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					             2 Minute Roundup
       2010 NASDCTEc Spring Meeting
              Washington, DC
             March 29-31, 2010

8484 Georgia Avenue Suite 320
Silver Spring, MD 20910
Phone: 301-588-9630
Fax: 301-588-9631
www.careertech.org
www.careerclusters.org
INTRODUCTION
One of the highest-rated features of NASDCTEc‘s meetings is the time dedicated to sharing
among states. To that end, we are continuing our tradition of the 2-Minute Roundup, a state
update session at our Spring Meeting in March. The 2-Minute Roundup provides State Directors
with the opportunity to offer a snapshot of each their state‘s position on current issues, and the
successes and challenges in which they face. The session allows for networking among State
Directors and a forum for the sharing of ideas and solutions.
PLEASE NOTE: States submitted this content through a survey of three questions. These
questions are designed to showcase your state‘s successes, greatest challenges and to also
provide input for future webinars and research briefs. NASDCTEc did not author the content, but
did format it into a single document for a consistent look.
   1. Please share your state‘s top three CTE 2009 -10 accomplishments.
   2. Please list the top three challenges (besides funding issues) facing CTE in your state.
   3. Providing relevant, high-level professional development for members is a priority for our
      association. Please share the top three subjects or issues that you would like us to focus
      our webinars and research briefs on in the coming year.



Input from NASDCTEc

Accomplishments:

      Developing a new vision of CTE
      Expanding the staff/organizational structure to include marketing and research
      Collaboration with major corporations (Microsoft, Cisco, Apple) and organizations
       (NGA, U.S. Chamber, CCSSO) to raise the profile of CTE

Challenges:

      Policymakers not understanding that CTE will help us turn the economy around and
       reform high schools
      Stigma of old vocational education
      Secondary–postsecondary divide/competition in the states




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TABLE OF CONTENTS



ALABAMA .................................................................................................................................... 5

ARIZONA....................................................................................................................................... 6

ARKANSAS ................................................................................................................................... 8

CALIFORNIA ................................................................................................................................ 9

COLORADO ................................................................................................................................ 10

CONNECTICUT .......................................................................................................................... 11

FLORIDA ..................................................................................................................................... 12

HAWAII ....................................................................................................................................... 15

IDAHO .......................................................................................................................................... 15

ILLINOIS ...................................................................................................................................... 16

INDIANA ..................................................................................................................................... 17

KANSAS....................................................................................................................................... 17

KENTUCKY................................................................................................................................. 18

MAINE ......................................................................................................................................... 19

MARYLAND ............................................................................................................................... 20

MICHIGAN .................................................................................................................................. 21

MISSISSIPPI ................................................................................................................................ 22

MISSOURI ................................................................................................................................... 23

MONTANA .................................................................................................................................. 25

NEBRASKA ................................................................................................................................. 25

NEVADA ...................................................................................................................................... 26

NEW HAMPSHIRE ..................................................................................................................... 27


                                                                                                                                                 3
NEW JERSEY .............................................................................................................................. 28

NEW MEXICO ............................................................................................................................. 29

NEW YORK ................................................................................................................................. 30

NORTH CAROLINA ................................................................................................................... 31

NORTH DAKOTA ....................................................................................................................... 32

OHIO............................................................................................................................................. 33

OKLAHOMA ............................................................................................................................... 34

OREGON ...................................................................................................................................... 36

PENNSYLVANIA ........................................................................................................................ 37

RHODE ISLAND ......................................................................................................................... 39

SOUTH CAROLINA.................................................................................................................... 40

SOUTH DAKOTA ....................................................................................................................... 41

TENNESSEE ................................................................................................................................ 42

TEXAS .......................................................................................................................................... 43

UTAH ........................................................................................................................................... 43

VERMONT ................................................................................................................................... 44

VIRGINIA .................................................................................................................................... 45

WASHINGTON ........................................................................................................................... 46

WEST VIRGINIA ........................................................................................................................ 48

WISCONSIN ................................................................................................................................ 48

WYOMING .................................................................................................................................. 50




                                                                                                                                                  4
                                          ALABAMA
Accomplishments:
       Curriculum: Implementation of mandated CTE Curriculum to include: Implementation of
       Courses of Study based on 16 National Clusters including (300+ Business Industry
       Recognized courses); development and implementation of Plans of Instruction for each
       course; provided SUCCESS guides for each cluster; authorized embedded/substitute credit
       and statewide implemented statewide articulation for ≈ 89designated courses; developed or
       purchased a total of 11 on-line CTE Courses for distance learning credit through ACCESS.
       Development and implementation of on-line counselor course work modules for counselors.
      Technology: Utilization of technology to provide Face to Face (F2F) PD for teachers,
       Distance Learning CTE online coursework for students through ACCESS, and e-learning
       retooling opportunities for teachers.
      Resources:
       -  Teacher Education and Teacher Certification:
          o Revised CTE teacher certification requirements
          o Revised Subject Personnel Codes
          o Reviewed Alabama Continuum for Teacher Development (stages of teaching)
             Governor‘s Commission on Teacher Quality
          o Provided standards for inclusion in Masters in Instructional Leadership requirements
             to include CTE Content Knowledge and Skills
          o Provided standards for inclusion for CTE Content Knowledge and Skills for the
             Education and Leadership AA Program
          o Revised standards for AA-Instructional Leadership (Teacher Education Program
             Approval Standards for Education Leadership Class AA Certification) to include CTE
             field based experiences
      - Publications:
          o Revised and approved CTE Methods of Administration (MOA) manual for CTE
             including:
              Administrative Code, Advisory Council Manual, Work Based Learning Manual,
               CTE Administrator‘s Desk Reference, Business and Industry Certification (BIC)
               Guidelines, Course/Program Equipment Lists, Perkins Program Application, and
               Partnership Manual.
   Other Notes of Interest:
              Implemented Student Subsidized Employment partnership program for cooperative
               education students in partnership with Department of Human Resources.
              Hosted a Joint Leadership Development Conference (JLDC) for all CTSO students
               resulting in increased collaboration, membership, opportunities & activities.
Challenges:
      Credentialing and Technical Skills Assessments beyond Governor‘s Office of Workforce
       Development Career Readiness Certificate (WorkKeys)

                                                                                              5
      Re-tooling of teachers to teach using 21st Century Learning Skills
      Implementation of accountability measures and insufficient data systems
Future Webinars and Research Briefs:
      Credentialing – Technical Skills Assessment
      POS design modules in emerging Green and ―yet to be determined‖ technical areas
      Incorporation of 21st Century Learning Skills and Career Readiness Skills into common core
       assessments.


                                             ARIZONA
Accomplishments:
      Expansion of the CTE Assessment System: Arizona Career and Technical Education, in
       partnership with Arizona State University and under the auspices of the Arizona Skills
       Standards Commission have developed an online delivery system for CTE end of program
       assessments. During the past couple of years Arizona/CTE purchased services from an
       outside/out-of-state vendor to deliver the states CTE Technical Skills Assessments. Due to
       cost constraints and the need to design specific data collection capacities, it became evident
       that Arizona/CTE needed to own and control their own assessment delivery system. The first
       group of Arizona students will take their ‗end of program‘ CTE Technical Skills Assessment
       using the new system March 2010. It is predicted that over 10,000 Arizona students will be
       assessed.
      Development of an Electronic Submission System for Notification of Intent and
       JTED Applications for Course Approval: Local school districts must submit their request to
       begin a new CTE program through the ―Notification of Intent‖ process. Joint Technological
       Education Districts must submit their request to begin a new program through an
       ―Application for Course Approval.‖ In the past both processes have been paper driven and
       labor intense. Arizona CTE now has created an electronic submission format for both,
       submission processes, reducing labor, time and allowing more accurate data management.
      NRCCTE Math-In-CTE Professional Development: Arizona Career and Technical Education
       is in the process of developing model programs that implement effective instructional
       strategies for teaching math within CTE programs that are sustainable and replicable. In
       partnership with the National Research Center for Career and Technical (NRCCTE) four
       days of intense professional development have been conducted for the model program teams.
       Each team consists of a district level CTE program administrator and math specialist and a
       CTE and math teacher from each participating school. The model programs are
       implementing the strategies learned in their classroom during SY 2009-2010. Beginning
       April, 2010 and throughout the 2010-2011 school year, the model programs become lead
       teams statewide with the opportunity to participate in the NRCCTE Math-In-CTE research
       based professional development for teaching math content that occurs within CTE programs.


                                                                                                   6
       Current focus is on programs in Automotive Technologies, Construction Technologies and
       Engineering.
      U.S. Department of Labor Grant Collaboration: The Career and Technical Education
       Division of ADE, working in collaboration with the Arizona Departments of Economic
       Security and Commerce and a broad base of business and industry, has become the recipient
       of a $6 Million Dollar (the maximum amount allowable), USDOL grant for
       training/retraining in green, renewable and sustainable occupations. Local Workforce
       Investment Boards (LWIBS) and One-Stop Centers will coordinate with some of the Joint
       Technical Education Districts (JTEDS) in CTE statewide. The collaboration will involve the
       training/retraining of students and adults in creating and adapting curriculum and developing
       a pipeline between secondary and postsecondary education culminating in the creation of
       new and adapting existing careers.
Challenges:
      Development of Programs of Study: The development of Programs of Study containing
       statewide articulation/dual enrollment components continues to be a challenge. Arizona
       community colleges have no central governing body (the statewide community college board
       was dissolved in 2002); therefore, each of the 20 community colleges and 10 districts operate
       independently. This diminishes opportunities for statewide articulation/dual enrollment
       because there is minimal uniformity in the programs community colleges offer, course work
       required in what appears to be ―like programs,‖ and teacher certification requirements.
       Currently only one Program of Study (Education Professions) exists that has statewide
       articulation (from secondary to community college, between community colleges and to the
       three state universities.) Success has been attained in Programs of Study with varying degrees
       of articulation, and more successful developing Programs of Study between local secondary
       schools and community colleges (often with options to transfer the credit to the partnering
       university.)
      Professional Development (PD) Participation: Due to increased accountability (time in the
       classroom) and local budget issues, it is becoming increasingly difficult for educators to
       leave the classroom (requiring substitutes and additional transportation to attend professional
       development opportunities. The CTE staff is constantly adapting strategies to offer PD in
       concentrated timeframes at easily accessible geographic locations. Equally important is the
       perception of value for dollar spent and ―venue perceptions‖ when hosting PD at sites that
       can have negative connotations even though they are advantageous in size, service and
       function in a down economy.           Innovative strategies include weekend or evening
       opportunities, summer events (critical) and electronic/online delivery.
      Political Awareness: In Arizona it has become increasingly evident that CTE needs to be
       more proactive in educating state government leaders and general public on the critical
       importance of CTE in producing the pipeline for business and industry in High Wage, Skill
       and Demand occupations. All stakeholders must understand the myriad of career
       opportunities awaiting CTE students. Decisions cannot be predicated on antiquated
       misconceptions of CTE relevance in a global economy. Visibility of CTE, secondary and
       postsecondary must be continuous in venues statewide throughout the year. Business and

                                                                                                    7
       Industry must take the lead in connecting CTE with workforce success and Arizona‘s
       economic future.
Future Webinars and Research Briefs:
      Programs of Study: Programs of Study (POS) in CTE have been an ongoing PD topic for
       some time, generating extensive dialogue and a many varied opinions and approaches.
       Considering the myriad of definitions and visions within POS, ongoing PD offering multiple
       strategies and implementation options, in a variety of situations, would be very beneficial.
      Strategies for Credit Worthy Academic Integration: Increased mandates involving expanded
       academic requirements for high school graduation offer a compelling reason for all CTE
       programs to assimilate relevant and current academics to benefit students. Professional
       development focused on strategies and resources available for the implementation of
       effective academic integration with rigor worthy of academic credit is critical. This would
       also increase positive perceptions of CTE by a broad base of constituents including
       government/political entities, business and industry and the general public.
      Perkins Re-authorization: What will be critical components of the next iteration of the Carl
       D. Perkins Act? How can and should we be proactive in working with Congress and
       USDOE? In our own states, how do we communicate and interface with all of our
       constituents, marketing CTE as ‗THE‘ ongoing solution to Workforce and Economic
       Development and the pipeline for business and industry in a global marketplace?


