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					   THE UNITED REPUBLIC OF TANZANIA




            NATIONAL AUDIT OFFICE




   A Performance Audit on the Processing of
Terminal Benefits of Retirees from the Central and
         Local Government of Tanzania


                    A Case Study of

  Public Service Pension Funds (PSPF) and Local Authorities
                    Pension Fund (LAPF)




A REPORT OF THE CONTROLLER AND AUDITOR GENERAL OF
          THE UNITED REPUBLIC OF TANZANIA
         THE UNITED REPUBLIC OF TANZANIA




        National Audit Office of Tanzania


                                                 Vision
        To be a centre of excellence in public sector auditing


                                              Mission
    To provide efficient audit services in order to enhance
 accountability and value for money in the collection and use
                      of public resources


                            Our core values
                                                   Objectivity

                                                   Excellence

                                                      Integrity

                                               Peoples Focus

                                                   Innovation
NATIONAL AUDIT OFFICE OF TANZANIA                                                                                        ii
A Performance Audit Report on the Processing of Terminal Benefits of Retirees from the Central and Local Government of
Tanzania
                                                   LIST OF CONTENTS
LIST OF TABLES ......................................................................................................................................... v
LIST OF FIGURES....................................................................................................................................... vi
PREFACE .................................................................................................................................................... vii
ACRONYMS .............................................................................................................................................. viii
EXECUTIVE SUMMARY ........................................................................................................................... ix
CHAPTER ONE............................................................................................................................................. 1
INTRODUCTION.......................................................................................................................................... 1
  1.1 Background .......................................................................................................................................... 1
  1.2    Indication of the problem ................................................................................................................ 2
  1.3 Objective and Scope......................................................................................................................... 3
    1.3.1     Audit Objective ....................................................................................................................... 3
    1.3.2     Audit Scope............................................................................................................................. 3
  1.4    Audit Design ................................................................................................................................... 4
    1.4.1     Audit Questions....................................................................................................................... 5
    1.4.2     Methods of Implementation .................................................................................................... 6
    1.4.3     Limitations of the Audit .......................................................................................................... 7
  1.5 Data Validation Process ................................................................................................................... 7
  1.6 Structure of the Audit Report ........................................................................................................... 7
CHAPTER TWO............................................................................................................................................ 9
TERMINAL BENEFITS PROCESSING SYSTEM IN TANZANIA ........................................................... 9
  2.1 Stakeholders in the Processing of Terminal Benefits ........................................................................... 9
  2.2 Flow of Receiving and Maintaining Pensions’ Information............................................................... 12
  2.3 Sources of funds for the Pension Funds (LAPF and PSPF)................................................................ 14
    2.3.1 Contributions to the Fund............................................................................................................ 15
    2.3.2 Investments income...................................................................................................................... 15
    2.3.3     Accountability for Public Pension Management .................................................................. 16
CHAPTER THREE ...................................................................................................................................... 17
INTRODUCTION TO FINDINGS .............................................................................................................. 17
  3.1 Time to finalize retirement benefits ............................................................................................... 17
  3.2 Notification and retirement for the retirees .................................................................................... 18
  3.3 Reasons for Delays in Processing Terminal Benefits..................................................................... 18
  3.4 Employers’ response to Issues Raised by Pension Funds .............................................................. 18
  3.5 Submission of Employees’ and Employers Contributions ............................................................. 18
  3.6 Registration of employees who contribute to the Fund.................................................................. 19
  3.7 Actions taken by authorities to ensure efficient processing of pension.......................................... 19
CHAPTER FOUR ........................................................................................................................................ 20
PUBLIC SERVICE PENSION FUNDS ...................................................................................................... 20
  4.1 Increase of time to finalize retirement benefits .............................................................................. 20
  4.2 Increase in number of retirees awaiting benefits finalization......................................................... 21
  4.3 Total waiting time for the processing of terminal benefits............................................................. 22
  4.4 Reasons for Delays in Processing Terminal Benefits..................................................................... 24
  4.5 Employers not responding adequately to issues raised by PSPF.................................................... 25
  4.6 Contributions made not based on the current salary....................................................................... 26
  4.7 PSPF failure to remind employees to remit their contributions ..................................................... 27
  4.8 Failure to register all Employers who contribute to the Fund ........................................................ 28
  4.9 Registration of Retired members.................................................................................................... 29
CHAPTER FIVE.......................................................................................................................................... 32
LOCAL AUTHORITIES PENSIONS FUND.............................................................................................. 32
  5.1 Time taken to finalize retirement benefits...................................................................................... 32
  5.2 Retirees awaiting terminal benefits finalization ............................................................................. 33
  5.3 Total waiting time for the processing of terminal benefits............................................................. 33
  5.4 Length of Average waiting time..................................................................................................... 34
    5.4.1     Length of time to prepare retirement benefits is high........................................................... 34

NATIONAL AUDIT OFFICE OF TANZANIA                                                                                                                            iii
A Performance Audit Report on the Processing of Terminal Benefits of Retirees from the Central and Local Government of
Tanzania
   5.4.2  Late retirement of some of the retirees ................................................................................. 35
   5.4.3  Late notification for the retirees ........................................................................................... 36
CHAPTER SEVEN ...................................................................................................................................... 50
CONCLUSIONS .......................................................................................................................................... 50
CHAPTER EIGHT....................................................................................................................................... 55
RECOMMENDATIONS ............................................................................................................................. 55
REFERENCES............................................................................................................................................. 58
  APPENDIX 1 ........................................................................................................................................... 60
  APPENDIX 2 ........................................................................................................................................... 61
  APPENDIX 3 ........................................................................................................................................... 67
  APPENDIX 4 ........................................................................................................................................... 70




NATIONAL AUDIT OFFICE OF TANZANIA                                                                                                                       iv
A Performance Audit Report on the Processing of Terminal Benefits of Retirees from the Central and Local Government of
Tanzania
                                             LIST OF TABLES
Table 4.1:           Time taken to process terminal benefit
Table 4.2:           Total Waiting Time for the Processing of Terminal Benefits for the
                     year 2006/7 – 2008/9
Table 4.3:           Notification Times by Employees
Table 4.4:           Submission time Employers
Table 4.5:           Showing frequency of key reasons for delay in Processing Terminal
                     Benefits
Table 4.6:           Analysis of the penalty paid
Table 4.7:           Number of registered members and the total number of those who
                     contribute to the fund
Table 4.8:           Workload in Head Office and regions on following employers’
                     compliance
Table 5.1:           Average Time to Finalize Retiree Benefits
Table 5.2:           Comparison of average delay and average time to finalize Retiree
                     Benefits
Table 5.3:           Late retirement of retirees
Table 5.4:           Showing frequency of key reasons for delay in Processing Terminal
                     Benefits
Table 5.5:           Delays in processing terminal benefits payments due to submission
                     of incomplete documents
Table 5.6:           Untimely curtailing of members’ contributions to the Fund

Table 6.1:           Number of retirees awaiting final pension
Table 6.3:           Late notification of an employee
Table 6.4:           Key reasons for delay in processing terminal benefits
Table 6.5:           Delays in processing terminal benefits payments due to submission
                     of incomplete documents
Table 6.6:           Employers response to various issues raised by Pension Funds
Table 6.9:           Delayed payment due to non or under-submission of employees’
                     contribution
Table 6.8:           Work load in Funds’ offices




NATIONAL AUDIT OFFICE OF TANZANIA                                                                                        v
A Performance Audit Report on the Processing of Terminal Benefits of Retirees from the Central and Local Government of
Tanzania
                                           LIST OF FIGURES
Figure 2.1:          Stakeholders in the Processing of Terminal Benefits in Tanzania
Figure 2.2:          Flow of Receiving and Maintaining Pensions’ Information
Figure 2.3:          Flow chart for Processing Terminal Benefit
Figure 2.4:          Funds accounts information flow
Figure 4.1:          Average Time to Finalize Retiree Benefits
Figure 4.2:          Number of Retirees Awaiting Final Pension Calculation
Figure 4.3:          PSPF members’ registration
Figure 5.1:          Average Time to Finalize Retiree Benefits at LAPF Head Office
Figure 5.2:          Total Waiting Time for the Processing of Terminal Benefits for the
                     year 2006/7 – 2008/9
Figure 5.3:          Late Submission
Figure 6.1:          Average time to finalize retirees’ benefits
Figure 6.2:          Total waiting time for the processing of terminal benefits




NATIONAL AUDIT OFFICE OF TANZANIA                                                                                        vi
A Performance Audit Report on the Processing of Terminal Benefits of Retirees from the Central and Local Government of
Tanzania
                                                    PREFACE
The Public Audit Act No. 11 of 2008, Section 28 authorizes the Controller and
Auditor General to carry out Performance Audit (Value-for-Money Audit) for the
purposes of establishing the economy, efficiency and effectiveness of any
expenditure or use of resources in the MDAs, LGAs and Public Authorities and
other Bodies which involves enquiring, examining, investigating and reporting, as
deemed necessary under the circumstances.

I have the honour to submit to His Excellency the President of the United
Republic of Tanzania, Dr. Jakaya Mrisho Kikwete and through him to Parliament
the first Performance Audit Report on Processing Terminal Benefits of retirees
from the Central and Local Government of Tanzania.

The report contains conclusions and recommendations that directly concern the
Central Government through the Ministry of Finance and Economic Affairs,
President’s Office – Public Service Management, Ministry of Education and
Vocational Training, Ministry of Agriculture Food Security and Cooperatives,
Ministry of Health and Social Welfare; and Local Government Authorities.
The Central and Local Government Authorities have been given the opportunity
to scrutinise the factual contents and comment on the draft report. I wish to
acknowledge that the discussions with the auditees have been very useful and
constructive.
My office intends to carry out a follow-up at an appropriate time regarding actions
taken by the auditees in relation to the recommendations in this report.
In completion of the assignment, the office subjected the report to the critical
reviews of the following experts namely, Mr. Mushtaq Osman of the University of
Dar es salaam, Advocate Cornelius Kariwa an expert in labour laws and Dr.
Richard Kavura (a retired officer), who came up with useful inputs on improving
the output of this report.
This report has been prepared by George Haule, James Pilly, Wendy Massoy,
Michael Malabeja, Elizabeth Augustino, Warento Nyanchogu, Martin Henry and
Esnath Henry under the guidance of Gregory G. Teu. I would like to thank my
staff for their assistance in the preparation of this report. My thanks should also
be extended to the auditees for their fruitful interaction with my office.




Ludovick S. L. Utouh
Controller and Auditor General
Dar es Salaam,
January 2010
NATIONAL AUDIT OFFICE OF TANZANIA                                                                                        vii
A Performance Audit Report on the Processing of Terminal Benefits of Retirees from the Central and Local Government of
Tanzania
                                                  ACRONYMS
DED                  –         District Executive Director

FN-6                 –         Form Number 6

GoT                  –         Government of Tanzania

ILO                  –         International Labour Organization

LAPF                 –         Local Authorities Pension Fund

MDA                  –         Ministries Departments and Agencies

MoAFC                –         Ministry of Agriculture, Food Security and Cooperatives

MoEVT                –         Ministry of Education and Vocational Training

MoHSW                –         Ministry of Health and Social Welfare

NAO                   –        National Audit Office

NGOs                 –         Non Governmental Organizations

NSSF                 –         National Social Security Fund

PO-PSM               –         President’s Office – Public Service Management

PPF                  –         Parastatals Pension Fund

PSPF                 –         Public Services Pension Fund

PUT                  –         Pensioners Union of Tanzania

ROI                  –         Regional Office In-charge




NATIONAL AUDIT OFFICE OF TANZANIA                                                                                        viii
A Performance Audit Report on the Processing of Terminal Benefits of Retirees from the Central and Local Government of
Tanzania
                                     EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
Today, Pension payments to retirees have been and continue to be a big
problem in Tanzania, which requires immediate attention. Most of old age people
who served in the public sector are dependent on the terminal benefits as their
major source of income after retiring from public services.

The terminal benefits for the retirees in Tanzania are managed by five different
Pension Funds which are Public Service Pension Funds (PSPF), Local
Authorities Pension Fund (LAPF), Government Employees Provident Fund
(GEPF), National Social Security Fund (NSSF) and Parastatal Pension Fund
(PPF). These Pension Funds are responsible for the payment of pensions,
gratuities, and other benefits in respect of the service of retirees.

Beyond policy formulation and regulation, Central Government Authorities and
the Prime Minister’s Office – Regional and Local Government Authorities as main
employers and custodians of Pension Funds are responsible for the way
Terminal Benefits are being processed in the country.

However, indicative problems discussed in the proceeding paragraphs suggest
that there are problems in the processing of Terminal Benefits of retirees. This is
following an outcry of many people who have been retiring from public service
employment. The purpose of this audit was to assess the efficiency of the
Government, Pension Funds and selected Employers on processing terminal
benefits of retired public servants in Tanzania. The aim was also, to evaluate the
adequacy of systems and procedures in place for managing terminal benefits.

The audit covered three fiscal years i.e. 2006/2007, 2007/2008 and 2008/2009;
and focused on two Public Pension Funds namely the Public Service Pension
Fund and the Local Authorities Pension Fund administered by the Ministry of
Finance and Economic Affairs and Prime Minister’s Office – Regional and Local
Government Authorities respectively. Similarly, this audit was carried out in three
selected Ministries out of 29 and 17 LGAs out of 133 of various sizes, population
and with reasonable accessibility. These are samples of the main employers of
the public servants and in which case all of them have a role to play in
processing terminal benefits in Tanzania.

The above Ministries and LGAs have been selected due to the fact that they
have a large number of Public servants and the rate of retirement is considered
to be high compared to other Ministries and LGAs in Tanzania.

Major Findings and Conclusions
The audit disclosed that the main employers i.e. Ministry of Finance and
Economic Affairs (MoFEA) and President’s Office – Public Service Management
NATIONAL AUDIT OFFICE OF TANZANIA                                                                                        ix
A Performance Audit Report on the Processing of Terminal Benefits of Retirees from the Central and Local Government of
Tanzania
(PO-PSM) being the overall overseers of Pension Funds on behalf of the
Government have not to a large extent fulfilled their responsibilities of ensuring
the processing of terminal benefits of retirees on time and without recourse to
duress. Specifically, the audit noted that there is increasing number of retirees
waiting processing time.

Together with that, other issues noted are:
   • Pension Fund’s system of keeping records is appallingly inefficient and
      ineffective this is due to poor record keeping by Pension Funds,
   • The processes to finalize terminal benefits of retirees continued to be
      problematic which in consequence hinders the retirement system’s ability
      to fulfill its mission and inordinate delays in processing retirees’ benefits.
      This problem can be addressed by revamping the existing pension system
      in the country.
   • There is lack of clearly defined awareness programs by the two main
      employers (The MoFEA and PO-PSM).
   • Employer’s system of keeping records is appallingly inefficient and
      ineffective
   • The Employers failed to properly manage and control the necessary
      documents for the processing of retirement benefits of their respective
      employees resulting in reciprocal delays and trading of blames between
      the Funds and the employers.
   • In addition, MoFEA and PO-PSM as main Employers have not taken any
      tangible action to ensure efficient processing of terminal benefits is
      instituted despite the fact this is a known and repetitive problem
      throughout the period of the audit i.e. 2006/07 to 2008/09.

Based on the audit findings and conclusions it is being recommended that:

PSPF and LAPF should review the processing of terminal benefits of retirees’
workflow. This includes preparation of a Client Service Charter which will
incorporate all core activities and the whole process of terminal benefits
indicating exact time a certain activity is going to be initiated and completed and
identify who will be accountable for what. Communication should be improved
among stakeholders to ensure timely communication between the funds and
employers. The Pension Funds should also, create awareness to their members
including conducting training on pension matters


MoFEA and PO-PSM as Main Employers should ensure that proper records of
employees are accurately kept and submitted to Pension Funds for processing
terminal benefit payments, there is a clear coordination among stakeholders and
an improved coordination among the key stakeholders including transferability of
benefits in favour of those who are paid by LAPF and PSPF and have served
both the Local Government Authorities and the Central Government.


NATIONAL AUDIT OFFICE OF TANZANIA                                                                                        x
A Performance Audit Report on the Processing of Terminal Benefits of Retirees from the Central and Local Government of
Tanzania
Likewise, Employers should prepare a schedule of employees who are about to
retire in the near future at least have a three years’ schedule. This schedule
should be used as a basis for reminding employers on the date of retirement of
staff, when to notify staff on their retirement dates, and also the right time to look
for the necessary documents. This will ensure timely access to information for
efficient decision making on terminal benefit matters

In addition, employers should ensure that monitoring, evaluation and feedback
mechanism for the training conducted on staff awareness on pension matters is
done. Through this, it will be easier for the employers to identify areas that need
to be addressed for future improvements.




NATIONAL AUDIT OFFICE OF TANZANIA                                                                                        xi
A Performance Audit Report on the Processing of Terminal Benefits of Retirees from the Central and Local Government of
Tanzania
                                              CHAPTER ONE
                                             INTRODUCTION

1.1 Background
The International Labour Organization (ILO) Social Security (Minimum standards)
Convention of 1952 describes eight specific contingencies, which social security
schemes should cover1. By implication, these contingencies do define and
delineate boundaries of social protection which any country or Central and Local
Government Authorities (LGAs) should provide to the population.

The ILO therefore, defines social security as protection that the society should
provide for its members through a series of public measures against social and
economic distress, which otherwise would have been caused by sudden
stoppage or substantial reduction of an income, accruing from specific
contingencies such as sickness, workplace injury, maternity, invalidity, disability,
old age and death.

