Inquiry in Context

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					    Teaching & Learning
          Events
Begin to design reading activities
that will help your students
comprehend the content of complex
text and reach the benchmarks and
Standards for reading and science
or social studies.
        Goals/Standards: (#’S)                   CONTEXT                                                 CONTENT
                                            Engaging the Learner                               Teaching and Learning Events*
    State Goal 17. Understand world
    geography and the effects of
                                        In modeling the opening we:
                                                                              • students read letter and complete task
    geography on society, with          People interact with their              analysis; ask questions based on opening
    emphasis on the United States.      environment to create cultures. If      activities and letter
    Standard A. Locate, describe, and   civilization depends on natural        • inquiry begins with students reading articles provided
    explain places, regions, and        resources then their demise may be      by teacher
    features on the Earth.              the result of overuse; Students        • jigsaw information in teams, organize and share with
                                        explore cultures that collapsed          class
                                        because of this mistake. Teachers      • mini lessons begin
                                        use an apple to represent the Earth        Vocabulary activity
 Benchmark                              and slice away portions that          • activity
                                        represent resources.                  • activity
                                                                              • activity
                                        Student teams are asked to            • activity
 Benchmark
                                        populate an international village     Note taking with graphic organizer
                                        based on current population        • activity
  State Goal 1. Read with               figures. They must then “feed” the • activity
  understanding and fluency.            village based on what they think   • activity
   Standard A. Apply word               the people will need.
  analysis and vocabulary skills
  to comprehend selections
  Standard B. Apply reading
  strategies to improve
  understanding and fluency.              Final Team Performance                                Individual Student Assessments
  Standard C. Comprehend a              Teams create infomercials
  wide range of reading                 promoting sustainable growth
  materials.
                                        strategies and base their
  Read a variety of non-fiction
  materials to identify, describe       reasoning on analysis of
  and locate important                  historical patterns of human
  information about trees               growth and development.                     *Numbers after Teaching and Learning Events refer to assessments

Emily Alford, 1998
                      Integrated Curriculum and Instruction De sign: Inquiry-Based Learning
                               Authors: Lori Ufkes, Carthage School District; Becky Cowser, Peoria School District
                                                 Title: Trees or Us            Grade Level: 2nd
                                S)
             Goals/Standards: (#Õ                         CONTEX T                                                     CONTENT
                                                      Engaging the Learner                                 Teaching and Learning Events*
State Goal 12: Understand the
fundamental concepts, principles and                                                     Note: prior to beginning unit students received instruction in the
interconnectons of the life, physical and       The teacher brings in a bird nest,       QAR (Question and Answer Relationships)
earth/space sciences                           products from trees, a broken             identify essential questions and current thinking about our trees
                                               branch, etc. Teams are asked to             and plants including their importance, parts and systems;
Standard A. Know and apply concepts that
                                               brainstorm relationships between            organize questions (1)
explain how living things function, adapt
and change.                                    the items.                                Reading Strategy: Mak ing Connections, open or closed
                                                                                           word sorts
Standard B. Know and apply concepts that
                                                The Park Ranger speaks (and sends        inquiry begins with students seeking information from books,
describe how living things function, adapt
and change.                                    a letter) to the class explaining that      internet and observations of trees
      Analyze the tree as a living system     he/she can protect the trees that are     Reading Strategy: Questioning; review “right there” and
        and determine the function of its      within the forest preserve but not the      “think and search” questions, students practice and become
                                               trees outside of the preserve.              proficient in answering these types of questions using non-
        parts
                                               Children are harming the trees by           fiction materials.
      Determine the growing patterns
                                               carving on them, clim bing on them,       teams jigsaw information, record important facts and sketch
        and needs of plants
      Predict and verify the lif e cycle of   naili ng things to them, breaking off       trees showing major parts; share with class; hypothesize how
        plants                                 leaves and branches, etc.                   parts of the tree serve the whole system
                                                                                         Mini lessons on lif e cycle: teams grow Fast Plants (U. of Wisc.);
      Use the parts of trees to determine
        the species                            The Ranger will ask the class to            (2); students will observe plants growing, draw and label
      Describe how trees impact our           make a book for other children to           pictures and describe growth patterns
                                               help them understand the importance       Sort parts (root, stem, leaf, flower, seed) and “expert” teams
        daily lives and judge their value
                                               of trees and their needs.                   locate information about function and physical characteristics
State Goal 1. Read with understanding
                                                                                         Mini lesson: use celery and food coloring in water to show how
and fluency.
 Standard A. Apply word analysis and                                                       plants distribute water and nutrients; experts write team
vocabulary skill s to comprehend selections                                                summary statement; share results orally (3)
                                                                                                             Individual Student Assessments
Standard B. Apply reading strategies to               Final Team Performance
                                                                                         (1,3) Pre-test on tree parts and their functions.
improve understanding and fluency.              The children will make a trade book
                                                                                         (2) Pre-test in which students sequence pictures of the life cycle of a
Standard C. Comprehend a wide range of         about trees to be shared with lower
                                                                                             plant.
reading materials.                             grade children. The book:
                                                                                         (4) Post test: students sequence pictures of the life cycle of a plant
     Read a variety of non-fiction             explains the importance of the of       (5) Narrative writing prompt: Seasons in the Life of a Tree
       materials to identify, describe and        trees and their parts
       locate important information about       provides information about needs
       trees                                      and protection of trees
     Emily Alford, 1998                                                                              *Numbers aft er Teaching and Learning Events refer to assessments
 What strategies do we
use to comprehend text?
What is TCP ?
The Thermal Conversion Process, or TCP, copies the geological and
geothermal processes of nature. The technology emulates what occurs daily
in the earth's subduction zones, but uses an accelerated process. This
process converts industrial waste and low-value streams into fuels, oils,
gases and carbons, with no hazardous emissions into the environment.

