
           back not only to the mentee but also to Idasa, through a written report. Mentors
           seemed to feel that this mechanism would help Idasa keep track on the investments it
           has made on their leaders as well as be better placed to monitor their progress.


       What gifts given to mentee
           Goal setting
       What gifts gained from mentee
           Reflection on their own leadership style of the way that
       Impact of relationship on own leadership


   Thoughts on collaborating with the mentee on assigned project




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idasa: Citizen Leadership for democratic Governance
    In addition to helping with the conceptualization of the project Assistance provided was much
    more of a lot of information


Findings          from       interviews         with        facilitators       and       material
developers
Approach and methodology
The contact session with the facilitators and the materials developer, like that of the trained
participants was conducted in a dialogical manner, framed and guided by the questionnaire
below. The questionnaire was designed to get project to staff reflect on the programme from an
insider’s perspective, and covered the following aspects:


Facilitator’s reflections on the programme
    Reflections on the programme’s objectives – in this regard the facilitators were asked the
    following questions
        In your opinion, would you say that the project was successful in achieving its objectives
        as articulated in its founding documents
             Both the facilitators expressed their confidence in the course’s success at meeting its
             objectives.
             However they pointed to the difficult conditions under which they had to work to
             meet the programme’s objectives. In this regard they pointed to what they considered
             a disconnect, between the programme’s objectives and the real needs, based on the
             participants socio-economic realities, as well as the difficulties they faced, during the
             recruitment phase, in accessing some of villages to which they went.
        As the programme nears its end, and thinking as a person who took part in its
        implementation, would you say that you are satisfied with the results that were achieved.
             Although both facilitators expressed satisfaction with the results they achieved, they
             felt that perhaps much more could have been accomplished, had the programme’s
             objectives been framed, taking into account the implications that the participants
             socio-economic conditions would have on overall progress.
        In what ways, if any would you say the programme lost opportunity to maximise on its
        stated objectives?
             Both the facilitators felt that in was perhaps in the recruitment phase that many
             opportunities were missed, with the selection criteria sometimes working to exclude




                                            www.idasa.org.za                                       33
idasa: Citizen Leadership for democratic Governance
           active citizen leaders who might have benefited from the course, because they were
           did not have literacy skills to were needed for admissions.
           Particularly so because in both the areas chosen there was already a small pool of
           leaders to choose from.
           In cases where proper recruitments had been made, the lag time between recruitment
           and start of courses sometimes meant that people who had been admitted on merit
           had moved on, and were no longer available to attend the course.
       What, considering what you now know, that you didn’t before, would you do differently,
       mostly in approach, to maximise on the realisation of the programme’s objectives?
           In response to this question the facilitators stated, that in terms of ensuring the
           individual’s sustained progress after the course, the programme could have had built
           in review and follow up mechanisms.
           This, they felt would have meant that the participant’s ongoing progress could be
           monitored, and they could be offered help where they needed, post the course.
           The facilitators did commend the participants however, for the initiative they took in
           setting up informal networks, through which they (the facilitators) have been to keep
           contact with participants.


   Reflections on the courses facilitated
       Please talk about your general impressions of the courses you delivered as a whole –
       emphasising, your experience of them, the participants, and the impact that you think
       they have had on them.
           Both the facilitators expressed their enjoyment of the course, in terms of its applied
           methodologies, and the structure of its content.
           They particularly relished the fact the courses ability to break down very complicated
           phenomena into a language and presentation format that can easily be understood.
           The facilitators also cited as the course’s value added, the fact that the participants
           could easily use the skills learned from this course for the development of their own
           organisations, and could also share these same skills with others, thereby creating a
           multiplier effect of sorts.


   Programme’s life after the initial three years
       What are your thoughts on what will, or should happen, to the Programme now that this
       phase of it has come to and end?



                                          www.idasa.org.za                                     34
idasa: Citizen Leadership for democratic Governance
       The facilitators stated that the course’s popularity was such that participants who had
       attended it, most mentors and councillors in both the provinces and in the Gauteng
       province have been calling the office asking for it to be given to their leaders. As such the
       programme seems set to join the many other training programmes that Idasa offers on
       request.


   Outsider’s perspective on the programme
       Can I ask you to assume an outsider’s perspective on the programme, and ask, what
       about this programme would you have done differently, were you not an integral part of
       it?
             In addition to offering the programme in languages other than English, opening up
             the selection criteria for other leaders who were left out of it, because of literacy
             skills and age, the facilitators stated that adding more time to the programme by
             about a week or two – would allow for the review and follow-up tasks they squeezed
             in, to happen within the programme’s timeframe.


   Impact of the course on the facilitators
       We now know, from having spoken to all the people who underwent this course, what it
       did for them, what would you say that it did for you?
             The facilitators spoke about the increased they now have for leaders in both the
             provinces who seemed able to achieve the impossible tasks of effecting change in
             their communities with little, and sometimes no resources at all.
       What one thing do you take from your involvement with this programme that you will
       forever hold dear and relish in your heart.
             Both facilitators spoke about the privilege of having been afforded a chance to
             witness, from an insider’s perspective the ways in which leaders in the rural
             communities work to make things happens. They stated that this led to their own
             paradigm shift from a place of wondering why on the surface it appeared that not
             much was happening in rural communities to a place where they came to an
             appreciation of the impediments that leaders in these communities have to deal with.