                                            ARKANSAS
Accomplishments:
      Arkansas Works: Arkansas Works is a pilot program, which is funded through TANF
       (Temporary Assistance for Needy Families) funding. The program is designed to motivate
       and support Arkansas students from the 21 poorest counties in their pursuit of career
       preparation and/or a college degree. Students in the 8th – 12th grade will be served by Career
       Coaches, who have been assigned to their middle and high schools. The Arkansas Works
       program and Career Coaches will provide assistance and information for resources in the
       areas of: academic tutoring, career counseling, mentoring, financial guidance, and other
       supports necessary for career educational access and retention.
      Leadership Institute for CTE Leaders: Utilizing Reserve Funds the Arkansas Department of
       Career Education has developed a Leadership Academy to create a holistic understanding of
       career and technical education essential for our future teacher leaders. Future teacher leaders
       must not only be able to identify his or her personal strengths and styles, but be able to
       understand the diverse leadership styles of others in order to work effectively in a team
       setting. The ultimate goal is to provide teachers with the necessary leadership skills to ensure
       success in our workforce education programs and their operation on the local, regional and
       state levels. Attending this event will provide teachers with the skills to better serve the
       students in their classroom, the community and fellow teachers. We are hosting eight
       sessions over a two year period. One session will be held each quarter (four times a year).

                                                                                                     8
      JAG Expansion: Arkansas Career Education Department gave new program start-up grants in
       the amount of $433,000 to 28 ALE sites for the 2009-2010 school year. Another first was the
       JAG program at ACTI – Arkansas Rehabilitation training school which serves adult
       population as well as student population. ACE has received a $250,000 grant from Verizon to
       assist in expansion of JAG programs in the Delta region and to offer a yearly leadership
       seminar for JAG students to enable them to develop their leadership skills. Twenty three of
       42 JAG programs received the 5 of 5 award for the 08-09 school year. This is the highest
       recognition given by national JAG. (5 of 5 refers to the JAG performance outcomes: 90%
       graduation rate; 80% positive outcomes rate; 60% job placement rate; 60% full-time jobs rate
       and 80% full-time placement rate). Arkansas JAG was 3rd in the nation for receiving the 5 of
       5 Award
Challenges:
      Not meeting our indicator on Technical Skill Attainment in Perkins IV
      Developing new curriculum to address rigor in CTE Courses
      Our greatest challenge is to more fully align with the Career Cluster knowledge and skills
       within our Arkansas Frameworks and to align those frameworks with Arkansas academic
       standards. This is an ongoing process that will take approximately two years to fully
       incorporate.
Future Webinars and Research Briefs:
      Perkins V and Early State Preparation
      Technical Skill Attainment
      Academic Integration


                                         CALIFORNIA
Accomplishments:

      CTE is a Driver for High School Reform: The Secondary, Career, and Adult Learning
       Division has created an office titled the High School Transformation Unit. This group is
       focused on creating systemic change leading to higher performance for all students, with the
       goal of having every student postsecondary and career ready upon graduation. Central to this
       effort is the marriage of academics and CTE around problem-based and theme-based
       instruction. Over 500 Career academies have been established as well as dozens of career-
       themed high schools which have demonstrated dramatically higher student engagement and
       performance. In April 2010, a yearlong study will be released on the feasibility of
       establishing and expanding multiple pathways programs for all students. It will include bold
       recommendations for moving from an industrial model high school system to a system
       designed to create high performance high schools. Stay tuned for this one!


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      Implementation of Career Pathways Plans of Study (POS): Every secondary school district
       receiving Perkins has submitted at least one POS. These have been reviewed by state staff to
       determine whether they meet the state‘s established criteria. From these, models will be
       identified and posted. Tech Prep grantees are also developing statewide model POSs. The
       Community College Academic senate is leading the effort to create statewide articulation
       agreements and associated portable certifications. The state has worked to align the POS
       components and criteria to the definition and components proposed by the Office of
       Vocational and Adult Education.

      CTE Courses Accepted for University of California (UC) Admission: The UC system
       requires students to complete a series of academic courses to be eligible for admission known
       as the a-g courses. The university system reviews each high school course submitted by high
       school principals to ensure there is substantial academic content. A partnership among the
       California Department of Education and the UC Office of the President has been operational
       since 2002, and has led to the approval of 7,600 CTE courses as eligible for admission to the
       UC. This represents over 25% of CTE courses offered in California. Interestingly, 1,400
       private school CTE courses have also been submitted and approved. Over 1,000 courses
       qualify in the ―d‖ category as laboratory science courses. Over 4,000 courses are approved in
       the ―f‖ category for Fine Arts. This astonishingly high number of CTE courses qualifying
       under the a-g system has served to increase the image of CTE and helped insulate them from
       drastic budget cuts that local districts are making.

Future Webinars and Research Briefs:

       Twenty percent across the board state budget cuts are certainly causing the closure of some
       CTE programs and hampering the high school reform efforts. Additional cuts next year will
       likely cause federal Maintenance of Effort issues.

      The lack of pool of qualified CTE teachers and a corresponding lack of CTE teacher training
       programs are hampering expansion of CTE programs and high school reform efforts.

      The Perkins funding has become an increasingly important funding stream for local program
       improvement and state-level administration, yet it has not seen an increase in many years. At
       a minimum, a federal funding cost-of-living adjustment would be extremely beneficial.


                                           COLORADO
Accomplishments:
      Completed revision and/or creation of State Approved CTE Standards and Competencies
       aligned to model content standards in math, science and language arts and Colorado‘s newly


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       adopted Postsecondary and Workforce Ready descriptors. We will be setting the new
       expectation, requiring CTE instructors to ―teach‖ both if a natural alignment exists.
      Created a new Program of Study template for postsecondary programs, tailored to the needs
       of adult learners returning to expand their education and employment potential.
      Revised the Colorado Career Cluster Map – Updated pathways for Energy and STEM,
       including noting STEM affiliated pathways as appropriate and in the process now have a
       clear vision for what is and what is not a STEM program.
      Legislative requirement of Individual Academic Plans – Due to the overwhelming positive
       response to the concept of programs of study, legislative approval was given for each student
       to have an Individual Career & Academic Plan beginning in the ninth grade or earlier.
Challenges:
      Impending program closures at the secondary level due to prioritization of CTE (elective)
       below academic core in an environment of shrinking secondary funds.
      Twenty percent increase in postsecondary program enrollment without ability to increase
       instructional staff.
      Integration of multiple state data systems.
Future Webinars and Research Briefs:
      Continued examples of CTE return on investment studies.
      Consideration of new Perkins performance metrics that provide an accurate reflection of CTE
       impact and/or deficiencies.
      Clarification on uses of State Leadership and Administrative $.


                                          CONNECTICUT
Accomplishments:
      Effective use of Reserve and other funds utilized as a competitive source has increased the
       number of Personal Finance Programs as a graduation requirement in a number of school
       districts throughout the state.
      The CTE assessment system after making a gradual transition to electronic testing has shown
       improvement in student performance. Testing will now be offered electronically exclusively,
       while at the same time re-aligning and adding assessment areas with more rigorous standards
       and competencies.
      CTE serves as leader in the establishment of individual student learning plans, called the
       Student Success Plan, which is now a critical element of the Secondary School Reform. An
       anticipated rollout over the next 5 years, should allow for student success plans to be a part of
       all students' educational process. The establishment of pilot districts where Student Success
       Plans have been established for CTE students has dramatically benefited the process.

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      CTE will become part of the agency longitudinal database which in the long run will yield
       more reliable data and more efficient data retrieval for CTE.
Challenges:
      One major challenge this past year was the lack of human resources, partially due to an early
       retirement incentive in the summer of 2009, which resulted in individuals taking on an
       increasing number of job responsibilities.
      Continual high turnover of local Perkins administrators means constant re-education on
       Perkins legislative policies and data collection.
      LEA funding issues is causing CTE program dissolution and teacher staff reduction.
      Uncertainty of state budget cuts has and will affect what little state funds are allocated to
       CTE.


                                              FLORIDA
Accomplishments:
      Florida‘s Differentiated Accountability System: Career and Technical Education (CTE) is
       embedded into the state‘s Differentiated Accountability (DA) Process. Florida's DA plan
       streamlines the federal and state accountability systems and directs increasing school-wide
       interventions and school and district accountability based on Adequate Yearly Progress
       (AYP) and school grade. This program allows FDOE to operate a new tiered approach to
       working directly with schools to increase student achievement.
       The support and assistance provided to each school is individualized depending on the needs
       of that school. Through DA, schools are categorized based on the level of the school's need.
       The lowest performing schools receive the most support, and under DA, these schools are
       required to implement the most robust interventions that will help lead to successful school
       improvement. In order to provide direct support to schools, Florida has created a regional
       system of support.
       The Regional Support System is a State of Florida educational initiative in the Differentiated
       Accountability Plan designed to provide support to schools and districts that fail to meet state
       educational performance standards. Schools and districts are provided assistance in the form
       of professional development.
       Through DA, Florida is divided into five regions and Regional Teams provide direct
       assistance to schools and districts in their region. Each Regional Team works with struggling
       schools by assessing what assistance each school requires and then providing that assistance
       directly to the school in partnership with the districts. Career and Adult Education Division
       (CAED) is an active participant in the DA process.
       CAED personnel, along with the Regional Executive Directors (RED‘s) and their identified
       teams of Instructional Specialists take part in the DA process by serving on the curriculum
       review teams. The areas of need that were addressed by the Regional Team include:

                                                                                                    12
    curriculum and instruction, school leadership, school improvement planning, professional
    development, teacher quality, and continuous school improvement.
    District CTE Directors also play a key role in the improvement process and were asked to
    serve on the District-based leadership team to develop, support, and facilitate the
    implementation of policies and procedures for each school, and to plan for systems of change
    toward Problem Solving and Response to Instruction/Intervention (RTI) through district-
    wide consensus building, infrastructure development, and implementation. State CTE staff
    visited and participated in a comprehensive program review at 34 ―F‖ and Intervene high
    schools with CTE programs. An extensive Final Report and Action plan were prepared by
    the evaluators and submitted to the RED‘s, principals and District CTE staff. The final plans
    were then submitted to the State Board of Education for approval as the established ―Plan of
    Action.‖ State CTE staff are assigned to CTE District Directors who assist in the monitoring
    of the individual school‘s monthly progress, professional development, and program
    implementations.
    Having CTE involved in this process is precedent setting and represents a shift in philosophy
    about the role of CTE in high schools. CTE is recognized as way to boost student
    achievement, retention and graduation rates.
   Role of CTE in Florida‘s Race to the Top Application: As a result of CTE‘s participation in
    the aforementioned DA process, and in an overall recognition and understanding of the
    importance of CTE, CTE is poised as an integral part of the state‘s Race to the Top initiative
    (RTTT).
    - Examples of Florida‘s RTTT Initiatives:
       o MOU – The LEA will implement at least one additional high school career and
         technical program that provides training for occupations requiring science,
         technology, engineering, and/or math (STEM). The LEA will pay, or secure payment
         for the industry certification examination for graduates of such programs. These
         programs must lead to a high-wage, high-skill career for a majority of graduates that
         supports one of the eight targeted sectors identified by Enterprise Florida and result in
         an industry certification. The LEA will ensure that these programs will include at
         least one Career and Technical Education course that has significant integration of
         math or science that will satisfy core credit requirements with the passing of the
         course and related end-of-course exam.
       o Struggling Schools – Improve and Expand Science, Technology, Engineering, and
         Mathematics (STEM) Career and Professional Academies ($10,046,000). To assist
         with improvements in the CTE programs, the Department will:
                Award competitive bids for $350,000 to provide five CTE experts who will
                 join the existing DA Regional Teams to work closely with and monitor
                 progress in the identified schools.
                Supplement existing program expansion, including equipment, CTSO‘s and
                 technology, and to establish /expand CTE programs at 24 schools; the expected
                 cost is $7,431,000, with much of the cost coming in the early years to acquire
                 the infrastructure.
                The remaining ($2,265,7000) costs are to:

                                                                                               13
                          o  provide for professional development workshops
                          o  implement a mentoring program for 90 teachers.
      Improve College and Career Readiness - Standards and Assessments: Broaden STEM course
       enrollment and career & technical programs
      Expand Opportunities for Post-Secondary Degrees and Certificates - Turning Around the
       Lowest-Achieving Schools: Expand career and professional academies to allow more
       students to achieve secondary degrees, thus preparing additional students for postsecondary
       education.
      Statewide Articulation Based on Industry Certification: Florida has initiated a process to
       develop statewide articulation agreements to the AS/AAS degree based on industry
       certifications that have been identified as critical to Florida‘s economy. Visit Articulation
       Agreements - Statewide to view the statewide articulation agreements that have been
       approved by Florida‘s Articulation Coordinating Council and the State Board of Education.
Challenges:
      Many high school CTE courses are not currently accepted by State University System (SUS)
       Admissions Directors. The Division of Career and Adult Education is actively working to
       have all rigorous CTE courses identified as level 3 courses and accepted by the SUS as
       courses that count for entrance, count toward the states‘ Talented 20, and the Bright Futures
       Scholarships in an effort to reward CTE students who elect to transition from high school
       straight into a 4 year state university.
      Florida requires students who are classified as level 1 and 2 readers (based on FCAT scores)
       to take intensive remediation courses in Math and/or Reading. This requirement results in a
       large number of students enrolled in CTE courses inability to concentrate/complete
       meaningful CTE programs that are part of a program of study. While Florida has developed
       an innovative professional development program to allow CTE teachers to become Reading
       endorsed and thereby eligible to deliver the required reading remediation within the content
       (Content Area Reading) of their CTE discipline; many school districts have not exercised this
       option.
      Recently, the Florida Legislature passed the Career and Professional Education (CAPE) Act
       which created mandated CAPE academies within each district. CAPE academies must be
       centered on CTE programs that result in a student sitting for a nationally recognized industry
       certification. As a result, additional legislation has been passed that allows for additional
       FTE for district to cover the cost of the exams and industry certifications are now a factor in
       calculating school grades. While all of the above mentioned legislation is certainly a positive,
       the challenge is that there are some quality CTE programs that are not linked to a nationally
       recognized industry certification. Currently, CTE program specialists within the division are
       working with their industry advisory groups to research and/or create industry certifications
       for the programs where no industry certification currently exists.
Future Webinars and Research Briefs:
      Measurement of Technical Skill Attainment and OVAE‘s expectation in the remaining years
       of Perkins IV.