TCP mimics the earth's system; however, TCP takes only minutes to do what
nature does over thousands of years. By controlling the temperature and
pressure of this man-made system through the use of pipes, TCP produces
high quality products, including valuable oils that do not contain any tars or
asphaltines. The solid component is also produced the way nature would
recycle its elements. TCP reforms even heavy metals into oxides that are
safe and non-leachable and pass TCLP (leaching) standards.
Why is it important to
read nonfiction text?
         It is estimated that
          ___% of direct
          instruction is
provided for reading
nonfiction materials in the
primary grades…
  ___% of the time
   spent reading and
   writing as adults is
nonfiction.
Stages of Inquiry
in the Classroom
 Encountering the Issue                    Making Connections
                                      Text to text, text to self, text to
 • getting the “big idea”              world
 • making connections                 Open and closed word sorts

 Task Analysis                             Asking Questions
 • defining the task                  Right there, think and search
                                      Author and you, in your head
 • asking questions
 Investigating Information                 Determining Importance
 • seeking, organizing, analyzing,    Features, structures of text
                                      Note taking, graphic organizers
 • applying to project                Facts to main ideas, summaries

 Reasoning with Information              Inferring and Visualizing
 • evaluating, creating, judging,     creating models
                                      using text clues and prior knowledge
   inferring, visualizing             using implicit and explicit information
 • making decisions                   to reach conclusions (author and you)

 Acting on Decisions                                Synthesizing
 • synthesizing                       text to text, self and world
                                     • applying to new settings and contexts
 • communicating findings            • in your head
What happens when we provide non-fiction
materials to primary children?
 They read more, are more willing to
 struggle with difficult text, choose trade
 books over games during indoor recess,
 and are empowered to find information
 that supports the inquiry question. The
 classroom mantra is…”did you know”?
                    Non-Fiction Texts:
                    True or False?
“Students aren’t as
interested in nonfiction as
they are in fiction.”
               “When reading fiction the
               strategies
               are the same.”
                    “Non-fiction text is too
                    difficult for struggling
                    readers.”
   Brainstorm: what’s this unit
   about?
   “It’s “Monday” morning, let’s begin... . Oh, I
   just received a note from the office to which I
   must attend. Tell you what, why don’t you plan
   a party while I’m working. We’ve worked so
   hard and I think we could use a party”.
                   Students are asked to plan a
                   party while the teacher tends
                   to an “office” problem. They
                   are given no guidelines for planning
                   or decision making. After 15
                   minutes the teacher requests
                   the party plan. Students process
                   the obstacles to successful planning.
Review: Step One
The “HOOK”
                       Open Word Sort


                               beliefs congress patriotism
                               governor Lincoln Memorial
                               rights      democracy
                                 Capitol       senator
                              responsibility House voting
                                Senate      government




Step Two: Optional placement for
vocabulary activity
  Any Guesses???
      Debrief the party experience
      Let students know that you were
       introducing the next unit
      Ask if they can guess the topic




Next step: Any guesses?
                                                 Virginia Lake School
                                               Palatine School District 15
                                                    Palatine, Illinois

 Dear Students,

 I need your help! We have a lot of families moving into our community from other countries. They have so much
 they are trying to learn: a new language, new customs, and about a new community. They are eager to become a part
 of this country, and I would like our school to help them learn more about the United States government.
 We would like to be able to give these families a kit that has lots of information that will help them learn more about
 our government in our town, our state, and our country. We want them to know more about the leaders in our
 government. They could learn how to respect the law, what "patriotism" means, and their individual rights. They
 must know about our election process so they better understand how Americans cooperate to elect our leaders.

 Remember, these people don't speak very much English! That means you will need to include pictures, diagrams,
 and videotapes. You can make the kit so it will help them improve their English as they learn about our government.

 Thank you for your help! I'm looking forward to seeing your project when you are finished.

 Sincerely,

 Dr. Ludwig
 Principal
Next step:
Letter announcing
partnership and
tasks.
         Complete Task Analysis
   Ask, “What are we expected to do”?
   Record responses on chart paper
                      Define the Task         Ask Questions


    Create kits so that our             What questions do we
    community can better                have now?
    understand:                         •
    •Government in our town,            •
    state and our nation                •
    •Leaders in our                     •
    government                          •
    •The meaning of                     •
    patriotism, rights and
    responsibilities
    •How our democracy
    works through the
    election process
Next: Task Analysis
         Inquiry Begins!!!
Next: Let them begin!
         Semantic Features Chart

     Government         Places to   Importance   Leaders and   How they are   Important
                          know                    their jobs     choosen      decisions

     Local




     State




     National




Note-taking organizer
                           Essential Question

How does a government help people make decisions?


Coaching questions: (developed from the learner outcomes)

   What is the significance of patriotic symbols?
   What are the similarities and differences between local, state, and
    federal government?
   What process do we use to elect our leaders?

 Post your questions after students have posted theirs.
MakingConnections
Asking Questions
Determining Importance
Visualizing
Drawing Inferences
Synthesizing
And then there is the v       of w       . If w
were any less s     , it would be less stable and
could therefore disrupt delicate c        activities.
But if w    were more v        , it would prevent the
movement of large m            necessary for c
division.
And then there is the viscosity of water. If water
were any less sticky, it would be less stable and
could therefore disrupt delicate cellular activities.
But if water were more viscous, it would prevent
the movement of large molecules necessary for
cell division.




                          Dr. Timothy Johnson, Finding God in the Questions
Making Connections: THE HOOK
THE HOOK
 The teacher introduces the unit by having teams
 participate in a taste test; one cup is chocolate and
 water, one is chocolate and milk, and one is
 chocolate mixed with salt water. They must rate
 the three drinks and give their preference. Then
 students read Goldilocks and the Three Bears
 (reader’s theater). Following the
 reading teams look on the bottom
 of the glasses to reveal a picture of
 Venus, Earth, and Mars. Earth is
 considered the Goldilocks
 Planet and it is their task to
 discover why.
  AUTHENTIC CONNECTION: Levels of
            Authenticity
1.Someone from within the classroom
2.Someone from within the school
3.Someone from the local community or
  from outside the community
           AUTHENTIC CONNECTION:
                     Highest Level of
                       Authenticity

Student-generated connections
• If students have had other inquiry experiences in which a letter
  delivered the challenge, then it is most appropriate to use another
  form of invitation
• Students with high competency levels in using inquiry strategies can
  be challenged to explore connections to up-coming unit topics and
  advise the class about possibilities
• The teacher could also encourage teams of students to work on
  different projects connected to authentic needs in the school,
  community or world at large.
Introduce the Young Producers’ Contest from
www.earthsky.org/Teachers/YP/
The Young Producers’ Contest
What is the Young Producers’ Contest?
The Young Producers’ Contest is an annual event sponsored by the Earth & Sky
radio series and the National Science Foundation. Each year, students around the
world create their own science radio programs. We choose the five best and air
them on the Earth and Sky program in the spring.


Teams will share scripts with fifth grade students who are
studying the planets to help them learn about space and to get
feedback before submitting their scripts.