Material developers reflections on the programme:


   Rationale behind the arrangement of the training material



                                            www.idasa.org.za                                     35
idasa: Citizen Leadership for democratic Governance
       Please talk to us about the rationale behind the arrangement of the material, as well as
       the process that led to these decisions
           The material developer’s assessment of the material was that it was designed to
           “unearth the leader’s experience, at the same time as it challenged their potential”
           The process followed in the development of the material involved the use of the
           various concepts, related to citizenship, leadership, and democratic governance as
           building blocks, in the following manner:
               ♦ Week 1 – Introduction to key concepts – with the aim of getting participants
                   to understand and begin to grapple with the applicability of concepts.
               ♦ Week 2 – Build on old concepts and introduce new ones – with the aim of
                   refining those concepts already understood and laying tracks to
                   implementation.
               ♦ Week 3 –Finalising preparations towards the implementation of assigned
                   project – the aim here being to encourage to use the skills learned in
                   collaboration with others, to effect change in the communities.
               ♦ Week 4 – The Finale – where participants reported back on their projects to a
                   group of peer reviewers.


       Did you have the potential audience of trainees in mind when the material was designed
       The process of material development was finalised with the recruited participants in
       mind, and was also tested on the facilitators. This was done in order to balance the ideals
       of what the material was meant to achieve with their applicability in a training
       environment.


       You also had the opportunity to conduct some of the training based on the material,
       please share with us your impression on how you think the material was received.
       In response to this question the materials developer expressed in his experience as trainer
       he found that because of its pitch, the participants received the material well, and that he
       was particularly impressed by the way in which they interpreted the information,
       evidenced in their ability to undertake the projects they did, drawing on the content of the
       material.


   Views on the local government interaction - focusing on:
       General impressions on working with local government


                                          www.idasa.org.za                                        36
idasa: Citizen Leadership for democratic Governance
            Leaders expressed that on the whole their experience of working with councillors,
            where they did manage to get collaboration were generally good and productive.
            The leaders however felt that there perhaps existed a scope to broaden the
            councillor’s course, to make it as extensive as the leaders courses, in order to ensure
            that both councillors and leaders were aware of the same information, in equivalent
            details.
            Also as a way of dispelling whatever fears councillors might have of leaders trying to
            usurp their authority, given that the leaders seemed to have a deeper theoretical
            understanding of the workings of local government.
            Resoundingly all the leaders expressed that they felt relations would improve if both
            the leaders and councillors made an effort to meet with each other as often as was
            possible.


        Results derived from these engagements
            These are detailed in the section that reviews the projects undertaken by the leaders.


        Perceptible changes in the relationship before and after the course
            Like the councillors, the leaders experienced the councillors as more receptive after
            the course.
            Also given their new understanding of the challenges faced by the councillors and
            armed with a better understanding of how things worked in the council, they were
            able to meet the councillors from a place of understanding.
            The leaders did however express the need for the programme to reach a wider section
            of councillors, because as they stated problems, mostly of understanding still
            remained when they worked with councillors who had not been part of the course.



Similarities and differences in the provinces
What is interesting to note is that even though at the design phase of the programme, the Northern
Cape was chosen for its need to address Drug and Substance abuse that HIV/ AIDS and Gender
Violence came up more than was expected, whereas the Eastern Cape was thought to be the
province grappling the most with HIV/AIDS and Gender violence, tackled more the issue of Drug
Abuse. This perhaps speaks to an interlink or even a crisscrossing for that matter of these issues,




                                           www.idasa.org.za                                      37
idasa: Citizen Leadership for democratic Governance
which perhaps requires further thought on, with a view to devising a concerted strategy that looks
at the relationship between these issues.


The only difference highlighted, especially in the Eastern Cape, concerned the added layer of
traditional leadership in the local governance structures, with whom the citizen leaders also have
to consult.

The existence of this layer of governance has its own challenges, in the sense that sometimes
there exists differences between local municipalities and traditional leaders, which sometimes has
negative effects on the progress that citizen leaders make.



Findings from meetings with local councillors
Local municipality representatives impressions of the:
    Overall project – focusing on:
        The most useful aspect of the course
              Almost all the councillors cited the face-to-face encounter with the community
              leaders as the most important and useful aspect of the course for them.          They
              expressed a sense of satisfaction not only at meeting leaders from their communities,
              but also at the opportunity the encounter presented, to listen, and gather lessons from
              other councillors.


        The most important lesson learned
              Most of the councillors attending this course had already undergone in some form or
              another, training to help the get to grips with their responsibilities.
              They lauded the course for its different approach that of allowing for their full
              participation, instead of the lecture format used by other institutions.
              A majority of councillors commented on the case studies used in the training as
              providing inspiration for strategies that they could see themselves adapting to their
              situations.
              Overwhelmingly councillors commented on the course’s usefulness helping them
              refresh on the information they already had.


        The most striking component of the course




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idasa: Citizen Leadership for democratic Governance
           A great number of the councillors were grateful for the opportunity to have met with
           other councillors, to exchange ideas, best practices, cross pollination of skills, and
           also to share their experiences. These were mostly councillors who came from small
           municipalities, where they often work in isolation from other councillors, and only
           get to meet and interact during council meetings.
           The councillors in the Northern Cape had also gone so far as to make attempts to
           establish a network of councillors, which although they had wanted to formalise as a
           face-to-face structure, now unfortunately, now only exists as virtual structure. The
           benefit coming out of this is that councillors now know that they can access support
           and help from peers they already know, if and when they should need it.


       The most useful skill(s) gained
           Out of the exercises used in the course, the councillors cited the puzzle exercise –
           with its aim of fostering an appreciation for coherence and working together as a
           means to finding solutions, as being the most useful.