Social security measures in their conventional form are intended to provide a
decent standard of living to people who are unable to earn an income due to
invalidity, unemployment or old age. This has been the operational policy
oriented definition of social security. Thus, the enactment of social security
legislation such as the Public Service Retirement Benefits Act (Cap 371) and
Local Authorities Pensions Fund Act (No. 9 of 2006)2; establishment of different
pension schemes, provident funds and related laws in Tanzania; should have
their foundation in this fundamental philosophy of providing economic security to
the needy, at least to a certain acceptable standard within the context of
Tanzanian society. Appendix 4 details the chronological development of the
Pension Funds in Tanzania.

Today, most of old age people who served in public sector are dependent on the
terminal benefits as their major source of income after retiring from public
services, so they need it urgently and should be paid on time without
unnecessary delays.




1
  International Labour Conversions and Recommendations 1919 – 1981 Second Impression 1985 page 519
Article 7.
2
  Refer Appendix 2 – Main Laws and Regulations governing Processing of terminal Benefits in Tanzania
NATIONAL AUDIT OFFICE OF TANZANIA                                                                                        1
A Performance Audit Report on the Processing of Terminal Benefits of Retirees from the Central and Local Government of
Tanzania
1.2         Indication of the problem

Some of the common factors which cause a range of difficulties while processing
terminal benefit payments indicate the following problems:

      •    Delay in processing payment of terminal benefits has been a long time
           outcry of many people who have been retiring from public service
           employment. The more the time that passes the more difficult it can be for
           everyone involved to remember exactly what has happened. It has been a
           common observation for retired officers to spend more than 12 months
           without receiving their terminal benefits.

      •    On account of this untimely payment of pensions there are reported cases
           where pensioners die before getting their dues thereby making it even
           more difficult for relatives to obtain the due pensions and result in
           miserable life of dependants who are left without any reliable source of
           income hence denied a decent standard of living.

      •    A number of retired people have been observed gathering at the Ministry
           of Finance and Economic Affairs pension offices complaining and
           condemning the delay in processing their terminal benefit payments3.

      •    Retirees have been claiming that the delay has a negative impact to them
           since it goes to the extent of affecting their purchasing power.

      •    In some instances the delay in processing payments takes long time as
           this could be facilitated inter-alia by the fact that there are multiple
           governing laws pertaining to settlement or processing of terminal benefits
           of retired employees from either central, regional or LGAs.

      •    Further, notwithstanding the delay in processing payments, we noted that
           there is a huge disparity of terminal benefits being paid under different
           schemes applying different formulas, for example PSPF, LAPF, GEPF,
           PPF and NSSF despite the fact that both retirees have been serving or
           operating under the same government.

      •    Terminal benefits are being processing after retirees have retired from
           public service which denies them easy access to any required information
           while processing terminal benefits.




3
    Retirement Benefits in Tanzania: Realities and Challenges by Pensioners Union of Tanzania (2009
NATIONAL AUDIT OFFICE OF TANZANIA                                                                                        2
A Performance Audit Report on the Processing of Terminal Benefits of Retirees from the Central and Local Government of
Tanzania
1.3       Objective and Scope

1.3.1 Audit Objective

The objective of this audit was:

To assess the efficiency of the Government, Funds and selected Employers on
processing terminal benefits of retired civil servants in Tanzania giving
consideration to:

      •   Time taken to wait for the terminal benefits to be effected;
      •   Supervision, training and effective communication between different
          pension stakeholders and schemes;
      •   Workflow of processing terminal benefits;
      •   Actions taken by responsible authorities to reduce average waiting time;
      •   Impact of late payments of terminal benefits to retirees; and
      •   How to complain if retirees are unhappy about the way terminal benefits
          have been handled or processed.

To evaluate the adequacy of systems and procedures in place for the processing
of terminal benefits; and

Finally, to make recommendations as deemed appropriate under the
circumstances.


1.3.2 Audit Scope

This audit covered three fiscal years i.e. 2006/2007, 2007/2008 and 2008/2009;
and focused on two Public Pension Funds (Public Service Pension Fund and
Local Authorities Pension Fund) administered by the Ministry of Finance and
Economic Affairs and the Prime Ministers’ Office (R.A.L.G) respectively.

This audit was carried out in 3 (three) selected Ministries and 17 (seventeen)
Local Government Authorities. These are employers of the public l service in
Tanzania and in this sense all of them have a role to play in public pension
management in Tanzania.

The selected ministries and local government authorities were:

Central Government (Ministries)
      i.) Ministry of Education and Vocational Training (MoEVT)
     ii.) Ministry of Health and Social Welfare (MoHSW)
    iii.) Ministry of Agriculture and Food Security (MoAFS)

NATIONAL AUDIT OFFICE OF TANZANIA                                                                                        3
A Performance Audit Report on the Processing of Terminal Benefits of Retirees from the Central and Local Government of
Tanzania
                                 Local Government Authorities
                         Region         Councils
                         Morogoro       • Morogoro Municipal Council
                                        • Ulanga District Council
                                        • Kilombero District Counci
                         Mbeya          • Mbeya City Council
                                        • Mbozi District Council
                         Kigoma         • Kigoma District Council
                                        • Kasulu District Council
                         Dar es salaam • Ilala Municipal Council
                                        • Temeke Municipal Council
                                        • Kinondoni Municipal Council
                         Manyara        • Babati District Council
                                        • Hanang District Council
                         Lindi          • Lindi District Council
                                        • Nachingwea District Council
                         Dodoma         • Dodoma Municipal Council
                                        • Bahi District Council
                                        • Chamwino District Council

The above Ministries and LGAs were selected due to the fact that they have a
large number of Civil servants and the rate of retirement is quite high compared
to other Ministries and LGAs.

The Ministry of Finance and Economic Affairs (MoFEA) and President’s Office –
Public Service Management (PO-PSM) are our main auditees since the two
selected Pension Funds are under the MoFEA and PMO-RALG and under the
public service employers are under the PO-PSM.



1.4        Audit Design

The audit work was designed by using questions and the audit methodology
used is presented in sub-section 1.4.2. The questions were based on Time taken
to wait for the terminal benefits to be effected, Supervision, training and effective
communication between different pension stakeholders, Workflow of processing
terminal benefits, Actions taken by responsible authorities to reduce average
waiting time; and Impact of late payment of terminal benefits to retirees. The
used questions are as shown in section 1.4.1 and Appendix 1.




NATIONAL AUDIT OFFICE OF TANZANIA                                                                                        4
A Performance Audit Report on the Processing of Terminal Benefits of Retirees from the Central and Local Government of
Tanzania
1.4.1 Audit Questions

Question 1:           Are important bottlenecks in the Processing of Terminal
                      Benefits for retirees identified?
This audit question determined whether there is a reliable system for identifying the
bottlenecks in the processing of terminal benefits of members of a Fund. Whether long
waiting time caused by non-professional management of the Terminal Benefits
Processing time, application forms and procedures are too complicated and causing
unnecessary problems for the retirees, organization and coordination of the entire
process for the payment of terminal benefits.


Question 2:           Are there bottlenecks in the workflow causing queues and
                      idle time?
This audit question checked whether there are differences in idle times between
ministries and local governments and causes of varying performance. It also checked
whether the observed long idle times in any step of the flow, were critical in the sense
that they needed to be reduced to shorten retirees’ waiting times.


Question 3:          Are there ways to reduce average waiting times without
                     additional costs?
The audit question evaluated whether there is any evaluation conducted whose results
were used to come up with ways to reduce average waiting times without additional
costs.


Question 4:            To what extent is the lack of supervision, training and
                       effective communication affecting the efficient processing of
                       documents?
This audit question evaluated whether there are evaluations on the effectiveness of
supervision, training and communication of retirees documents between different parties
involved, that is Employers and Pension Funds.


Question 5:             What is the impact of inadequate processing or delays in
                        paying terminal benefits?
This audit question determined whether there are adverse impacts to retirees as a result
of delays in receiving their terminal benefits.

Question 6:                    Is there mechanism in place to manage terminal benefits
                               processing complains.

This audit question determines whether there is a proper office set up to deal
with or investigate complains about the way both employers and Funds are
dealing with peoples’ terminal benefits issues.


NATIONAL AUDIT OFFICE OF TANZANIA                                                                                        5
A Performance Audit Report on the Processing of Terminal Benefits of Retirees from the Central and Local Government of
Tanzania
1.4.2 Methods of Implementation
After preparation of the audit questions mentioned above, the administration of
the audit questions were done as follows:

          o The staff were interviewed in the following areas:

                     Central Government - Senior officials in the Ministry of Finance
                     and Economic Affairs (MoFEA), President’s Office – Public Service
                     Management (PO-PSM), Ministry of Education and Vocational
                     Training (MoEVT), Ministry of Health and Social Welfare (MoHSW),
                     and Ministry of Agriculture, Food Security and Cooperatives
                     (MoAFC).

                     Local     Government      -   City/Municipal/District     Directors,
                     Administrative and Human Resource Officers, Representatives of
                     Teachers Service Department in the Council and Health Secretary
                     in the seventeen Local Government Authorities dealt with.

          o A number of documents were reviewed including:
            • Operating Policies and Procedures (OPPs)
            • Public Service Retirement Benefits Act No. 2 of 1999
            • Public Service Act No. 8 of 2002
            • Standing Orders for Public Servants, 1994 Edition, Section Q. 45 –
               47.
            • Staff Circular No. 5 of 1986.
            • Muongozo wa kuhusu masuala ya Ajira katika Utumishi wa Umma
               of 2009.
            • Client Service Charter (PO-PSM - Mkataba wa Huduma kwa Mteja)
               of June, 2007
            • Local Authorities Pension Fund (LAPF) Act No. 9 of 2006.
            • Other documents (see Reference)

          o Third parties were consulted on their views of the performance of
            Pension Funds, Ministries and LGAs. They included:
               • Pensioners Union of Tanzania (PUT)
               • Help Age International - Tanzania




NATIONAL AUDIT OFFICE OF TANZANIA                                                                                        6
A Performance Audit Report on the Processing of Terminal Benefits of Retirees from the Central and Local Government of
Tanzania
1.4.3 Limitations of the Audit
There are some limitations that need to be acknowledged and addressed
regarding this audit as presented hereunder;

Concerning the availability and adequacy of terminal benefits processing data
from Ministries and LGAs visited. It was not easy for the audit team to get readily
available data or information.

Regarding availability of reliable data: the team received conflicting information
from different Ministries and LGAs and from Pension Funds (PSPF and LAPF).
This illustrates that information structure is not working or functioning properly but
we tried to handle them and present in the best way.

However, according to the complexity of the matter, we have limited our audit on
the processing of terminal benefits of retirees to PSPF and LAPF only. The other
Pension Funds such as GEPF, PPF and NSSF were not dealt with.

Three ministries, seventeen LGAs and two pension Funds were examined as
samples. Despite the fact that the audit team had examined these few
organizations but the broader picture obtained indicated that the conclusions
reached in this report can represent and be applicable to other Ministries and
LGAs in Tanzania.


1.5   Data Validation Process
The Ministries, Funds and LGAs dealt with were given an opportunity by the
Audit Team to go through the figures and information presented in this report.
They confirmed the accuracy (situation they reflect) of the figures used and their
subsequent information.


1.6     Structure of the Audit Report
This report has been structured in such a way that, Chapter one covers an
introduction to the audit area, including the objective, scope and limitations of the
audit; it also, discusses the audit methodology and its implementation.

Chapter two presents the key national laws, policies and standards related to
processing of terminal benefits in Tanzania. The introduction to findings of the
report are presented in Chapter three, while Chapter four and five present the
audit findings for the Central and Local Government Levels respectively.

Chapter six presents a summary or the consolidated findings from Central
Government and LGAs and Chapter seven presents the conclusions reached.
Finally, Chapter eight presents the audit recommendations issued to the Funds,
LGAs and to Central Government respectively.


NATIONAL AUDIT OFFICE OF TANZANIA                                                                                        7
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References used and appendices are also presented, whereas, Appendix 1
shows a list of Audit Questions and sub questions, Appendix 2 is highlighting the
main laws and regulations regarding terminal benefits processing in Tanzania,
Appendix 3 is a description of the payment of terminal benefit system on how it
should be rationalized. Appendix 4 shows the chronological development of the
Pension Funds in Tanzania. Appendix 5 presents the summary of Tanzania
Social Security (Pension) Funds.




NATIONAL AUDIT OFFICE OF TANZANIA                                                                                        8
A Performance Audit Report on the Processing of Terminal Benefits of Retirees from the Central and Local Government of
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                                              CHAPTER TWO
         TERMINAL BENEFITS PROCESSING SYSTEM IN
                        TANZANIA
This chapter deals with the actors (see the following sub sections) system set up
for the terminal benefits processing system in Tanzania. The system of terminal
benefits processing in Tanzania is indicated in figure 2.1 below:-


2.1 Stakeholders in the Processing of Terminal Benefits


                                                 Parliament of URT
                              Passes Legislation and Acts to Manage Public Pensions in
                                                      Tanzania



                      PMO-                                                                                  Po-PSM
                RALG/MoFEA/MoLYD                                                  Issue guidelines



                                                               Pay
                   Pension Funds                               retirement
             PSPF, LAPF, GEPF, PPF and                         benefits




                                                                                                                                 • Fill retirement forms
                                                                                                          Employer
                       NSSF                                                                          Ministries, Executive
                                                                                                     Agencies and LGAs
                                                               • Submit
                                                                 documents
                                                               • Acknowledge



                                                                                                                                 • Notify
                                                                 receipts
               Financial Institutions
               NMB, CRDB, POSTAL                                                                            Retiree
                   BANK, NBC


Figure 2.1: Stakeholders in the Processing of Terminal Benefits in Tanzania

Public Service Pension Funds (PSPF)
The Public Service Pension Funds (PSPF) was established by the Public Service
Retirement Benefits Act No. 2 of 1999 to provide for contributions to and
payment of pensions, gratuities and other benefits in respect of the service of
officers in the Public Service and to provide for the related matters. The Act
applies to Public Service employees in Tanzania including those employed in
Executive Agencies established by Acts of Parliament.

NATIONAL AUDIT OFFICE OF TANZANIA                                                                                            9
A Performance Audit Report on the Processing of Terminal Benefits of Retirees from the Central and Local Government of
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The Pension Fund is responsible for collection of contributions from government
employees and those working in executive agencies, members’ records keeping,
sustainable investments of the contributions and ensuring compliance to the
scheme to mention just a few.

Local Authorities Pensions Fund (LAPF)
Local Authorities Pensions Fund (LAPF) was established by the Local Authorities
Pensions Fund Act No. 9 of 2006 to provide for contributions to and payment of
pensions, gratuities and other benefits in respect of the service of officers in the
Local Government and to provide for the related matters. The Act applies to all
Local Government employees in Tanzania.

The Fund’s responsibilities include collection of contributions from local
government employees and any other Institution or person who wishes to be a
member, members’ records keeping, sustainable investments of the contributions
and paying out pensioners in compliance to the established scheme.

Employee (Expected Retiree)
  • Employee is supposed to understand his/her terms of service which
     determines the mode of payable terminal benefits payment
  • Know the date of birth which will enable the employer and employee to
     know the date of retirement
  • Gives notification to employer (through a letter of notification) six months
     before retirement date

Employer
  • Employer has a responsibility of reminding an employee on the date of
     retirement
  • Has to write a letter of termination or otherwise once notification letter from
     the employee is received.
  • Has a role of filling retirement forms/data sheets within six months and
     submit them to PSPF/LAPF or other Funds on time
  • Has the responsibility of ensuring that all the required documents are in
     place and intact.

Funds (PSPF/LAPF)
  • Funds have a responsibility of capturing all the information/data of staff
     required to join their schemes and put them into their computer systems.
     This information should include cheque number, date of birth, date of first
     appointment, date of confirmation, date of admission to pensionable
     terms, indicative date of termination etc.
  • Assessment of the information/documents submitted.
  • Preparation of terminal benefits payment.
  • To ensure that all contributors are fully registered.

NATIONAL AUDIT OFFICE OF TANZANIA                                                                                        10
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Treasury
   • To ensure that contributions of employees paid by Treasury are remitted
      to the Funds on time.

President’s Office – Public Service Management
   • To issue guidance, to monitor and conduct merit based recruitment in the
      public service.
   • To ensure that service schemes are formulated and implemented.
   • Ensure that all retirees are deleted from the government payroll.
   • Issue authority to retire on public interest.

TYPES OF BENEFITS PAYABLE
Funds are responsible for the payment of eight kinds of benefits to its
beneficiaries as shown below:
   • Old age Benefits
   • Survivor Benefits
   • Death Gratuity
   • Sickness Benefits
   • Invalidity Benefits
   • Withdraw (due to marriage, maternity, and giving birth)
   • Withdraw (due to Emigration/unemployment)
   • Funeral Benefits

This audit will focus more on the Old Age Benefits as provided by PSPF and
LAPF. Old Age Benefits are as detailed below:

BENEFIT TYPE                                     DOCUMENTS NEEDED                     FORMULAR USED
OLD AGE BENEFITS               • Membership Card                                      Specified amount = 1/540 ×
                               • A letter of notification                             No. of complete months
Conditions                       of retirement from                                   served × last annual salary
Attain   age     of  voluntary   employee
retirement (55 yrs) or that of • A         letter      of                             CPG4 = SA/2 × 15.5
compulsory retirement (60yrs)    termination from the                                 MP5 = SA6/2×1/12
                                 employer
Beneficiary
Member

Period of Payment/Limit
Till death

As for other Pension Funds details can be found on Appendix 5 of this report.