 Conclude with reader’s theater, The Goldilocks Problem.
     Student Decision Making: Levels of
              Empowerment
1.Staff member requests help in some aspects
  of planning
2.Staff member and students collaborate
  during planning and implementation
3.Students assume leadership with feedback
  and suggestions from staff
4.Students define issue, develop and
  implement action plan and operate within
  parameters established by teacher and class
•Letters MUST be authentic, not fiction. Unless the students
 are told it is a simulated event, you cannot move forward as if
 the partnership between the class and the designated
 connection were real. Otherwise, it becomes an ethically
 questionable process whereby students are lead to believe the
 partnership reflected in the letter is real when it is not.

• The teacher must reach out to people in the community to
  move the content beyond the constraints of a textbook.

•The letter should outline the need that will be served and
 introduce the target audience.
•Information needed by the audience should be outlined and
 the format for presentation specified (PowerPoint, etc.).
Vir gin ia La ke Sch oo l
Pa la tin e, Illin ois

Dea r Fir st a nd Secon d Stud en ts ,

Wh o sh o uld live a nd wh o sh o uld d ie? I th in k I’ve go t Ch a rl o tte living in
th e ba se m ent . Oth er s cr ea tur es a re wiggli n g in th e class r oom s, jump ing in
th e ha llw a ys a nd fly in g in th e ca feteri a. Som e o f th em a re furr y, som e
cr aw l, som e sco ot, som e sting a nd som e m a y b ite. W h at sh ould I d o ?

I n ee d y our h elp to in ves tiga te th ese cr it ter s a nd tell m e wh ic h ins ects a re
h a rmfu l a nd wh ic h o n es a re h elp ful . I n ee d to kn o w if I sh ould ca ll th e
exte rmin a to r , if I sh o uld smo os h th em , o r if I sh o uld ca tch th e ins ects a nd
r elea se th em o ut sid e.

Co uld cen tip ed es b e u se ful in th e cour tya rd ? Do spid er s h elp p eop le? Do
b ird s eat r o llie p o llies? W h at a bou t th e b ee s on th e pl ay grou n d? Do
ins ects se rv e a n y u se ful purp os e?

After y ou lea rn a bou t th ese ins ects, pl ea se let m e kn o w wh at y ou lea rn .
Rep o rti n g th e in fo r ma tio n in a flip b oo k wo uld b e h elp ful to m e so I kn o w
wh ic h ins ects I sh o uld r es cu e a nd wh ic h o n es , if a n y , I sh o uld n o t.



Sin ce re ly,

Th e He ad Cu sto di a n
   Text-to-Self
Connections that readers
make between the text
and their past experiences
or background knowledge.
               Goudvis & Harvey 2000
   Text-to-World
Connections that
readers make between
the text and the bigger
issues, events, or
concerns of society and
the world at large.
             Goudvis & Harvey 2000
  Text-to-Text
Connections that
readers make between
the text they are
reading and another
text.

           Goudvis & Harvey 2000
  Beavers           by Helen H. Moore

         Read about beaver features, p. 24-27
         Use post it notes and write:
t/s = text to          t/w = text to    t/t = text to
self                   world            text
T/S                    T/W              T/T
Open Word Sort



  krill       web       flippers
          fluke   tentacles
  meat plankton           wings
    insects trees ocean
  seals       molars    rainforest
Semantic Features Chart
             Food           Other          Features      Behaviors      Threats to
             (predator prey habitat        (size, body   (nesting,      animal
             relationships) features       parts)        life clycle,
                            (location,                   hiding,
                            description)                 movement,
                                                         defenses)


Mammals


Fish


Birds


Amphibians
Reptiles


Insects
Making Connections
 What do you do when the connections
 students make aren’t very helpful?
    Making Connections


             When you are five… .




Think about the connections young children make by telling their stories!
In September and October, kindergarteners are making connections to
each other and their teacher, who is the first replacement for MOM.

    By November teachers can encourage text to self
    connections by using the following strategies.
    1.Pair students and have them take turns discussing their
    stories as you pause after interesting pages.
    2.Students discuss connections to the book.
    3.Call on several students to tell about the connection
    made by their their PARTNER.
                           Making Connections


             When you are five… .




As students make connections to a book that you read aloud,
record their responses on chart paper.
    I saw a beaver on Animal Planet.
    When I watched Animal Planet I saw Steve Erwin wrestling a
    crocodile.
    My grandmother has a beaver family at the lake where she spends
   the summer. They bite the trees near her house. She said they use
    the trees for their dams.
    My grandmother lives in Florida.
    Ask them to help you check the statements that help us better
    understand the book.
Making Connections
  Anticipation Guides
Me   Text
            Mosquitoes eat plant nectar and pollinate
            plants.
            Mosquitoes make great food for fish.
            Honeydew is a favorite food of the
            male mosquito.
            The larvae do not breed successfully in
            water that has fish or frogs.
            Mosquitoes are the most dangerous
            Animal in the world.
                   Making Connections
                       with Words

Vocabulary knowledge is
the single most important
factor contributing to
reading comprehension.
J. G. Laflamme, The effect of the Multiple Exposure Vocabulary Method and the Target
Reading Writing Strategy on Test Scores. 1997
       Three properties of
successful vocabulary instruction

            1.Integration (relating
              words to previous
              experiences)
            2.Repetition
            3.Meaningful use
Making Connections
    With Words
Open Word Sort



  krill       web       flippers
          fluke   tentacles
  meat plankton           wings
    insects trees ocean
  seals       molars    rainforest
                    Closed Word Sort



                      krill       web       flippers
                              fluke   tentacles
                      meat plankton           wings
                        insects trees ocean
                      seals       molars    rainforest


Categories:
•Animal habitats
•Animal features
•Food for animals
•no clue
                     Closed Word Sort

          ocean
        rainforest
            web                             meat krill
           trees                              insects
                                             plankton


                     •animal habitats                    food for animals



Categories:
•Animal habitats
•Animal features                        flippers fluke
•Food for animals                       tentacles wing
•no clue                                   molars

                                                         animal features
    Word    Use in Text   Page
krill
web
flippers
fluke
tentacles
meat
plankton
wings
insects
trees
ocean
seals
molars
          Continuing Word Connections:

Vocabulary Word              My Definition   Dictionary   Use in Text
                                             Definition
1.

Write about it…

2.

Write about it..

3.

Write about it…

4.

Write about it…

5.