       The ways in which the programme has impacted on their work
           The councillors who had the chance to meet with leaders from their communities
           expressed an increased understanding of the issues that they needed to prioritise.
           They also expressed an increased appreciation of extending themselves to be
           accessible to the community as a whole, but specifically the community leaders.
           The councillors who did not have a chance to meet leaders from their communities,
           stated the same awareness, but also added that in addition they went back to their
           communities to seek community leaders, to enter into discussion with them.
           All the councillors cited an increased awareness and appreciation to working together
           with community leaders, and not so much in isolation, as one of the most noticeable
           changes they effected on their approach to their work.


       Impressions on the programme material
           Almost all the councillors commented on the usefulness on the material, especially
           commenting on its inter activeness, but also expressed a desire for an extended
           course.
           Some remarked that for them it felt as if the course ended just when they thought it
           was beginning.



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idasa: Citizen Leadership for democratic Governance

           Impressions on the facilitation methodologies
                All the councillors commended the facilitation for its insistence on inter-activity, so
                that they were in part responsible for their learning.


           Suggestions on how the programme could be framed differently for maximum effect
                The timing4 of the course was a matter most councillors referred to, stating that it was
                important for these courses to be given at the beginning rather than towards the end
                of the councillor’s tenure. Although this might be outside the scope of this
                programme’s objectives, but a big number of councillors asked for an in-depth
                coverage of technical skills such as5:
                •    Change management and local government
                •    Financial management – with an emphasis on budgeting and reporting
                •    End user computer training
                •    Effective communication for leaders
                •    Detailed course on the functions of local government and how these interface
                     with the work done by provincial and national government.
                The councillors in the Eastern Cape expressed a desire to have courses that help them
                understand and make the best of the dual – traditional leadership and local
                government system under which they work. This in order to bring about coherence
                between community leaders, traditional leaders and local government.
                Some suggested a course designed for business, who the councillors also felt did not
                understand how local municipalities functioned and as a result inhibited progress in
                matters affecting them.


      Views on the face-to-face encounters with citizen leaders
           Experiences of the face-to-face interactions
                Although a lot of councillors said they came to these feeling that they would have to
                defend themselves from the barrage of questions they felt they would get from the
                leaders, in the end they walked away with a sense of relief.


4
    Most of the councillors received this training during the last year of their term in office
5
    These were highlighted against the backdrop that local government, as it operates currently, is a relatively new
phenomena, which most of the new councillors still have not grasped fully




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idasa: Citizen Leadership for democratic Governance
           All the councillors mentioned, that in addition to the session being a space for
           dialogue, it was also useful for the opportunity it provided for them to explain
           themselves how they operated. A problem, which according to most councillors, has
           been the cause of conflict and hampered progress.


   Thoughts on opportunities to collaborate, during and after the programme
       Experiences of collaborating with leaders on their projects and Opportunities to
       cooperate after the programme
           Most of the councillors who had the opportunity to meet leaders from their
           communities, worked successfully with these leaders when they carried out their
           programmes.
           And for some of the projects that had a life beyond the awareness raising campaign,
           these relationships continue.
           For most councillors just knowing about these leaders has meant that since the
           course, they have planned a lot of their interventions with these leaders in mind as
           potential partners.


       Noticeable changes working with leaders before and after training and Differences
       between working Idasa trained community leaders and others
       Although most of the leaders and councillors present had never really worked with each
       other before the programme, the councillors stated that it was all the easier working with
       the leaders who had undergone the training as opposed to those who had not. The reasons
       given for this was that these leaders:
           understood the structures and channels through which different issues needed to be
           raised, which in itself made life easier for all involved.
           had an appreciation of the processes that matters go through between them being
           raised and the time of their implementation.
           had, for most issues they brought to the attention of the councillors, already done
           sufficient enough ground work, so that the issues were clearly articulated, and
           resulted in time saving and more concerted strategies for implementation.


Findings from meetings with mentors
Mentors impressions of the:
   Overall project – focusing on:



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idasa: Citizen Leadership for democratic Governance
       The most useful aspect of the course
           Mentors highlighted their appreciation for gaining a new skill that helped them to
           improve and expound on their own leadership skills in that it forced them to think
           about what it is they do as leaders, as they helped nurture young talent.
           They also cited the part of the course that dealt with local governance and its
           functions as being useful in helping them distinguish between participation in and
           involvement in politics.


       The most important lesson learned
           For most mentors, this programme opened up possibilities that they otherwise would
           not have had to collaborate not only with the citizen leaders but also with local
           government in seeing to fruition effectual projects. Thereby fostering the much
           needed spirit of cohesion between government and civil society organisations.
           For others still it was the chance to use the expanded skills gained to in their own
           organisations, thereby improving the functionality of their own organisation.


       The most striking component of the programme
           Most mentors highlighted the chance to work with young leaders, as the most striking
           part of the programme. They mentioned that this gave them comfort knowing that
           they had been able to lend their skills to groom the next generation of leaders.


       The most useful skill(s) gained
           Again mentors mentioned the technical aspects of what is involved in a mentoring
           relationship, as useful, not only for their relationship with the citizen leaders in the
           programme, but found that they could apply it even in their organisation, as well as in
           other structures they belonged to – such as their churches and the social clubs to
           which they belonged.


       The ways in which the programme has impacted on their work
           For mentors who are also involved in community work, the programme helped them
           gain an appreciation of not only their responsibilities as citizens, but also the
           processes involved in moving issues through the local government structures.
       Impressions on the programme material




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idasa: Citizen Leadership for democratic Governance
           Like the councillors the mentors commented on the usefulness on the material,
           especially commenting on the interactive approach that ensured that they tapped into
           their already existent knowledge pool, as part of extending their learning.
           Similar to the councillors the mentors expressed a desire for an extended course,
           which they hoped in the first instance would deepen their practice of this newly
           acquired skill, but also one that would delve deeper into issues of local governance,
           bringing them up to par in their understanding as the citizen leaders.