4
  Commuted Pension Gratuity
5
  Monthly Pension
6
  Specified Amount
NATIONAL AUDIT OFFICE OF TANZANIA                                                                                        11
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2.2 Flow of Receiving and Maintaining Pensions’ Information

                                                         EMPLOYER
                               • Employ after requesting permission from PO-PSM
                               • Fill employee data Sheet which shows deduction code
                                                                                                               EMPLOYEE/ RETIREE
                                            Give
    Issue                                   permission                    Send data                            • Contributes to PSPF/LAPF
    deduction                               to employ                     sheet                                • Notify employer on
    sheet                                                                                                        retirement
                                                         PO-PSM                                                          Submit deduction
                               • Review Data sheet and send it to Treasury                                               sheet after
                                                                                                                         reconciling with
                               • Provide detail payroll sheet to PSPF/LAPF                                               the existing
                                                                                                                         employee




                                                    TREASURY
                               • Deduct pension contribution
                               • Provide payroll showing deduction (Summary)
                                 to PSPF/LAPF




                                                         PSPF/LAPF
                               •    Receives pension contribution Cheques from
                                    Treasury and employers and issue receipts
                               •    Reconcile deduction sheets with payroll and cash
                                    received


       Figure 2.2: Flow of Receiving and Maintaining Pensions’ Information

The following is the chronological flow of events in the processing of terminal
benefits:

      a) Notification to employer on intention to retire
         Employee is required to give notification to employer six months before
         the retirement date. This notification is normally done through a written
         notification letter. The employer is then supposed to respond back to the
         notification letter written by the employee7.

      b) Filling Retirement Claim forms (data sheet)
         To commence terminal benefits processing the expected retiree starts by
         filling the forms and the employer submits them to PSPF/LAPF three
         months before the date of retirement. Therefore, the employer has a
7
 According to standing orders, an authority to cease working on the grounds laid down in the standing
order is issued to allow terminal benefits processing take place.
NATIONAL AUDIT OFFICE OF TANZANIA                                                                                            12
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          responsibility of ensuring that all relevant documents are in place and
          intact.

          Since, the Employer is the one who maintains the employees’ service
          records, he has to ensure that Retirement Benefits Application Forms
          have been filled correctly and appropriately, that is to ensure that all
          required information have been reported on the application form. Also, the
          employer has to ensure that all information is supported by documentary
          evidence.


     c) Submission of the Retirement Claim forms of retiree to the Pension
        Fund
        The Employer is responsible for the submission of the retirement’s claim
        forms to the Pension Fund. This submission of claim form is normally
        supposed to be done three months before the retirement date of an
        employee. The Employer has one person in his/her office who is working
        as a contact/liaison officer to the Pension Fund. Through this office all the
        correspondences between the Pension Fund and the Employer regarding
        expected retirees’ payments are done. In case of any missing or improper
        filling of data sheets, this information is communicated to this official.

     d) Assessment of the information/documents submitted
        After the retirement forms/data sheet have been submitted to the Fund
        (e.g. PSPF or LAPF) by an employer, then the operation officers start to
        scrutinize that information to see whether what was presented is correct
        and appropriate.

          The scrutiny of the information submitted normally aims at checking if all
          relevant information are in place and sufficient to enable the Fund grant
          terminal benefits to the retiree. If all the information submitted is correct
          and complete, preparations of the terminal benefits start right away.
          However, if some information is lacking queries will be raised which force
          the operation officer to communicate back with the Employer. The
          employer is then required to submit that information so as to allow
          Terminal Benefits process to continue. Depending on the nature of the
          query, the terminal benefits will not be processed pending query reply.


     e) Preparation of terminal benefit payments
        The preparation of terminal benefits is done, when the employee’s
        required information are complete and submitted. The computation result
        on the amount of lumpsum (Commuted Pension Gratuity) payable soon
        after retirement and Monthly pension collected after every three months
        (i.e. collected 4 times a year) up to the date of death of a pensioner.


NATIONAL AUDIT OFFICE OF TANZANIA                                                                                        13
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          Normally, the computations pass through internal checks within the fund
          before the cheque is prepared.

     f) Sending cheque to employer
        When a retirement benefit cheque is ready, the Fund informs the employer
        and his/her official goes to the Fund to collect the cheque. Only this official
        is allowed to collect the cheque from the Fund. The cheque is then sent to
        the employer’s office for the collection by the retiree.

     g) Retiree collects cheque from the employer
        Having collected the cheque from the Fund, the employer notifies the
        retiree about the presence of the cheque. Then retiree comes to the
        employer to collect the same which will be presented to the appropriate
        bank for cashing.

The above narrated process can be visualized as shown in Figure 2.3 below


      Notification
      to employer
                                             Submission of retirement                      Assessment of the
      and filling
                                             forms to fund by employer                     information by
      retirement
                                                                                           the PSPF/LAPF
      forms
                                                                                                                   Referral
                                                                                                                   time
                                                 Referral time

                                               Re- submission                          Preparation of
                                               after missing                           terminal benefits
                                               documents                               payment

                         Total time to get
                         terminal benefit                                  Referral time


      Retiree receives
      cheque from                                                                            Sending cheque
      her/his employer                                                                       to employer



                                 Key

                           Employer
                           Employee
                           Funds officers


                      Figure 2.3: Flow chart for Processing Terminal Benefit

Appendix 3 provides additional information regarding Processing Terminal
Benefit.

2.3 Sources of funds for the Pension Funds (LAPF and PSPF)
Pension Funds are financed by two main sources, namely, employees and
employers contributions on the one hand, deducted from employees’ monthly

NATIONAL AUDIT OFFICE OF TANZANIA                                                                                             14
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wages and direct remittances to the Funds by the Treasury (Government)
respectively and investment income on the other hand.


2.3.1 Contributions to the Fund
PSPF’s and LAPF’s contributions are of two categories; Employer’s 15% and
Employee’s 5% of the employees’ monthly salary. For the case of 5%
contributions, a Cheque accompanied by payment voucher and schedules as
supporting documents, is sent by respective employers to the Fund’s cash office.

The 15% contributions are collected directly from the Treasury, in which case,
cheques and vouchers are brought into the Fund’s Cash Office where cross
checking is done against previous month’s pension contribution deduction sheet
for verification purposes.

Both Contributions are supposed to be remitted to the Fund within thirty days
after the end of each month. The statutory contributions which ought to be
contributed by parties concerned are outlined in the Figure 2.4 below.

                          Contribution 5%                                              Contribution 15%




                                                         PSPF/LAPF
                                                                                                          TREASURY
       EMPLOYER




                             Receipts                                                     Receipts

                          Figure 2.4: Funds accounts information flow


2.3.2 Investments income
According to the investment policies of the Funds, there are two categories of
Investments namely short term and long term investments.



NATIONAL AUDIT OFFICE OF TANZANIA                                                                                        15
A Performance Audit Report on the Processing of Terminal Benefits of Retirees from the Central and Local Government of
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Short term investments involves investing in areas like government securities
(treasury bills, treasury bonds etc) and commercial papers; while long term
investments involves loans, equity participation etc.

See PSPF’s income and expenditures for the year 2006 – 2009

 Table 2.1: PSPF’s Income and expenditures for the year 2006 – 2009 (TShs
                                 billion)
 Item                                            30 June 09           30 June 08           30 June 07          30 June 06
 Member’s Contributions Income                          232.0                151.6               127.4                85.7
 Investment Income                                       60.6                 70.4               177.7              123.6
 Benefit expenses                                     (142.6)              (132.4)               (74.4)             (61.5)
 Administration Expenses                                 (7.9)               (5,.7)               (4.4)              (9.1)

                                     Source: PSPF Financial Records

2.3.3 Accountability for Public Pension Management
The Public Pension Scheme in Tanzania is large and complex to administer. It
involves extensive policy formulations and consultations within the Central and
Local governments and with numerous special interest groups such as Trade
Unions and others. It also involves running one of the most important service
operations in the government (public sector), maintaining an enormous
computerized record-keeping system, and ensuring that over 15,000 cheques
are delivered on time every three months to over 15,000 individuals.

Through Public Service Retirement Act and Local Authorities Pensions Fund Act,
the Minister of Finance and Economic Affairs has the sole responsibility for the
administration of the Public Pension System. In addition, the same Ministry plays
an important role in policy negotiations and discussions on financing with
Pension Funds. However, for the case of the NSSF its control and administration
are overseen by the Ministry of Labour, Employment and Youth Development.

Similarly, PO-PSM has a responsibility of coming up with different policies
regarding public service provision which binds all civil servants. The same office
is the one which regulates all the categories of the civil servants which finally
determines the level of payment of terminal benefits.

On the other hand, PO-PSM governs all the public services, therefore any
dispute in the service administration of an employee or retiree has to be
appealed to this office for resolution.




NATIONAL AUDIT OFFICE OF TANZANIA                                                                                        16
A Performance Audit Report on the Processing of Terminal Benefits of Retirees from the Central and Local Government of
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                                           CHAPTER THREE
                             INTRODUCTION TO FINDINGS
The National Audit Office has audited two key ministries (MoFEA and PO-PSM),
two pension Funds (Public Service Pension Fund and Local Authorities Pensions
Fund), three ministries (employers) and 17 Local Government Authorities
(employers).

The findings of the audit have been presented in the next three chapters of this
report. Findings for each Fund (PSPF and LAPF) have been presented
separately in chapters four and five respectively of this report.

Based on the scope of the audit, the following issues have been addressed on
the findings chapters:
   • Length of time to finalize retirement benefits;
   • Number of retirees awaiting benefits finalization;
   • Notification and retirement for the retirees;
   • Average waiting time;
   • Reasons for Delays in Processing Terminal Benefits;
   • Submission of retirement Documents;
   • Employers’ response to Issues Raised by Pension Funds;
   • Submission of Employees’ and Employers Contributions;
   • Registration of employees who contribute to the Fund;
   • Ways to reduce average waiting time;
   • Actions taken by authorities to ensure efficient processing of pension; and
   • Impact of delays in paying pensions.



3.1    Time to finalize retirement benefits
The estimated time to finalize processing of terminal benefits of retirees over a
period of years (2006/7 – 2008/9) is presented.

In this part a number of retirees awaiting terminal benefits finalization is also
shown.

Similarly, average waiting time for the retirees to receive their terminal benefits is
presented. A number of computations and figures done are shown in this part of
the report.




NATIONAL AUDIT OFFICE OF TANZANIA                                                                                        17
A Performance Audit Report on the Processing of Terminal Benefits of Retirees from the Central and Local Government of
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3.2   Notification and retirement for the retirees
The requirement for the employee to notify the employer the intention to retire is
presented in this part. This section also examined and presents time taken by the
employers to respond to employees request to retire.

Notifications were assessed to check whether it was done six months before the
retirement. This information is presented in the next three chapters.

Likewise, the date of retirement of different employees were analysed, reviewed
and are presented in this part.



3.3   Reasons for Delays in Processing Terminal Benefits
Reasons for the delays in processing Terminal Benefits for retirees have been
presented in this part.

The presentation also focuses on the extent or influence of the delay in
processing terminal benefits.

Similarly, these reasons have been grouped in such a way as to determine who
the source is. Delays presented in this part are either caused by employers,
employees or Pension Funds.

These three sources of delays are highlighted in the report.


3.4   Employers’ response to Issues Raised by Pension Funds
Employers are responsible for ensuring that retiree’s information is submitted to
the Pension Funds on time. They are required to make sure that all information
submitted is correct and appropriate.

Once any information is found to be missing or inadequate, Pension Funds
communicate with the respective employers.

This section reports on the employers’ response on all issues raised by the
Pension Funds. It tries to assess whether the same kind of information is sought
from the employers by the Fund.



3.5    Submission of Employees’ and Employers Contributions
One of the responsibilities of the employers is to ensure that they submit their
contributions on time. These contributions include employees’ and employers’
contributions of 5% and 15% respectively.


NATIONAL AUDIT OFFICE OF TANZANIA                                                                                        18
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The findings presented in this section, highlight issues regarding submission of
employees’ and employers’ contributions.


3.6     Registration of employees who contribute to the Fund
PSPF and LAPF are responsible for registration of all members who contribute to
their respective Funds.
Once registered members’ information is stored on the Funds’ data bank and can
be used by the Fund to process terminal benefits of their members.
This section also presents findings regarding the level of registration of Funds’
members done by PSPF and LAPF.


3.7     Actions taken by authorities to ensure efficient processing of
        pension
In this section, actions and efforts taken by different government institutions
(Central and Local) and Pension Funds (PSPF and LAPF) to reduce the problem
of delay in processing terminal benefits are presented. Also, presented are
findings on the impact of those actions in reducing delays.




NATIONAL AUDIT OFFICE OF TANZANIA                                                                                        19
A Performance Audit Report on the Processing of Terminal Benefits of Retirees from the Central and Local Government of
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                                                      CHAPTER FOUR
                           PUBLIC SERVICE PENSION FUNDS
In this chapter, findings as answers to the audit questions shown in chapter one
of this report are presented. The findings are linked to processing of terminal
benefits for payment by PSPF.



4.1     Increase of time to finalize retirement benefits
Over the past several years, PSPFs’ efforts to process final retirement benefits
for their members have deteriorated. The finalization process, which is designed
to ensure that retirees receive all due benefits that they are due, takes about 1 to
24 months to complete. This audit has found that the PSPF has had difficulties
meeting its own benchmark of finalizing benefits within seven days after the date
of retirement.

Based on interviews with PSPF officials and our analysis of 1,553 retirees, we
found that the current average finalization time has now increased to seven
months. This is seven times longer than in FY 2006/2007. Figure 4.1 displays the
increasing average time to process a retiree’s final benefits.

                                              Average Time to Finalize Retiree Benefits

                                    0
                                             2006/7               2007/8                     2008/9
                                    -1

                                    -2
                 Number of Months




                                    -3

                                    -4

                                    -5

                                    -6

                                    -7

                                    -8
                                                                   Year

                                                           Source: PSPF

                                     Figure 4.1: Average Time to Finalize Retiree Benefits

PSPF officials also reported that a number of factors have contributed to the
increased time in processing payments: This includes submission of incomplete
retiree’s documents by employers or expected retiree, untimely and inaccurate
submission of monthly contributions. Regardless of alleged causes, the poor
NATIONAL AUDIT OFFICE OF TANZANIA                                                                                        20
A Performance Audit Report on the Processing of Terminal Benefits of Retirees from the Central and Local Government of
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quality of service and proper filing of retiree’s documents extended by the PSPF
to their beneficiaries is inexcusable.


4.2                        Increase in number of retirees awaiting benefits finalization

As of June 30, 2007, there were 178 retirees awaiting finalization of pensions.
Since then, the number of retirees awaiting finalization has almost doubled in the
following year. As of June 30, 2009, there were 192 retirees awaiting finalization.


                              Number of Retirees Awaiting Final Pension
                                             Calculation

            350                                            331

            300
 Number of Retiree




            250
                                    178                                                       192
            200
            150
            100
                     50
                     0
                                   2006/7                  Year
                                                          2007/8                             2008/9

                                                     Source: PSPF

                            Figure 4.2: Number of Retirees Awaiting Final Pension Calculation

Figure 4.2 illustrates that from a reviewed 65 files randomly selected from
retirees’ already paid their retirement benefits for the FY2006-07 to June 30,
2009, 26 retirees, or about 40 percent of those awaiting benefits finalization,
have been waiting for one to four months for their payment of final benefits. Five
retirees had been waiting nearly a year for a final pension calculation while
eleven retirees had been waiting for more than one year as shown on Table 4.1
below.
               Table 4.1: Time taken to process terminal benefits

                          Number of months          Number of Retirees                    Percentage (%)
                            Less than 1 Month               8                                   12
                                   1–4                     26                                   40
                                   5–8                     15                                   23
                                  9 – 12                    5                                    8
                            Above 12 Months                11                                   17
                                 TOTAL                     65                                  100
                                                    Source: PSPF

NATIONAL AUDIT OFFICE OF TANZANIA                                                                                        21
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4.3     Total waiting time for the processing of terminal benefits
According to the Public Service Retirement Benefits Act No. 2 of 1999, a retired
officer is supposed to receive his/her terminal benefits within seven days after the
date of his/her retirement.

This is following the process started by the employee (retiree to be) six months
before the retirement date.

Table 4.2 below shows a number of retirees with their corresponding total waiting
time.

  Table 4.2: Total Waiting Time for the Processing of Terminal Benefits for
                           the year 2006/7 – 2008/9
       Total waiting time Number of retirees        Percentage (%)
            (Months)
       Less than 1 Month             415                  25
               1–6                   760                  46
               7 - 12                286                  17
              13 - 18                 85                   5
        Above 18 months              101                   7
                                Source: PSPF

Table 4.2 above shows that, the average waiting time ranges between 1 and 6
months. A large part of the retirees waits for an average of 5 months.

According to the interviews with PSPF officials, the total waiting time for the
retirees to get their terminal (retirement) benefits is long due to a number of
reasons. These include:
    • Contributions not remitted on time or in a certain period, and
    • Submission of incomplete supporting documents for the processing of
       terminal benefits such as Letter of first appointment, Confirmation letter,
       retirement acceptance letter, letter of last promotion and recent salary slip.

Similarly, according to the interviews with employers, the reasons for this long
waiting time is due to the fact that employees don’t keep their employment
records properly, PSPF failed to register some of its members and when they are
due to retire then they have to go through registration first before other processes
are initiated.