Write about it…


 C. Samojedny, 2004
1
             2   3               5
                          4                 6




    7            8         9
                                     10




        11                     13         14
                     12
                         Group 1


Birds
Zoo Animals
Farm Animals
               Group 3
Group 2
                                             insects




Directions:
• Place index card with vocabulary word in the front of the book along
  with sticky notes.
• Students work in pairs to place sticky note on every page where the
  word is printed.
• After locating words they return to each page and make connections
  between the word and the picture to see if they can name the word.
Making Connections
    With Words

   kit         whales
   beavers     cub
   waste       dens
   omnivore    herbivore
   droppings   fur
   fins        lodges

   and            are connected because
Making Connections
    With Words

             More About Beavers,
             Page 28, 29
             Mini Lessons for
            Making Connections
   Engaging the Learner (jigsaw and letter)
   Power of Post-its (T/S, T/W, T/T)
   Open Sort/Closed Sort
   Connect Two
   Word Splash
   Tracking Words
   Word Detective
   Anticipation Guides
Guided Practice
 Write or edit the letter
 Select or create organizer for jigsaw materials
  (tradebooks)
 Choose book for modeling Text to Text
  connections
 Select vocabulary strategy and create student
  handouts – including word tracking organizer
 Create anticipation guide



 = mandatory lessons
 = optional lessons
Making Connections
Asking Questions
Determining Importance
Drawing Inferences
Synthesizing
A sap-sucking insect may
hold the key to a whole new
class of antibacterial drugs,
say scientists who have
been looking at how these
creatures combat infection.
Readers ask questions to…

 Find specific information
 Clarify confusion

 Construct meaning

 Discover new information
   There are how many types of bees?
   How many eggs does the queen lay?
   What does the drone do?
   Where does a colony live?
   What do worker bees do for the colony?
   What do bees do with pollen?
   Where do bees live?
     Question/Answer Relationship (QAR)
IN THE BOOK                 IN MY HEAD
 Right There:               Author and You: answer

  answer in text, easy to     not in text; must think
  find; words used in         about what is known,
  question and used in        what text is saying and
  answer are in same          how it fits together
  sentence

   Think and Search:          On My Own:
    words and answers           using experiences
    come from different         to answer question
    parts of text (or
    books)
In the Book (Gathering Information   In Your Head (Inference)

  Right There:                       Author and You (Inference)
  Queens Lay 1500 eggs each day.
                                     Which bee is the busiest?
  Right There:                       Why is it necessary for the queen to
  Drones mate with the queen bee.    lay so many eggs?
  Worker Bees…
  •Make wax                          On Your Own
  •Feed the larvae
  •Collect pollen                    Do you know someone who
                                     works as hard as the bee?
  •Store pollen
  •Make honey
  •Guard the hive
1.   I wonder...
2.   what horses eat?
3.   where horses live?
4.   how horses help people?
  I wonder…?
 Choose a book, turn the pages
  and WONDER
 Write “I wonder… (about

  animals)?”
 Wonder and Wander in the books!
http://www.yahoo ligan s.com/content/animals/species/3595.html

Wher e do ants l ive?

http://www.bijlmake rs.com/entomology/beg in.htm#ana tomy

Under “Insec t ana tomy,”

      What are the body part s of an insec t?


http://research.amnh .org/ento mology /socia l_ins ects/ants/ant_ colony_cyc le.html

      How does an ant colony begin?

      Wher e does the queen search for food?

      What are the queen’ s respon sibilities?

      How often do the ants need to be fed?

      What are the jobs of the worker ants?

      What is the larva l phase?

      What happens when the colony queen dies?
http://www.fno.org/nov97/toolkit.html#anchor173647
What is an Essential Question?


Generate an Essential Question for your unit.


http://www.fno.org/nov97/toolkit2.html#anchor186984
What is the difference between an Essential Question and a Telling
Question (also called Coaching Questions)?


What part of your unit design (Inquiry-Based Learning Template) will
assist you in developing Telling Questions?


List your Telling or Coaching questions.


How will you introduce your students to your Essential and Telling
questions?




                                                created by E. Alford, 2003
How does a whale’s
body help it survive?
 Questioning
Moves Inquiry
  Forward
        Goals/Standards: (#’S)                   CONTEXT                                               CONTENT
                                            Engaging the Learner                             Teaching and Learning Events*
             No questions = no inquiry!
    State Goal 17. Understand world
    geography and the effects of
    geography on society, with
                                        In modeling the opening we:
                                        People interact with their
                                                                            • students read letter and complete task
                                                                              analysis; ask questions based on opening
    emphasis on the United States.      environment to create cultures. If    activities and letter
    Standard A. Locate, describe, and   civilization depends on natural      • inquiry begins with students reading articles provided
    explain places, regions, and        resources then their demise may be    by teacher
    features on the Earth.              the result of overuse; Students      • jigsaw information in teams, organize and share with

             Call it directed research. explore cultures that collapsed
                                        because of this mistake. Teachers
                                                                               class
                                                                             • mini lessons begin
                                        use an apple to represent the Earth • Vocabulary activity
 Benchmark                              and slice away portions that        • activity
                                        represent resources.                • activity
                                                                            • activity
                                                                            • activity
 Benchmark
             Call it project-based learning.
  State Goal 1. Read with
  understanding and fluency.
                                                                            Student’s continue asking questions and
                                                                            seeking answers throughout the unit.

   Standard A. Apply word                                                  • Note taking with graphic organizer
  analysis and vocabulary skills                                           • activity
  to comprehend selections                                                 • activity
  Standard B. Apply reading                                                • activity

             But, do not call it inquiry-based
  strategies to improve
  understanding and fluency.
  Standard C. Comprehend a
                                          Final Team Performance
                                        Teams create infomercials
                                                                                              Individual Student Assessments

  wide range of reading                 promoting sustainable growth
  materials.
             learning!
  Read a variety of non-fiction
  materials to identify, describe
                                        strategies and base their
                                        reasoning on analysis of
  and locate important                  historical patterns of human
  information about trees               growth and development.                   *Numbers after Teaching and Learning Events refer to assessments

Emily Alford, 1998
              Mini Lessons for
              Asking Questions

   Question and Answer Relationships
    (QAR)
   Developing In the Book Questions
    (Right There, Think and Search)
   Wonder and Wander
   Essential and Coaching Questions
Guided Practice
   Select book and create In the Book questions.
   Create Cyberhunt and guiding questions.
   Design activities for teaching the QAR.
   Kindergarten develop Wonder and Wander
    strategies.
   Create essential and coaching questions.
   Create planned opportunities for students to
    continue inquiry by asking and seeking
    information to their questions.
Making Connections
Asking Questions
Determining Importance
Drawing Inferences
Synthesizing
What are the three
 most important
facts in this book?
    Beavers    by Helen H. Moore

• Read the chapter on Beaver
  Family Life and decide on the
  three most important ideas.