       Impressions on the facilitation methodologies
           All the mentors commended the facilitation for its insistence on inter-activity, so that
           they were in part responsible for their learning.


   Views on the relationship with the mentee
       General experiences of relationship
           Of the relationships that worked, mentors found them productive and helpful, in both
           directions, for both parties involved.
           Of the ones that did not work – mentors stated that it provided them with the
           opportunity to think of creative ways to overcome the hindrances that affected
           success of the relationships, for future reference.
       How the relationship was conducted
           Most of the mentors who had relationships that worked met their mentees at their
           places of work, either through setting time aside, or working meetings into part of the
           work related meetings. These happened at least once a month, where the procedures
           suggested in training were used, with allowances made for the meetings to unfold
           organically to address the issues raised.
           Others used opportunities presented by other forums away from the work place to
           meet. These happened less regularly but, like the more regular meetings but sought to
           address, within given constraints the issues raised by the mentee.
           The remainder of the mentors where resources allowed conducted their relationships
           mostly over the phone and for the most part were limited to dealing with the most
           urgent issues presented by the mentee.


       Challenges and obstacles
           Time constraints were cited as the biggest obstacle, followed by


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idasa: Citizen Leadership for democratic Governance
            Geographical issues, especially in the Northern Cape where towns lay such a long
            distance away from each other.
            Another challenge was what the mentors called “inconsistency in accountability.”
            Some mentors stated that some of the breaks between them and their mentees could
            easily be marked by lack moments when mentees were supposed to report back on
            their progress, which they did not do as consistently as they should have. In this
            regard mentors suggested that perhaps it would have been useful had a three way
            reporting structure been established. One that would require that the mentee report
            back not only to the mentee but also to Idasa, through a written report. Mentors
            seemed to feel that this mechanism would help Idasa keep track on the investments it
            has made on their leaders as well as be better placed to monitor their progress.


        What gifts given to mentee
            Goal setting
        What gifts gained from mentee
            Reflection on their own leadership style of the way that
        Impact of relationship on own leadership




    Thoughts on collaborating with the mentee on assigned project
    In addition to helping with the conceptualization of the project Assistance provided was much
    more of a lo


Findings           from    interviews          with         facilitators     and       material
developers
Approach and methodology
The contact session with the facilitators and the materials developer, like that of the trained
participants was conducted in a dialogical manner, framed and guided by the questionnaire
below. The questionnaire was designed to get project to staff reflect on the programme from an
insider’s perspective, and covered the following aspects:


Facilitator’s reflections on the programme



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idasa: Citizen Leadership for democratic Governance
   Reflections on the programme’s objectives – in this regard the facilitators were asked the
   following questions
       In your opinion, would you say that the project was successful in achieving its objectives
       as articulated in its founding documents
            Both the facilitators expressed their confidence in the course’s success at meeting its
            objectives.
            However they pointed to the difficult conditions under which they had to work to
            meet the programme’s objectives. In this regard they pointed to what they considered
            a disconnect, between the programme’s objectives and the real needs, based on the
            participants socio-economic realities, as well as the difficulties they faced, during the
            recruitment phase, in accessing some of villages to which they went.
       As the programme nears its end, and thinking as a person who took part in its
       implementation, would you say that you are satisfied with the results that were achieved.
            Although both facilitators expressed satisfaction with the results they achieved, they
            felt that perhaps much more could have been accomplished, had the programme’s
            objectives been framed, taking into account the implications that the participants
            socio-economic conditions would have on overall progress.
       In what ways, if any would you say the programme lost opportunity to maximise on its
       stated objectives?
            Both the facilitators felt that in was perhaps in the recruitment phase that many
            opportunities were missed, with the selection criteria sometimes working to exclude
            active citizen leaders who might have benefited from the course, because they were
            did not have literacy skills to were needed for admissions.
            Particularly so because in both the areas chosen there was already a small pool of
            leaders to choose from.
            In cases where proper recruitments had been made, the lag time between recruitment
            and start of courses sometimes meant that people who had been admitted on merit
            had moved on, and were no longer available to attend the course.
       What, considering what you now know, that you didn’t before, would you do differently,
       mostly in approach, to maximise on the realisation of the programme’s objectives?
            In response to this question the facilitators stated, that in terms of ensuring the
            individual’s sustained progress after the course, the programme could have had built
            in review and follow up mechanisms.




                                           www.idasa.org.za                                       45
idasa: Citizen Leadership for democratic Governance
             This, they felt would have meant that the participant’s ongoing progress could be
             monitored, and they could be offered help where they needed, post the course.
             The facilitators did commend the participants however, for the initiative they took in
             setting up informal networks, through which they (the facilitators) have been to keep
             contact with participants.


   Reflections on the courses facilitated
       Please talk about your general impressions of the courses you delivered as a whole –
       emphasising, your experience of them, the participants, and the impact that you think
       they have had on them.
             Both the facilitators expressed their enjoyment of the course, in terms of its applied
             methodologies, and the structure of its content.
             They particularly relished the fact the courses ability to break down very complicated
             phenomena into a language and presentation format that can easily be understood.
             The facilitators also cited as the course’s value added, the fact that the participants
             could easily use the skills learned from this course for the development of their own
             organisations, and could also share these same skills with others, thereby creating a
             multiplier effect of sorts.




   Programme’s life after the initial three years
       What are your thoughts on what will, or should happen, to the Programme now that this
       phase of it has come to and end?
       The facilitators stated that the course’s popularity was such that participants who had
       attended it, most mentors and councillors in both the provinces and in the Gauteng
       province have been calling the office asking for it to be given to their leaders. As such the
       programme seems set to join the many other training programmes that Idasa offers on
       request.