Late notification for the retirees
The Public Service Retirement Benefits Act No. 2 of 1999 and its regulations
require the employee to notify his employer about his/her retirement six months
before the retirement date. The same goes to the employer who is also supposed
to inform the employee that he is about to retire three months before retirement
date.
NATIONAL AUDIT OFFICE OF TANZANIA                                                                                        22
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The same task of informing employers about the officials who are about to retire
is done by PSPF which compiles a list of employees who are going to retire in
the next financial year and submits the same to the employers.

The Table 4.3 shows the average time taken by employers to notify their
employees on their retirement dates.

                           Table 4.3: Notification Times by Employees

                     Number of retirees                    Average notification time
                                                                  (Months)
                                   9                     6 months after retirement date
                                   13                    2 months after retirement date
                                   25                   3 months before retirement date
                                   12                           No notification
                                   59
                                                    Source: PSPF

Table 4.3 shows that it has taken an average of three months for the employees
to be notified on their retirement dates. The shortest notification time is two
months while the longest notification time is six months after the retirement date.

According to the interviews with employees, this is a persistent problem which
employers have been facing and it has contributed to delays in processing
retirement benefits. Reasons behind this are that some of the employees change
employers and information regarding the employee is not requested from the
previous employer

According to PSPF, besides the fact that it has notified employers a year before
about the employees who are expected to retire in a year’s time, Employers have
not utilized the information as a reminding note to them. Employers also did not
use the information (list of prospective retired employees) to start processing
their retirement terminal benefits.


                 Table 4.4: Submission time of Employers
              Number of retirees      Average submission time
                                               (Months)
                        15            5 months before retirement
                        22            1 month before retirement
                        31            4 months after retirement
                                Source: PSPF
Table 4.4 above shows the average submission time of employees’ retirement
records to PSPF. Almost half of employers submit records of their employees to
PSPF four months after the dates of employees’ retirement.
NATIONAL AUDIT OFFICE OF TANZANIA                                                                                        23
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4.4   Reasons for Delays in Processing Terminal Benefits
According to various interviews and documents reviewed, there are different
reasons for the delay in processing terminal benefits. These are:
    • contributions not remitted on time or in a certain period of time;
    • contributions paid on low/less salary compared to the actual salary of the
      contributor and
    • incomplete supporting documents.

The audit team found it fit to assess the frequency of occurrence of key reasons
for the delay in processing terminal benefits.

Table 4.5 shows the frequency of key reasons for the delays in processing
terminal benefits.


    Table 4.5: Showing frequency of key reasons for delay in Processing
                                  Terminal Benefits
Reasons for delay                                     Frequency
                                        Several Often Occasionally seldom
                                         times
Contributions not remitted on time                            √
or in a certain period
Contributions paid on low/less
salary compared to the actual                       √
salary of contributor (not related
with the actual salary received)
Incomplete support documents
required
        - Letter of first appointment               √
        - Confirmation letter                       √
        - Retirement acceptance                               √
          letter
        - Letter of last promotion                            √
        - Recent salary slip                                  √
                                    Source: PSPF


Delays in processing terminal benefits payments due to submission of
incomplete documents

According to the Public Service Retirement Benefits Act No. 2 of 1999, for the
PSPF to effect payment of retirement benefits, there are some documents which
are supposed to be in place. These documents are:
   • Letter of retirement;
   • Confirmation letter;

NATIONAL AUDIT OFFICE OF TANZANIA                                                                                        24
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     •    Retirement acceptance letter;
     •    Letter of last promotion;
     •    Recent salary slip; and
     •    Filled forms for the request of terminal benefits (FN-6)

These documents are supposed to be submitted by employers to PSPF three
months before the date of retirement of an employee.

According to the interviews with the PSPF officials, most of these documents
were not submitted on time. This was also confirmed by the reviews of
documents conducted by the audit team which revealed that schedule officers
wrote a number of queries to different employers asking for a number of
documents which were not submitted.


According to the interviews with Employers, the reasons for not submitting the
above mentioned documents on time were:

     1. Letter of first appointment and a letter of confirmation
           • Employees change a number of employers before retirement
           • Employee firstly employed on a temporary basis and then
               employed on the permanent terms
           • Employees not keeping the required documents in safe custody for
               future reference
     2. Recent salary slip
           • Lack of awareness
           • Employees did not receive the salary slip on time
     3. Retirement acceptance letter
           • Late issuance of notification letter to retirees by employer
           • Poor communication which results in retirees not receiving the letter
               from employers on time
     4. Letter of last promotion
           • Long promotion process whereby retirees end their services before
               receiving the letters of promotion
           • poor communication whereby employees do not receive promotion
               letters on time



4.5    Employers not responding adequately to issues raised by PSPF
The Public Service Pension Fund (PSPF) normally prepares an annual list of
retirees and submits it to all employers who are members of the Fund. This list
shows the list of all employees who are due to retire in one year’s time (normally
in the next financial year).



NATIONAL AUDIT OFFICE OF TANZANIA                                                                                        25
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This list shows the kind of documents which are lacking at PSPF and need to be
submitted to PSPF. After going through this list, employers then know what kind
of documents the PSPF doesn’t have and they have to submit them when
sending the information of their employees to PSPF during the retirement.

However, according to interviews - the employers sometimes do not respond to
the reports as a result they submit retiree forms with incomplete documentation
which then results in delay in processing terminal benefits.


4.6     Contributions made not based on the current salary
According to the Public Service Retirement Benefits Act No. 2 of 1999,
Employees and Employers are supposed to contribute to the Fund every month.
An Employee is supposed to contribute five percent of his/her monthly salary and
an Employer is supposed to contribute fifteen percent of the employee’s monthly
salary.

These deductions are supposed to be submitted to PSPF within 30 days after the
payment of the monthly salary. The Employer is responsible for submitting these
deductions to PSPF and must be submitted on time as stipulated in the Act.

The submissions of deductions are supposed to be of the actual deductions and
not less than what has been specified. Once an employee’s salary has changed,
the employer is required to fill in data sheet and submit it to the Treasury through
PO-PSM to effect changes on the monthly contributions. According to the Public
Service Retirement Benefits Regulations of 2003, Reg. 9 (6), for contributions not
paid within one month after the end of each month, a penalty of five percent will
be charged for unpaid amount for each month or part of month following the date
when the payment was supposed to be paid.

However, some of the retirees were not paid their terminal benefits on time due
to non submission of correct contributions to the Fund during the period of their
service. For example, one of the retirees was charged Tshs.4,335,187.50 (131%
of the unpaid amount) as penalty as shown in Table 4.6 for non submission of
monthly contributions amounting to Tshs.3,303,000. Length of defaulting time is
14 months.

                               Table 4.6: Analysis of the penalty paid

                    Apr 2006 to June 2007                 Penalty for late payment
                                                                   (TShs.)
                    Retiree 1                                              4,335,188
                    Retiree 2                                             10,044,233
                                                    Source: PSPF



NATIONAL AUDIT OFFICE OF TANZANIA                                                                                        26
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Table 4.6 above shows that penalty imposed may be more than the contribution
amount. According to the interviews with PSPF, most of the employers did not
pay the penalty imposed on time which resulted into non finalisation of the
terminal benefit payments pending payment of the penalty by the employer.

According to the interviews with PSPF, the following are the reasons for non-
submission of contributions:-
        • Employers did not submit data sheet to PO-PSM to effect deductions
        • PO-PSM did not submit data sheet to Treasury to effect deductions
        • Employers intentionally want to minimise the amount paid (15%)


4.7    PSPF failure to remind employees to remit their contributions
One of the main functions of the PSPF is to ensure that all members
(contributors) comply with the requirements of the Fund. To ensure that this role
is discharged appropriately, PSPF has a Compliance section whose one of its
main functions is to ensure that all members comply with all the requirements of
the Fund including submission of the employees’ and employers’ contributions.

This section is charged with the role of reviewing all the contributions submitted
monthly and if there is any problem regarding contributions submitted then they
have to inform the concerned employer to submit his/her contributions.

Table 4.6 shows that there are a lot of delays in submitting contributions and also
some of the employers submit lesser amounts of contributions than the one
supposed to be submitted.

The compliance section of PSPF remained silent to this problem of non or under
submission of the contributions. There is no evidence showing that the Section
has taken efforts to remind employers on the need to submit their contributions
on time and make sure the right amount of deductions are submitted on time.

According to the same officials of the PSPF, when an employee is retiring and
his/her contributions were not submitted then he/she has to wait for sometimes to
get his terminal benefits until all the contributions are paid for by him/her and
employer. This has caused a lot of inconveniencies to retirees, since they have to
look for the money elsewhere in order to be able to pay the contributions which
were not submitted.

This payment is also accompanied by the payment of the penalties which are
also paid by parties, employee and employer.

According to the interviews with employers, this problem occurs simply because
there are some officials who move from one employer to another and others in
fact got promoted and their salary scales have changed a lot and hence they
forgot to update their information.

NATIONAL AUDIT OFFICE OF TANZANIA                                                                                        27
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4.8   Failure to register all Employers who contribute to the Fund
Another major function of the Compliance Section of the PSPF is to register all
members of the Fund. In that sense, as stipulated by the Public Service
Retirement Benefits Regulations, 2003, PSPF has to register all its members
who contribute to the Fund.

Once these members are registered, all necessary documents and particulars
concerning individual members are scanned and saved in the PSPF data bank.
During this time it is when all the registration forms are filled and stored by PSPF
for future reference.

This exercise is quite important since most of the documents and information
concerning members are in the hands of the Fund then in the later stages can be
very helpful when an employee reaches retirement age.

Requirement of the above mentioned Regulations is that, all employees who
contribute to the Fund must be registered by the Fund and this task is normally
performed by the Compliance section of the Fund.

Table 4.7 below shows the number of registered members and the total number
of those who contribute to the Fund. Similarly, it shows the number of those who
have not been registered by the Fund but at the same time they still contribute.

  Table 4.7: Number of registered members and the total number of those
                        who contribute to the fund
Year    Total           Registered       Unregistered     Unregistered
        members         members                           (%)
2004/5 202,165          161,126          41,039           20.3
2005/6 196,384          166,497          29,887           15.2
2006/7 222,258          197,965          42,293           19.0
2007/8 240,091          189,792          50,299           20.9
2008/9 260,356          205,409          54,947           21.1
                               Source: PSPF

Table 4.7 above shows that the number of unregistered members is increasing
year after year. Even though the increment is slow and steady but it shows that
the problem is persisting.

According to the interviews with Employers, this problem seems to increase year
after year. If all members could be registered, delays would be minimized since
most of the documents found to be incomplete would have been sorted out
during the registration period/process.

According to interview, reasons for not registering all of its members is
contributed by employers failing to request registration forms from the PSPF
offices, which should then be filled in duplicate where by one copy remains with
NATIONAL AUDIT OFFICE OF TANZANIA                                                                                        28
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the employer while the other is sent to PSPF accompanied with other materials
as may be required for registration purposes. However, the fund is required to
create awareness to employees on the benefit of registration. In addition, the
Fund should trace all unregistered contributors to ensure that they are registered
accordingly.


4.9    Registration of Retired members
According to the Act, only registered members can be paid their retirement
benefits by the Fund. Due to this fact, unregistered members need to be
registered first before their terminal benefits could be computed.

For that matter, those who retired without being registered by the Fund have to
wait for sometime before their terminal benefits can be processed.

The audit team randomly selected 55 files of members registered by PSPF in
year 2007 and 2008. Among the 55 reviewed files of members paid by PSPF, it
was found that 11% of the members were registered after their retirement date.

Figure 4.3 below illustrates registration of members at PSPF before and after the
date of retirement. Based on analysis, 74% of the members were registered
more than twelve months before their actual date of retirement, 15% of the
members were registered between one to twelve months prior to their date of
retirement and only one member was registered less than one month before the
retirement date. On other hand, 5 members were registered between one and
twelve months after their dates of retirement passed and one was registered after
more than twelve months after the dates of retirement.

According to interview with PSPF officials, for one to be a member of the Fund
she /he must first fill the PSPF Form Number one (FN-1). The actual date of
registration of a member is the date when FN-1 forms are filled, without filling this
form the terminal benefits can not be processed.

                                              PSPF Members' Registration
                                                       11%

                                        15%




                                                                                74%




                                 More than 6 months before date of retirement
                                 Within 6 months before date of retirement
                                 After retirement date


                                                       Source: PSPF

                                Figure 4.3: PSPF members’ registration
NATIONAL AUDIT OFFICE OF TANZANIA                                                                                        29
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 4.10      Delays due to centralization of retirement benefits processing
           activities

 Workload in Head Office
 According to staff list and job description, the Public Services Pension Fund
 (PSPF) has 21 regional offices which are headed by a Regional Office In-charge
 (ROI). At the same time, each regional office has at least one operation officer. In
 total each region has 2 officials and for the entire country the total number of
 officers in the regions is 42.

 The same staff list shows that in PSPF head office, there are 17 schedule
 officers who are responsible for the assessment of retirees’ files.

 These officers at head office normally are supposed to go through 4000 retirees
 files per annum. On average each Schedule Officers is expected to process 235
 file annually.

 Workload in Head office and regions on following employees’ compliance
 Table 4.8 below shows the comparison of the workload between the regional and
 head office in terms of number of files to number of compliance officers.

    Table 4.8: Workload in Head Office and regions on following employers’
                                 compliance

              Year                        2008/09          Number of                                    Workload/
                                                          Compliance                                   Compliance
                                                            Officers                                     Officers
Number of retirees                            840               8                                       105 retirees
Number of employers                           221               8                                      27 employers
                                                  Source: PSPF


 4.11 Training of Governmental officials on pension’s related matters
 The PO-PSM conducts training at least once in a year in sensitization and
 awareness for processing of terminal benefits. All MDAs and LGAs were
 represented by Human Resources Officers (HROs), District Administrative
 Secretaries (DAS), Assistant Administrative Secretaries (AAS) etc to a one day
 workshop/seminar conducted and hoisted by PO-PSM.

 The participants were taught;

      •    Acts and regulations regarding pensions;
      •    Processes taken on preparing terminal benefits;
      •    Filling of retirees data sheets; and
      •    Disseminating knowledge to other employees within the organization;
 NATIONAL AUDIT OFFICE OF TANZANIA                                                                                        30
 A Performance Audit Report on the Processing of Terminal Benefits of Retirees from the Central and Local Government of
 Tanzania
After the training, the PO-PSM has not made follow up regarding the
development of MDAs and LGAs plans of staff awareness which the participants
were supposed to train their employees at organization level and assess whether
the conducted training is assisting the MDAs and LGAs employees.

As regards staff awareness, we have noted that the said training did not cut
across on pension matters.
The above findings reflect lack of training plans solely aimed at ensuring that
employees are conversant about pension processes regarding employees’
awareness. This should be seen against the obligations of the PO-PSM to be
forward looking and chart out monitoring and evaluation mechanisms.




NATIONAL AUDIT OFFICE OF TANZANIA                                                                                        31
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                                                            CHAPTER FIVE
                                            LOCAL AUTHORITIES PENSIONS FUND
In this chapter, findings as answers to the audit questions shown in chapter one
of this report are presented. The findings are linked to Processing of Terminal
Benefits for payment by LAPF.


5.1                                     Time taken to finalize retirement benefits

Over the past several years, LAPF’s effort to process final retirement benefits for
its members has not been satisfactory. The finalization process at the LAPF head
office, which is designed to ensure that retirees receive all benefits that are due,
takes about one week to more than 35 months to complete. The LAPF has had
difficulties meeting its own benchmark of finalizing benefits within fourteen days
after the date of receiving the claims from the employers. Further analysis shows
that at LAPF head office, the average processing time is slightly less than 7
months. Only 25% of the claims are finalized within a month; half of the claims
are cleared within 4 months and about 25% of the claims are processed for about
11 months.

Based on interviews with LAPF officials and our review of records, we found that
the current average finalization time has decreased from 15.5 in 2005/06 to 1.3
months in 2008/09. Figure 5.1 displays the decreasing average time to process a
retiree’s final benefits.


                                                  Average Time to Finalize Retiree Benefits

                                       0
    Waiting time (Number of Months)




                                              2005/06         2006/07          2007/08                    2008/09
                                       -2

                                       -4

                                       -6

                                       -8

                                      -10

                                      -12

                                      -14

                                      -16
                                                                        Year




                                                               Source: LAPF

                   Figure 5.1: Average Time to Finalize Retiree Benefits at LAPF Head Office
NATIONAL AUDIT OFFICE OF TANZANIA                                                                                        32
A Performance Audit Report on the Processing of Terminal Benefits of Retirees from the Central and Local Government of
Tanzania
LAPF officials also reported that incomplete documents to support the
applications have been a major factor contributing to the delays in processing
payments. Other factors include, inconsistencies in the information submitted,
and inadequate information regarding the beneficiaries’ bank accounts.

Regardless of alleged causes, the fact that there are delays in processing of
terminal benefits to LAPF beneficiaries is unjustifiable.


5.2       Retirees awaiting terminal benefits finalization
As of December 31, 2009, there were 23 retirees awaiting finalization of terminal
benefits and the major reason was lack of documents to support their payments.


5.3       Total waiting time for the processing of terminal benefits
According to the Local Authorities Pensions Fund (LAPF) Act No. 9 of 2006, a
retired officer is supposed to receive his/her terminal benefits seven days after
the date of his/her retirement.
This is following the process started six months before the retirement date.
Figure 5.2 below shows a number of retirees with their corresponding total
waiting time.
On average, a retiree has to wait for more than 8 months from the retirement
date to the day the payments are ready. In this Fund, waiting time varies from a
day to almost 3 years.

