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Journey Begins Journey Begins

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									Grand Rounds
                                     W I N T E R 2 0 01




   SAINT LOUIS UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF MEDICINE




                             The
                             Journey Begins
                                   Members of the class of 2005
                                                       coats
                                   receive their white coats.




Alumni in New York respond
to the terrorist attacks
Surviving student debt
                                       More than 300 School of Medicine graduates came together to meet old friends and new alumni at Reunion
                                       2001. The oldest in attendance was 97-year-old Cornelius Kline, M.D. (’34), who came from Belleville, Ill.
                                       He attended all alumni events including the dean’s reception, a scholarship breakfast, the reunion dinner and
                                       the alumni Mass. Those who traveled farthest to attend the reunion were Michael Beirne, M.D. (’51), of
                                       Anchorage, Alaska, George Rourke, M.D. (’61), of Kailua-Kona, Hawaii, and David Crudo, M.D. (’81), also of
                                       Kailua-Kona.

                                       To see more photos from Reunion 2001, log onto medschool.slu.edu.



                                                                               Members of the class of
                                                                               ’86 at a private class party
                                                                               hosted by reunion chair
                                                                               Dan Martin, Jr., M.D.




                                                                                           Harmon Harrison, M.D.
                                                                                           (’51), and his wife,
                                                                                           Mary, enjoy a dance at
                                                                                           the Adam’s Mark




                                            Second-year student and
 Reunion Classes                            Reinert Scholarship
                                            recipient Jacqueline
    Support                                 Hellwege with Don
Scholarship Effort                          Fischer, M.D. (’51), and
                                            his wife, Mary, at the
A new program has received gen-             scholarship breakfast
erous support from members of
the five-year reunion classes at
the School of Medicine. In recog-
nition of the rising cost of med-                                                          Members of the class of ‘51,
                                                                                           which had the largest turnout
ical education and the debt level
                                                                                           of the classes attending this
with which students must cope,                                                             year’s reunion
alumni are being asked to consid-
er a gift of $100 or more for
every year since graduation.
These funds become immediately
available as scholarships for cur-
rent, qualified students and are
administered through the office              John McNamara, M.D.
of student financial planning.              (’51), and his wife,
"We've had a tremendous                     Norrine, with second-
response to this program, and I             year student Jason
especially want to thank the                Schlautman. Schlautman
Reunion Giving chairs,” said John           is a recipient of a Reinert
Soucy, director of reunion giving.          Scholarship, which the
“I’m looking forward to recruiting          McNamaras support.
volunteers to be reunion giving             “The contribution is
                                            faceless until you meet
chairs for next year's classes." For
                                            the student,” McNamara
information on the reunion giv-             said during the scholar-
ing program contact John Soucy              ship breakfast
at (314) 268-5962.




                      Mark Your Calendars
                Reunion 2002: October 17, 18 and 19
                                                Contents
Grand Rounds
Volume 1, No. 2

Grand Rounds is published bi-
annually by Saint Louis University
Health Sciences Center
Development and Alumni
                                                                           Grand Rounds • Winter 2001
Relations.

Grand Rounds is mailed to alumni
and friends of the School of
Medicine.

Patricia L. Monteleone, M.D.
Dean
Saint Louis University
School of Medicine
Schwitalla Hall M268
1402 S. Grand Blvd.
St. Louis, MO 63104-1028                                                                                                                       page 12

On the cover: White coat recipients
For more details, see page 9

Coordinator
                                                features
Marie Dilg (Soc Ser ’94)

Contributors
Laura Geiser (A&S ’90, Grad ’92)
Jennifer (Cavato) Frakes (A&S ’91)
Joe Muehlenkamp (A&S, B&A                       6    New York Stories
  ’89, Grad ’98)                                     Alumni share their personal accounts of the Sept. 11
Photo Credits                                        terrorist attacks.
Steve Dolan, 2, 17, 19
Aaron Gold, 3
Kevin Lowder, cover, 3, 10, 11, 20
Joyce Weber, 5, 20
                                                9    Cloaks of Compassion
Design                                               The annual white coat ceremony encourages first-
AKA Design Inc.                                      year students to think like doctors.
Art Direction: Richie Murphy

Health Sciences Center
Development and Alumni
Relations                                       12   Finding the Dollars to Support
Paul Schnabel
                                                     the Dream
Executive Director                                   Ironing out the costs of a medical education.
3525 Caroline Mall, Room 535
St. Louis, MO 63104
(314) 577-8676
schnabep@slu.edu
                                                16   Reflections
Marcia Quint (Grad ’95)                              Two longtime faculty members discuss their careers
Associate Director
Alumni Relations                                     in the division of allergy and immunology.
quintmj@slu.edu