   Outsider’s perspective on the programme
       Can I ask you to assume an outsider’s perspective on the programme, and ask, what
       about this programme would you have done differently, were you not an integral part of
       it?




                                            www.idasa.org.za                                     46
idasa: Citizen Leadership for democratic Governance
           In addition to offering the programme in languages other than English, opening up
           the selection criteria for other leaders who were left out of it, because of literacy
           skills and age, the facilitators stated that adding more time to the programme by
           about a week or two – would allow for the review and follow-up tasks they squeezed
           in, to happen within the programme’s timeframe.


   Impact of the course on the facilitators
       We now know, from having spoken to all the people who underwent this course, what it
       did for them, what would you say that it did for you?
           The facilitators spoke about the increased they now have for leaders in both the
           provinces who seemed able to achieve the impossible tasks of effecting change in
           their communities with little, and sometimes no resources at all.
       What one thing do you take from your involvement with this programme that you will
       forever hold dear and relish in your heart.
           Both facilitators spoke about the privilege of having been afforded a chance to
           witness, from an insider’s perspective the ways in which leaders in the rural
           communities work to make things happens. They stated that this led to their own
           paradigm shift from a place of wondering why on the surface it appeared that not
           much was happening in rural communities to a place where they came to an
           appreciation of the impediments that leaders in these communities have to deal with.




Material developers reflections on the programme:


   Rationale behind the arrangement of the training material
       Please talk to us about the rationale behind the arrangement of the material, as well as
       the process that led to these decisions
           The material developer’s assessment of the material was that it was designed to
           “unearth the leader’s experience, at the same time as it challenged their potential”
           The process followed in the development of the material involved the use of the
           various concepts, related to citizenship, leadership, and democratic governance as
           building blocks, in the following manner:
               ♦ Week 1 – Introduction to key concepts – with the aim of getting participants
                   to understand and begin to grapple with the applicability of concepts.


                                          www.idasa.org.za                                        47
idasa: Citizen Leadership for democratic Governance
                ♦ Week 2 – Build on old concepts and introduce new ones – with the aim of
                   refining those concepts already understood and laying tracks to
                   implementation.
                ♦ Week 3 –Finalising preparations towards the implementation of assigned
                   project – the aim here being to encourage to use the skills learned in
                   collaboration with others, to effect change in the communities.
                ♦ Week 4 – The Finale – where participants reported back on their projects to a
                   group of peer reviewers.


       Did you have the potential audience of trainees in mind when the material was designed
       The process of material development was finalised with the recruited participants in
       mind, and was also tested on the facilitators. This was done in order to balance the ideals
       of what the material was meant to achieve with their applicability in a training
       environment.


       You also had the opportunity to conduct some of the training based on the material,
       please share with us your impression on how you think the material was received.
       In response to this question the materials developer expressed in his experience as trainer
       he found that because of its pitch, the participants received the material well, and that he
       was particularly impressed by the way in which they interpreted the information,
       evidenced in their ability to undertake the projects they did, drawing on the content of the
       material.




   General comments –these although initially not part of the questionnaire came up so often in
   discussion that they were subsequently included:
       Possible future interventions that might possibly galvanise and sustain the effects of the
       course
           Make the programme outcomes based and insist on increased accountability for those
           who attend – so that resources are not wasted on people who will not use them in
           their communities
           have facilitator’s present at some of the implementation of the projects to get first
           hand feel for the implementation – random sample




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idasa: Citizen Leadership for democratic Governance
             Assistance in setting up networks, that might be co-ordinated through the Idasa
             office, and possibly supported, even if the support was not in direct funding, but
             perhaps with in kind donations, referral letters, and side-by-side branding.
             In some districts attempts were made at setting up networks – Siyanda for example,
             but these did not last because in addition to the organisations that the leaders are
             involved in, mostly as volunteers, in some instances where they fund them out of
             pocket, sustaining of these networks would have meant added costs for the leaders.


Conclusion
Finally, based on our findings, gathered through the process we adopted, we can conclude that the
Citizen Leadership for Democratic Governance Programme, succeeded, in line with their set
objectives, to meet its goals, of
    strengthening leadership capacity in civil society organisations,
    building confidence and transferring much needed skills to citizens leaders.
In the areas we visited, and through our interactions with the project beneficiaries we were able to
perceive very clear signs of enhanced citizen participation. From assertions made by local
government officials, although these were uneven at times, we were able to ascertain that there
had been efforts made and in some cases sustainable ones, to reach out to one another and work
together, for the benefit of communities.


The only thing, according to the citizen leaders, that remains, is the task of applying the
knowledge learned, across as many as sectors of public life as possible.


From Idasa’s side the challenge now perhaps is the task of responding to some of the suggestions
that were made by the citizen leaders, to aid and support them, towards maximising on their
newly acquired skills.




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idasa: Citizen Leadership for democratic Governance




Annexures

Citizen leaders questionnaire

Overall impressions on the project: questions asked
-   What was the most important lesson you learned from the programme?
-   What for you was the most striking component of the course?
-   What would you say was most useful skill you gained from the course?
-   In what ways has the programme impacted on the way you now do your work?
-   What were your overall impressions on the programme material used in this course?
-   What were your impressions, thoughts and feelings on the methods of facilitation used in
    the course?