                  Total Waiting Time for the Processing of Terminal
                                       Benefits


                         17%

                                                                             40%
                                                                                               3 Months
                                                                                               9 Months
                                                                                               12 Months
          19%
                                                                                               More than 18 Months


                                        24%




                                                    Source: LAPF

   Figure 5.2: Total Waiting Time for the Processing of Terminal Benefits for the
                               year 2006/7 – 2008/9



NATIONAL AUDIT OFFICE OF TANZANIA                                                                                        33
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Tanzania
Figure 5.2 above shows that, it takes at least 3 months to process a quarter of
the claims, 8 months to clear half of the claims, 15 months to clear three quarters
of the retirees.

According to the interviews with LAPF officials, the total waiting time for the
retirees to get their retirement terminal benefits is long due to a number of
reasons, these are Contributions not remitted on time or in a certain period and
submission of incomplete support documents for the processing of terminal
benefits such as Letter of first appointment, Confirmation letter, Retirement
acceptance letter, Letter of last promotion and Recent salary slip.

Similarly, according to the interviews with employers, the reasons for this long
waiting time is due to the fact that employees don’t keep proper records of their
employment, LAPF has failed to register some of its members and when they are
due to retire then they have to go through registration first before other processes
followed.



5.4       Length of Average waiting time
5.4.1 Length of time to prepare retirement benefits is high
Over the past several years, LAPF’s effort to process final retirement benefits for
its members has not delivered sufficient results. The finalization process, which is
designed to ensure that retirees receive all benefits that are due, takes about one
week to more than 2 years to complete. However, we found that the Pension
Fund has had difficulties meeting its own benchmark of finalizing benefits within
seven days after the date of retirement.

Based on interviews with LAPF officials and our review of records, we found that
the current average processing time has decreased from 17.1 months in 2005/06
to one month in 2008/09. Table 5.1 displays the average time to process a
retiree’s final benefits from the retirement date to the time when payments are
due.

                    Table 5.1: Average Time to Finalize Retiree Benefits
                              Year      Average waiting time
                                              (months)
                            2005/06             17.1
                            2006/07              6.4
                            2007/08              4.6
                            2008/09              1.2
                                Source: LAPF and Employers

LAPF officials also reported that incomplete documents to support the
applications have been a major factor contributing to the increased time in

NATIONAL AUDIT OFFICE OF TANZANIA                                                                                        34
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Tanzania
processing payments. Other factors include, inconsistencies in the information
submitted, and inadequate information regarding the beneficiaries’ bank
accounts.

Comparison was made between the average waiting time from retirement date to
the day payments are finalised and the average time the LAPF HQ has stayed
with the application.

Table 5.2: Comparison of average delay and average time to finalize Retiree
                                Benefits

                             Year           Average waiting                  Average time
                                             time (months)                   spent at the
                                                                             HQ (months)
                           2005/06                    17.1                       15.5
                           2006/7                      6.4                        5.9
                           2007/8                      4.6                        2.3
                           2008/9                      1.2                        1.3

Table 5.2 displays significant amount of time spent during the finalization process
at the LAPF head office.

5.4.2 Late retirement of some of the retirees
According to the Local Authorities Pensions Fund (LAPF) Act No. 9 of 2006,
all government officials are allowed to retire at the age of 55 on the voluntary
retirement and 60 years for compulsory retirement.

This age of retirement is determined by the date of birth. In this case a retiree
and employer are supposed to determine this date upon knowing the date of
birth.
Some of the public officials from the visited employers in Central and Local
Government offices, failed to honour their retirement dates and retired at later
dates.

Table 5.3 shows the number of retirees who failed to retire on the dates on which
they were supposed to retire.
                    Table 5.3: Late retirement of retirees
      Extended time after required retirement date Number of retirees
                        (Months)
                            0-6                                  19
                           6-12                                   7
                          12-18                                   1
                          18-24                                   5
                            >24                                   3
                           Total                                 35
                                 Source: LAPF
NATIONAL AUDIT OFFICE OF TANZANIA                                                                                        35
A Performance Audit Report on the Processing of Terminal Benefits of Retirees from the Central and Local Government of
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Table 5.3 above shows that 35 retirees failed to retire on their required retirement
dates. The extended period after the age of 60 years varied from one month to
almost 8 years. On average the extended time was more than a year.

According to the interviews with LAPF, this is due to failure by employers to notify
their employees on their retirement date. The consequence of this is that these
officials keep on working for a longer period. LAPF does not deduct part of the
money paid to the retirees after working for a period beyond their retirement date.
LAPF is not concerned about prolonged public service and the associated
contributions because, according to them, more contributions mean additional
money to the Fund. This, however, is different from the rules of the game in other
Funds where services after 60 years is considered as illegal and will not count in
the calculation of retirement benefits.

The same officials of LAPF said that, for those who are given extension of time
normally, there is a different approach to be followed and they have to be notified
before date of termination. This has never been practised by the employers.

According to employers, some of the employees who are about to retire do not
inform their employers, and employers sometimes fail to get details of these
officials particularly those who have been transferred from one employer to
another and leave behind their details with their previous employers.


5.4.3 Late notification for the retirees
The Local Authorities Pensions Fund (LAPF) Act No. 9 of 2006 and its
regulations require the employee to notify its employer about the retirement six
months before the retirement date. The same goes to the employer who is also
supposed to inform the employee that he is about to retire.

The same task of informing employers about the officials who are about to retire
is done by LAPF which compiles a list of employees who are going to retire in the
next financial year and submit the list to employers.

Based on records of 17 retirees obtained from Chamwino District Council, 3
retirees were notified prior to notification date. The remaining 14 retirees got a
late notification. The extended time after required notification date varied from 2
weeks to 5 years. On average, the delay by employers to notify their employees
on their retirement dates is about 11 months.


There is no regulation indicating the deadline for submission of claims to LAPF.
According to LAPF, claims are accepted for processing at any time from 6
months before retirement date. Review of retirees’ records indicated that out of
314 retirees’ files, 129 files (41%) were submitted to LAPF before whereas 185


NATIONAL AUDIT OFFICE OF TANZANIA                                                                                        36
A Performance Audit Report on the Processing of Terminal Benefits of Retirees from the Central and Local Government of
Tanzania
files (59%) were submitted after retirement dates. Figures 5.3 and 5.4 below
show periods between submission dates to LAPF and the retirement dates.

                                   Files Submitted to LAPF After Retirement Date



                                      4%      5%

                        21%                                                                     0-6 Months
                                                                                                6-12 Months
                                                                                                12-18 Months
                                                                                                >18 Months
                                                                           70%




                                                     Source: LAPF

                                         Figure 5.3: Late Submission




                      Number of Retirees' Files Submitted Before Retirement
                                               Date


                                        5%      3%
                             10%
                                                                                                       0-6 Months
                                                                                                       6-12 Months
                                                                                                       12-18 Months
                                                                                                       18-24 Months

                                                                     82%




                                                     Source: LAPF

                                         Figure 5.4: Early Submission

From the Figures 5.3 and 5.4 above, most late claims (70%) were submitted
within the first 6 months after retirement, 21% were submitted between 6 and 12
months after retirement and the remaining 9% were submitted after 1 year.

5.5 Reasons for delays in processing terminal benefits
According to various interviews and documents reviewed, there are different
reasons for the delay in processing terminal benefits. These are such as
NATIONAL AUDIT OFFICE OF TANZANIA                                                                                        37
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contributions are not remitted on time or in a certain period of time; contributions
paid on low/less salary compared to the actual salary of contributor and
incomplete support documents.

The audit team deemed it fit to assess the frequency of occurrence of key
reasons for the delay in processing terminal benefits.

Table 5.5 below shows the reasons for the delays in processing terminal
benefits.

    Table 5.5: Showing frequency of key reasons for delay in Processing
                                  Terminal Benefits
Reasons for delay                                    Frequency
                                       Several    Often Occasionally seldom
                                        times
Contributions not remitted on time                                      √
or in a certain period
Incomplete support documents
required
        - Letter of first appointment      √
        - Confirmation letter              √
        - Retirement acceptance                                         √
          Letter
        - Letter of last promotion                                      √
        - Recent salary slip                                 √
                             Source: LAPF and Employers


5.6 Delays in processing terminal benefits payments due to submission of
   incomplete documents
According to the Local Authorities Pension Fund Act No. 9 of 2006, for the LAPF
to effect payment of retirement benefits, there are some documents which are
supposed to be in place. These documents are such as:
   • Letter of retirement;
   • confirmation letter;
   • retirement acceptance letter;
   • letter of last promotion;
   • recent salary slip; and
   • filled forms for the request of terminal benefits;

In addition, LAPF demands the following information:
    • retirees’ banking details;
    • evidence of monthly contributions; and
    • Letter of transfer from Central to Local Government


NATIONAL AUDIT OFFICE OF TANZANIA                                                                                        38
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These documents are supposed to be submitted by the employer to LAPF six
months before the date of retirement of an employee.

According to the interviews with the LAPF officials, most of these documents
were not submitted on time. This was also confirmed by the review of records of
pending claims.

Table 5.6 shows the type of documents which are often missing when terminal
benefits are processed.

        Table 5.6: Delays in processing terminal benefits payments due to
                      submission of incomplete documents
Employer        Number of        Letter of transfer       Missing           Inadequate bank         uncertainty in date of
                 retirees         from Central to         salary             account details          birth/retirement
                                    Local Govt            slips
Tabora MC             2                                         1                     1
Urambo                2                                                               2
DC
Sikonge               1                                                               1
DC
Ifakara DC            2                    1                     1                                               1
Mpwapwa                                                                               1
DC
Kigoma                1                    1
MC
Iramba DC             1                    1
Kibaha TC             1                    1
Kondoa                1                    1
DC
Nzega DC              1                                                                                          1
Kilwa DC              1                                          1
                                     Source: LAPF records of pending claims

According to the interviews with Employers, the reasons for not submitting the
above mentioned documents on time were:
   • Transfer of officers from one station to the other or from central to local
      government and vice versa was not accompanied by the transfer of
      employees records such as letters of first appointment and confirmation;
   • When documents cannot be found it has been unfairly retirees’
      responsibility to search for such documents wherever they are (including
      previous stations) and submit them to the Fund.


5.7 Delayed payment to retirees due to non or under-submission of
   employees’ contributions
According to the Local Authorities Pensions Fund (LAPF) Act No. 9 of 2006,
Employees and Employers are supposed to contribute to the Fund every month.
An Employee is supposed to contribute five percent of his/her monthly salary and
employers are supposed to contribute fifteen percent of the employee’s monthly
salary.

NATIONAL AUDIT OFFICE OF TANZANIA                                                                                        39
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These deductions are supposed to be submitted to LAPF within a month after the
month of salary payment.

Employers are responsible for submitting these deductions to LAPF and as
stated above are supposed to be submitted on time as stipulated in the Act.

The submissions of deductions are supposed to be of the actual deductions and
not less than what has been specified.

According to LAPF, terminal benefits for the retirees are always processed
regardless of contribution gaps as long as the retirees have met the minimum
criteria of 180 contributions. In case the retiree has been underpaid, the
difference will be paid upon request and submission of evidence that
accompanys the claim.


5.8 LAPF failed to remind employees to remit their contributions
One of the main functions of the LAPF is to ensure that all members
(contributors) comply with the requirements of the Fund.
To ensure that this role is discharged appropriately, LAPF has a Compliance
section whose one of its main functions is to ensure that all members comply
with all the requirements of the Fund including submission of the employees’ and
employers’ contributions.

This section is charged with the role of reviewing all the contributions submitted
monthly and if there is any problem regarding contributions submitted then they
have to inform the concerned employers to submit his/her contributions.

Table 5.7 shows that there are a lot of cases where submissions of contributions
are terminated untimely.

Information regarding 278 retirees shows that 20 percent of retirees experience
untimely termination of their contributions to the Fund.

Table 5.7:           Untimely curtailing of members’ contributions to the Fund

      Termination of                            Number of Retirees                             Percentage (%)
       contributions                                Involved
Timely termination                                    223                                               80.2
Early termination                                      18                                                6.5
Delayed termination                                    37                                               13.3
TOTAL                                                 278                                               100
                                                  Source: LAPF

Contributions to the Fund that were curtailed prior to the members’ retirement
age varied from 1 to 12 months. On average, the period of discontinued

NATIONAL AUDIT OFFICE OF TANZANIA                                                                                        40
A Performance Audit Report on the Processing of Terminal Benefits of Retirees from the Central and Local Government of
Tanzania
remittance of contributions is slightly above 41/2 months. According to LAPF,
follow up is generally done by the Fund through their zonal offices to remind
employers on the need to submit their contributions on time and make sure the
right amount of deductions are submitted on time.

Delayed termination of contributions to the Fund resulted into prolonged
remittance of money to the Fund ranging from 1 month to 8 years after the
member has retired. On average, the period of continued remittance of
contributions is slightly above 12 months.

The compliance section of LAPF remained silent to this problem of prolonged
submission of the contributions. There is no evidence showing that LAPF has
taken efforts to remind employers on the need to stop remitting contributions
beyond the beneficiaries retirement ages. According to LAPF, that the money
obtained through prolonged contributions will be reconciled later since the
employers owe the Fund substantial amounts of money.

According to the same officials of LAPF, when an employee is retiring and his/her
contributions were not fully submitted then the retirement benefits will be
computed based on the available information regarding submission if the
information is sufficient. This has resulted into complains from some retirees
because some of them were underpaid due to insufficient records of their
contributions to the fund. This has caused a lot of inconveniencies to retirees,
since they have to look for the records elsewhere in order to be able to find proof
of their contributions which were not submitted. This proof entails travelling to
previous working stations where records of salary deductions are expected to be
kept. According to LAPF, where the retiree has evidence that deductions were
made from his/her salaries during the period where contributions were not made
to the fund, LAPF would pay the retiree and seek the contribution arrears from
the employers.

According to the interviews with employers, this problem occurs simply because
there are some officials who move from one employer to another and others in
fact got promoted and their salary scales have changed a lot and hence they
forgot to update their salary information.


5.9 Delays due to centralization of retirement benefits processing activities

Workload on compliance officers at the Head office
According to staff list and job description, the Local Authorities Pension Fund
(LAPF) has 5 zonal offices which are headed by Zonal Managers (ZM). At the
same time, each zonal office has at least 3 compliance officers.

The same staff list shows that at LAPF head office, there are 4 compliance
officers who are responsible for the assessment of retirees’ files.

NATIONAL AUDIT OFFICE OF TANZANIA                                                                                        41
A Performance Audit Report on the Processing of Terminal Benefits of Retirees from the Central and Local Government of
Tanzania
These officers at head office normally are supposed to go through an average of
896 retirees files per annum. On average each compliance officer is expected to
process 224 file annually.




NATIONAL AUDIT OFFICE OF TANZANIA                                                                                        42
A Performance Audit Report on the Processing of Terminal Benefits of Retirees from the Central and Local Government of
Tanzania
                                                  CHAPTER SIX

         A SUMMARY OF FINDINGS OF ALL PENSION FUNDS AND
                           EMPLOYERS
 In this chapter, the summary of findings from chapters four and five of this report
 are presented with the view to make comparisons on the performance of PSPF
 and LAPF.

6.1 Average time to finalize retirees’ benefits
All pension Funds are required to finalize retirement benefits within seven days
after the date of retirement of the concerned retiree.

Once the process of the preparation of terminal benefits starts, six months before
the retirement date of an employee, the conclusion needs to be done seven days
after the date of retirement. The completion of the final retirement benefits beyond
the specified period is termed as a delay.

As stated above, the Pension Funds have to ensure that payments are effected on
time. The problem of delays in finalizing terminal benefits can be evaluated yearly
to see how it is progressing.

Figure 6.1 shows the average waiting time for the retirees to be paid their terminal
benefits among the two Funds.

                       Average Waiting Time to Finalize Retirees Benefits
                   8
                   7                                                                   7
                   6             5.9
    Waiting Time
     [months]




                   5
                                                                                                        PSPF
                   4                                        4
                                                                                                        LAPF
                   3
                   2                                        2.3
                   1             1                                                     1.3
                   0
                             2006/7                 2007/8                       2008/9
                                                Financial Year
                                              Source: LAPF and PSPF

                              Figure 6.1: Average time to finalize retirees’ benefits

 According to Figure 6.1 above, the average waiting time in each year for PSPF is
 increasing while that of LAPF is decreasing. Even though the average waiting
 time of LAPF is decreasing, still a retiree has to wait for more than a month to get
 his/her terminal benefits.

 NATIONAL AUDIT OFFICE OF TANZANIA                                                                                        43
 A Performance Audit Report on the Processing of Terminal Benefits of Retirees from the Central and Local Government of
 Tanzania
6.2 Number of retirees awaiting final pension
All retirees who served in the public sector and are members of the PSPF and
LAPF ought not to wait long to be paid their terminal benefits. As put by the two
Acts (Public Retirement Benefit Act and Local Authorities Pensions Fund Act),
retirees need to get paid seven days after the retirement date.

The number of retirees who wait long to be paid their terminal benefits after their
retirement date is occurring in both the two Pension Funds dealt with.


Table 6.1 shows the number of retirees waiting to get paid by both Funds.