Kent Hornberger (A&S ’68, Grad ’99)
Director of Development
hornbergkd@slu.edu
                                                                                                                            page 6

Shelia Manion
Director of Development
manionsm@slu.edu
                                                                                          departments
Jeanne Hunt
Alumni Assistant
huntjl@slu.edu
                                                                                             2       Vital Signs
Ginny Renick                                                                                         News briefs from the School of Medicine
Development Assistant
renickvm@slu.edu

Jane Dickenson
                                                                                           2         Dean’s Message
Office Manager
dickenja@slu.edu
                                                                                          20         Alumni Pulse




                                      page 16
Vital Signs
        g                                                                                                 500. “But I know what a dif-
                                                                                                          ference they are making in
                                                                                                          mine. They have given a gift
Medical Students                   Lisa Chipps won second            school’s annual memorial             that allows me to unlock the
Honored                            prize, and Jessica McMichael      service for those who donated        mysteries of the human body.
                                   won third prize.                  their bodies to science so that      And I have learned about
                                      Haas, the highest-ranking      others might learn to heal.          altruism in a most unlikely

S    ix medical students at
     Saint Louis University
were honored for research
                                   winner, focused his research
                                   on the underlying molecular
                                   mechanisms of opiates such
                                                                        As is the tradition, first-year
                                                                     students organized the cere-
                                                                     mony, which included every-
                                                                                                          place — the laboratory.”
                                                                                                             Randal Scholma said he
                                                                                                          imagined that during his
excellence during a forum          as morphine and heroin as         thing from drawing the art-          journey of learning in medical
featuring student research.        part of a study of the long-      work for the invitations and         school and residency, he
  The judges of the Alpha          term effects of maternal opi-     program to playing music             would encounter many won-
Omega Alpha Medical student        ate use on offspring.             during the service. Students         derful teachers.
research forum at Saint Louis         The research forum is an       from the Class of 2005 also             “But I have a feeling we’ve
University awarded first prize     annual event sponsored by         offered brief prayers from           already met our greatest
in the basic sciences research     the School of Medicine.           their various religions and          teachers,” Scholma said of the
competition to medical stu-                                          expressed thanks to surviving        donors. “We will never forget
dent Paul Haas, second prize       The Most Precious Gift            family members and friends           what we learn from them. We
to Scott Schepker and third                                          in the form of reflections.          have the greatest respect for
prize to Olivia Giddings. In                                            “I may not know the differ-