• What are important strategies
  that beavers use to survive?
Illinois School
Park Forest, Illinois



Dear Students,

Our first Spirit Day is fast approaching. I am really looking forward to honoring the outstanding work of our students and
teachers. We have planned the assembly, the treats, and the presentations -- but there’s one thing we forgot: A SCHOOL
MASCOT!

A school mascot is a very important symbol. We need to choose a school mascot that is worthy of our attention and
promotes school spirit! Most people choose a mascot because of the way it looks. I think we should consider the way it
looks and behaves in its environment. When we make our decision, we need to think about the animal’s survival,
conservation, and importance.

I understand that you are studying animals this year. Would you be willing to nominate ten animals to be our school
mascot? The animals should represent all five classes - mammals, insects, reptiles, amphibians, and birds. Then we’ll have
a school election to choose the best mascot for us. Be sure to include information about how these animals adapt and
survive. We don’t want students choosing a mascot only because of the way it looks!

I look forward to your nominations.

Sincerely,

Dr. Joyce Carmine, Principal
Illinois School
    Finding Important Information


     The context puts the
“     important ” into finding
    important information.
     Beavers    by Helen H. Moore

       What did the author think was
        important for the reader to know about
        beavers?
Let’s learn about beavers!
      Read the book using only features as
        table of contents and index
• from clues for determining importance.
• from labels and captions
• from pictures
Bold Text   Italics   Captions   Labels   Table of
                                          Conte nts
                  Using The Features
            of Nonfiction Text to Determine
                       Importance
   Table of Contents
   Index
   Titles, Headings
   Font Size
   Font Style
   Tables, Graphs, Charts, Diagrams,
    Labels, Captions
   Features of Websites
                Cutting Up With Facts
Cows have four stomachs. They eat grass

Ostriches can run 40 miles an hour. It can kick its enemies.

Ostriches have long nails.

Frogs pushes their stomach out of their body when if it eats something bad.

Baboons live together in troups.

Rabbits eat their droppings. Rabbits eat grass.

Chameleons change colors to hide.

Cobras puff out their necks to look bigger.

Whales can talk to each other.

 The starfish stomach goes out of its body and into the shellfish

 Meercats stand guard to warn of danger.
                 Cutting Up With Facts
Features
 Cows have four stomachs. They eat grass

 Ostriches have long nails.

 Frogs pushes their stomach out of their body if it eats something bad.

 Rabbits eat their droppings. Rabbits eat grass.

 Baboons live together in troups.

 The starfish stomach goes out of its body and into the shellfish

Behaviors
 Cobras puff out their necks to look bigger.

 Whales can talk to each other.

 Chameleons change colors to hide.

 Meercats stand guard to warn of danger.

 Ostriches can run 40 miles an hour. It can kick its enemies.
                Name: ____________________________________

                                                              Wha t are the two main types of trees? How ca n you tell them apart?



What are the parts of a tre e and what do they do?
Tree Part             What doe s it do?




                                                             In the box below, draw a picture of your favor ite tre e. Nex t to the picture ,
                                                             explain how to identify this tre e.




Draw a picture of a tre e’s life cycle.                         What pro ducts are made fro m trees? How ar e trees imp ortant in
                                                                your life?
                Scavenger Hunt
       Interactions of animals and plants
           How do animals use plants?
Name of animal               Part of plant used




Human (animal)                Part of plant used
         Moving Seeds
Name of mover       How seeds are moved
Insect

Life Cycle                      Note: see section on
                                inferencing for
                                completion of this
                                format.
                                      Basic Information
             What do I know about plants and _________________?
                How do they survive?
                How do they change?

             Features that help it survive:




             Ways in which it helps others:




             Ways in which it may harm others:




                                                                  Virginia Lake, First Grade
           Reading and Taking Notes
Reading Center:
 students read trade books about communities

 they write the name of the book and one fact that is

  important to the questions they are answering.
Examples:
This Is My Street
People live on different streets and go different places.
Needs and Wants
The things you want sometimes don’t help us live.
 People Who Lead Us
 People who lead us are people like somebody who
 teaches people how to work as a team.
 Signs
 Sign help us and keep us safer like sign at the zoo say do
 not feed the animals.     Created by Kathy Kroll
       Using Graphic Organizers to
         Determine Importance
   Semantic Features Charts
   Change Over Time
Semantic Features Chart
             Food           Other          Features      Behaviors      Threats to
             (predator prey habitat        (size, body   (nesting,      animal
             relationships) features       parts)        life clycle,
                            (location,                   hiding,
                            description)                 movement,
                                                         defenses)


Mammals


Fish


Birds


Amphibians
Reptiles


Insects
Change Over Time: Life Cycle of a Tree
            Change Over Time: Life Cycle of a Tree
Maple key          Maple seed   Seedling      Tree          Tree dies
(seed)             sprouts      grows         matures




   Falls            Seed                      Smooth        Maple
   from                         Stretches
                    inside                    trunk         can live
   mature                       leaves to
                    key                       becomes       for 200
   tree.                        sun.
                    swells.                   rough.        years.




                                                            Many
   Spins            Seed        Leaves        Produces
                                                            holes
   to               coat        make          blossoms
                                                            made by
   forest           splits      chlorophyll   which are
                                                            animals
   floor.           apart.      and food      fertilized.
                                                            lightening




                   Tiny root    Becomes        Makes         Not
   Lies
                   creeps       dormant        more          enough
   under
                   into the     in winter.     maple         sap can
   leaves all
                   damp soil.                  keys          feed
   winter.
                                               (seeds).      growth.
Investigating Information
                      Inquiry:
                        After seeking information by
                         conducting experiments

                         Students use graphic organizers
                          to organize

                      Note: this was a second
                      unit and this team
                      created their own format
                      for organizing
                      information. Then they
                      called 1-800-flowers
                      Organizers for
                       Note-taking

   The power of post-its
   Cutting up with facts
   Creating organizers for concepts
    (mapping the way)
Open Word Sort



  krill       web       flippers
          fluke   tentacles
  meat plankton           wings
    insects trees ocean
  seals       molars    rainforest
             My Vocabulary List
krill
web
flippers
fluke
tentacles
meat
plankton
wings
insects
trees
ocean
seals
molars
rainforest
            Finding Important Information:
                      Vocabulary
                   Words And Concepts (WAC)

 A     B       C        D      E      F       G   H

 I      J     K         L      M     N        O   P

 Q      R      S        T      U     V        W   X

 Y      Z


Reading Strategy: Determining Importance
                         Category
                         What is it?
                                       Properties
                         ANIMAL
Compare/Contrast                       Describe it.
What is it like?
                                       HAS WINGS

  MOUSE                   BAT

                                       MAMMAL


  FRUIT
                                         USES
               INSECT-
                                        “RADAR”
               EATING
                           VAMPIRE
Illustrations: What are some
examples?
A bat is an animal similar
to a mouse. It is a mammal,
has wings and uses radar to
locate prey. Some examples
are fruit, vampire and insect
eating bats.
                       Category
                       What is it?
                                     Properties
Compare/Contrast                     Describe it.
What is it like?