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      Best practices from states that have developed statewide articulations based on high school
       coursework from secondary to AS/AAS degree level and from secondary to baccalaureate
       degree level.
      Data collection strategies for measuring progress of students enrolled in programs of study.


                                               HAWAII
Accomplishments:
      We were funded as one of 6 states receiving support for its Rigorous Program of Study
       efforts.
      We established a significant Dual Credit program of study in marketing.
      We supported a project that provided increased longitudinal data to teachers and faculty, and
       that got them together to improve curricular alignment from high school to community
       college.
Challenges:
      There is a notable shortage in qualified teachers for CTE fields. Teachers are being asked to
       teach outside of their field of expertise.
      There is low morale in our department of education due to extensive furloughs. The
       furloughs also have reduced teaching, planning and meeting time.
      Is has been difficult to develop CTE in a time when the focus is on meeting No Child Left
       Behind goals.
Future Webinars and Research Briefs:
      Ideas on what we can do in our states to provide professional development to the schools and
       colleges, including ideas for local conventions.
      Clarification of the parameters of our role as the Office of the State Director.
      Dealing with Maintenance of Effort and waiver requests


                                                IDAHO
Accomplishments:
      An academic endorsement can now be attached to our industry (Occupational Specialist)
       endorsement.
       Increased the go-to-college rate for Professional-Technical Education completers by 3%.
       (FY2008-60%, FY2009-63%)
      Worked cooperatively with the Idaho Digital Learning Academy to deliver secondary on-line
       health professions introductory classes to meet the needs of rural districts. The goal is to
       deliver more introductory level on-line Professional-Technical Education classes which will
                                                                                                  15
       help rural districts put their resources into delivering more capstone classes which will
       expand their programs of study.
      Provided all first year high school students with the Idaho Professional-Technical
       Education Career Planning Guide. The Guide is a resource for students and parents to use
       as students develop their 4-year high school plan. The planning guide is based on career
       clusters and includes information about occupations and careers; technical and academic
       course necessary for those careers and Idaho colleges that offer the required education and
       training.
Challenges:
      Shortage of PTE certified teachers.
      Technical skill assessments at the secondary level.
      Data collection and reporting at the local level since Idaho does not currently have a
       longitudinal data system.
      Meeting student demand at the postsecondary technical colleges with limited resources.
Future Webinars and Research Briefs:
      Best practices for meeting nontraditional performance measures.
      Continuing the work with the new CTE principles


                                             ILLINOIS
Accomplishments:
      Development of statewide common course descriptions based on federal inventory of classes
      Development of web-based program approval program for local consortia
      Strong involvement of CTE in development of RTT application
Challenges:
      Lack of innovation in local CTE programs
      Enrollment: more rigid graduation requirements and ―dumb‖ remediation
      Lack of rigor in most classrooms
Future Webinars and Research Briefs:
      Leading student centered change in high schools
      Impact of and technology upon simulation and personalization of instruction and how CTE
       can lead in this arena
      How CTE can replace remediation



                                                                                                16
                                              INDIANA
Accomplishments:
      Indiana reorganized the way we are doing Career Pathways – expanding them into ―College
       and Career Pathways‖ (to increase buy-in from multiple audiences) and strictly tied to the
       Perkins guidelines.
      Initiated the process of switching Federal Perkins dollars from the Department of Workforce
       Development to our Indiana Department of Education.
      Got serious about tying continued Perkins funding (and possibly state CTE funding) to
       student outcomes
Challenges:
      The intricacies of developing College and Career Pathways that address many issues – a
       significant challenge.
      Educating a new administration about what CTE is and does well.
      Finding best practices and models of making our programs more successful.
Future Webinars and Research Briefs:
      Best practices or good ideas by areas (e.g. Tech Prep, course standards, etc)
      Marketing techniques and ideas


                                              KANSAS
Accomplishments:
      CTE Program Alignment: Kansas is currently in the process of aligning program. The
       purpose of the alignment is to provide a system of high-quality technical education programs
       aligned with industry needs and to equip graduates with industry-based credentials and
       academic skills necessary for success in a competitive employment market. The process will
       align program length, program core courses, and business & industry identified exit points
       with a national certification.
      NTO Initiative: The Kansas ―New Look‖ Liaisons were selected in 2009 to represent the four
       regional areas of the state. The Liaisons provide NTO resources and technical assistance for
       Kansas postsecondary institutions relating to gender nontraditional career fields.
          The nine Kansas ―New Look‖ Liaisons provided assistance in the following ways:
          - Assist in planning workshops and events by
                 o Providing content and resources
                 o Facilitating at events
          - Provide technical assistance to established Teams
                 o Telephone and e-mail support
                 o Provision of resources
                 o Visit Team-sponsored special events
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          -   Participate in State sponsored webinars
                  o Collect information to provide resources to colleges
                  o Collate and edit information for Newsletter
                  o Participate with Kansas Board of Regents CTE staff and the Illinois Center for
                      Specialized Professional Support in the development of the NTO 101
                      Curriculum for Kansas postsecondary institutions
          -   Attend NTO resource professional development (National Alliance of Partnership in
              Equity, etc. workshops)
          -   Assist with reviewing and awarding of NTO 101 Curriculum Certifications
      Economics and Personal Finance: The Kansas Career Pipeline offers a sophisticated career
       planning tool that is legislatively supported. Via www.kansascareerpipeline.org, students,
       parents and counselors can use the internet to find classes, training opportunities, and careers
       that ―fit‖ the student. The Pipeline, using KUDER software, creates a profile of the student‘s
       interests, skills, and inventories, then compares that professional personality to existing job
       openings. The Kansas Department of Education staff worked cooperatively with the Kansas
       Career Pipeline field representative to provide continued education for counselors, CTE and
       academic teachers, and administrators to implement the career-focused Kansas Career
       Pipeline. Kansas is currently working to provide a one-stop provider of career and technical
       education information by linking Kansas Career Pipeline with CareerZoom Kansas,
       www.careerzoom-kansas.org, a comprehensive search tool for career and technical education
       in Kansas and KansasWorks, www.kansasworks.com, the Kansas Department of Labor
       employment locator website.
Challenges:
      Implementation of aligned programs.
      Educating institutions on Perkins and how to make data driven decisions.
      Linking data systems
Future Webinars and Research Briefs:
      Data collection and Best Practices on educating institutions on how to use their data.
      Processes and forms other states have developed
      Perkins Reauthorization


                                            KENTUCKY
Accomplishments:
      As a state we met the 90% adjusted levels of performance on all Perkins Performance
       Measures at both the secondary and post secondary levels. We are particularly pleased with
       the results for nontraditional participation and completion. Two projects were developed
       with Perkins funds and distributed throughout the state. A poster project featuring
       nontraditional students in their chosen CTE program became an excellent recruitment and

                                                                                                    18
       retention tool. A video with interviews of CTE stakeholders identified the impact CTE can
       have in a community and was very well received.
      The math in CTE project continued to improve integration activities in our classrooms,
       cooperation and renewed respect between academic and technical teachers, and relevance of
       instruction for students. In its third year, the program has been statistically shown to improve
       academic math skills in technical students.
      Introduction of green technologies into the CTE curriculum continued to expand particularly
       in electricity and automotive technologies. Electricity students focused on wind and solar
       power generation and automotive focused on hybrid technology.
Challenges:
      Fully implementing programs of study.
      Dual credit and articulation being recognized and accepted at the postsecondary level.
      Data sharing among institutions.
Future Webinars and Research Briefs:
      For those of us being monitored this year, a webinar to assist us in preparation would be
       helpful. Something along the lines of identifying the top ten most common problem areas
       OVAE has found during their visits and how to correct them.
      FERPA as it relates to data sharing
      Continued updates on the potential programs of study evaluations. Our determining factor in
       merging Tech Prep with the basic grant was the inability of our postsecondary institutions to
       identify students who transitioned from secondary institutions. We are concerned that many
       of the same problems encountered with Tech Prep data collection will occur if clear
       guidelines and realistic expectations are not communicated to states.


                                               MAINE
Accomplishments:
      In spring 2009 the Maine legislature passed a portion of the high school graduation
       requirements bill. The portion that helps to support Maine CTE is the portion that remains
       regarding students ability to graduate by achieving attainment of Maine‘s Learning Results
       through ―multiple pathways‖. Maine students in Career and Technical Education now may
       use CTE as a pathway to graduation.
      Strengthening the rigor and responsibilities of our advisory committees and their role in the
       evaluation of programs.
      Work on Technical Skill Attainment, partnerships with business and industry,
       entrepreneurship, and identification of National Industry Standards with which our programs
       will align has continued to move forward. 50 of our 64 programs have agreed upon the
       National Industry Standards they will use as guidance to revise or develop curriculum.

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Challenges:
     Identification of the third party technical skill assessment to be used for every program.
     Development of the Longitudinal Data system for Maine to include CTE.
     Educating CTE directors, teachers and the public on the need for data collection and use.
Future Webinars and Research Briefs:
     Actual industry standards and technical skills assessments that are ready for secondary use.
     Nontraditional students and the best practices and most accurate methods of obtaining and
      attaining the numbers to increase enrollment.
     Programs of study – the development of a common template for use in all schools and clear
      criteria for evaluating what is a robust and rigorous Program of Study.


                                           MARYLAND
Accomplishments:
     The recommendations of the Governor‘s P-20 Task Force on Career and Technology
      Education were accepted by Governor O‘Malley in May, 2009 and integrated into his Plan
      for Improving Student Achievement and Readiness in Maryland. The Governor‘s Plan calls
      for expanding access to CTE as critical to helping Marylanders acquire the skills they need to
      prepare for jobs in the State‘s high demand industries like bioscience and high tech. Among
      the Governor‘s goals are increasing the number of CTE graduates prepared for college and
      careers, fully implementing Maryland‘s 48 CTE Programs of Study, and increasing the
      numbers of CTE graduates earning industry certifications and early college credit.
     Maryland continued its implementation of State CTE Programs of Study aligned to the career
      cluster frameworks. To date, 37 of the planned 48 State CTE programs of Study have been
      completed and are being implemented in the State‘s local school systems. In FY 2009, over
      39% of Maryland‘s CTE students were enrolled in one of the State POS, up from 15.2% in
      FY 2007. The number of CTE students accessing and obtaining industry credentials is also
      on the rise. The number of CTE students earning industry credentials tripled in 2009 with
      3403 CTE completers earning an industry credential. And, Maryland‘s
      secondary/postsecondary partnerships continued to expand as evidenced by the establishment
      of statewide articulation agreements. Six State POS now include statewide articulation
      agreements
     In partnership with the Maryland State Department of Education‘s Division of Career
      Technology and Adult Learning and Division of Library Services, a second CTE awareness
      campaign was launched and gained national notice. Career and Technology Education:
      Don’t Go To College Without It continued as the theme of the event. The Superintendent of
      the Howard County Public Schools and the CEO of the County‘s library system were joined
      by the County Executive as they announced the collaborative campaign to provide resources
      and information about the County Public School‘s CTE programs. The Howard County
      Libraries created a display area in each branch of the library system to share this information
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       with parents and students. Training materials were provided to library staff and at the kick-
       off event, CTE students, both current and graduates shared their experiences with their CTE
       programs and answered questions.
Challenges:
      Implementation of technical assessments continues as a challenge. While more and more
       students are taking and acquiring industry certifications, the requirement has posed
       challenging at local levels both in the school systems and community colleges. Challenges
       include securing resources to pay for available industry credentials, identifying/locating
       authentic industry certifications, and obtaining feedback on student results.
       Integrating CTE and STEM continues as a challenge. Maryland is developing a cross-
       curricular approach to STEM. However, CTE‘s contribution to STEM is still viewed in a
       narrow fashion. For example, CTE‘s pre-engineering programs are highly regarded as part of
       the State‘s STEM efforts while CTE IT programs are often overlooked as STEM content.
       Acceptance of CTE as a value-added opportunity for secondary students remains an issue,
       especially in the world of STEM.
Future Webinars and Research Briefs:
      Expanding/leveraging access to Industry Credentials
      Creating a shared vision for 21st Century CTE
      Invigorating CTE Advisory Councils to facilitate partnerships needed for successful
       implementation of CTE programs of study.