                                    I
                                                                                                          them and for those who sup-
the clinical sciences research        t was standing room only       ences your loved ones made           ported their decision.”
competition, S. Robert                in the Learning Resources      in your lives,” James Ramos             “We will repay their gen-
Witherspoon won first prize,       Center auditorium for the         told the crowd of more than          erosity with our service to
                                                                                                          others,” Lynn Marie Morski
                                                                                                          told the crowd.
  From the Dean’s Desk                                                                                       The School of Medicine
                                                                                                          receives more than 375 body
  Dear Alumni and Alumnae,                                                                                donations a year. It has held
                                                                                                          memorial services for
     Most of us will remember where we were on Sept. 11, 2001. I                                          decades but usually in the
  was sitting in my office when I heard about the first plane slam-                                       hospital chapel, where there
  ming into the side of a Trade Center tower. As the events of the                                        is room for faculty and stu-
  morning unfolded, I felt a sense of disbelief and horror. In the                                        dents. Margaret Cooper,
  hours and days that followed, the dichotomy of the tragic human                                         Ph.D., professor of anatomy
  loss and the beauty of the human spirit came forth.                                                     and neurobiology and associ-
     It is a privilege to hear the stories of two of our alumni who                                       ate director of the gift body
  live in New York City (pages 6-8). Our medical training gives us                                        program, said the school
  the tools and knowledge to offer assistance. But it is our individual approach to using these           began inviting family mem-
  gifts that sets each of us apart. Our Jesuit training emphasizes the importance of giving back          bers in 1995 when the
  — a mission these alumni promptly and proudly exemplified.                                              Caroline Mall was construct-
     It also was a privilege to host a reception and meet with alumni during Reunion Weekend              ed, which provided more
  2001. The diversity and the depth of the work performed by our alumni are phenomenal. I                 space for the service.
  have communicated with many of our alumni during the past year, and it’s always wonder-                     “Many times when loved
  ful to hear from you.                                                                                   ones donate their bodies,
     Remember to share your stories and news through this alumni magazine.                                family members don’t under-
                                                                                                          stand what they’ve done or
                                                                                                          why they did it,” Cooper said.
                                                                                                          “Many family members don’t
                                                                                                          even hold memorial services.
  Patricia L. Monteleone, M.D.,                                                                           They just donate the body,
  Dean                                                                                                    and that’s the end of it. It’s
  Saint Louis University School of Medicine                                                               very difficult, and we hope
                                                                                                             Mark Buller, Ph.D.,
                                                                                                          associate professor of molecular
                                                                                                          microbiology and immunology,
that by inviting family mem-                                                                              has received a seven-year,
bers to our service, they will                                                                            $3,917,542 contract award
find some closure and gain                                                                                from the National Institute of
some understanding.”                                                                                      Allergy and Infectious Diseases
   James Mueller’s mother,                                                                                for the smallpox-related study
Olivia, donated her body to                                                                               “Small Animal Models of
the School of Medicine a year                                                                             Human Orthopoxvirus
ago. Her family held a memo-                                                                              Infections for Evaluation of
rial service after her death, but                                                                         Experimental Therapies.”
                                                                       Scenes from the annual
Mueller said he did not want                                           memorial service for
to miss the school’s ceremony.                                                                              Govindaswam
                                                                       body donors
   “It’s a beautiful gesture,”                                                                            Chinnadurai, Ph.D.,
Mueller said. “It’s nice to                                                                               professor of molecular virolo-
know that someone you loved                                                                               gy, has received a five-year,
can mean so much to others.”                                              A new study at the School       $1,133,009 grant from the
   A plaque honoring those                                             of Medicine may offer hope.        National Cancer Institute for
who have donated their bod-                                               “This is a terrible problem     the study “Modulation of
                                    Lymphoma Society with the
ies to science is placed in a                                          for people who suffer from         Oncogenesis by E1A: Role of
                                    organization’s Scholar Award.
garden near the center of                                              axillary hyperhidrosis, and        CTBP and CTIP.”
                                       Shilatifard was selected in
Caroline Mall.                      part due to his extensive          people don’t like to talk about
                                                                       it,” said Dee Anna Glaser,           Terrance M. Egan, Ph.D.,
                                    research and discovery of the
                                                                       M.D., associate professor of       associate professor of pharma-
Society Bestows Scholar             molecular role of both the
                                                                                                          cological and physiological
Award to Biochemist                 MLL and ELL proteins. The          dermatology at the School of
                                                                       Medicine and lead author of        science, has received a four-
                                    MLL protein plays a key role
                                                                       the study. “Changing clothes       year, $1,021,588 competitive

C
                                    in a large percent of acute
       urrently, the most effec-                                       several times a day is a normal    renewal award from the
                                    myelogenous leukemia result-
       tive ways to treat                                              way of life for these patients.”   National Heart, Lung and
                                    ing from the chromosomal
leukemia and lymphoma are                                                 Saint Louis University’s        Blood Institute for the study
                                    translocation in children.
through chemotherapy, radia-                                           department of dermatology is       “Characterization of Cardiac
                                    Shilatifard’s lab is studying
tion therapy and often a bone                                          one of just 18 sites in North      Purinoceptors.”
                                    the role of both MLL and ELL
marrow transplant. Research         proteins in the development        America, and the only in the
at Saint Louis University may                                          Midwest, studying the use of          Steven J. Fliesler, Ph.D.,
                                    of childhood leukemia.
change that.                                                           botox purified neurotoxin to       professor of ophthalmology,
                                        “To understand the path-
   Ali Shilatifard, Ph.D., assis-                                      treat excessive sweating.          has received a four-year,
                                    ways of the proteins that con-
tant professor, and Edward                                                “Patients will get a set of     $1,178,500 competitive renew-
                                    tribute to the development of
Mallinkcrodt Jr., young inves-                                         botox injections, or placebo,      al award from the National Eye
                                    human leukemia, we can create
tigator, from the department                                           in the underarm,” Glaser said.     Institute for the study
                                    drugs that specifically kill the
of biochemistry and molecu-                                            “Past studies in other coun-       “Isoprenoid Metabolism in the
                                    cancer cells without affecting
lar biology at the School of                                           tries show that the treatment      Retina.” He also has received a
                                    normal cells,” Shilatifard said.
Medicine, are conducting                                               works well.”                       three-year, $195,927 grant
research into the molecular                                               Researchers say botox works     from the March of Dimes for
                                    Treatment Studied for                                                 the study “Effects of Vitamins
pathway of the disease with         Excessive Sweating                 by being injected into the
the hope of creating drugs                                             affected area. The treatment       and Sterol Supplementation In
that shut down that pathway.                                           inhibits the skin’s ability to     a Rodent Model of Smith-
   Shilatifard’s research into a
family of proteins called MLL
(mixed lineage leukemia
                                    T      he estimated 1-to-2
                                           million Americans who
                                    suffer from axillary hyper-
                                                                       produce sweat but only in the
                                                                       immediate area of the injec-
                                                                       tion. Botox is not a permanent
                                                                                                          Lemli-Opitz Syndrome.”