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idasa: Citizen Leadership for democratic Governance
-   If you were given a chance to offer your thoughts on how this programme could be
    structured differently, for maximum effect, what would your suggestions be?
Views on the projects/ assignment undertaken in line with Idasa’s action-learning
methodology
-   Which of the action –learning projects were you involved in?
-   Describe how you and your group decided on these.
-   Describe your experience of working as part of a team, as well as your general
    experiences of working on this project.
-   What would you say were some of the indicators that point to the success of your
    project?
-   What lasting opportunities for future collaboration with your local municipalities as well
    as other stakeholders did you take advantage of?
Views on the mentoring component of the course and relationship with mentors
-   Describe your relationship with your mentor – how you chose them, how often you met
    and so on
-   Would you say that yours was a successful relationship?
-   What benefits if any did you derive from this relationship?
-   What challenges and obstacles did you find you had to overcome in this relationship?




Views on the local government interaction - focusing on:
-   In your opinion would you say that your engagement with your local councillors yielded
    any results? If so what would you say they were?
-   Had you had any prior interaction with your councillor? If so what perceptible changes
    would you say you began to notice in them after they had attended the course?
-   Did you have opportunity to work and collaborate with your councillors either in your
    project or any time since the course?
-   What measures would you say, both you and your councillor, have taken to build a long
    lasting relationship?
-   Describe the nature of the relationship that you – as leader, and your community have
    with your local municipality, now
General comments –these although initially not part of the questionnaire came up so often in
discussion that they were subsequently included.




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idasa: Citizen Leadership for democratic Governance
-   What comments would you make on the nature and quality of the relationship, that you
    as a leader, or your organisation has had with Idasa?
-   At the end of the course, do you feel yourself fully competent and confident to operate
    and function as leader?
-   If not, what other additional support do you think should be provided for you in order to
    sustain your newly acquired skills?




Local councillors questionnaire

Local municipality representatives impressions of the:
Overall project – focusing on:
-   What would you say for you was the most useful aspect of the course?
-   What would you say was the most important lesson you learned from the programme?
-   What would you say for you was the most striking component of the course?
-   What would you say was most useful skill you gained?
-   In what ways has the programme impacted on the way you now do your work?
-   What were your overall impressions on the programme material used in this programme?
-   What were your impressions, thoughts and feelings on the methods of facilitation used in
    the programme?



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idasa: Citizen Leadership for democratic Governance
-   If you were given a chance to offer your thoughts on how this programme could be
    structured differently, for maximum effect, what would your suggestions be?
Views on the face to face encounters with citizen leaders

-   How did you experiences of the face-to-face interactions you had with the citizen leaders at
    the course?
-   Would you say that this platform open up opportunities for you and the citizen leaders in
    your area to collaborate?
-   If yes in what ways were these taken forward?
-   Did you find interacting with other councillors useful for you? If so in what way was it
    useful?
Thoughts on opportunities to collaborate, during and after the programme
-   Did you collaborate with any of the citizen leaders on any of the projects they were
    assigned? If so what role did you play in the collaboration?
-   Have you had occasion after the course to do joint work with any of the citizen leaders who
    were trained by Idasa.
-   Referring to your work in general, would you say that you have noticed any changes in the
    ways in which you interact with your community, since attending the course?
Experience of Idasa trained citizen leaders vs others in general
-   If you have had occasion to work with the leaders who attended the course, would you say
    there any noticeable differences between them as compared to those who never undertook
    the course. If so what would you say they are?

Mentors questionnaire

Mentors impressions of the:


Overall project – focusing on:
-   What would you say for you was the most useful aspect of the course?
-   What would you say was the most important lesson you learned from the programme?
-   What would you say for you was the most striking component of the course?
-   What would you say was most useful skill you gained?
-   In what ways has the programme impacted on the way you now do your work?
-   What were your overall impressions on the programme material used in this programme?
-   What were your impressions, thoughts and feelings on the methods of facilitation used in



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idasa: Citizen Leadership for democratic Governance
    the programme?
-   If you were given a chance to offer your thoughts on how this programme could be
    structured differently, for maximum effect, what would your suggestions be




Views on the relationship with the mentee

-   Please describe the nature of your relationship with your mentee – in general terms,
    referring to how you met them, and how they approached you to mentor them, and why
    you greed to doing it?
-   Please describe the ways in which your meetings were conducted, where and how
    regularly?
-   Please speak about any challenges and/ or obstacles you faced in this relationship?
-   If one were to ask your mentee, ways in which they benefited from you, or gifts they
    received from you, what do you think they would say? What would you say?
-   What benefits or gifts gained would you say you received from this mentoring
    relationship?
-   In what way has being a mentor impacted on you as a leader, and your leadership style
    also?
Thoughts on collaborating with the mentee on assigned project
-   Did you and your mentee work together on the project they were assigned?
-   If so, please describe the role you played in this collaboration?
-   What impact would you say your participation/ or non-participation impacted on the
    project?

Facilitators questionnaire

Facilitator’s reflections on the programme:
Reflections on the programme’s objectives – in this regard the facilitators were asked the following
questions
-   In your opinion, would you say that the project was successful in achieving its objectives as
    articulated in its founding documents
-   As the programme nears its end, and thinking as a person who took part in its implementation,



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idasa: Citizen Leadership for democratic Governance
    would you say that you are satisfied with the results that were achieved.
-   In what ways, if any would you say the programme lost opportunity to maximise on its stated
    objectives?
-   What considering what you now know, that you didn’t before, would you do differently,
    mostly in approach, to realise the programme’s objectives?
Reflections on the courses facilitated
-   Please talk to me about your general impressions of the courses you delivered as a whole –
    emphasising, your experience of them, the participants, and the impact that you think they
    have had on them.
Programme’s life after the initial three years
-   What are your thoughts on what will, or should happen, to the Programme now that this phase
    of it has come to and end
Outsider’s perspective on the programme
-   Can I ask you to assume an outsider’s perspective on the programme, and ask, what about this
    programme would you have done differently, were you not an integral part of it?
Impact of the course on the facilitators
-   We now know, from having spoken to all the people who underwent this course, what it did
    for them, what would you say that it did for you?
-   What one thing do you take from your involvement with this programme that you will forever
    hold dear and relish in your heart.