                                           MICHIGAN
Accomplishments:
      Statewide Articulation Agreement – In February, Michigan signed the first statewide
       articulation agreement with Davenport University, a private, four-year institution. There are
       two options for students – the first is if a student has successfully completed the technical
       skills assessment for their program – they will receive a block of credits from the college.
       The second option is for programs without a technical skill assessment or for students who
       were not successful taking the assessment – these credits are earned through a course by
       course analysis. The university worked with consultants in the Department of Education
       using the statewide technical standards for each high school program to determine the
       amount of articulated credits that would be awarded. Because it is an agreement between the
       state and the university, any high school CTE student in Michigan is eligible to earn the
       credits by enrolling in a corresponding bachelor‘s degree at Davenport. More information on
       Davenport:
       http://www.davenport.edu/Home/PressRoom/Statewidearticulationagreement/tabid/799/Defa
       ult.aspx
      Alternative Energy Programs and Demonstration Sites – There are 15 Career and Technical
       Centers in Michigan who have installed equipment and are receiving training to become

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       Alternative Energy demonstration sites. Through a grant from the Michigan Public Service
       Commission for Renewable Energy Education, each of the centers will receive wind turbines,
       a solar array with weather station hook up, information on making biofuels and a small diesel
       engine to run with the biofuels, biomass technology information, a small pellet mill, and
       information on green construction. In addition, the Michigan legislature awarded grants to
       three area centers in the Thumb Region to begin integrating Alternative Energy concepts into
       existing CTE programs, such as HVAC, construction trades and automotive technology. Our
       website was also expanded with a Green Initiatives section that includes resources for
       teachers: http://www.michigan.gov/mde/0,1607,7-140-6530_2629_54498---,00.html
      Early/Middle Colleges – A competitive state grant program has helped increase the number
       of Early/Middle Colleges in Michigan from two to twelve. Nine of the newest Early/Middle
       Colleges are focused on Health Care Careers. Students who enroll in the Early/Middle
       College programs attend for five years and earn a high school diploma as well as an
       associate‘s degree (or transferrable credits). The current focus on the most recent
       competitive grant expanded to include STEM areas as well as Health Care Careers. For more
       information: http://www.michigan.gov/mde/0,1607,7-140-43092_51178---,00.html
Challenges:
      Technical Skills Assessments – Michigan is struggling to find available and affordable
       assessments that align with Michigan CTE program standards. Progress toward assessments
       has been slow because of the lack of funding available to work on a comprehensive solution
       to the assessment question.
      Race to the Top and Educational Reform – Although CTE was at the table, the Race to the
       Top application aligns with ESEA. It has been a challenge to find a meaningful fit for CTE
       within the reform efforts.
      Staffing – The work on assessments and reform has been made much more difficult because
       of losing staff and the inability to hire within state government.
Future Webinars and Research Briefs:
      Technical Skills Assessments – A nationwide effort toward assessments aligned to Cluster
       Knowledge and Skills would be helpful.
      Reauthorization – Continue to keep membership aware of talks in Washington – it is
       especially helpful for those of us who cannot travel.
      Return on Investment and CTE as a reform strategy – both of these topics will be helpful in
       the months ahead.


                                           MISSISSIPPI
Accomplishments:
      Academic Credit for CTE classes in required courses for high school graduation in Health
       and Economics.

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      Upgraded data system for Perkins grant management for State and local use.
      Upgraded licensure requirements for CTE instructors which include Technical Literacy
       testing.
Challenges:
      Continued difficulty in attracting and maintaining internal staff in Program/Technical
       Assistance area.
      Continued difficulty in attracting and maintaining qualified instructors in the field.
      Public Relations efforts to inform the public of the upgrades and changes in CTE courses
       regarding course rigor and employment opportunities.
Future Webinars and Research Briefs:
      Programs of Study
      Early College
      Career Academies


                                              MISSOURI
Accomplishments:
      CTE Vision Group: To support Missouri in establishing a 21st‐ century vision for delivering
       career education, in February 2008 staff from the Missouri Department of Elementary and
       Secondary Education (DESE) convened a Missouri Career Education Advisory Committee to
       assess the status of the career education delivery within Missouri schools. Committee
       membership included representatives from Missouri‘s secondary education system, including
       those based in comprehensive high schools and area career centers; representatives from
       Missouri‘s community college system; individuals from the state‘s Economic Development
       agency; and stakeholders from the Chamber of Commerce & Industry and businesses in
       critical demand in the state.
       The advisory committee members worked to identify new approaches for organizing and
       delivering high‐quality career education services in the state. During the year‐long project,
       committee members reviewed national developments in the delivery of quality career
       education programs; quantified the level of federal, state, and local investment in Missouri‘s
       career education enterprise; and conducted virtual site visits with educators from leading
       states and institutions throughout the country—via conference calls and webinars—to
       identify the characteristics of quality career education programs. Members also met quarterly
       to review project results and work products.
       On July 16, 2009 a paper entitled Delivering Career Education in Missouri was released.
       This paper which was prepared by MPR Associates summarizes the findings of the
       committee and offers recommendations for guiding state efforts to reinforce the delivery of
       career education using Programs of Study (POS) as an organizing framework. The paper can
       be                                        found                                          at:
                                                                                                  23
       http://www.dese.mo.gov/divcareered/documents/MCE_Vision_CareerEdStudy_Klein_07160
       9.pdf
      Interdivisional Collaboration: The Division of Career Education is collaborating with the
       Divisions of Special Education and School Improvement to focus on promoting,
       coordinating, and aligning three-tiered models of intervention around the state. The goal is to
       improve achievement for all students using School-wide Positive Behavior Supports (SW-
       PBS), Professional Learning Communities (PLCs), Reading First, and High Schools That
       Work as the key strategies for implementing three-tiered models of intervention.
      Competency Packets: Competency packets are being developed as a synthesis of initiatives
       impacting career and technical education curriculum in a way that can be used for multiple
       purposes, including Programs of Study. Factors influencing the development of the
       competency packets include: Programs of Study; Career Clusters; technical skill attainment;
       end of course assessments; and alignment with local, state and national standards.
       Work was completed on the Career Pathways for the Teaching Profession competency packet
       http://missouricareereducation.org/CDs/CompPacket/EdTrngCluster.pdf
       This packet will lay the groundwork for Missouri‘s participation in SREB‘s Linking CTE to
       College-and Career-Readiness Standards project. Missouri will take the lead on the
       Education and Training project.
Challenges:
      Race to the Top: Missouri was one of 40 states that submitted a first-round application for
       Race to the Top funding. Our Commissioner of Education is using the four principles of
       Race to the Top to reorganize the Department‘s work. Our greatest challenge is figuring out
       how Career Education fits into the Race to the Top functions and activities.
      Area Career Centers (ACCs): Missouri has 57 area career centers or shared-time centers.
       Most of our ACCs are still narrowly focused on job specific occupational programs that
       enroll both secondary and adult students. Several of our ACCs are involved in SREB‘s
       Technology Centers That Work (TCTW) initiative. Those ACCs are using the principles and
       practices to rethink the purpose and structure of their centers. The greatest challenge is
       getting all of our ACCs to rethink their role in the overall educational system.
      Technical Skill Attainment: Technical Skill Attainment continues to be a challenge for local
       Perkins grant recipients. Missouri chose to use a phase-in approach to rollout technical skill
       attainment. We are bringing on additional assessments this year for FCS and Agriculture
       Education. We are also working with postsecondary institutions to allow portfolios as a
       method for meeting 2P1 Technical Skill Attainment where a technical skill assessment is not
       available or applicable to the program.
Future Webinars and Research Briefs:
      Programs of Study Accountability
      Race to the Top/ESEA Reauthorization and CTE
      Integration of academics/embedded credit

                                                                                                   24
                                             MONTANA
Accomplishments:
      The development of statewide articulations.
      Using the Montana Career Information System (MCIS) to imbed Career Clusters, Pathways
       and Programs of Study into Montana high schools and middle schools.
      Montana received a Making Opportunity Affordable grant through the Lumina Foundation.
       One of the primary objectives of the grant is to use Faculty Learning Outcome Committees to
       define common course numbers and content for 2 year postsecondary programs. This project
       is working hand-in-hand with the Perkins Specialist developing the statewide articulations.
Challenges:
      Although a funding issue, if Perkins allocations are increased, Montana and I assume other
       states, will not be able to fully match the general fund requirement for administration.
      Folding in Tech Prep will be a challenge for Montana.
Future Webinars and Research Briefs:
      Interpretation and utilization of data. The new data elements required to focus on
       CTE/Perkins quality issues.
      Performance or demonstration based proficiency assessments rather than knowledge based
       testing.
      How to define and report the results for Programs of Study.
      Maintaining Tech Prep activities after funds have been rolled into Title 1.


                                            NEBRASKA
Accomplishments:
      Passage of the 2009 Nebraska Center for Student Leadership and Extended Learning Act by
       our State Legislature. The Act provides an additional $500,000 as well as legislative
       language to support CTSO work and expand leadership development opportunities. Working
       completed has included expansion of leadership programs for new CTE cluster areas as well
       as new extended learning opportunities. New partnerships have been developed with Future
       Educators Association, Community Learning Centers, Afterschool networks, Student
       Council and the Nebraska Human Resources Institute.
      Implementation of a four-year plan to revise Nebraska‘s programs of study using the
       framework developed through our USDE Rigorous Program of Study grant. The process
       includes a career cluster ―Visioning‖ session conducted to review current program of study
       and make recommended changes. The visioning process involves individuals business and
       industry from the cluster working with middle school, secondary and 2- and 4- year
       postsecondary instructors to review current program of study and make recommendations
       based on labor market projections and economic development priorities. The next step is the
                                                                                                25
       standard and performance indicator writing process that aligns to the identified programs of
       study. A priority for the standard development is the identification of embedded academics
       in each CTE course.
      Implementation of a new marketing/communication campaign for CTE. Based on the
       information received through Nebraska‘s participation in the National Governors‘ Academy
       on CTE, Nebraska is working the University of Nebraska Center on Public Policy and a
       marketing firm to develop a new communication plan. Activities completed to date are an
       educator/administrator CTE perception survey and a summit on career readiness to develop
       new career readiness standards for Nebraska. Currently underway is the public perception
       CTE survey. The results will be used by the marketing firm to develop strategies to refresh
       our Nebraska Career Education brand and develop stronger messages about CTE‘s role in
       college and career readiness.
Challenges:
      Continue to work on quality of CTE data. We have made great strides, but it is a work in
       progress.
      Teacher shortages are going to be a huge issue for us, in particular in the areas of Industrial
       Technology and Family and Consumer Sciences and especially in the rural areas. We have
       large retirement bubbles coming and not enough bodies in the preparation pipeline.
      Continued development of both synchronous and asynchronous distance learning CTE
       courses for secondary students. Dual-credit courses and rural career academies are
       continuing to be developed in partnership with community colleges, but the demand is
       greater than supply at the current time.
Future Webinars and Research Briefs:
      CTE‘s alignment/role with common core standards and assessments
      Definition of career readiness that is meaningful and aligned to the college and career
       readiness initiative
      Like the work on return on investment for CTE, sharing more information that would help
       states generate data on ROI would be helpful


                                              NEVADA
Accomplishments:
      Developed templates for high school programs of study and revised the Nevada Career
       Cluster Model to more efficiently align program areas, programs, career clusters and career
       paths. Conducted two statewide workshops involving teams for local school teachers,
       counselors, and curriculum administrators to promote, on a statewide basis, the full
       organization of CTE into programs of study.