gene) and ELL (11-19 lym-           hidrosis, an excessive sweat-      treatment. It usually wears off
phoid leukemia gene) was            ing of the underarms, face         in six-to-nine months and
honored by the Leukemia &           soaking wet clothes every day.     must be re-injected.
                Saint Louis University Hospital Ranked Among
                   America’s Best in 10 Medical Specialties
    U.S. News & World Report’s 2001 edition of “America’s Best Hospitals” places Saint Louis
    University Hospital among the top 50 medical centers in treatment for the following disor-
    ders and diseases:                                                                                 spinal surgery safer and less
                                                                                                       invasive. He is an authority on
      digestive disease (29)                             ear, nose and throat (29)                     the application of computer
      geriatrics (7)                                     heart (23)                                    technology in neurosurgical
      hormonal disorders (26)                            kidney disease (33)                           procedures and post-operative
                                                                                                       patient monitoring and an
      orthopedics (32)                                   respiratory (25)
                                                                                                       innovator in specialized tech-
      rheumatology (33)                                  urology (40)                                  nologies of neurosurgery,
                                                                                                       including systems for indicat-
                                                                                                       ing the position of a surgical
                                                “We are extremely pleased to have 10 programs          probe within a patient’s head
                                              that are ranked by their peers to be among the           on an image of the head. His
                                               most elite in the country,” said Gary Peterson,         patents include the ventricu-
                                               M.D., president of the Saint Louis University           lostomy probe, drill guide and
                                                Hospital medical staff and professor of surgery        biopsy probe guide.
                                                 at Saint Louis University. “For us to have these         Bucholz’s life-long fascina-
                                                  programs nationally ranked reflects well for         tion with electronics and com-
                                                  our hospital and its medical staff partner,          puters and his early interest in
                                                   Saint Louis University School of Medicine.          neurosurgery are reflected in
                                                    Most of all, it reflects well on our patients      his clinical and research activi-
                                                     and the care we provide them.”                    ties that focus on the use of
                                                        In its 2001 edition, U.S. News & World         computers in surgical proce-
                                                      Report assesses hospital care for 17 spe-        dures. In 1990, Bucholz con-
                                                       cialties at 1,878 hospitals nationwide,         structed a neurosurgical navi-
                                                        up from 1,701 last year.                       gational system in his home
                                                                                                       workshop that, following fur-
                                                                                                       ther development with Kurt
                                                                                                       Smith, D.Sc., became the
                                                                                                       StealthStation.

SLUC a r e Brings Latest
    C                                “This laboratory means our      Award by the Academy of               C
                                                                                                       SLUC a r e Posts
in Cardiac Imaging Out            patients have access to the        Science of St. Louis for his      Dramatic Turnaround
of the Hospital and               latest in cardiac imaging at a     innovations in engineering,       in Operating Results
                                  convenient, outpatient office      technology and projects in
Into the Office
                                  setting,” said Arthur J.           computer-guided neurosurgery.


P     atients who undergo
      specialized heart scans
                                  Labovitz, M.D., director of
                                  the division of cardiology at
                                  the School of Medicine. “It’s
                                                                        Bucholz, professor of sur-
                                                                     gery in the School of
                                                                     Medicine, invented the frame-
                                                                                                       S    LUCare, the physician
                                                                                                            practice group of Saint
                                                                                                       Louis University, achieved a
to determine whether there is     uncommon to find a full-           less stereotactic surgical sta-   $10.7 million improvement in
blockage in their coronary        service cardiovascular diag-       tion for computer-guided neu-     operating performance in
arteries often are required to    nostic center such as this         rosurgery to make cranial and     2001. The dramatic improve-
go to a hospital where the        outside a hospital.”                                                    ment was a result of
necessary high tech camera                                                                                     strong revenue
equipment is available. But       Bucholz Honored for                                                             growth and solid
now SLUCare’s international-      Innovations that                                                                  expense control.
ly recognized divisions of        Combine Technology,                                                                    For the year
cardiology and nuclear medi-                                                                                           ending June
                                  Medicine
cine have opened a new car-                                                                                             30, 2001,
diac perfusion imaging labo-                                                                                            SLUCare
ratory at their University
Club Tower office in St.
Louis’ West County.
                                  R     ichard D. Bucholz, M.D.,
                                        has been named recipi-
                                  ent of the first James B. Eads
                                                                                                                        reported a
                                                                                                                       $1.9 million
                                                                                                                      loss, compared