                      Earth




Illustrations: What are some
examples?
             The Frayer Model
Definition            Characteristics




                  word
Examples              Non-Examples
              The Frayer Model
Definition               Characteristics
Is warm-blooded, has fur     • warm-blooded
and makes milk. An           • have fur
example is a human. A        • produce milk
spider is not a mammal


                        Mammal
Examples                                  Non-
                                          examples
• human      • horse       • frog        • spider
• squirrel   • whale       • snake       • lizard
• dog        • cow         • turtle      • shark
• bat        • rabbit      • butterfly   • chicken
       Mini Lessons for
       Determining Importance
   The Features of Nonfiction Text
   Key Points and Supporting
    Details
   Graphic Organizers, Note
    Taking
   IWAC, The Frayer Model,
    Concept Definition
             Guided Practice for
             Writing Lessons for
           Determining Importance
   Select books for teaching features
   Create or modify note taking
    format
   Create or modify graphic
    organizer(s) for whole group
    summaries and comparisons
   Use Frayer Model or Concept
    Definition Map and define a
    selected word for your unit
Making Connections
Asking Questions
Determining Importance
Drawing Inferences
Synthesizing
“Inferential thinking occurs
when text clues merge with
the reader’s prior knowledge
and questions to point toward
. . . a conclusion in the text.”

                  Goudvis & Harvey, 2000
A volunteer,
please…
In the Book (Gathering Information   In Your Head (Inference)

  Right There:                       Author and You (Inference)
  Queens Lay 1500 eggs each day.
                                     Which bee is the busiest?
  Right There:                       Why is it necessary for the queen to
  Drones mate with the queen bee.    lay so many eggs?
  Worker Bees…
  •Make wax                          On Your Own
  •Feed the larvae
  •Collect pollen                    Do you know someone who
                                     works as hard as the bee?
  •Store pollen
  •Make honey
  •Guard the hive
                Cutting Up With Facts
 Features
Cows have four stomachs. They eat grass

Ostriches have long nails.

Frogs pushes their stomach out of their body when if it eats something bad.

Rabbits eat their droppings. Rabbits eat grass.

Baboons live together in troups.

The starfish stomach goes out of its body and into the shellfish

 Behaviors
Cobras puff out their necks to look bigger.

Whales can talk to each other.

 Chameleons change colors to hide.

 Meercats stand guard to warn of danger.

 Ostriches can run 40 miles an hour. It can kick its enemies.
        What can we infer?
Cows have four stomachs. They eat grass

Rabbits eat their droppings. Rabbits eat grass.

What can we infer about grass?

Ostriches have long nails.

The starfish stomach goes out of its body and into the shellfish

The cheeta has a spotted coat.

Frogs pushes their stomach out of their body when if it eats something bad.




Animal features…
Considering all of the facts about animal features, what can we infer?
    What can we infer?
Cobras puff out their necks to look bigger.

Whales can talk to each other.

Chameleons change colors to hide.

Meercats stand guard to warn of danger.

Ostriches can run 40 miles an hour. It can kick its enemies.

Baboons live together in troups.




Animal behaviors…
              Inferential Thinking

                     ABC’s of Inferring
                    Animal Survival
 A      B      C       D       E         F   G   H

 I      J      K       L       M         N   O   P

 Q      R      S       T        U        V   W   X

 Y      Z


Reading Strategy: Inferential Thinking
    Reasoning with Information:
    evaluating, creating, judging,
    inferring, visualizing, making decisions
You are a tree in the fall. Your leaves are changing color for the first time.
Tell what you see and how you feel. What would you say?

I feel imbarrist because all the trees around me are pine trees and their leaves don’t
change color. I’m scared because I wonder if somethings wrong. I don’t like it
because I liked it when my leaves were green. I’m asking the pine trees if something
is wrong but they don’t know because they have not dad it happen to them. I don’t
see any other trees to ask so I don’t know what will happen next

Uh-oh! Your leaves are turning brown and falling to the ground. Now how
do you feel? What do you see? What would you say?

I’m starting to wonder if I’m goinjg to die. I don’t know if this is something that
should happen. I’m glad I got throught the other thing but this is even worse. This is
worse than having a kid climb you. This is terrible. I hate it. I like green way better
than brown.                                       2nd grade
Response to writing prompt at the conclusion of the unit:

You are a tree in the fall. Your leaves are changing color for
the first time. Tell what you see and how you feel. What
would you say?
I look so pretty but I wish they were nice fresh green. The colors are
so pretty but I wish it never happens. I will just haft to stay like this for
a long time. At least I am alive. I do not like fall because it makes my
leave turn different colors.

Uh-oh! Your leaves are turning brown and falling to the
ground. Now how do you feel? What do you see? What would
you say?


I look so bad and my leaves are falling off. The brown is werse than
last time. I rather have colored leaves than brown. At least they will
turn green again nest summer. I wish I was a needle leaf and not a
broad leaf.     2nd grade
        Mini Lessons for
       Drawing Inferences

 Inferring Feelings
 Inferring from the Cover,

  Illustrations, and Text
 Inferring in Nonfiction

 Facts, Inferences, New Ideas
Guided Practice
   Inferring meaning using Author and Me
    questions (create questions)
   Inferring meaning from text clues
    (words, pictures, notes)
   Writing prompt
Making Connections
Asking Questions
Drawing Inferences
Determining Importance
Synthesizing
“Synthesis at the highest level
goes beyond merely taking
stock of meaning as one reads.
A true synthesis is achieved
when a new perspective or
thought is born out of the
reading.”
                 Goudvis & Harvey, 2000
Insect
                                          What should we do about ___________ in
Life Cycle                                our school?