                                                                                                   26
      Safeguarded $4 million in state funds earmarked for CTE program maintenance, program
       development and program improvement. The funds were successfully sub-granted to 16
       school districts through a competitive- and allocation-grant process.
      Ongoing statewide promotion of CTE in education reform efforts to promote higher
       graduation rates and lower dropout rates. Expansion of secondary-postsecondary linkages,
       primarily through articulation agreements, to promote student success in postsecondary
       education.
Challenges:
      Expansion of core academic course requirements for high school diplomas.
      Integrating state data systems to ensure the collection and reporting of useful, reliable data.
      Developing a framework for standards and assessments to establish a credentialing system.
Future Webinars and Research Briefs:
      Collecting and using data to demonstrate student outcomes and program success and
       identification of deficiencies and areas in need of improvement, beyond the accountability
       requirements in Perkins IV.
      Stronger policy guidance in the area of uses of funds.
      Guidance to help utilize Perkins resources to direct change that supports the vision and core
       principles established for CTE.


                                        NEW HAMPSHIRE
Accomplishments:

      Implementation of Career Pathways Plans of Study (Programs of Study): Thanks in part to
       the RPOS grant and excellent relationships with our community colleges, New Hampshire
       has been successful in creating plans of study for 75% of their current program offerings.
       The plans of study are created with teachers, faculty and administrators from secondary and
       postsecondary. Curriculum alignment, along with concurrent enrollment, are features in the
       dynamic process as well as a clearly developed pathway of course taking for high school
       students transitioning into postsecondary options.
      Completion of two powerful data systems exclusively for CTE: CATE (Career and Technical
       Education) has been developed for state-wide data collection aligned with needs for
       performance indicators, program improvement and multi-use reports. This system ―talks‖ to
       the state-wide student information system allowing reliable and valid reporting throughout
       the year. Additionally, Performance Pathways has been developed to support our
       competency based CTE programs. All competencies are now electronic, multiple reports can
       be generated and student progress can be monitored throughout the year.
      Math-In-CTE: Math-in-CTE from University of Louisville is about to enter its third year.
       Progress has been consistent with positive outcomes. Four content areas have participated to
       date with Health Science and Machine Tool and Welders participating in the upcoming year.

                                                                                                         27
      Footnote: NH is the recipient of the STEM-Equity Pipeline grant so initial work has taken
      place.
Challenges:

     Establishing criteria for accepting embedded credits in CTE courses
     Establishing strong connections (pathways) from middle school to high school and high:
      school with academics (effectively eliminating or reducing silos)
    Establishing a system the systemically upgrades competencies: (creating a proactive system
      as opposed to a reactive system)
Future Webinars and Research Briefs:

      Alternative uses/creative uses of reserve money
      On-line program development for CTE
      POS design models in emerging technology areas.


                                          NEW JERSEY
Accomplishments:
       New Jersey State Board of Education adopted Career and Technical Education Standards as
       part of New Jersey‘s Core Curriculum Content Standards and represent the first ever state
       standards for Career and Technical Education. These standards are based on the knowledge
       and skill statements of the Sixteen Career Clusters framework. This has been a monumental
       accomplishment aligned to New Jersey‘s overall plan to implement standards linked to 21st
       century skills. These newly adopted standards emphasize the development of skills used in
       real world situations in the digital age and provide opportunities for multiple measures of
       mastery. Interdisciplinary connections, technology integration, global perspectives, and 21st
       century themes are integral to this new design. A comprehensive statewide professional
       development plan and the development of an interactive web site will assist in all aspects of
       standards implementation. http://njcccs.org


      New Jersey is piloting the implementation of personalized student learning plans for all
       students beginning in grade six. Sixteen pilot schools have been selected to implement
       personalized student learning plans for students in grades six and nine. The Office of Career
       and Technical Education is providing leadership to this initiative. A personalized student
       learning plan is defined as a formalized plan and process that involves students setting
       learning goals based on personal, academic and career interests, beginning in the middle
       school grades and continuing throughout the high school with the close support of adult
       mentors that include teachers, counselors and parents. The Personalized Student Learning
       Plan Pilot Program will provide an opportunity for schools to explore meaningful, creative
       and flexible ways to personalize the learning environment through the development and
       implementation of a Personalized Student Learning Plan. This will have a significant impact
       on CTE by intensifying efforts to provide meaningful career guidance and preparation for all
       students to prepare for postsecondary education and careers.

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      Career and technical education data elements will be incorporated into the statewide
       comprehensive student warehouse (NJ SMART) for the first time. In the past, CTE data has
       been collected in a separate system. This new feature will enhance the accuracy of the CTE
       data collected as well as provide the genesis for the Office of Career and Technical
       Education to focus on greater analysis of data. This effort is the result of lengthy discussions
       with multiple offices within the Department of Education. This has also laid the groundwork
       for CTE to be a critical component of proposed longitudinal data collection systems in the
       state.
Challenges:
      Although improved over the past few years, a disconnect remains in the secondary and
       postsecondary CTE delivery systems in New Jersey. Opportunities for secondary students to
       participate in dual enrollment courses are dependent upon agreements developed at the local
       level. Portability of credit is often a challenge. There is no statewide system for articulation
       agreements; thus, there are disparities between and among our secondary schools and the
       community college system. This presents obstacles for developing a seamless non-
       duplicative CTE system required by Perkins and implemented through the Program of Study
       framework.
      Integration of academics and CTE continues to challenge our educators. Fundamentally
       changing the delivery of career and technical education instruction will require intensive,
       sustained professional development for teachers and require significant revisions to
       curriculum and instruction. Current CTE teachers have limited experience in this new
       paradigm and will require sustained professional development.
      Although the quality of CTE data has improved over the years, there are limitations in its
       utilization to address the success of programs and students.
Future Webinars and Research Briefs:
      Implementation of Program of Study models/successes
      Models for integrating academic and technical content
      Technical Skills Assessments/national common core of technical standards


                                          NEW MEXICO
Accomplishments:
      Ongoing revisions to and improvement of electronic application for Perkins / Tech Prep
       Applicants. Includes ability to data mine regarding POS's approved and offered; financial
       data, and reduces time/effort on behalf of stakeholders regarding application completion;
      Using statewide input from trades and industry (union and non-union), teaching faculty
       (secondary and postsecondary), educational administrators, established framework for and
       promulgated rule for Pre-Apprenticeship Program for High School Students;


                                                                                                    29
      Increased statewide participation in CTSO's through targeted support for the Career
       Technical Leadership Program. Continuous support for New Mexico's Association for Career
       Technical Education, 2009 recipient of ACTE‘s Quality State Association Gold Award. The
       Quality Association Award is given to states that meet the Quality Association Standards
       (QAS). This award recognizes those state associations that promote career and technical
       education and provide their members with a high level of service.
Challenges:
      Overcoming counselor shortages
      Data Collection
      Valid/reliable data collection on technical skills assessments; placement; non-traditional
       completion
      Engendering a collective understanding within traditional core subject/content area
       instructors (math, science, language arts, social studies) of the positive impact that can result
       from the integration of academics with career and technical education.
Future Webinars and Research Briefs:
      CCSSO‘s definition of college and career readiness and the plan                               for
       insertion/adaptation/implementation of that definition will be advanced across states;
      Early College in High School Models;
      Incorporation of 21st Century Learning Skills into Common Core Assessments; hopefully this
       will lead into comprehensive conversations regarding technical skills assessments and
       successful performance on these as an alternative demonstration of competencies for high
       school graduation and/or NCLB accountability.


                                             NEW YORK
Accomplishments:
      Past 1,000 mark for state-approved CTE programs
      Successful E-forum on challenges and issues facing CTE
      Collaboration with special education office on skills credential for students with disabilities
Challenges:
      Avoid re-establishment of tracking CTE students
      Develop effective processes for collecting CTE-related data
      Providing effective PD and other support for CTE teachers
Future Webinars and Research Briefs:
      Effective Local Data Collection
      Developing Evaluations on Impact of Perkins Funding
                                                                                                     30
      Programs of Study monitoring and evaluation


                                      NORTH CAROLINA
Accomplishments:


      Conducting pilot test of new web-enabled instructional management system: North Carolina
       launched a semester-long pilot project in January to investigate how to move our nationally
       recognized instructional management system to a web-enabled platform. This move will
       allow for more efficient distribution of curriculum resources, easier collection of data from
       local school systems, and increased use of data by teachers for instructional improvement.
       The pilot, which has been in planning for nearly three years, will run through the end of the
       current school year. Depending on the results, North Carolina may be able to move to
       statewide implementation in 2010-2011. In addition to the possibilities this project presents
       for Career and Technical Education, the pilot also will serve as a model for North Carolina‘s
       efforts to move to a formative and summative assessment system throughout K-12 education.
      Continuing to provide curriculum aligned to national and state industry standards: North
       Carolina CTE continues to develop and adapt curriculum products for use by CTE teachers
       across the state. Using Revised Bloom‘s Taxonomy, state curriculum consultants lead teams
       of teachers and others as they identify essential standards for each course, develop or adopt
       curriculum materials aligned to the standards, and design assessments to indicate student
       mastery of the standards and course proficiency for Perkins reporting of Technical
       Attainment.
      Distributing Career Clusters Guide: The North Carolina Department of Public Instruction and
       the North Carolina Community College System worked collaboratively to develop North
       Carolina Career Clusters Guide, a statewide guide to the 16 federal Career Clusters that links
       the academic and Career and Technical Education programs at the secondary and
       postsecondary levels to increase student achievement. The guide showcases the Career
       Clusters and highlights opportunities based on North Carolina Employment Security
       Commission data. Fifty thousand copies of the guide were distributed to students, teachers,
       community colleges, and Joblink Centers, and the guide also was made available in
       electronic format.
Challenges:
      Increasing the use of and ability to report industry credentials earned by students at both the
       secondary and postsecondary levels: Increasing access by students to industry-recognized
       credentials at both the secondary and postsecondary levels has been a focus in North Carolina
       over the past few years. There has been much interest in earning credentials by students and
       recognition by business that the credential adds value to the student‘s education. However,
       several issues have slowed full implementation of credential use, primarily how to pay the
       often significant cost, how to obtain data on who earned credentials from organizations
       reluctant to release student results because of FERPA and other restrictions, and how to
       integrate these credentials into federal reporting.
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      Continuous updating of data systems required to meet changing federal requirements, keep
       current with technology, and provide information needed to improve Career and Technical
       Education: North Carolina‘s Career and Technical Education data system, which integrates
       reporting on the state‘s eight Performance Indicators and strategic planning by local and state
       staff, has been recognized around the country as a model for collecting and reporting data.
       However, maintaining a state-of-the-art system that takes advantages of developments in
       technology has proven to be a time-consuming and expensive task. The ongoing move from
       the legacy mainframe system to a web-based application already has taken more than two
       years. Shifting agency priorities and the emphasis on other projects such as the P-20
       longitudinal data system have made it difficult to obtain adequate resources to devote to this
       project.
      Collaboration across states on CTE initiatives: Funding could be used more efficiently to
       maximize results if groups worked together better. Projects such as development of
       curriculum and professional development could benefit greatly from the establishment of
       state-level consortia where states contribute their strengths. These groups could accomplish
       more working together than any individual members could separately.
Future Webinars and Research Briefs:
      How to identify resources from other federal grants (such as ESEA, Race to the Top) that
       impact CTE and take advantage of those resources to meet the needs of all involved.
      How to influence the ongoing reauthorization of the Elementary and Secondary Education
       Act to ensure CTE has a place at the table.
      How to train future state CTE leaders.


                                        NORTH DAKOTA
Accomplishments:
      Established a ―Career Advisor‖ position/certification that will be recognized in schools to
       help meet the new guidance requirement ratio of 1/300 students. A Career Advisor can make
       up 1/3 of the required time needed in a school guidance program to meet that ratio. CTE will
       provide the training and certification for that position. Certification is tied to the national
       Career Development Facilitator (CDF) credential.

      Established a state CTE scholarship which will provide up to $6000 over four years to attend
       a post secondary program. A student must score all fives on the WorkKeys assessment in
       Reading for Information, Applied Math, and Locating Information. Additionally they must
       have a 2.5 GPA and complete certain course requirements which include 4 credits in CTE.

      ND was able to provide a 2% across the board increase in reimbursement rates for all
       secondary CTE programming, increased the amount of funding for the expansion of
       ―Virtual‖ Area CTE Centers‖, and established a $3 million ―Workforce Enhancement― fund
       for new and existing programs at the two year campuses.
Challenges:
                                                                                                   32
      Increasing academic requirements are having an impact on students choosing CTE courses.
       Need to work on having CTE courses meet, or substitute for, academic requirements.