Table of participants who took part in the evaluation
List of participants who took part in the Northern Cape evaluation
Date: 13 February 2006             District: Namkwa                  Total number: 10



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   idasa: Citizen Leadership for democratic Governance
   Citizen Leaders
Name                   Organisation              Contact details       Project            District
                                                                       participated in    represented
Katrina Bugen          Abet                      072 157 7191                             Namakwa

Chris Boois            Disabled Group            (027) 821 1474                           Namakwa
                                                 082 387 0339
Charmaine Oppel        ANC           Women’s     073 109 8478                             Namakwa
                       League
Chantel Bam-Boyce      Komaggas         Advice   (027) 821 1546                           Namakwa
                       Office                    076 6782932
Cynthia Lukas          ANC           Women’s     073 936 8290                             Namakwa
                       League – Xhukaipe
Rolanda Jankies        One       Stop    Child   027 857 7400/1                           Namakwa
                       Justice Centre
Daniel Engelbrecht     Namakhoi                  073 191 7653                             Namakwa
                       Municipality
Elanshia Adonis        KJOF GPF                  027 821 1876                             Namakwa

Nkosimbini Godson      PNY                       027 718 1958                             Namakwa
Mdlalana
Tania Kuswayo          Nababeep         Advice   083 348 2203                             Namakwa
                       Office


   List of participants who took part in the Northern Cape evaluation
   Date:      14 February 2006            District: Namkwa                   Total number: 3
   Local municipality members
Name                   District represented      Portfolio         Land      line   contact    Cell numbers
                                                                   numbers
Miranda Cloete         Namaqua                   Councillor        (027) 851 7180              073 677 4014


Zine de Jongh          Namakhoi                  Councillor        (027) 713 8777 (H)          083 565 3359
                       Municipality                                (027) 713 8618 (W)
Frik John Sterkse      Hantam Municipality       Raadslid          (054) 603 8400 (tel)        083 246 6723
                       - Brandvley                                 (054) 603 8401 (fax)




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idasa: Citizen Leadership for democratic Governance
List of participants who took part in the Northern Cape evaluation
Date: 14 February 2006                 District: Namkwa                     Total number: 1
Mentors
Name              Name of mentee         District              Name                  of     Contact details
                                         represented           organisation
Katrina Boois     Estrid du Plessis      Namaqualand           Namrec                       (027) 712 1096 (tel)
                  and                                                                       (027) 712 1354 (fax)
                  Lynette Fortuin                                                           076 308 1359
                                                                                            mddc@kingsly.co.za


List of participants who took part in the Northern Cape evaluation
Date: 16 February 2006         District: Siyanda          Total number: 7
Citizen Leaders
Name              Organisation        Contact details                  Project                District
                                                                       participated in        represented
Louisa Louw       FAMSA-              054 332 5616                     Child- Abuse           Siyanda
                  Upington
Lionel            VABO                054 331 3840                     Child Rape             Siyanda
Josephs                               072 713 1183
                                      lawvabo@webmail.co.za
Magda             FAMSA           -   054 339 0363 (h)                 Domestic               Siyanda
Edwards           Upington            054 332 5616 (w)                 Violence
                                      072 212 9689
Monwabisi         PPSA                054 332 3112                     Youth                  Siyanda
Geya                                  084 508 2407                     Development
Quintus           Radio               054 332 1775 (w)                 Local                  Siyanda
Deegree           Revirside           054 332 1772 (f)                 Government
Mokgatle                              083 885 3698
                                      qmokgatle@webmail.co.za
Derik Louw        Friersdale          073 285 7402                                            Siyanda
                  Youth
Michael           Victim              054 339 1293                     Councillor-            Siyanda
Pietersen         Support Centre      054 332 1775                     Listen
                  –          Radio    082 400 9957                     Association
                  Riverside                                            Group        Radio
                                                                       Riverside




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idasa: Citizen Leadership for democratic Governance



List of participants who took part in the Northern Cape evaluation
Date:     17 February 2006           District: Siyanda                 Total number: 2
Local municipality members
Name                  District represented         Portfolio               Land line contact          Cell numbers
                                                                           numbers
H Eygelaar            Kharattais                   Councillor                                         072 673 5410

B Olyn                Ka! Garib                    Councillor                                         082 578 1027


List of participants who took part in the Northern Cape evaluation
Date: 17 February 2006               District: Siyanda                 Total number: 3
Mentors
Name                  Name          of     District represented     Name of organisation            Contact details
                      mentee
WM Eiman                                   Keimos                                                   073 148 6900

MR Eiman                                   Keimos                                                   073 141 9941

Mohlabi Teboho                             Siyanda                                                  073 721 9503


List of participants who took part in the Eastern Cape evaluations
Date: 13 March 2006                  District: OR Tambo                                       Total number: 5
Citizen Leaders
Name                  Organisation                   Contact details     Project                    District
                                                                         participated in            represented
Nonkululeko           Malungeni            Youth     083 684 9581        Sport              Youth   OR Tambo
Maqokolo              Development                                        Activities – Life
                      Association                                        Skills
Nozodwa               Nelson             Mandela     047 532 5110        Street Kids Project,       OR Tambo
Matikinla             Museum                         072 203 8607
Nomtandazo            Coza Dramatic Society          083 977 3538        Sports        Culture,     OR Tambo
Nhlawa                                                                   Recreation           and
                                                                         Life      Skills     for
                                                                         Youth
Gladys Mlindazwe      Zanokhanyo                     072 223 9815        Orphans              and   OR Tambo
                      Development Project                                Vegetable            and
                                                                         Poultry