                         Table 6.1: Number of retirees awaiting final pension
                         Year      Number of retirees awaiting final pension
                                         PSPF                   LAPF
                         2006/07          178                     NA8
                         2007/08          331                     NA9
                         2008/09          182                     23
                                      Source: PSPF and LAPF

 According to table 6.1 above, the number of retirees waiting to receive their
 terminal benefits is increasing year after year.

 All the two Funds seem to face the same challenges of having a backlog of files
 which are yet to be paid.

6.3 Total waiting time for the processing of terminal benefits
To get an actual picture of the total time taken to wait for the retiree to receive their
terminal benefits. The audit team computed the total time taken to process terminal
benefits for the central and local government staff.

Figure 6.2 below shows the comparison of time taken by LAPF and PSPF to
process terminal benefits. This is also taking into account that LAPF is dealing with
LGAs staff while PSPF is leading with Central Government employees and some
of the LGAs staff,




 8
   LAPF had to defer their payments for three years. It started to pay terminal benefits three years after its
 establishment
 9
   Not Applicable
 NATIONAL AUDIT OFFICE OF TANZANIA                                                                                        44
 A Performance Audit Report on the Processing of Terminal Benefits of Retirees from the Central and Local Government of
 Tanzania
                            Waiting Time for Retirees to Get Terminal Benefits
                   10
                               8                                           8
                   8
    Waiting Time


                                   6.4
     [months]


                   6                               5     4.6                                           PSPF
                   4                                                                                   LAPF
                   2                                                             1.2

                   0
                               2006/7            2007/8                    2008/9
                                             Financial Year
                                              Source: LAPF and PSPF

                        Figure 6.2: Total waiting time for the processing of terminal benefits

 According to Figure 6.2, the waiting time is long with PSPF compared to LAPF
 which takes an average of 1.2 months.

6.4 Late retirement of retirees
According to the laws and regulations which governs the work of PSPF and LAPF,
all employees who are members of these two Funds are supposed to retire at the
age of 55 years (voluntary retirement age) and 60 years (compulsory retirement
age).

One of the reasons for delays in effecting terminal benefits to some of the Fund’s
members is that the employees fail to retire at the statutory age as stated by the
laws and regulations governing public service in the country.

According to the interviews with PSPF and LAPF officials, some of the employees
who are members of the two Funds waited for some time before they retired. This
is despite the fact that they have reached the compulsory retirement age of 60. On
average it took about 12.7 months before some of the officials retire.

6.5 Late notification of an employee
Acts and regulations governing the two Funds of PSPF and LAPF are demanding
that, employees who are about to retire have to notify their employers about that
intention six months before the date of retirement. This notification has to be done
in writing. The employer then has to respond by awarding certificate of retirement
to the employee or otherwise.

The notification processes which are done by the staff at central and local
governments who are members of the two Funds are as compared on Table 6.3
below.



 NATIONAL AUDIT OFFICE OF TANZANIA                                                                                        45
 A Performance Audit Report on the Processing of Terminal Benefits of Retirees from the Central and Local Government of
 Tanzania
                    Table 6.3: Late notification of an employee
   Employers          Late notification of employees who are supposed to retire
                                                  (Month)
                                  PSPF                          LAPF
   Central Government                9                            -
   Local Government                  9                           11
                              Source: LAPF and PSPF

 According to Table 6.3 above, there are some employees who take long to notify
 their employers about their retirement date. They fail to notify their employers
 within a specified period of six months before the retirement age.

6.6 Key reasons for delay in processing terminal benefits
According to the document reviews and interviews conducted by Funds officials
and employers in Central and Local Governments, a number of reasons were
found to be the source of delays in processing of the terminal benefits.

These reasons include submission of incomplete documents, delays in submission
of employers’ and employees’ contributions, failure to fill retirement forms (FN 6)
etc.

These factors are compared among the request submitted to PSPF and LAPF by
different employers. This is as shown on Table 6.4 below:

           Table 6.4: Key reasons for delay in processing terminal benefits
    Key reasons for delay in processing terminal benefits       Pensions Fund
                                                                 PSPF       LAPF
    Incomplete documents                                            √         √
    Delays in submission of employers’ and employees’               √
    contributions
    Inaccurate filling of retirement forms (FN 6)                   √
                                  Source: LAPF and PSPF

According to Table 6.4 above, these factors are the causes for delays and are
common to both Funds. Other factors like inadequate work planning which results
into higher workload seems to affect PSPF more than LAPF.

6.7 Delays in processing terminal benefits payments due to submission of
    incomplete documents
Delays in processing terminal benefit payments due to submission of incomplete
documents have been seen to happen very often.

Most of the documents found to be missing are:
  • Letter of first appointment
  • Confirmation letter
  • Retirement acceptance letter
 NATIONAL AUDIT OFFICE OF TANZANIA                                                                                        46
 A Performance Audit Report on the Processing of Terminal Benefits of Retirees from the Central and Local Government of
 Tanzania
             •    Letter of last promotion
             •    Recent salary slip
             •    Forms for request of terminal benefits (FN-6)

        According to Table 6.5 below, comparison has been made between the two
        Funds to assess the extent of this problem in each Fund.

                   Table 6.5: Delays in processing terminal benefit payments due to
                                 submission of incomplete documents

Pension                                             Type of missing or incomplete document
 Fund           Letter of first           Bank       Uncertain Confirmation Retirement      Letter of                      Recent      Forms
             appointment/transfer        details      birth or      letter     acceptance     last                         salary        for
                from Central                        retirement                     letter  promotion                        slip      request
               Government to                            date                                                                              of
                    LGAs                                                                                                              terminal
                                                                                                                                      benefits
                                                                                                                                       (FN-6)
 PSPF                   √                    √            √                 √                  √                √                √
 LAPF                   √                    √            √                                                                      √
                                                     Source: LAPF and PSPF

        According to table 6.5 above, the problem of the incomplete documents has been
        found to affect both Funds. The same kinds of documents which are needed by
        the Funds are submitted incomplete.

    6.8 Employers response to various issues raised by Pension Funds
    Once the retiree’s file has been submitted to PSPF or LAPF by an employer for the
    processing of terminal benefits, officials of the Funds normally review the
    submitted documents and come up with their comments on the adequacy of the
    information submitted.

    Once the information has been reviewed by the concerned Fund, queries can be
    raised due to a number of reasons as mention in sections 6.6 and 6.7 of this
    report.
    Queries have to be sent to the employer and come up with responses as soon as
    possible.

    The Funds have been experiencing mixed responses from employers. Table 6.6
    below shows the summarized level of responses of the employers who are
    members of the Funds.

                 Table 6.6: Employers responses to various issues raised by Pension Funds
                                 Pension Fund Response to issues raised
                                 PSPF                     Low10
                                 LAPF                       Low
                                          Source: LAPF and PSPF

        10
             Low means performance is not satisfactory
        NATIONAL AUDIT OFFICE OF TANZANIA                                                                                            47
        A Performance Audit Report on the Processing of Terminal Benefits of Retirees from the Central and Local Government of
        Tanzania
 Table 6.6 above shows that, the level of response of employers to queries raised
 by PSPF and LAPF is very low. It takes quite long for employers to look for the
 information or seek clarification of the matter raised by the Fund.

6.9 Delayed payment due to non or under-submission of employees’
     contribution
Employers and employees are supposed to submit their monthly contributions to
the Funds. Employer’s contributions are 15% of the salary of an employee and
employee’s contribution is 5% of the same salary.

These contributions as stipulated by the Acts governing the two Funds are
furnished before the next month end.

According to different interviews with PSPF officials and review of records, this has
been one of the reasons for the delays. If employees’ contributions are not
submitted on time or if lesser amounts are submitted, PSPF do not pay terminal
benefits to the respective retiree until all the unsubmitted sums and penalty have
been furnished.

As for LAPF, payments will be processed as long as there is evidence of
deductions from the retirees’ salaries. If these deductions were not remitted to
LAPF, the retiree will be paid and LAPF will claim the unremitted sums from the
employers. If the number of monthly contributions is below the minimum criteria of
180 contributions, the retiree will be paid gratuity only and not monthly pensions.

Table 6.7 shows the extent of submission of monthly contributions to the Pension
Funds


     Table 6.9: Delayed payments due to non or under-submission of employees’
                                   contributions
                 Pension Fund          Monthly contributions
                                Non submission Under submission
                 PSPF                  √                  √
                 LAPF                  √                 NA
                Source: MoFEA, PSPF and LAPF Financial Records (2009)

 According to Table 6.7 above, the problem of the non and under-submission of
 contributions is facing both the two Funds.

 According to LAPF, this problem of non and under submission of contribution is
 existing in small extent. But under-submission may not lead to under payment.
 The same officials admit that payments are delayed for non-submission of
 contributions but not for the under-submission unless under-submission has led
 to not meeting minimum criteria of 180 contributions.


 NATIONAL AUDIT OFFICE OF TANZANIA                                                                                        48
 A Performance Audit Report on the Processing of Terminal Benefits of Retirees from the Central and Local Government of
 Tanzania
6.10 Work load in Funds’ offices (Head offices)
PSPF and LAPF are processing different number of files of retirees. While PSPF is
processing 4,000 files per annum and it has 17 schedule officers, LAPF is
processing 896 files per annum with four compliance officers.
The above information provides a basis for computing the workload in each Fund.

Table 6.8 shows the workload of each staff at PSPF and LAPF.

                                 Table 6.8: Work load in Funds’ offices
                              Fund Workload (Number of files/staff/year)
                              PSPF                    235
                              LAPF                    224
                                        Source: LAPF and PSPF

 Table 6.8 shows that the difference in workload between PSPF and LAPF is not
 significant, while that of PSPF is higher by 11 files/staff/year compared to that of
 LAPF.




 NATIONAL AUDIT OFFICE OF TANZANIA                                                                                        49
 A Performance Audit Report on the Processing of Terminal Benefits of Retirees from the Central and Local Government of
 Tanzania
                                          CHAPTER SEVEN
                                             CONCLUSIONS
 Audit findings presented in the previous chapters give us reasons to draw the
 following conclusions.

7.1 General
  The main employers i.e. Ministry of Finance and Economic Affairs (MoFEA) and
  President’s Office – Public Service Management (PO-PSM) being the overall
  overseers of Pension Funds on behalf of the Government have not to a large
  extent fulfilled their responsibilities of ensuring that the processing of terminal
  benefits of retirees is done on time and without recourse to duress.

7.2 Specific
  The following are more specific conclusions drawn from the relevant Pension
  Funds respectively

7.3 PSPF and LAPF
  7.3.1 Clear written policy guidelines for processing and reviewing
        applications and appeals not provided during audit

 Virtually no written policy guidelines for processing and reviewing applications,
 entitlements and appeals for establishing boundaries within which decisions for
 the payment of terminal benefits were provided during the audit despite several
 requests. Very little information about the procedure or directives was being
 disseminated to the public, particularly the public servants. DAP’s Office, usually
 the initial contact point for retiring applicants, were having considerable difficulty
 in informing individuals of the status of their applications. There were no really
 useful procedures for measuring and reporting productivity and level of service.

 Due to the weaknesses mentioned above, the audit team noted that:
       i.) It was taking an average of 90 days to process an initial application;
      ii.) More than 45 per cent of the rejected initial applications were being
           taken back to employers for further processing due to a number of
           reasons such as :
             • Missing information
             • Non or under-submission of employees and employers
                contributions
             • Inaccurate filling of retirement forms
     iii.) It was taking an average of 90 days up to two years to process
           incomplete files of a retiree.


 7.3.2 Ever increasing number of retirees waiting processing time

 NATIONAL AUDIT OFFICE OF TANZANIA                                                                                        50
 A Performance Audit Report on the Processing of Terminal Benefits of Retirees from the Central and Local Government of
 Tanzania
The two audited Pension Funds have continually not exerted efforts to provide
quality retirement service to their members. This could be evidenced by ever
increasing number of retirees awaiting payments for terminal benefits.

The Pension Funds have allowed both processing time and the number of
retirees awaiting finalization of terminal benefits to increase significantly. For
example, we found that the current average processing time has now increased
to about 7 months resulting in three times longer than the average processing
time reported by Pension Funds in previous years.

For example, the Pension Fund allowed a retiree’s final terminal benefit to remain
for 24 months without being settled. This case could be abnormal for letting the
retiree to wait for an average of 24 months which is considered to be too long
and not acceptable.

The number of retirees awaiting for final pension calculation increased from 178
in June 30, 2007 and 192 in June 30, 2009 respectively resulting in an increase
of over 8 percent.

Such delays become even more acute in view of the fact that no interest is paid
on any underpayment or delay of a retirees’ estimated pension.

7.3.3 Poor record keeping by Pension Funds

Pension Fund’s system of keeping records is appallingly inefficient and
ineffective, hindering the retirement system’s ability to fulfil its mission. Pension
Funds failed to properly manage and control the necessary documents for the
processing of retirement benefits of their respective members resulting in
reciprocal delays and trading of blames between the Funds and employers. In
addition, the kind of missing documents/information was found to be the same all
years long and there is no action taken by the Funds to address this endemic
and ever increasing problem.

The missing documents were identified to be:
          • Letter of first appointment
          • Letter of confirmation
          • Letter of transfer from Central Government to LGAs and vice versa
          • Bank details
          • Birth Certificate




NATIONAL AUDIT OFFICE OF TANZANIA                                                                                        51
A Performance Audit Report on the Processing of Terminal Benefits of Retirees from the Central and Local Government of
Tanzania
7.3.4 Inordinate delays in processing retirees’ benefits.

The processes to finalize terminal benefits of retirees continued to be
problematic. The process takes too long both in terms of time effluxion before
benefits are received and bureaucracy in place which ostensibly were meant to
reduce backlogs but to the contrary add up and even unnecessarily complicates
the approval of the pension benefits.

Pension Funds are by all reasonable expectations responsible in providing
identified retirees with timely and accurate pension payments. Initially, the
employer is supposed to fill the data sheet and submit relevant documents to the
Fund. Then, the Fund reviews them and then calculations are performed and
payments are remitted to retirees based on an estimated pension calculation.

Generally, even before the calculations are done, lots of files are returned back
to employers due to a number of queries mainly, missing information which
makes it very problematic for helpless retirees to make unpredictably numerous
follow ups to obtain meagre pension benefits.

7.3.5 Pension Funds Mismanagement as unwarranted burden to retirees

Significant delays in finalizing retirement benefits do pose an unnecessary
burden on retirees. The interviews with different employers revealed that failure
to finalize terminal benefits on time place a notable burden to retirees in terms of
costs to make follow ups of retirement benefits. These costs are incurred
particularly when a retiree is looking for the missing data/document at a delicate
moment in life when he\she no longer has access to official documents by virtue
of the retirement and also, during which the retiree has no any kind of income
thus making life very difficult and miserable.

It becomes quite expensive for a retiree to follow his/her terminal benefits in the
Head office or even at regional/zonal offices of the Pension Funds let alone to
travel to his /her station of first appointment just to look for some information.


7.4 MoFEA and PO-PSM (Main Employers)
7.4.1 Lack of clearly defined public awareness programs
There is lack of clearly defined awareness programs by the two main employers.
The MoFEA and PO-PSM have not given consideration on public education
program.

Nevertheless on average, terminal benefits, represent almost 100 per cent of the
retirees’ income. Given this and the fact that not all programs are targeted
against specific levels of income, individuals who are expected to provide
adequately for their retirement must know the extent to which public pensions will
supplement their income from private savings and employer sponsored plans.

NATIONAL AUDIT OFFICE OF TANZANIA                                                                                        52
A Performance Audit Report on the Processing of Terminal Benefits of Retirees from the Central and Local Government of
Tanzania
This public awareness program should be seen to cover educational programs
and levels of benefits available, eligibility requirements, advice on tax, retirement
income planning and available services such as direct deposit and tax deducted
at source.

7.4.2 Poor record keeping by employers

Employer’s system of keeping records is appallingly inefficient and ineffective,
hindering the retirement system’s ability to fulfil its mission. The Employers have
failed to properly manage and control the necessary documents for the
processing of retirement benefits of their respective employees resulting in
reciprocal delays and trading of blames between the Funds and employers. In
addition, the kind of missing documents/information was found to be the same all
years round and there is no action taken by the employers to address this
endemic and ever increasing problem.

The missing documents were identified to be:
         a. Letter of first appointment
         b. Letter of confirmation
         c. Letter of transfer from Central Government to LGAs
         d. Bank details
         e. Recent salary slip
         f. Letter of last promotion
         g. Retirement acceptance letter

7.4.3 Inaction by the main employers

MoFEA, and PO-PSM as main Employers have not taken any tangible action to
ensure efficient processing of terminal benefits is instituted despite the fact this is
a known and repetitive problem throughout the period of the audit i.e. 2006/07 to
2008/09.

The audit team noted that, the same weaknesses identified on the first financial
year happened again in the following year, but no corrective actions were ever
taken to address them let alone reduce the problem. It has been business as
usual!

With this trend, it is evident that, the concerned authorities will not be able to
improve the services rendered to retirees and in that sense keeping them in
difficult situations for no cause of the concerned victims something that could be
resolved just by applying ordinary diligence and accountability.

The audit team noted that, the above mentioned authorities failed to even:
   • address the ways to reduce average waiting time;



NATIONAL AUDIT OFFICE OF TANZANIA                                                                                        53
A Performance Audit Report on the Processing of Terminal Benefits of Retirees from the Central and Local Government of
Tanzania
      •    identify areas where idle time observed more frequently in different steps
           of terminal benefits processing and try to reduce that time and if possible
           remove it; and
      •    Causes of delay in processing terminal benefits and varying performance
           among Pension Funds and Employers in dealing with matters related to
           terminal benefits of retirees.