      Access to quality CTE programming is limited in areas of the state, especially at the
       secondary level. The demand for skilled workers is increasing in all areas and more
       programming in needed to meet that demand, especially in the underserved areas.

      How to continue to provide Math in CTE to more and more teachers. The demand of time
       away from the classroom makes it difficult for schools and teachers to participate. We
       continue to work with how and when it is delivered which includes convincing teachers and
       school administrators of its benefits.
Future Webinars and Research Briefs:
      How other states are meeting the challenge of allowing academic credit for CTE courses.

      What is available in terms of technology and programming to deliver CTE courses. Are
       there innovative ideas that help deliver more hands-on type CTE courses over distance.


                                                OHIO
Accomplishments:
      Articulation through Assessment Project. On schedule to develop and/or pilot 19 new
       pathway-level technical skill assessments. Due to the strong collaboration between secondary
       and postsecondary faculty in constructing/validating the assessments, statewide articulations
       are expected to result from the assessment development. Assessments are in process for
       pathways in Agricultural and Environmental Systems, Arts and Communication, Business
       and Administrative Services, Finance, Information Technology, Marketing and
       Transportation Systems.
      Committed to development of a new Project Lead the Way-like curriculum package for
       Automated Materials Joining. This curriculum will represent our first secondary CT program
       that will be a cross-career cluster program that is comprehensively integrated (as opposed to
       a series of varied segments). It will include rigorous academics and challenging career-
       technical content from multiple career clusters taught through inquiry-based pedagogy.
      Implementing a state credit flexibility policy ensuring that Ohio students, including CT
       students, can earn units of academic and technical high school credit toward graduation based
       on the demonstration of subject area competency instead of or in combination with
       completing Carnegie units of classroom instruction. This state and local policy is expected to
       support greater integration of academic and technical content in CT POS.
      Continued efforts to reach a goal of 100% of CT workforce development programs with
       state-approved POS as called for in the Ohio Perkins State Plan. In the first year of our five-
       year plan we increased the number of students enrolled in programs with state-approved
       Programs of Study by 19%.
Challenges:
                                                                                                   33
      Ohio‘s vision for academically rigorous and technically challenging secondary coursework
       that will prepare all students for non-remedial postsecondary study and warrant the awarding
       of college credit to students while still in high school requires increased support for
       educators. Educators need skills in delivering differentiated instruction to a diverse
       population and in maintaining high expectations for the quality of student work required.
      Almost all the work required by the Perkins State Plan is collaborative in nature, secondary
       and postsecondary. Work plans are overflowing. Staffing is slim. Deploying postsecondary
       staff to work that targets secondary education (e.g., secondary technical skill assessments or
       secondary curriculum) is a significant challenge.
      The greatest hope for CTE is in the connection between our work and employers needs. Ohio
       needs to draw stronger connections between the economic development targeted industries
       for the state and the development and nurture of educational programs.
Future Webinars and Research Briefs:
      Pedagogy that concentrates on inquiry-based and differentiated instruction
      Effective formulation and implementation of Individual Education Programs
      Integration of academic and technical content in coursework
      Return on Investment (ROI) documentation


                                           OKLAHOMA
Accomplishments:
      Labor Force/Students
          o Legislation enacted to transcript business/industry recognized technical credentials on
              high school transcript.
          o Transitioned the Career Readiness Certificate work ready program to the Dept of
              Career and Technology Education, which is a joint effort for helping students attain
              the ACT Work Keys certificate as well as working with business to continue growing
              the number of job profiles from Oklahoma industries.
          o Cooperative efforts with common education and higher education i.e., Drop-out
              Recovery, Pre-engineering, Alliance, Cooperative agreements, Academies, etc.,
              expanding the value of Career and Technology Education.
          o Maintaining unity of the system by addressing budget shortfalls in ways that
              minimize impact to the greatest number of students.
      Teachers/Programs
          o Participating as a pilot state in the SREB Alternative Certification teacher induction
              program.
          o The maintenance of our system's autonomy and infrastructure in challenging
              economic times - including a separate board, a separate agency, sustainable funding,
              millage, etc.
          o Continue to expand Online Teacher Certification.
      Career Clusters/Innovation/Leadership/Performance
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          o Maintaining high quality effective services to the field even in harsh financial times.
          o Continue to grow our STEM initiative through our restructuring efforts aligning
            Technology Engineering middle school efforts with PLTW pre-engineering, PLTW
            biomedical sciences, and a biotechnology initiative.
          o Continue to grow our Cooperative Alliance project, aligning CTE courses with
            college degree programs for articulated credit. The focus has moved from receiving
            college credit to completing technical degrees.
          o The support of multiple leadership initiatives to grow the next generation CareerTech
            leadership through programs such as Tech Cap, CareerTech Perspectives, and
            Women in CareerTech Leadership.
          o HSTW/TCTW focus on data driven programs/strategies.
          o Responding to the needs of Oklahoma workers who have been victims of plant
            closures and downsizing with quick, efficient and pertinent training opportunities for
            re-employment in the new employment arena.
          o The Okla. CareerTech system had over 535,000 enrollments in 2009.
          o Technology Upgrade Grants for 270 comprehensive programs at $5,000 each.
Challenges:
      Labor Force/Students
          o Ability to meet the increased demand of displaced workers/under employed workers
              with increasing unemployment rates
          o Maintaining high school student access to CTE courses in high school and tech
              centers with increased academic requirements.
          o We need to help solve the drop out problem.
          o Concern that our job placement rates will decrease drastically in the current economy.
      Teachers/Programs
          o Teacher shortage, recruitment, preparation, retention, professional development and
              certification issues are major hurdles for the future.
          o Educating Legislators affected by term limits and the impact on institutional
              knowledge concerning Career and Technology Education.
          o Enhancing program/teacher quality in tough economic times.
      Career Clusters/Innovation/Leadership/Performance
          o The ability to collect and analyze academic performance data for CTE students and
              the creation of a longitudinal student data system that will interface with other state
              data systems. Transitioning all CTE to the career cluster framework that includes
              appropriate academics (Programs of Study is the terminology at the national level)
              and being able to report student data in that format. I.e. Annual Report still reflects
              traditional CTE areas versus career clusters for high school students.
          o Insuring that our CTE programs and dollars support technical skill training and career
              majors that are needed to grow targeted industry sectors such as Aerospace,
              Healthcare, Advanced Manufacturing, Bioscience, Energy, Logistics and Value
              Added Agriculture.
          o Impact of future leadership on our system including new legislators, new governor,
              new superintendent of public instruction, new board members and business &
              industry leaders in Oklahoma.

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Future Webinars and Research Briefs:
      Labor Force/Students
          o Guidance and Advisement/Student Transitions (secondary to post-secondary)
          o Branding/PR issues - how to tell the CareerTech story to maintain our autonomy and
              funding.
          o Economic issues - how to re-tool old programs to address current industry needs that
              will lead to industry certification for students and/or skill upgrades.
          o How do we continue to raise the bar without closing the door to kids who might be at
              risk of dropping out?
          o What do small and mid-size companies really need in a workforce?
      Teachers/Programs
          o Recruitment/retention issues - how to ensure quality teachers and work through
              alternative certification issue.
          o What are Green Jobs, what news areas are needed, how many jobs will there be in the
              future in this new area?
          o Where will the hot jobs be in the next 5 years, 10 years?
          o How to best incorporating entrepreneurship into CTE training.
          o Professional Development-how, what, when, and where for teachers and CareerTech
              Administrators.
      Career Clusters/Innovation/Leadership/Performance
          o Developing meaningful Programs of Study now and in the future.
          o Quality Data-how to define it and how to use it for future careers, and skill
              enhancement. What are examples of established effective performance data and how
              it is being used to drive change?
          o How do you market employment as success for CTE training?


                                            OREGON
Accomplishments:
      Oregon has expanded its efforts in secondary CTE to provide opportunities for increased
       academic achievement for students. Professional development opportunities include a third
       year of statewide efforts in Math-In-CTE, and Oregon is developing a multi-year Applied
       Academics Research Project with the National Research Center for Career and Technical
       Education. Implementation at the local level of Credit for Proficiency is growing statewide
       with increased availability for teacher training options. Additionally, within the revision
       process for Oregon CTE teacher licensure, requirements are being incorporated to increase
       teacher preparation in applied academics, as well as standards based instruction and
       assessment.
      In response to the Oregon Legislature and in line with the Governor‘s workforce priorities,
       community colleges have focused on statewide needs for healthcare education. This has
       resulted in the formal establishment of the Community College Healthcare Education
       Alliance (CCHEA) to move the work forward with industry, secondary, and post secondary
       stakeholders involved. The first year‘s accomplishments include the development of distance
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       and distributed learning in Health Informatics, Basic Nursing Assistant, Mental Health and
       Addictions Counseling, Practical Nursing, Pharmacy Technician, and Basic Healthcare
       courses.
      Oregon has invested significant time and resources in improving its data systems and
       collections. Significant progress has been made in coordinating the input and work of the
       secondary and postsecondary systems, communication with various stakeholders and
       statewide professional development and resources. As a result, a new secondary course and
       program data base is being developed for implementation in 2010-2011.
Challenges:
      Ensuring that all programs are providing seamless and authentic connections for students to
       transition from secondary to postsecondary programs.
      Adequate technology and training for data systems to support and inform the work and the
       success of students in CTE.
      Oregon model of local control for education, and the diversity of educational opportunities
       resulting from Oregon‘s topography.
Future Webinars and Research Briefs:
      Bridging the secondary –postsecondary cultural gap in policy and practice.
      Survey methods to capture secondary progress without social security numbers.
      The benefits and challenges of performance based funding


                                        PENNSYLVANIA
Accomplishments:
    Increased services for special education students enrolled in career and technical centers:
     Working with the Bureau of Special Education, we have developed materials to assist school
     districts understand CTE and to assist CTE to understand special education. Materials are
     found at this link.
       http://www.pattan.net/files/Transtn/CTE-TechEd.pdf
       http://www.pattan.net/files/Transtn/CTE-SpecEd.pdf
       Working with the Bureau of Special Education and their service centers, focus groups are
       being developed between special education departments at sending schools and career and
       technical education centers. The focus groups have been positive experiences for the schools
       involved. The focus group discussions are leading to better services for special needs
       students because of the increased communication between the districts and centers.
      Postsecondary articulation agreement provides a minimum of 9 college credits for secondary
       coursework: The Bureau of Career and Technical Education continues to advance the
       Programs of opportunities to students qualifying under the conditions stated in the Perkins IV
       Programs of Study Statewide Articulation Agreement. Students can earn collegiate credits
       depending on the Program of Study selected and the partnering agreement made with PDE
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    and postsecondary institution. Students graduating from secondary CTE can enroll in
    articulated programs regardless of where they graduate from and where the postsecondary
    institution is located.
    http://www.portal.state.pa.us/portal/server.pt/community/programs_of_study/7686/articulatio
    ns/679190
    To date, twenty-eight postsecondary institutions have aligned for advanced credit offerings in
    at least one program of study area. As postsecondary faculty continue to make alignments,
    the transfer and articulation information for PDE/BCTE Programs of study is listed on the
    college transfer website: www.collegetransfer.net , and if credits are aligned to a
    Commonwealth Community College partner, the information can also be found on the
    Pennsylvania Articulation and Transfer Center at www.PATRAC.org. Students, parents,
    secondary/postsecondary guidance personnel and interested public audiences can access
    specific credits offered in a partnering agreement by also visiting the
    www.collegetransfer.net website.
    Also, the Bureau of Career and Technical Education has recently developed an Out-of-State
    Postsecondary Institution Articulation Agreement. This agreement will establish advanced
    credit opportunities with Out-of-State Postsecondary Institutions, which offer education
    beyond the secondary school level, and whose main campus of operation lies outside the
    geographical boundaries of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania.
    To date, the Agency has 55 Perkins statewide articulation agreements reported across 20 POS
    along with the course/credit alignment reported on website located at
    www.collegetransfer.net. To date, 28 postsecondary institutions have reported credit
    alignment in various PDE developed POS(s). The number of postsecondary credits aligned
    ranges from a minimum of 9 credits to as much as 25 credits, depending upon the related
    CTE POS to which credit is being aligned. Some postsecondary institutions have aligned
    credit opportunities with as many as ten different POS(s).
   Success in providing technical assistance to career and technical centers: The Technical
    Assistance Program provides resources to 40 of the 84 career and technical centers. The
    assistance focuses:
    o Literacy
    o Numeracy
    o Guidance
    o Technical Skill Attainment
    o Administrative Leadership
    http://www.careertechpa.org/content/category/11/40/82
    Schools involved in the TAP realized a 19.6% increase in students scoring competent or
    advanced on the technical skill attainment. Schools not involved in TAP realized an 11%
    increase.
    Reading Muhlenberg Career and Technology Center located in Reading, PA has over the past
    two years realized a 68% increase in the percent of students at the advanced level and a 54%
    increase in the percent of students competent or advanced.