                      How do plants and _______________depend on each other to
                      survive? Help each other to stay alive? How do they work
                      together?




                                      Basic Information
             What do I know about plants and _________________?
                How do they survive?
                How do they change?

             Features that help it survive:




             Ways in which it helps others:




             Ways in which it may harm others:




                                                                   Virginia Lake, First Grade
Read aloud                         Step One




Beginning        Middle                End
               Fact      Fact   Fact
 Fact   Fact
                                        Fact

 Fact   Fact          Fact
Read aloud                          Step Two




Beginning          Middle             End
                  1. Fact, yada
1.   Fact, yada                   1. Fact, yada
                  2. fact, yada
2.   fact, yada                   2. fact
                  3. fact
3.   fact,
4.   fact
                                  Step Three
 Martin Luther King Jr.
By: Frankie Forester
                Martin Luther King’s birthday is
                January 15. He got his Ph.D and
                was then Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

                He won the Nobel peace prize in
                1964. He had ideas that were
                good for black people and white
                people.

                Martin Luther King, Jr. gave many
                important speeches. His most
                important speech was his “I Have a
                Dream” speech. King wanted peace
                and everyone treated the same.
                                              Planet Power Point Checklist
Name: _________________
                                                              Provide a checklist or other means of
                 Qu i k Ti e™a nd a
                 ph
                     c m
              Gra ics de mp ssor
                           co re
                                                              informing students of the expectations for
Planet:__________________
                  de         h        u
           aren ee dto see t i s p ic t re.




                                                              their final team performance

                                              Check o ff each step when it is done.
                                                 I have completed a chart that shows the distance
                                                 between my planet and the sun, and my planet and the
                                                 Earth.
                                                 I have defined revolution and rotation.
                                                 I have explained how revolution affe cts the seasons
                                                 and years.
                                                 I have explained how rotation affects ni ght and day.
                                                 I have desc ribed the size of my planet.
                                                 I have desc ribed the atmosphere of my planet.
                                                 I have desc ribed the climate of my planet.
                                                 I have included at least two unique features of my
                                                 planet.
                                                 My prese ntation includes a t least one picture of my
                                                 planet.
                                                 My prese ntation has my name on it.
                                                 My teacher has ch ecke d my work and helped me to
                                                 sa ve and print it.
                                                 I have shared my presen tation with my class and my
                                                 first grade friends.
Writing experiences help prepare students for
synthesis AND the final team performance.
  Final Product Organizer
South Berwyn School District 100
Julie Dyra, Angelo Annoreno, Kathy Grimes
                                                            These teachers used a
                                           The Nine Planets linked document to give
                                                            their students a
                                                            computer-based inquiry
                                                              s
                                                     Ahhh, itÕ just right!
                                                            experience
             Scenario                                                Why is Earth the “G oldilocks”
                                                                     planet?
                                            There are nine planets in our s olar system. Of those nine
                                            planets Earth is the “Goldilocks” planet. It is your mission
                                            to discover why this is true and to help other 3rd graders
                                            studying the solar system know why our planet is so special.
                          ci ™ d
                          km
                      Qui T e an a
                      pc o e r
                   Gr ahi sdecmpr sso
                    d      e hs i e
                                 c
               areneeedto se t i pt ur .




              Task                          You will research each of the planets and compare them to
                                            each other and to the Goldilocks planet, Earth.




             Product
                                            You will create a Power Point presentation and book
                                            about a specific planet and compare that planet to
                                            Earth.

          Assessments
                                            U   s   et   h   i   s    c   h   ec   kl   i   st   f   or   you   r   p   l   a   n   e   t   un   t
                                                                                                                                                 i   .
South Berwyn School District 100
Julie Dyra, Ange lo Annoreno, Kathy Grimes   Final Product Organizer
                  Questions                    Here are some questions to think about while
                                               you are researching:
                                                   Why does the distance from the sun influence the
                                                     development of life on each planet?
                                                   How does revolution and rotation affect seasons,
                                                     days, and years?
                                                   How do the size, atmosphere, clim ate, and
                                                     unique features influence the development of lif e
                                                     on each planet?
           Click here for your sites.
                   Gather                         Gather information using internet sites and
                                                                   books.



                   Organize                    Click on the pencil and paper to organize
                                               your research notes on a planning sheet.




                  Conclusion                       Do you think          Review your checklist to
                                                   Earth is the          make sure you have
                                                   “Goldilocks”          included all the
                                                   planet?               information required in
                                                                         your Power Point
                                               presentation and book.
                                               Display your booklet in the Library Media Center
                                               to share what you have learned about the
                                               planets with students, parents and friends.
                                               Let's have a class discussion...
   http://www.bcps.org/offices/lis/models/families/index.html
    http://www.bcps.org/offices/lis/models/depaola/index.html
    http://www.bcps.org/offices/lis/models/snow/index.html
    http://www.bcps.org/offices/lis/models/life/index.html
    http://www.bcps.org/offices/lis/models/weather/index.html
 Use the links to see how other teachers organize their inquiry
  units.
 Click on the assessment component to view the student product
  checklist.
 What will you include in a checklist to guide your students in
  completing their Final Team Performance?
Ending the Unit:

As well as using the Harcourt Science Assessment, students will share their
research about the solar system to counteract misconceptions in a format decided on
by the teacher or as a class. Possibilities include video , PowerPoint presentations,
books, or brochures. In the final project, students must clearly demonstrate
knowledge of the essential facts about their planet and expl ain reasons why high er
life forms cannot exist on their planet. They will expla in why Earth is considered
the Goldilocks planet. See follo wing rubric attached used to rate students on their
scripts and cooperative skills in a final video project.
        Supporting Students with
               Synthesis
   Writing Experiences

   Effectively Using Technology to
    Communicate

Completing the Final Product:
Trees, Planets
      Guided Practice
Your task:
 Use the template to describe the
  final product that students are asked
  to create for the authentic
  connection/audience.
 Create a Word document which more
  fully explains the ftp (final team
  performance and place in your
  desktop folder).
 Create a writing prompt to move
  your students toward synthesis.
   Assessment:
Individual Accountability
           And
  Team Responsibility
Holding Individuals Accountable
Information   Product: Final Team Performance
                 First individual assessment     Checks along the way…


                         Teams work on product


                Second individual assessment     Checks along the way…

                       Teams work on product


                 Third individual assessment
                                                 Checks along the way…