7.4.4 Lack of a proper Office set up to deal with or investigate complaints

There is no proper office which is responsible or has been set up to deal with
complains. This includes complaints and investigation about the way Pension
Funds and employers are dealing with peoples’ terminal benefit issues as they
are raised by the desperate retirees with a view of resolving them satisfactorily.

7.4.5 Un-harmonised Pension Schemes in the country

Public servants whether they are in Central Government or in Local Government
in Tanzania, where salaries of both Central Government employees as well as
Local Government employees are paid from the center, there are no apparent
justification of having different Pension Schemes dealing with virtually the same
group of retirees i.e. public servants.

Merging of the Funds could lead to substantial reduction of operational overhead
costs and lead to efficiency and effectiveness in managing pension matters.




NATIONAL AUDIT OFFICE OF TANZANIA                                                                                        54
A Performance Audit Report on the Processing of Terminal Benefits of Retirees from the Central and Local Government of
Tanzania
                                          CHAPTER EIGHT


                                    RECOMMENDATIONS
Serious and devastating problems in the processing of terminal benefits with
Pension Funds, Ministries and Councils visited have been pertinently noted.

This performance audit has been able to identify problems which can be
addressed by individual employers and Pension Funds themselves and problems
which are supposed to be addressed through joint efforts of all key stakeholders.

The following are recommendations of the problems that need to be addressed
fin order to bring out improvement in the Management of Pension Fund in the
country:

          PSPF and LAPF
a)        Review of the processing of terminal benefits of retirees’ workflow

               •     The Pension Funds should ensure that the processing of terminal
                     benefits of retirees’ workflow is reviewed in order to reduce the
                     bureaucracy.

               •     The Pension Funds should prepare a flow chart to identify areas of
                     unnecessary requirements that can be discarded in order to avoid
                     bureaucracy.

b)        Improve communication among the key stakeholders
             • The Pension Funds should improve communication between
               Employers, Retirees and Pension Funds (PSPF and LAPF)
               respectively.

c)        Conduct training on pension matters
            • The Pension Funds should ensure that regular training of officials
               dealing with pension matters is conducted on how to process
               terminal benefit payments without unnecessary delays.

d)        Manage staff resources appropriately and reduce the waiting time
            • The Pension Funds should better manage staff resources with a
               view of reducing time taken to process retiree’s terminal benefits;




NATIONAL AUDIT OFFICE OF TANZANIA                                                                                        55
A Performance Audit Report on the Processing of Terminal Benefits of Retirees from the Central and Local Government of
Tanzania
e)        Carry out data purification process
             • The Pension Funds should prepare a checklist and complete the
                data purification process to verify that active membership service
                credit information is accurate to allow for the expeditious
                processing of terminal benefit applications;

f)        Monitoring of resources
            • The Pension Funds should professionally plan, assess and monitor
                their resources by way of regular actuarial valuation to ensure that
                members receive adequate retirement benefits and counseling
                service sustainably

g)        Development of Client Service Charter on processing terminal
          benefits of retirees
             • The Pension Funds should prepare Client Service Charters which
                will incorporate all core activities and the whole process of terminal
                benefits indicating exact the time a certain activity is going to be
                initiated and completed and who will be accountable.


          MoFEA and PO-PSM (Main Employers)

h)        Proper record keeping of employees
             • Employers should ensure that proper records of employees is
               accurately kept and submitted to Pension Funds for processing
               terminal benefit payments.

i)        Improve coordination among the key stakeholders
             • Employers should ensure that a clear coordination and
               transferability of benefits in favour of those who are paid by LAPF
               and PSPF exists for those public servants who served both Local
               Government Authorities and Central Government

j)        Training of employees on pensions related matters
             • Employers should come up with training programs solely aimed at
                ensuring that employees are extensively trained on record keeping
                and understand the importance of retirement procedures.

k)        Development of schedule of staff who are about to retire
            • Employers should prepare schedules of employees who are about
                to retire in the near future at least a three years schedule. This
                schedule should be used as the basis for reminding employers on
                the date of retirement of staff, when to notify and also the right time
                to look for the necessary documents. This will ensure timely access
                to information for efficient decision making on terminal benefit
                matters
NATIONAL AUDIT OFFICE OF TANZANIA                                                                                        56
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l)        Carry out monitoring and evaluations of training conducted
             • Employers should ensure that monitoring, evaluation and feedback
                mechanism for the training conducted on staff awareness on
                pension matters is done. Through this monitoring and evaluation, it
                will be easy for the employers to identify areas that need to be
                addressed for future improvement.

m)        Establishment of a complaint mechanism
             • As noted in the report, there is a lack of a complaint mechanism
                through which aggrieved retirees can seek redress; we strongly
                recommend that such a complaint mechanism be established as a
                way of enhancing efficiency and accountability in the management
                of pension matters.

n)        Harmonization of Pension Schemes in the country
             • MoFEA and PO-PSM should ensure that Pension Funds are
               merged together and come up with only one Pension Fund serving
               all public servants in both Central and Local Governments. This will
               lead to substantial reduction of operational overhead costs and lead
               to efficiency and effectiveness in managing pension matters in
               Tanzania.




NATIONAL AUDIT OFFICE OF TANZANIA                                                                                        57
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                                             REFERENCES
1. Parliament of the United Republic of Tanzania
   • The Constitution of the United Republic of Tanzania,1977

2. International Labour Organization
   ILO Social Security (Minimum Standards) Convention N°.102 of 1952

3. Ministry of Finance and Economic Affairs
   • The Political Leaders Retirement Benefits Act, No3 of 1999

4. President’s Office – Public Service Management (PO-PSM)
   • Standing Orders for Public Servants, (1994), Section Q. 45 – 47
   • Staff Circular No. 5 of 1986,
   • Muongozo wa kuhusu Ajira katika Utumishi wa Umma of 2009, 2nd Edition,
      President’s Office – Public Service Commission,
   • Mkataba wa huduma kwa mteja of June, 2007, President’s Office – Public
      Service Commission,
   • Public Service Circulars No.1 of 2004,
   • The Public Service Management and Employment policy 2004, Public
      Service Regulation 2003,
   • The Employment Ordinance Cap 366,
   • The Security of Employment Act, No62 of 1964,
   • The Public Service Regulations,

5. Public Service Pension Fund (PSPF)
   • Public Service Retirement Benefits Act N°.2 of 1999
   • Summary of Performance Data 2003/04 - 2005/06

6. Ministry of Agriculture, Food Security and Cooperatives
   • Client Service Charter-MoAFC of 9th November, 2002

7. Local Authorities Pensions Fund (LAPF)
   • Local Authorities Pension Funds Act N°.10 of 2006
   • Annual Reports and Audited Accounts 2004/5 - 2006/07

8. Parastatal Pensions Fund (PPF)
   • Parastatal Pensions Act N°.14 (1978)
   • PPF Act Amendments of 1988, 1992 and 2001

9. Pensioners Union of Tanzania
   • Retirement Benefits in Tanzania: Realities and Challenges (2009
NATIONAL AUDIT OFFICE OF TANZANIA                                                                                        58
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10. National Social Security Fund (NSSF)
   • National Social Security Fund Act N°.28 (1997)

11. Photo on the cover
   • The photo on the cover page shows a Retiree complaining about his long
      outstanding terminal benefits. Retirees living in rural areas/villages lead a
      pathetic life, a factor which demoralizes them.




NATIONAL AUDIT OFFICE OF TANZANIA                                                                                        59
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                                                                                                       APPENDIX 1
AUDIT QUESTIONS
This report provides the results from applying the following five audit questions:

Question 1:     Are important bottlenecks identified?
                                     Sub Questions
1.1 Is the long waiting time explained by non- professional management?
1.2 Are the application forms too complicated, causing trouble for the clients/retirees?
1.3 Is the mix of resources, especially the mix of personnel, optimal?
1.4 Are there any problem associated with inadequate organization processing of
    terminal benefits payment?


Question 2:     Are the bottlenecks in the work flow causing queues and idle time?
                                     Sub Questions
2.1 Are the bottlenecks in the work flow causing queues and idle time?
2.2 Could long idle times be observed in any step of the flow, critical in the sense that
    that they have to be reduced to shorten clients’ waiting time?


Question 3:     Are there ways to reduce average waiting times without additional
               costs?
                                   Sub Questions
3.1 Are there ways to reduce average waiting times without additional costs?


Question 4:      To what extent is the lack of supervision, training and effective
                 communication affecting efficient processing of documents?
                                       Sub Questions
4.1 To what extent is the lack of supervision, training and effective communication
affecting the efficient processing of documents?


Question 5:    What is the impact of inadequate processing or delays in the paying
               pension?
                                    Sub Questions
5.1 What is the impact of inadequate processing or delays in the paying of pension?


Question 6:   Is there mechanism in place to manage terminal benefits
              processing complains.
                                  Sub Questions
6.1 How to channel complains about delays in processing terminal benefits?

6.2 Where to channel complains?




NATIONAL AUDIT OFFICE OF TANZANIA                                                                                        60
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                                                   APPENDIX 2
     Main laws and Regulations Governing Payment of Terminal
                       Benefits in Tanzania
2.1 Social Security (Regulatory Authority) Act No.8 of 2008
This Act is intended to implement the National Social Security Policy of 2003.

Generally, the Act deals with established mandatory schemes, and establishment
of supplementary and private schemes. It introduces competition amongst
mandatory schemes and mechanisms for the establishment of minimum benefits.

The Act also introduces the indexation of benefits, portability of benefit rights of a
member from one scheme to another and reviews of taxation policies after
consultation with the Minister for Finance.

2.2 The Public Service Retirement Benefits Act No. 2 of 1999
The Public Service Retirement Benefits Act No. 2 of 1999 was enacted to provide
for the establishment of the PSPF and to repeal some older laws, such as the
Pension Ordinance of 1954 which was enacted to regulate retirement benefits to
civil servants in Tanzania Mainland. PSPF started operating in July 1999 and for
the first five years of its existence, no benefits were paid. Benefit payments
started in July 2004.

PSPF is responsible for the payment of benefits to any civil servant who retires
from service. The years of service taken into account in the pension formula
includes the whole period the person was in government service. This means
that PSPF started operating with a potentially substantial unfunded liability.
PSPF covers the permanent and pensionable employees of central Government
and the contribution rate is 20 percent of gross salary (5 percent for employers
and 15 percent for employees).

2.2.1 Benefits Package
Benefits offered by PSPF are:
       a) old age (retirement);
       b) gratuity;
       c) death benefit;
       d) invalidity benefit, and
       e)   withdrawal benefit due to either maternity, marriage, emigration or
            departure from service.

 2.3 Local Authorities Pension Fund (LAPF) Act
The Local Authorities Provident Fund began operating in 1944. It operated as a
provident fund until July 2005 when the Local Authorities Pension Fund (LAPF)
was established as a defined-benefit pension scheme which offers retirement


NATIONAL AUDIT OFFICE OF TANZANIA                                                                                        61
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benefits similar to those of PSPF. LAPF covers local authorities’ employees. The
Act allows for inclusion of employees of other institutions.

2.2.1 Benefits Package
The benefits package provided by LAPF includes the following:
    a) Old age;
    b) Pension and gratuity;
    c) Death benefit;
    d) Gratuity;
    e) Invalidity benefit;
    f) Pension and
    g) Withdrawal for maternity, marriage, emigration and departure from
       service.

2.3 Parastatal Pensions Fund Act No. 25 of 2001
The Parastatal Pension Fund was established by Act No. 14 of 1978 (amended
with PPF Act No, 25 of 2001) to provide pensions and related benefits to its
members, who initially were workers in parastatal agencies. It is made up of two
schemes:
    • The “traditional” Parastatal Pension Scheme (PPS) covers the employees
      of parastatal organizations and public institutions or private companies in
      which the Government owns shares or registered private companies not
      covered by any other social security fund.
    • The Deposit Administration Scheme (DAS) covers employees who do not
      qualify for membership of the “Traditional” Parastatal Pension Scheme or
      employees already covered by any scheme who want a supplementary
      scheme. This scheme is a Defined-Contribution (DC) plan.

The contribution rates for the traditional parastatal pension scheme are:
   • 5 and 15 percent of the member’s gross salary for the employee and
      employer respectively for parastatals organizations and institutions
   • 10 and 10 percent of the member’s gross salary for the employee and
      employer respectively for all others (Private)
      The Deposit Administration Scheme’s contribution rate is the same as that
      of the Parastatal Pension Scheme. Contribution rates are flexible for
      members of the supplementary scheme.

2.3.1 Benefits Package
Benefits offered under the “traditional” parastatal pension scheme are:
       a) Old-age (retirement) benefit;
       b) pension and gratuity benefit;
       c) invalidity benefit;
       d) survivors benefit;
       e) death benefit;
       f)   withdrawal benefit and
       g) Education benefit.

NATIONAL AUDIT OFFICE OF TANZANIA                                                                                        62
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2.4 The National Social Security Fund (NSSF) Establishment Act No. 30 of
     1997
The National Social Security Fund was established by Act No.30 of 1997 by
conversion of the then National Provident Fund (NPF) system which was
established in 1964 into a pension scheme covering employees in the private
sector. Some of the previous provident fund conditions were carried forward to
the pension scheme and a member can still withdraw his/her contributions and
accumulated interest, in case of unemployment.

In terms of membership and income revenue, NSSF is the largest pension
scheme in Tanzania; it has been extended to cover employees in the private
sector (informal economy) on a voluntary membership basis but this has
remained on paper for a long time now with no serious implementation of the
same. The contribution rate is 20 percent of gross salary, shared equally
between employee and employer.

2.4.1 Benefits Package
There are long and short term benefits offered by NSSF, which include the
following:-
           a) Old age Pension;
           b) Invalidity benefit Pension;
           c) Survivors’ benefits Pension;
           d) Funeral grant;
           e) Withdrawals;
           f) Maternity benefit;
           g) Employment injury benefit and
           h) Health insurance benefits.


2.5 PUBLIC SERVICE ACT NO 8, 2002 & REGULATIONS ON RETIREMENT
   BENEFITS
     i.) Section 85,(1) where a public servant’s service is terminated on
         grounds other than disciplinary, he /she shall be granted his retirement
         benefits in accordance with the law applicable to the grant of those
         benefits for the time being in force.

       ii.) Section 2, the Public servants retirement benefits shall be governed
            under:
               • The Public Service Pensions Fund for all public servants other
                   than employed in the Local Government Authorities.
               • The Local Authority Pensions Fund for all public servants in the
                   employed in the Local Government Authorities.

       iii.) Section 86, where a public servant is transferred from one service to
              another within the Public Service ,his terminal benefits in respect of the

NATIONAL AUDIT OFFICE OF TANZANIA                                                                                        63
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              service he is transferred from ,be frozen and shall be payable on his
              retirement on grounds allowing payment of terminal benefits.

       iv.) Sub-section 2, the Public servant           transferred pursuant to the
              provisions of sub-regulation (1), of these regulations shall decide
              whether to continue with his membership in the scheme he was
              formerly governed with or join and contribute to the scheme governing
              the service to which he is transferred.

        v.) Section 87, the benefits payable under these Regulations are        any
              benefits payable under any law providing for the grants of any
              pension, compensation to persons in respect of their service as public
              servants to their widow, widowers, children, dependants or personal
              representatives of such persons in respect of that service.

       vi.) Section 89,(1) ,It shall be the duty of both employer and employee to
              keep employment records for the purposes of reference for calculation
              of the employee terminal benefits.

       vii.) Sub-section (2),    Employment records kept by both employer and
              employee shall be regarded as original copies duly signed by
              authorized person.

     viii.) Sub-section(3), where there is no possibility to get hold of employment
            records from the employer’s end ,records in custody of the employee
            shall used for any purpose provided that such records are in the
            original form.

2.6 National Social Security Policy - 2003
In 2003, the Government developed the National Social Security Policy.
The policy identified the following three shortcomings in the current social
security system:
          i.) Fragmentation and lack of coordination; as a result, contribution
              rates, benefit structures, qualifying conditions as well as plans and
              priorities differ from one institution to another.
         ii.) Lack of Mechanism for Portability of Benefit Rights; there is no
              established mechanism that can allow benefit rights of a member to
              be transferred from one scheme to another.
        iii.) Inadequacy of benefits paid (number and meaningfulness); the
              number of benefits offered by most of the existing schemes fall
              below the ILO Minimum Standards in terms of number, quality and
              indexation to the current levels of earnings.


     Basically the objectives of the policy are:
     • To widen the scope and coverage of social security services to all citizens;
     • To harmonize social security schemes so as to eliminate the current
        fragmentation by rationalizing contribution rates and benefit structures;
NATIONAL AUDIT OFFICE OF TANZANIA                                                                                        64
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     •    To reduce poverty through improved quality and quantity of benefits
          offered;
     •    To institute mechanisms for good governance and sustainability of social
          security institutions through establishment of a regulatory body;
     •    To establish social security structure that is consistent with ILO standards
          but with due regard to the socio-economic situation in the country; and
     •    To ensure more transparency and involvement of social partners in
          decision making with respect to social security institutions.