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Challenges:
      Developing a postsecondary technical assessment.
      Meeting the NCLB targets as negotiated between USDE and the Pennsylvania Department of
       Education. Pennsylvania is using the identical targets for Perkins and NCLB rather than
       lowering the NCLB target for Perkins.
      Determining the impact of movement from an 11th grade academic state assessment to end of
       course assessment.


                                        RHODE ISLAND
Accomplishments:
      Implementation of the Rhode Island Program Approval Process based on Rhode Island‘s
       CTE Program Standards. (Note that Rhode Island‘s CTE Program Standards align with
       OVAE‘s recently released Framework for Programs of Study.)
       The accomplishment includes hiring a staff person who was trained to lead a process
       involving and in depth ―monitoring‖ of all aspects of a program‘s design (planning, advisory
       board, access, admissions, outcomes, articulation and evaluation); instruction (curriculum,
       instruction, technology and assessment); organization, staffing and supports (certification,
       sufficiency of staff and professional development); program operations (safety and health,
       equipment, supplies, technology and resources); accountability (data collection, data
       analysis and reporting, and continuous improvement.)
      Supported very successfully professional development initiatives focused on the integration
       of career and technical, ELA and mathematics where administrators, CTE, ELA and
       mathematics teachers engaged in structured professional development programs designed to
       improve student academic performance and graduation rates. To date these efforts have
       included pairing CTE and the academic teachers on the development of integrated lesson
       planning facilitated by SREB – CTE that Works. Takeaways for all participants included
       lesson plans, PowerPoint presentations, portfolio-worthy artifacts, any/all associated
       materials (manipulatives, assessments, rubrics, etc.). Other takeaways include Math in CTE
       teaching and learning techniques focused on using algebra for the conversion of fractions;
       converting fractions and decimals; converting weights and measures; calculating discounts,
       mark-ups, etc., as well as locally-facilitated lessons to address topics such as outlining
       articles, writing business correspondence, email communications, writing oral
       communications (work orders, intake interviews, etc.), etc. While at least one initiative
       focused on incorporating mathematics and ELA skills into student workplace learning
       experiences during long-term internships, etc.
      RIDE supported secondary/postsecondary partnerships have increased and now include
       consortia initiatives focused on articulation in career and technical education for Fine and
       Performing Arts, Information Technology, Business and Finance, Construction, Engineering,
       Hospitality and Tourism, Culinary Arts and Law and Public Safety.
Challenges
                                                                                                39
      Rhode Island‘s economic climate has so strained LEAs that unintended consequences include
       compromises to quality career and technical education. Many districts are:
       -    Counseling and otherwise discouraging students from enrolling in higher cost CTE
           programs.
       -   Inhibiting the use of CTE equipment due to the reduction of technical assistants, who are
           essential to the safe operation of machinery and tools associated with several programs of
           study e.g. construction, culinary arts, printing, etc.
       The challenge is to work creatively with LEAs to create collaborative relationships with
       postsecondary institutions, other LEAs or through public/private partnerships to maintain
       opportunity and quality in CTE programming in light of Rhode Island‘s economic recession.
       While Rhode Island continues to be the only State without a student/school funding formula,
       the Department of Education has recently introduced a formula that includes funding
       provisions for State-approved CTE programs (see Accomplishment 1).
      In acknowledge of the long-term implications, the challenge is to ensure that CTE remains as
       a targeted funding feature of any legislation relating to student/school funding.
       The CTE community has spent several years crafting ―companion‖ CTE-specific regulations
       to the Rhode Island Basic Education Program regulations. These regulations have become
       ―high stakes‖ due to implications that they might have on the number and diversity of the
       CTE programs, funding for CTE programs, CTE facilities, academic credit for CTE courses,
       partnerships with other State agencies, etc.
      The challenge is to have Regulations of the Rhode Island Board of Regents Governing the
       Education of Students in State-Approved Career and Technical Education Programs in place
       by September 2010.
Future Webinars and Research Briefs:
      Integrating Perkins Accountability Data Collection and Reporting into State Data Systems
      Collaborative Public Relations – Is It Finally Time To Put Some Dollars Together?


                                      SOUTH CAROLINA
Accomplishments:
      Implementation of Rigorous Programs of Study USDOE/OVAE Grant: The RPOS grant
       provided the opportunity to build a seamless standard-based Engineering Pathway for grades
       9–16. The program of study created agreements with the 16 technical colleges and four
       engineering colleges and universities to provide dual credit opportunities. The 16 technical
       colleges agreed to common course numbering, course description, and common course
       credit.
      Implementing a new Longitudinal Data Collection system within the department called
       Power School: The system will provide CTE data requirements for student and program
       tracking, as well as course testing, accountability, and completion.
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      Partnered with Cornell University in a reading research project along with New York:
       Teachers are trained in literacy strategies to integrate into CTE courses.
      Participated in an Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) state
       review of career and technical education: Our state along with Texas will be compared to 14
       other countries undergoing similar reviews. Their final review is schedule for the week of
       March 18, 2010. A comprehensive report will be written with specific recommendations.
      Programs of study for career and technical programs are being fully implemented along with
       non CTE programs of study under our state legislation titled Education and Economic
       Development Act.
Challenges:
      Establishing statewide articulation and dual credit policy that embraces change.
      Establishing a clear policy on honors recognition for CTE courses.
      Establishing a statewide assessment system for CTE course/programs.
      State funding for CTE.
Future Webinars and Research Briefs:
      Expansion of CTE virtual courses.
      Create CTE teacher certification flexibility.

                                         SOUTH DAKOTA
Accomplishments:
      Launch of www.SDMyLife.com and publication of the 2nd edition of the MyLife Magazine.
       The first phase of South Dakota‘s online career guidance software is up and running. Also,
       the second edition of the companion print magazine is being distributed to schools. The
       focus of both projects is not only to provide solid career guidance and a means to access a
       dynamic and relevant Personal Learning Plan tool, but also to specifically highlight
       opportunities for students to seek postsecondary education and eventually careers in the state.
       By highlighting successful local business and industry professionals and using local
       resources the students can better connect to successful models in their own communities.
       The second phase includes enhancements to the webpage.
      Graduation requirements and state funded scholarship criteria change. Changes in the
       graduation requirements that collapsed a tiered graduation system now recognize CTE
       courses as fulfilling one of the graduation categories in the single graduation path. CTE
       courses may now be use to fulfill a one credit requirement (either alone or in combination) in
       a category that also includes World Languages, Capstone Experience, and Service Learning.
       A similar change was made to the state funded Opportunity Scholarship opening the
       scholarship to many more CTE students allowing two units any combination of CTE and/or
       World Languages.


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      CTE for Core Content Credit. The Board of Education approved rules that allow CTE
       courses to be used to meet core content requirements through an individual application
       process. The Office of Curriculum, Career & Technical Education will review applications
       and approve schools to use CTE courses in lieu of traditional core content courses in case
       where standards and teacher qualification benchmarks are met.
Challenges:
      Collecting valid and reliable Perkins data given privacy and logistical barriers.
      Implementing and assessing updated, uniform core standards in all clusters.
      Ongoing negative perception of secondary CTE and two postsecondary programs.
Future Webinars and Research Briefs:
      Valid and reliable assessments that fit well with the CTE education model.
      Effectively leveraging Tech Prep resources to connect secondary and postsecondary.
      Effectiveness of CTE through data; short briefs outlining research based findings.


                                            TENNESSEE
Accomplishments:
      Third year of the implementation of programs of study. State Board of Education passed
       new graduation requirements that included a requirement for all students to have a 3 unit
       focus of study. This requirement was based on the high graduation rates of CTE
       concentrators. (89.4% in 07-08 and 90.95 in 08-09)
      The implementation of a pilot project to use a rubric to determine student technical skill
       attainment. This project has the potential to raise the quality of instruction and increase the
       validity and reliability of technical skill attainment determination. We will fully implement
       this project during the 2010 - 2011 school year.
      Fully implemented a risk based monitoring program.
Challenges:
      Data collection and linking secondary and post secondary information.
      Expanding and establishing seamless post secondary linkages
      Professional development for administrators, counselors and community that increase their
       understanding of CTE and the potential it has for all students.
Future Webinars and Research Briefs:
      Guidance in preparation for federal monitoring
      State and local FAUPL negotiations
      PD on Perkins IV expenditures

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      Review of national CTE research
      Best practices in CTE

                                               TEXAS
Accomplishments:
      Completed updating the state curriculum standards for CTE courses: increased rigor and
       relevance, incorporated college and career readiness standards, eliminated out of date
       courses, updated and consolidated content - streamlining from 607 courses to 193 courses.
      The new CTE standards have increased rigor to the degree that the State Board of Education
       recently approved nine advanced CTE courses to meet the math (3) and science (6)
       requirements for the 4x4 graduation requirements (4 courses in each of math, science, social
       studies, and English).
      Professional development for implementing the new state standards has begun as a joint
       effort among Texas Education Agency CTE directors, education service centers, professional
       associations, and districts. Texas has ~24,000 CTE teachers who need this training. ESCs,
       professional associations, districts, etc. will conduct face-to-face training through August
       2010, and then continual asynchronous training will be available to teachers online.
Challenges:
      Jobs/economy
      Image
      Implementation of new state standards
Future Webinars and Research Briefs:
      Meeting USDE deadlines and requirements
      Data validity
                                                UTAH
Accomplishments:
      Launch of a new UtahCTE.org web site and other resources to help market and provide
       information about the relevance and importance of CTE. The website is a cooperative project
       with higher education and public education. It has the social networking media hooked in.
       We will be using this with students as a marketing tool. We have plans for phase II and III all
       ready, but hope that this new media will keep CTE in front of students, parents, and
       teachers. http://www.utahcte.org/        http://www.schools.utah.gov/cte/publications.html
      Recognition of CTE courses for Language Arts, Math, and Science credit
   http://www.schools.utah.gov/curr/main/graduation/FoundationAppliedorAdvancedCourses.pdf
      CTE Skills Certification testing is 100% on line, with over 200,000 tests administered last
       school year.

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Challenges:
      Staying connected to ―College and Career Ready‖ with the various definitions and
       interpretations within our state and nationally.
      Possibility of increasing graduation requirements to 4 years of math up through calculus and
       4 years of science.
      We believe that the new ESEA legislation will have more competitive elements that may or
       may not align with state goals or with specific industry and CTE needs.
Future Webinars and Research Briefs:
      Continued focus on the new vision and mission statements and how to incorporate into state
       and LEA constructs.
      Public relations with parents, students and decision makers. Also tips for garnering support
       from business and industry.
      Monitoring of ESEA legislation and period updates and professional development so that
       CTE is at the table in our own states.

                                            VERMONT
Accomplishments:
      Implementation of 3 State approved Program Assessments. These provided valuable
       feedback not only related to student skill attainment but as importantly for program and
       faculty effectiveness. Our data is reported by standard and terminal learning objective and in
       some pilot instances also includes academic assessment opportunities. These assessments are
       delivered on line as well as through some scenario based performance assessments.
      Completion of an economic cluster analysis in Agriculture/Natural Resources. This study
       will provide valuable insight to Vermont‘s Ag/NR workforce needs, economic development
       opportunities/challenges and focus points for Program of Study development and design for
       secondary and postsecondary CTE.
      Initiated 2 ―Industry and Education Centers of Excellence‖. These Centers convened
       business/industry stakeholders and educators in the fields of Green Building and
       Hospitality/Tourism. Through this engagement, VT DOE and Department of Labor have
       gained valuable information for program development, certification and assessments as well
       as increased availability of work-based learning opportunities. Work will continue in these
       areas and new Centers are under consideration in the STEM clusters.
Challenges:
      Decreasing enrollments is a challenge for shared time regional CTE centers and is
       exacerbated by our funding design.
      Increasing costs of postsecondary opportunities
      Accountability measures and insufficient data systems.

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Future Webinars and Research Briefs:
      Integration models of CTE-academics, academies, instructional models, etc.
      Successful models for CTE improvement in FAUPL accountability areas.
      POS design models in emerging technology areas.