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    idasa: Citizen Leadership for democratic Governance
                                                                              Drug Abuse

   Sikanyise Tenise        Umtata     Child    Abuse     084 767 9622         Children’s   Rights    OR Tambo
                           Resource Centre                                    Advocacy




    List of participants who took part in the Eastern Cape evaluations
    Date:       14 March 2006                          District: OR Tambo                     Total number: 1
    Local municipality members
 Name                   District represented     Portfolio               Land line contact          Cell numbers
                                                                         numbers
 Sydney Sogoni          OR Tambo                 Councillor                                         082 856 3833

 All the other participants when called said they could not come because they did not receive written invitations
 without which they could not attend. Also the meeting was scheduled to coincide with the election of the mayor,
 a function that most councillors were obliged to attend.


    List of participants who took part in the Eastern Cape evaluations
    Date: 14 March 2006                                District: OR Tambo                     Total number: 5
    Mentors
Name                    Name of mentee          District represented     Name of organisation           Contact details


Mavis Bangani                                   OR Tambo                                                083 495 9225
                                                                                                        047 555 0034
Patrick Jafta                                   OR Tambo                                                083 995 5955
                                                                                                        047 534 2313
Robert Jingxi                                   OR Tambo                                                073 235 6049
                                                                                                        047 555 0029
                                                                                                        047 531 2218
Nokuzola Tetani                                 OR Tambo                                                082 483 4643

Neley Maqokolo                                  OR Tambo                 Nyandeni Health Care           073 245 4541
                                                                                                        047 555 0196


    List of participants who took part in the Eastern Cape evaluations
    Date:       16 March 2006-10-31                    District: Chris Hani                   Total number: 12
    Citizen Leaders
Name                   Organisation               Contact details       Project                 District
                                                                        participated in         represented
Simphiwe               Nceduluntu                 083 206 9027          Poverty alleviation     Chris Hani




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    idasa: Citizen Leadership for democratic Governance
Motman

Mxolisi Dyidi        Community                 083 947 9994                               Chris Hani
                     Development Worker
Khanyisa             Funda Education and       083 929 1023       Social security         Chris Hani
Ntsendwane           Training
Gladile Lumka        Elliot Youth Forum and    072 911 0179       Rape                    Chris Hani
                     Ward Committee
Nopasika Mciteka     Mvula Trust               072 259 3215       Poverty alleviation     Chris Hani

Nomzamo Mpama        Poverty Free Africa       073 117 2227       Drug Abuse              Chris Hani

Edmund C Smiles      Indwe Residential Front   076 286 9888       Drug Abuse              Chris Hani

Vuyani               DoH, LG & TA              073 173 7569       Rape                    Chris Hani
Nkalitshane
Marlene Ewers        DoH, LG & TA              073 686 2538       Social security         Chris Hani

Patience N Shweni    Disabled Organisation     073 309 4443       Poverty alleviation     Chris Hani
                                               040 841 0540
Luyanda              Elliot Youth Forum        076 234 6893/      Rape                    Chris Hani
Mantlane                                       072 911 0179
                                               045 931 2915
Two Boy Maweni       Sahingomso                073 869 3888       Drug abuse              Chris Hani


    List of participants who took part in the Eastern Cape evaluations
    Date: 17 March 2006                          District: Chris Hani                   Total number: 1
    Local municipality members
Name                   District represented     Portfolio           Land line contact       Cell numbers
                                                                    numbers
Mxolisi Makoma         Emakaleni                Councillor                                  072 026 2153




    List of participants who took part in the Eastern Cape evaluations
    Date: 17 March 2006                          District: Chris Hani                   Total number: 5
    Mentors
    Name               Name of mentee          District             Name of organisation        Contact details
                                               represented
    Ntsikelelo Joe     Patronel                Chris Hani           CDW – Community             045 966 0008
                                                                    Development Worker          082 357 4169
    Nobuhle            Patronel                Chris Hani           Inkwanca Home Based         083 355 8756
    Mziweni                                                         Care



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idasa: Citizen Leadership for democratic Governance
Zolisa Pali          Yuzi Siqiki           Chris Hani                 HIV/AIDS Counselling       073 537 6591
                                                                                                 045 966 0694
Zukiswa Ncoko        Nomzamo               Chris Hani                 Poverty Free Africa        076 319 5619

Yuzi Sikiqi          Zoliswa Phali         Chris Hani                 Inkwanca Home Based        045 966 0467
                                                                      Care



Summary of participants who took part in the evaluation

Province                    District                    Type of participant                 Number         of
                                                                                            participants
Northern Cape
                            Namakwa                     Citizen Leaders                     10
                            Siyanda                     Citizen Leaders                     7
                            Namakwa                     Mentors                             1
                            Siyanda                     Mentors                             2
                            Namakwa                     Councillors                         3
                            Siyanda                     Councillors                         2
Eastern Cape
                            Umtata – OR Tambo           Citizen Leaders                     5
                            Queenstown/ Cala            Citizen Leaders                     12
                            Umtata – OR Tambo           Mentors                             5
                            Queenstown/ Cala            Mentors                             5
                            Umtata – OR Tambo           Councillors                         1
                            Queenstown/ Cala            Councillors                         1
Total citizen leaders                                                                       34
Total mentors                                                                               14
Total councillors                                                                           7
Total interviewees                                                                          58




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