In order to improve benefits offered by the existing mandatory schemes, the
Government decided to:
   • make concerted efforts to enhance awareness and sensitisation of the
      society regarding the provision of social security services as a right and
      not a privilege;
   • ensure minimum number of benefits that each social security scheme
      must offer and that the benefits are indexed to the current levels of
      earnings of contributors;
   • establish a mechanism to enable portability of benefit rights when a
      member moves from one scheme to another;
   • review tax policies to ensure contributions, benefits and incomes from
      investments to enable mandatory schemes offer meaningful benefits to
      members;
   • establish a regulatory body that would regulate performance of social
      security institutions and that the social security sector shall be co-
      ordinated by the Ministry responsible for social security matters, and
   • take full responsibility of guaranteeing members’ benefits in the event the
      established mandatory schemes become insolvent.

Furthermore, the Government committed itself to ensure that social security
schemes are managed efficiently.

2.7 ILO Social Security (Minimum Standards) Convention - 1952
On 28th June, 1952 during the 35th Session of the General Conference of the
International Labour Organisation (ILO) at Geneva (Switzerland), the ILO Social
Security (Minimum Standards) Convention was adopted.

The Convention provides guidelines for setting minimum benefits a social
security scheme should provide. It states that the following contingencies must
be covered:-
          a)   Old-Age (Retirement).
          b)   Invalidity.
          c)   Employment Injury.
          d)   Survivors
          e)   Medical Care
          f)   Sickness
          g)   Unemployment

NATIONAL AUDIT OFFICE OF TANZANIA                                                                                        65
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               h)         Maternity
               i)         Family allowance

Part XI of the Convention deals with periodical payments i.e. pension benefits. It
recommends that:
   • A social security scheme should provide to beneficiaries retirement,
       survivors and invalidity pension that is equal to at least 40 percent of the
       income of a middle income worker who has worked for 30 years;
   • In case of sickness, unemployment and maternity benefits, the
       replacement rate is 45 percent while for invalidity and incapacity to work,
       the rate increases to 50 percent.
   • On retirement age, the Convention states that normal retirement age
       should not exceed 65 years or such higher age as may be fixed by the
       relevant authority with due regard to the working ability of the elderly in
       that particular country.

2.8 PO-PSM CLIENT’S SERVICE CHATTER
Role and responsibility of the Office of the President - Public Service
Management among others are:
   • To formulate and supervise the implementation of policies governing the
      Public service.
   • To coordinate reforms in public service
   • To supervise for ; public service regulations, code of ethics and conduct
      in public service, reforms of systems of public service delivery,
      employment records and other documents in the public service.




NATIONAL AUDIT OFFICE OF TANZANIA                                                                                        66
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                                                                                                       APPENDIX 3
Description of the Payment of Terminal Benefits System on how it should
be rationally

SUBMISSION OF EMPLOYEE AND EMPLOYERS CONTRIBUTION
Every employer who is a member of the Fund has to ensure those employees’
contributions and employers’ contributions of 5% and 15% respectively are
remitted monthly to the Fund.

This monthly contributions are payable in respect of the member at the rate of
fifteen per-centum of the member’s salary likewise an employer shall contribute
in respect of a member by deducting that member’s contribution from his salary
at the end of each month

These deductions are in effect as from the date of becoming a member, a
contribution to the Fund at the rate of five per-centum of his salary and that
contribution are deducted from his/her salary at the end of each month.

MEMBERS REGISTRATION
One of the main functions of the Funds in Tanzania is to ensure that all
employees who contribute to the Fund are registered. During the registration it is
when all necessary documents concerning personal particulars of a member a
stored by Fund.

According to the laws, the Fund are required to establish and maintain for each
member of the Fund an account to his/her contributions made to the Fund in
respect of such member and all the payments made are charged.


EMPLOYER AND EMPLOYEE RESPONSIBILITY
All ministries/Independent Department/Regions will maintain full record of the
particulars of services of all their officers. These details will be recorded on
personal record form in the format given. A copy of the form duly filled should be
sent to the Principal Secretary (Establishment)

Furthermore it shall be the duty of both employer and employee to keep
employment records for the purposes of reference for calculation of employee
terminal benefits. Employment records kept by both employer and employee
shall be regarded as the original copies duly signed by authorized person. Where
there is no possibility to get hold of employment records from the employer’s
records in custody of the employee shall be used for any purpose provided that
such records are in the original form.




NATIONAL AUDIT OFFICE OF TANZANIA                                                                                        67
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RETIREMENT NOTIFICATION
An officer serving on permanent and pensionable agreement must notify his
employer at least six months before the engagement is due to expires. Similarly
the employer shall inform the officer through writing him/her letter of award
acknowledging the receipt of a notification from the officer three months before
retirement date.

FILLING RETIREMENT BENEFT FORM
After all the correspondences between the employer and employee, the
employee is supposed to fill the retirement benefit form which designed by the
Fund and submit them to the employer who is in turn distribute the form to
employees who are about to retire in the near future.

Similarly, employer has to ensure that these forms are dully filled and all
information of employee presented is correct and appropriate.


SUBMISSION OF INFORMATION TO THE PENSION FUND (PSPF and LAPF)
The employer is supposed to submit retiree particulars to the Fund on time for
pension processing purpose. Employer should also ensure that the retiree
documents sent to the Fund are intact and including all necessary information
such as:
      Letter of first appointment
      Letter of permanent and pensionable terms
      Confirmation letter
      Letter of last promotion
      Last salary slip
      Passport size photographs

PAYMENT OF TERMINAL BENEFITS
After receiving all the particulars regarding the retiree from employer, the Fund
has to check the authenticity and appropriateness of the particulars submitted by
employers.

The Fund has to ensure that a retiree receives his/her terminal benefits seven
days after the retirement date. This is determined by the cheque handed over to
retiree.

Cheque is collected by from the Fund by an employer’s representative from the
institution concerned who then dispatches the cheque to the retiree.

DATE OF RETIREMENT
The age of voluntary retirement from service shall be fifty five years. An officer
who attains the age of fifty five years may at any time opt to retire but an officer
who does not so opt shall continue in office in the service on pensionable terms
until he attains the age of sixty year which is the age of compulsory retirement.

NATIONAL AUDIT OFFICE OF TANZANIA                                                                                        68
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INSPECTION AND REVIEWING FILES
Human Resources Department (Administrative and Personnel Directorate) has a
responsibility of making sure that the retiree’s information is correct and
appropriate. This is done by inspecting the retiree’s file and retirement forms
filled. This department has to carry out inspect and review of retiree personal
information to make sure that they are in good order and submit them to the
Fund.

Once files are received by the Pension assessment by an officer of the Fund who
received them is needed. .To check whether all necessary documents are in
place and if some are lacking the files have to be returned to the appropriate
employer with a request to bring the missing information as soon as possible.
Therefore, before accepting files remitted by employers, inspection and
verification of necessary documents in place have to be done.

COMMUNICATION
The Fund communicates with the retiree less than two weeks after receiving
retiree particulars. The mode of communication between the Fund and employee
(retiree) is through letters. These letters need to be posted to the addressed
indicated by retiree in his/her retirement forms.

The fund should make sure that the addressed indicated by retiree is the one
which is easily accessible by him/her.
Similarly, procedures require that once Fund is communicating with retiree his
former employer also need to get a copy of that communication.




NATIONAL AUDIT OFFICE OF TANZANIA                                                                                        69
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                                                                                                       APPENDIX 4
                                          Chronology of Events
             Chronological development of the Pension Funds in Tanzania

  Year                                            Event
1942             The Government Employee Provident Fund (GEPF) was established
                 in 1942 to provide for the benefits of government employees who are
                 not eligible for pension. Such employees include those working under
                 contracts and under operational service for the central government,
                 independent government departments, executive agencies and donor
                 financed government projects.

1944             The Local Authority Provident Fund (LAPF) was established in 1944
                 with the aim to create a single fund for all local authorities’ employees
                 in the then colonial Tanganyika.

1954             Civil Service Pension Scheme was established under Pension Fund
                 Ordinance CAP 371

1964             National Provident Fund (NPF) was established by an Act of
                 Parliament no. 36 of 1964 as a mandatory savings scheme to provide
                 retirement income to private sector workers.

1978             (Parastatals Pension Fund) PPF was established in July 1978 by an
                 Act of Parliament no. 14 of the same year with a purpose of providing
                 pensions and other social security benefits to its members
                 (Parastatals Organisations)

1997             The National Social Security Fund (NSSF) was established by the
                 National Social Security Fund Act No. 28 of 1997 after the
                 transformation of the National Provident Fund (NPF). Its functions are
                 to register employers and employees, collect contributions, account
                 for the money collected, invest and pay out benefits to members,
                 according to the provisions of the Act.

1999             Changing Civil Service Pension Scheme from non-contributory to
                 contributory- formation of Public service Pension Fund (PSPF).

2002             Amendment in PPF to cover also private sector.

2003             The Social Security Policy is endorsed

2006             Formation of the Local Authorities Pension fund (LAPF)

2008             Enactment of the Social Security (Regulatory Authority) Act

NATIONAL AUDIT OFFICE OF TANZANIA                                                                                        70
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                                                                                                                                                                                   APPENDIX 5
                    SUMMARY OF TANZANIA SOCIAL SECURITY (PENSION) FUNDS
      Item                      GEPF                         SSSS                                  PPF                                      NSSF                           PSPF                             LAPF
  Act and Year of                                                                          Act N°. 14 of 1978                          Act N°. 28 of 1997                                              Act N°. 9 of 2006
  Establishment                    1942                        1968                  Amendments 1988 [%, CF, PF]                                                        Act N°. 2 of 1999
   (Precursor)                                                                      1992 [CPG], 2002 Act N°. 25 [Pvt]              (National Provident Fund)                                     (Local Auth. Provident Fund)
                                                        Board of Trustees
 Governing Body           Board of Management                                               Board of Trustees                           Board of Trustees              Board of Trustees              Board of Trustees
                                                        National Insurance
  Parent Body              Ministry of Finance                                              Ministry of Finance                Min. of Labour, Youth & S/Welfare       Ministry of Finance            P.M.O – R.A.L.G.
                                                              Corp.
                                                                                  Employees and Employers of:
                                                                                                                                                                                                 Employees and Employers
                                                                                  • Parastatal Organizations and                                                   Employees from the Central
                                                                                                                              Employees & Employers from:                                        from:
                                                                                     Public Institutions;                                                          Government & its Agencies
                                                                                                                              • Private Sector                                                    • Local Government
                                                                                  • Restructured Parastatals;                                                        as established by Acts of
                             Every non-               Senior Academic Staff                                                   • Government of Tanzania                                               Authorities & Institutions
                                                                                  • Companies in which the Gov’t of                                                Parliament who are under
                             pensionable                      of the                                                            Ministries and Departments not                                    • LAPF
   Membership                                                                        Tanzania has shares;                                                           “permanent” employment
                           Employee who is a               University of                                                        covered by PSPF;                                                  • Local Government
                                                                                  • Private Sector Companies not                                                     with retirement benefits.
                             “Depositor”                 Dar Es Salaam                                                        • Self-employed, and                                                   Loans Board
                                                                                     covered by any pension fund;
                                                                                                                              • All others not covered by any      NOT ALL Public Servants        • Any other Institution or
                                                                                  • Informal Sector
                                                                                                                                pension fund                         are PSPF Members                person who wishes to
                                                                                  • The Self-employed not covered by
                                                                                                                                                                                                     be a member
                                                                                     any other pension fund
  Contributions                                                                     • 5% -15% : Parastatals
                                                                                                                                                                                                  • 5% -15% : L/Authorities
Employee-Employer               10% - 10%                    5% - 15%               • 10% - 10% : Private Sector                           10% - 10%                        5% -15%
                                                                                                                                                                                                  • 10%-10% : Others
(% of gross salary)                                                                   (Flexible limits are negotiable)
                           Provident scheme           Endowment scheme            Traditional Pension Scheme(PPS)
                                                        Old Age Retirement               Old Age (Retirement);                     Old Age (Retirement);               Old Age (Retirement);         Old Age (Retirement);
                               Gratuity;                                                 Gratuity;                                                                     Gratuity;                     Gratuity;
                                                                                         Disability                                Invalidity                          Invalidity                    Invalidity
                                                          Death                          Death Gratuity                            Funeral Grant                       Death Gratuity                Funeral Grant
     Benefits                                                                            Survivors’/Dependants                     Survivors’ Pension                  Survivors’ Pension            Survivors’ Pension
                                                          Withdrawal                     Withdrawal                                Withdrawal                          Withdrawal                    Withdrawal
                                                                                         Education;                                Medical (Insurance)                                               Marriage, Maternity,
                                                                                  Deposit Admin. Scheme (DAS)                      Maternity                                                         Emigration, and/or
                                                                                    • Defined Contribution scheme                                                                                    Unemployment
                                                                                                                                                                                                      Medical (Insurance)




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 Conditions for Full     Age: 55, 60 yrs max.        Age: 55, 60 yrs max.                 Age: 55, 60 yrs max.                      Age: 55, 60 yrs max.            Age: 55, 60 yrs max.          Age: 55, 60 yrs max.
 Benefits Coverage        Maturity: 15 years          Maturity : Annualy                   Maturity: 10 years                        Maturity: 15 years              Maturity: 15 years.           Maturity: 15 years


        Item                     GEPF                        SSSS                                  PPF                                      NSSF                           PSPF                          LAPF

                                                                                   1/960 for 1978 – 30th June,1988
Pension Factor(s), PF               -                          -                                                                        1/720....1/600                     1/540                         1/540
                                                                                   1/600 for 1st July 1988 onwards
Commutation Factor,
                                    -                          -                                   12.5                                       18                            15.5                         15.5
       CF
                                                                                                                              Average Monthly Earning (AME)
                                                                                   Annual Pension Emolument (APE)                                                  Last (Monthly) Salary         Last (Monthly) Salary
Basis for Calculations         TOTAL                     Annual Salary                                                         based on the BEST 5 years
                                                                                                                                                                 Annualized (LMS-A or LAS)     Annualized (LMS-A or LAS)
                               Monthly                                                                                              of the LAST years
                                                                                   APE = Annualized Highest Monthly
                              Contribution            Not yet available                                                                                              Specified Amount              Specified Amount
    Computation                                                                       Average for BEST 5 years
                                                    Done SOLELY by NIC                                                                                              SA = PF x PS x LAS            SA = PF x PS x LAS

    CPG Formula                     -                           -                  CPG = APE x PS x PF x CF x 25%                 CPG = AME x 24 months             CPG = 0.5 x SA x CF           CPG = 0.5 x SA x CF

  Initial Lumpsum                                                                                  CPG                                                                      CPG                          CPG
                           One-Off Lumpsum                      -                                                                            CPG
  % of Total Pension                                                                               25%                                                                      50%                          50%
                                                                                    MP = APE x PS x PF x (1/12) x 75%
                                                                                                                                      MP = 30% x AME                                             MP = 50% x SA x 1/12
                                                                                   Guaranteed for ONLY 36 months                                                   MP = 50% x SA x 1/12
Monthly Pension, MP                 -                        None                   and thereafter as long as the                Minimum 80% of Minimum
                                                                                                                                                                  For as long as a pensioner   For as long as a pensioner
                                                                                         pensioner is alive                    Statutory Wage monthly salary
                                                                                                                                                                            is alive                     is alive
                                                                                                                               currently [2008] about 33,200/-
                                                                                     (Approx. 25 - 30% of the HMS)
                            Accrued TOTAL                                               GB = 5 x APE x PS x PF                         Gratuity = CPG                 Gratuity = CPG               Gratuity = 5 x SA
       Gratuity              Contributions                   None                          One-off payment                            One-off payment                One-off payment               One-off payment
                            Plus INTEREST                                                No Monthly Pension                          No Monthly Pension             No Monthly Pension            No Monthly Pension
Taxation on
 • Contributions               (Yes / No)                  (Yes / No)                        Not to be taxed                           Not to be taxed                 Not to be taxed          Taxed (by employer??)
 • Benefits                    (Yes / No)                  (Yes / No)                        Not to be taxed                           Not to be taxed                 Not to be taxed                Not Taxed
 • Investment income           (Yes / No)                  (Yes / No)                            Taxed                                     Taxed                           Taxed                        Taxed




                  NATIONAL AUDIT OFFICE OF TANZANIA                                                                                                                                                72
                  A Performance Audit Report on the Processing of Terminal Benefits of Retirees from the Central and Local Government of Tanzania
Key:         AME = Average Monthly Earnings (NSSF)                           APE = Annual Pension Emolument (PPF)                    CF = Commutation Factor
             CPG = Commuted Pension Gratuity (PPF)                           GB = Gratuity Benefit (PPF)                             HMS = Highest Monthly Salary (PPF)
             LAS = Last Annual Salary (PSPF, LAPF)                           MP = Monthly Pension                                    PF = Pension Factor (PPF, PSPF,
LAPF)
             PS = Period of Service                                          SA = Specified Amount (PSPF, LAPF)




   NATIONAL AUDIT OFFICE OF TANZANIA                                                                                                                               73
   A Performance Audit Report on the Processing of Terminal Benefits of Retirees from the Central and Local Government of Tanzania
         THE UNITED REPUBLIC OF TANZANIA




        National Audit Office of Tanzania


                                              Services
  Contributing to better stewardship of public funds by
   ensuring that our clients are accountable for the
              resources entrusted to them


   Helping to improve the quality of public services by
  supporting innovation on the use of public resources



             Providing technical advice to our clients on
             operational gaps in the operating systems



 Systematically involve our clients in the audit process
                   and audit cycles


NATIONAL AUDIT OFFICE OF TANZANIA                                                                                        74
A Performance Audit Report on the Processing of Terminal Benefits of Retirees from the Central and Local Government of
Tanzania

				
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