                                            VIRGINIA
Accomplishments:
      Revision of Workplace Readiness Skills (WRS): The Weldon Cooper Center, University of
       Virginia has worked with the Virginia Department of Education to update our Workplace
       Readiness Skills from 13 t o 21. Over 500 business and industry responses to a statewide
       survey of business and industry serving on local and state CTE advisory councils and
       Chambers of Commerce. A new assessment is currently being developed by VTECS and
       NOCTI to be submitted the Board of Education in January, 2011 for addition to our state-
       approved industry credentials.
      Academic and Career Plan Implementation:
       Virginia‘s new Academic and Career Plan was approved by the Virginia Board of Education
       CATE (Career and Technical Education) and utilizes the Programs/Plans of Study career
       pathways has the backbone of the ACP. Information on Virginia‘s ACP can be found at
       http://www.doe.virginia.gov/instruction/graduation/academic_career_plan.shtml
       A SAMPLE Program of Study (Virginia refers to them as Plans of Study) have been
       developed for each of the 79 career pathways in the 16 Career Clusters. Training of teams
       from each school division began in February and will be completed for all eight
       Superintendent‘s Regions by the end of March. Numerous resources are available for the
       implementation of the ACP and can be located on the above Web site, the VAWizard Web
       site and the Virginia CTE Career Clusters Web site. See the Web sites listed below:
       http://www.doe.virginia.gov/instruction/career_technical/career_clusters/index.shtml
       https://www.vawizard.org/vccs/Main.action
      Economics and Personal Finance: The CTE office has been a major part of the
       implementation of this new Virginia graduation requirement. The Business and Information
       Technology program area has long had a 36 week course (6120) and an 18 week course
       (6121) on Finance. 6120 was expanded to include all required standards of learning for the
       new graduation requirement and additional teacher endorsements were added. Besides the
       original business and information technology endorsement, the new endorsements include
       mathematics, social studies, agricultural education, family and consumer sciences, and
       marketing. Any students enrolled in this course will be considered CTE students no matter
       which teacher endorsement is teaching. Students will be able to utilize this course as a part
       of a CTE concentration and may participated in CTE student organizations. Additional
       information        on       this       endeavor       may        be          located       at
       http://www.doe.virginia.gov/instruction/economics_personal_finance/index.shtml

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Challenges:
      Being able to provide student data to the Virginia Community College for use within the
       VAWizard.
      Too many national/regional conferences – these need to be combined as often as possible and
       additional alternatives developed.
      Working with local CTE administrators who come into the position without any knowledge
       of career and technical education.
Future Webinars and Research Briefs:
      Data collection and EDEN.
      ―Perkins for Dummies‖ – we have more and more state level administrators who do not have
       a comprehensive understanding of Perkins.
      Best Practices on data collection and integration of academics/CTE.


                                         WASHINGTON
 Accomplishments:
      Technical Assistance Focus Groups: In a joint effort to promote secondary/postsecondary
       collaboration and coordination and to promote unified state-level technical assistance, staff
       from the Workforce Training and Education Coordinating Board (WTB), the Office of
       Superintendent of Public Instruction (OSPI), and the State Board for Community and
       Technical Colleges (SBCTC) conducted regional focus meetings across the state. These
       meetings provided a forum for local school and community college districts to interact with
       state staff in areas that included programs of study, performance accountability, curriculum
       development and exchange, local plans, and numerous other aspects of career and technical
       education in secondary and postsecondary programs. These forums provided opportunity for
       dialogue between and among local providers and with representative staffs from the
       administering agencies in the state.
      Workforce and Economic Development Partnership: The state is experiencing an emergence
       of increased and meaningful collaboration in connecting the two worlds of education and
       workforce training and economic development imperatives. In key regions around the state,
       secondary career and technical educators and postsecondary workforce training individuals
       are coming together with local Associate Development Organizations and Economic
       Development Councils, Workforce Investment Boards, labor organizations and business
       associations, and other workforce-related organizations and individuals to entertain
       opportunities for working together. In some areas this is the first time educators and
       administrators have directly conferred with economic development promoters on the integral
       relationship between providing a well-trained workforce on the supply side with the needs
       for job creation on the demand side. The state continues to promote industry skill panels as a
       mechanism for bringing together educators and business and industry.


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      Dropout Prevention and Intervention: The WTB and OSPI have joined forces to identify the
       Building Bridges Program, a comprehensive dropout prevention and intervention model.
       The model utilizes active participation in coordinating services from schools, parents, and
       other stakeholders and agencies in the local community. The state recognized research-based
       best practices and provides funding to replicate them. The program identifies at risk
       students, provides timely interventions (including student plans), provides coaches or
       mentors, coordinates the community involvement, acknowledges retrieval or re-entry
       activities, and supports alternative educational programming. Career and technical education
       remains a key strategy for combating the dropout problem in our state.
      Secondary CTE Recognition: Middle School STEM is funded at the same enhanced rate as
       high school CTE programs.
       CTE is recognized as meeting the 3rd year Math graduation requirement.
       CTE courses are now approved by the College Board to offer Advanced Placement
       programs.
Challenges:
      Funding: We know that all states are facing budget crises. In Washington, the Washington
       Award for Vocation Excellence (WAVE) is at risk of losing funding. The WAVE
       scholarship provides two years of tuition and fees for students at the secondary and
       postsecondary levels. It is one of two merit based financial aid programs in the state. Loss
       of funding not only negatively impacts future educational aspirations of our career and
       technical students who excel in their programs, but also removes an advocacy and
       recognition tool for career and technical education. We continue to face challenges in
       funding for equipment and technology needs.
      Technical Assessments: We continue to struggle with this topic and its myriad of nuances.
      Professional-Technical Instructors: This is a two-fold issue. In some professional-technical
       areas, we continue to experience a vacuum of experienced and skilled instructors. Many
       gravitate to the private sector where monetary rewards are far and away more prevalent.
       Schools districts may often compete for an instructor and that has its own set of challenges.
       Additionally, career and technical education teacher education programs in our universities
       are also experiencing cutbacks so that the flow of new teachers has subsided somewhat.
      Integration Challenges: We continue to experience challenges in integration. It is usually
       career and technical education providing the leadership and often funding for integration and
       it remains an uphill battle.
Future Webinars and Research Briefs:
      Combining Efforts between and among Departments of Education and Labor Programs
      International Comparisons: What is occurring in other countries that we can learn from
      Shared Facilities for Career and Technical Education



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                                        WEST VIRGINIA
Accomplishments:
      Completed the development of 87 Global 21, Problem-based Performance Assessments,
       aligned with the WV CTE pathways. These comprehensive assessments are designed to
       measure CTE completer mastery of the technical, literacy/numeracy and 21st Century skill
       sets identified as essential for postsecondary success in college or the workplace. The initial
       implementation of these assessments will occur in May 2010.
      Implemented the WV Work Readiness Credential in cooperation with the community &
       technical colleges and Workforce West Virginia. This credential is based on student
       performance on the ACT WorkKeys assessments and was awarded to 93% of all CTE
       completers in 2009.
      Completed the development of over 150 seamless, secondary/postsecondary career pathways
       in collaboration with the State‘s community & technical colleges. These pathways are
       designed around the three technical preparation options: Early College, Accelerated and
       Credentialed, and include advanced technical credit in both Associate Degree and Certificate
       programs.
Challenges:
      Limited capacity to serve increased numbers of students in grades 9-10, based on the current
       movement to decrease the dropout rate and increase the graduation rate. With 97% of all
       CTE completers graduating from high school, legislators and other policy makers have
       realized that increased numbers of students need access to CTE in the early grades, including
       middle schools.
      Developing agreements with the academic community in terms of awarding embedded
       academic credit for specific CTE courses.
      Increasing the literacy and numeracy focus of CTE offerings to assure that completers have
       the academic skill sets necessary for success in postsecondary education or the global
       workplace.
Future Webinars and Research Briefs:
      Professional Learning Communities/Collaborative Teams in CTE
      Embedded credit in CTE
      21st Century middle school CTE offerings


                                           WISCONSIN
Accomplishments:
      Promoting pathways to address Wisconsin‘s need for a qualified workforce through rapid
       delivery of outreach and support services for dislocated workers and through expanded
       enrollment options including:
       o adding course sections;
       o offering flexible course delivery, including evening and weekend offerings;

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       o   working with faculty to relax enrollment limits and deadlines;
       o   creating dedicated webpages with information specific to dislocated workers;
       o   waiving application and other fees;
       o   establishing computer literacy workshops;
       o   expanding tutoring options and other academic and student supports;
       o   offering ―cohort‖ basic skills courses so that dislocated workers can transition together;
       o   offering special assistance to streamline the admissions process and completion of
           financial aid applications;
       o   creating support groups and other approaches to simplify the enrollment process and offer
           added support in the transition to college;
       o   designing Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) aimed at dislocated workers and the
           agencies and staff with whom they interact;
       o   adding temporary faculty and other staff needed to respond to rising demand; and
       o   leasing additional space and equipment to expand capacity.
      Demonstrating success in supporting academic success for all students by meeting rigorous
       federal performance standards established for the WTCS under the Carl D. Perkins Career
       and Technical Education Act including:
       o exceeding the performance goals related to student retention/transfer and student
         placement; and
       o meeting performance expectations related to goals for student technical skill attainment,
         academic skill attainment, attainment of academic credentials, and both participation in
         and completion of nontraditional programs.
      Managing historic system wide enrollment increases without significant increases in general
       state support:
      o Double-digit system wide increases of 15% are expected in 2009-10, with more than one-
          half of WTCS colleges estimating increases of more than 20%. This is in addition to the
          5% system wide enrollment increase in 2008-09 that was largely due to significant
          increases at four colleges.
      o Recent enrollment surges follow steady rise in WTCS enrollments over the last 10 years.
Challenges:
      Exploring creative and flexible programming and finance decisions while prioritizing
       available resources to minimize the impact of capacity limits on growing enrollments.
       o WTCS colleges must balance resource availability (staff, classroom and lab space) with
         enrollment demands and demands for new or revised education and training programs
         and services.
       o WTCS colleges must balance enrollment, retention and completion needs of special
         student groups (dislocated and unemployed workers and veterans for example) with more
         traditional student populations.
       o WTCS colleges are aggressively pursuing federal funding opportunities and new public-
         private partnerships to maximize resources available to provide new and emerging
         programs.
      Securing adequate financial aid for students:
                                                                                                  49
       o State estimates suggest over 20,000 WTCS students eligible for a Wisconsin Higher
         Education Grant (WHEG) in 2009-2010 will not receive their grant because of a lack of
         state funds, which is more than triple the 6,000 WTCS students who were eligible for this
         grant last year but did not receive the grant because of a lack of state funds.
      Ensuring that potential new federal funding is not seen as eliminating the need for increases
       in ongoing federal and state support:
       o The WTCS is actively supporting new federal programs such as the American Graduation
         Initiative (AGI) and welcomes the exciting innovations that might result from these
         programs.
       o However, one-time increases in federal funding cannot be seen as reducing the need for
         ongoing state and federal support.
Future Webinars and Research Briefs:
      Federal Legislative Initiatives and Activities including: American Graduation Initiative, Jobs
       Bills, Workforce Investment Act Reauthorization, 2011 Federal Budget and Appropriations
      Career Pathway Development and Implementation: showcasing best practices in developing
       and implementing career pathways
      Development of Statewide Data Systems as part of increased demands for federal
       accountability: showing best practices in how to document student outcomes while in school
       and later in the workforce.


                                            WYOMING
Accomplishments:
      Wyoming will pilot assessments in the following cluster areas in February 2010: (1)
       Agriculture, Food and Natural Resources, (2) Architecture and Construction, (3) Business
       Management and Administration, (4) Information Technology, (5) Manufacturing, (6)
       Transportation, Distribution and Logistics, (7) Human Services, and (8) Hospitality and
       Tourism.
       Competencies, which are the base of our assessments, are posted on our website at
       www.k12.wy.us
       Note: Wyoming competencies and online assessments are being developed within our state
       Perkins IV budget.
      Establishment of our ―Wyoming Careers‖ website within Wyoming Fusion – the single sign-
       on web portal for Wyoming education entities. The site can be utilized by anyone willing to
       access the site. The site provides career guidance to people of all ages and lifelong learners.
      Development and implementation of a software program which allows our Perkins IV
       Coordinators to electronically negotiate FAUPL with school districts and community
       colleges. The program provides a legal record of negotiations with each local recipient that
       can be filed and used in future years and for targeted and full OVAE monitoring procedures.

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Challenges:
      Establishing a decent data baseline, analyzing data over the years to make good decisions,
       and establishment of credible continuous improvement goals.
      Collecting valid and reliable data from our community college partners.
      Establishing an effective, efficient and acceptable monitoring process.
Future Webinars and Research Briefs:
      Demonstrate technical skills attainment models that are being established from small and
       large states.
      Present best practices that have emanated from state government(s) that have demonstrated
       agility and improved rate of speed or change.
      Present best practices or models of statewide Perkins IV monitoring for small and large
       states.




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