                         Teams work on product




  Unit Ends
                                   Integrated Curriculum and Instruction Design: Inquiry-Based Learning
                                             Author: Emily C. Alford           Grades: K - 12
    Professional Teaching Standards
                                                        CONTEXT                                                  CONTENT
Content Knowledge                                Engaging the Learner                             Teaching and Learning Events*
#1 The teacher understands the                                                     • ICID training begins following modeling; PowerPoint is
central concepts, methods of                  Participants are introduced to         used to guide work
inquiry, and structures of the               the goals for the workshop and        • select unit topics, map concepts
discipline(s) and creates learning           shares the unit organizer.            • teams view examples of other teaching units with
experiences that make the content            Stages of inquiry are introduced        interesting preparatory sets (hooks) and authentic
meaningful to all students.                  by asking participants to share         connections
Instructional Delivery                       steps in resolving everyday           • plan unit opening and complete the first part of the unit
#6 The teacher understands and               activities in which information         organizer
uses a variety of instructional              is needed in order to make a          • select format teams will use for the final performance and
strategies to encourage students’            decision.                               write description which include concepts from map
development of critical thinking,                                                  • inquiry (internet search) to identify resources to
problem solving, and performance             The instructor models a unit            supplement textbook materials (activities, hot lists, web
skills.                                      opening using information on            quests, lesson plans, reading materials for students, etc.)
• identify elements of Integrated            energy costs and coal usage. A        • mini lesson: writing local benchmarks; teams use concept
   Curriculum and Instruction Design         letter of request from a town            maps and power verbs to write outcomes; align to Illinois
   and inquiry for structuring teaching      leader to share information              Learning Goals and Standards
   and planning units of instruction         about the topic is used to focus      • continue inquiry into Energy; read short articles overnight
• identify content outcomes                  the task.                             • teams jigsaw information, organize and share with class
  for selected unit topic                                                          • review stages of implementation using PowerPoint
• determine strategies for engaging the                                            • begin designing teaching and learning events for each
  learner and plan ways in which                                                     benchmark
  students will demonstrate content
  mastery                                        Final Team Performance                            Individual Student Assessments
• analyze links between content,            Teachers create units using the        • Each section of unit is reviewed by instructor.
  benchmarks and standards and plan         ICID template including targeted       • map and local benchmarks show higher level performances
  teaching and learning events              Illinois Goals/Standards, strategies     for students
• select format for assessing individual    for engaging students in real-world    • the context for learning provides student the “big picture’ for
 readiness for completing team              contexts, teaching and learning          the unit and focused direction with the authentic connection
product = outcome is assessed
                                         events and assessments.                • benchmarks are differentiated; teaching and learning events
        (Number refers to assessment)                                                are aligned to benchmarks
                                                                                         *Numbers after Teaching and Learning Events refer to assessments
 Emily Alford, 1998
Content-Area Rubric

   Knowledge Content information or processes.                   Unit Knowledge Elaboration
      1           2                3                 4           Key concepts, principles, themes, issues, facts, details, or processes (Process
   incomplete     incomplete       complete          complete    examples: conflict-resolution, scientific inquiry, computation, surveying a
   major errors   minor errors     minor errors      accurate    reading selection)
                                                                 Example: Process of scientific inquiry, including prediction and testing out
                                                                 prediction
                                                                 Rule of t humb: ŅKnowledgeÓsupplied by students will be the same fr om one
                                                                 person to another.

   Reasoning Analysis, evaluation and synthesis of evidence.     Unit Reasoning Elaboration
      1         2                  3                 4
   incomplete   incomplete         complete          complete    Use of critical/higher-order thinking; presence and validity of
   major errors minor errors       minor errors      accurate    support/evidence/references for statements/opinions/conclusions;
   no rationale some rationale     some rationale strong         consideration of al l elements and the re lationships/connections among t hem;
                                                     rationale   logic of interpretation/justification/explanation
                                                                 Example: Observation/factual support is provided for prediction and for
                                                                 findings after inquiry; relationships of all el ements ar e considered; logical and
                                                                 systematic application of plan to test prediction is evident
                                                                 Rule of t humb: ŅReasoningÓ is the unique use of knowledge by each student,
                                                                 though there may be common patterns.

   Communication: Clear message, specific terms and              Communication Elaboration
   vocabulary while communicating knowledge and reasoning.       Key terms that students should be able to use knowledgeably
                                                                 Communication of knowledge through:           Of reasoning through:
       1          2                3                 4           _____drawings                                 ____ drawings
   partly clear   partly clear     mostly clear      totally     _____labels                                   ____ labels
   clear                                                         _____orally                                         ____ orally
   no terms       some terms       most terms        all terms   _____in writing                                     ____ in writing
                                                                 _____in English                                ____ in English
                                                                 _____in another language                       ____ other language
                                                                 Rule of thumb: “If they can use these terms and communicate their
                                                                 message, their language will reflect learning of essential unit knowledge
                                                                 and reasoning.”
                                             CONTEXT                                CONTENT
        Goals/Standards: (#’S)
                                       Engaging the Learner               Teaching and Learning Events*




  • use ratio and
    proportion and
    draw to scale




                                       Final Team Performance               Individual Student Assessments
                                                                Return to your local benchmarks and
                                                                 • create Ask yourself:: “How will I
                                                                standards. a garden design using know if
                                                                 measurements given for area at a scale
                                                                each student has the knowledge and reasoning
                                                                to communicate an understanding of the
      = outcome is assessed                                   of 5:1; graph location of plants in
                                                                concept(s)?”
       (Number refers to assessment)
                                                                 Select a format for given coordinates
                                                                 courtyard using checking student
Emily Alford, 1998                                             knowledge.
Guided Practice
   Use the design template to describe how you will know if students
    have hit the targeted benchmarks and standard.

   Include individual student assessments and a rubric for judging the
    final team performance in your folder.

   How will you evaluate the final team performance? Check out this
    website. You must login first then follow directions to create your
    own rubric. Include in your folder.
•   http://rubistar.4teachers.org/ You must sign in to create a rubric..

   What about individual assessments? This site allows you to choose
    from available assessments or create your own.
   http://nb.wsd.wednet.edu/big6/big6_resources.htm
     Guided Practice
Include in your folder copies of
 assessments designed for your unit.

Briefly describe them on the design
 template.

Include your rubric for the final team
 performance or create one using the
 website provided.

Create individual assessments and
 include them in your folder
     Guided Practice
Include a bibliography in your folder (Title
 of Book, author, publisher).

				
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