4            Grand Rounds • Winter 2001
                                                                       Recent global threats from          Duane P. Grandgenett,
                                                                    terrorist groups have prompt-       Ph.D., professor of molecular
                                                                    ed U.S. officials to seek ways      virology, has received a
                                                                    to protect American citizens        five-year, $1,275,342 grant
                                                                    against bioterrorism and            from the National Institute
to a $12.6 mil-                                                     biowarfare.                         of Allergy and Infectious
lion loss for the                                                      "Because of the recent con-      Disease for the study “HIV-1
prior year.                                                         cerns of terrorism throughout       Integration.”
Revenues increased                                                  the world, the United States
to $121.4 million,                                                  government is making efforts          Rita M. Heuertz, Ph.D.,
up 12 percent over                                                  to improve its ability to pro-      assistant professor of pul-
the prior period.                                                   tect its citizens in the event of   monology, has received a
   SLUCare posted a                                                 an attack," said Sharon E.          four-year, $1,166,590 grant
$592,000 profit in FY 2001                                          Frey, M.D., associate professor     from the National Heart,
when results are adjusted to                                        of infectious diseases and          Lung and Blood Institute for
recognize the cost of a physi-                                      immunology and lead investi-        the study “Regulation of
cian incentive compensation                                         gator in the study, which is        Acute Lung Injury By Acute
program that was not in place                                       funded by the National              Phase Proteins.”
in the prior year.                                                  Institutes of Health (NIH).
   Daniel G. Zabel, M.P.H.,                                            The world was declared free        Mark M. Knuepfer, Ph.D.,
executive director of                                               of smallpox in 1979 after rou-      professor of pharmacological
SLUCare, said, “The revenue        Zabel                            tine vaccination proved effec-      and physiological science, has
increase is directly attributa-                                     tive. The vaccine, known as         received a five-year,
ble to the high quality of        Study to Target Threat            Dryvax, is no longer pro-           $1,454,973 grant from the
health care and outstanding       of Bioterrorism Begins            duced, but there is a limited       National Institute on Drug
customer service delivered by                                       supply available in the United      Abuse for the study
the physicians, nurses and                                          States. The vaccine is kept by      “Sympathetic Regulation of
other health care profession-
als at SLUCare. We’re very
proud of the commitment
                                  R      esearchers at the Center
                                         for Vaccine Development
                                  at Saint Louis University
                                                                    the Centers for Disease
                                                                    Prevention and Control (CDC)
                                                                    in Atlanta.
                                                                                                        Endotoxemia In Drug Abuse.”

                                                                                                          Ranjit Ray, Ph.D.,
and effort of the SLUCare         School of Medicine have              Saint Louis University is        professor of infectious diseases,
team for achieving this turn-     begun another study to deter-     one of four sites in the United     has received a five-year,
around.” Patient visits were      mine the safety and effective-    States conducting the study at      $1,018,692 grant from the
up 4.5 percent for the year.      ness of a vaccine that may        this time. Last year Saint Louis    National Cancer Institute for
   Zabel joined SLUCare in        protect humans against small-     University was the only center      the study “Functional Activities
August 2001 in the newly          pox disease.                      in the country to conduct a         of HCV Core Protein.”
created position of executive        A number of national news      similar study.
director with overall responsi-   outlets were present as the          Frey said the study will
bility for SLUCare’s opera-       first study participants were     focus on the effectiveness of
tions. SLUCare has about          inoculated in November            diluted doses of Dryvax.
1,000 employees, including        2001. Among them were                “Being able to dilute the
294 physicians who are also       CNN, ABC World News               vaccine would potentially
on the faculty of the Saint       Tonight, the New York Times       increase the available stock by
Louis University School of        and the Associated Press.         5 to 10 fold,” Frey said.
Medicine. SLUCare physicians
practice at 140 locations in
the greater metropolitan area
and are on the medical staff at
nine hospitals including Saint
                                      March 8, 2002, Silent Auction
Louis University Hospital and
SSM Cardinal Glennon                  To make a donation or for more info, e-mail Marcia Quint at
Children’s Hospital.                  quintmj@slu.edu or call (314)577-8106.
                      Stories
                  When terror struck, SLU alumni responded.




    The acts of terror on Sept. 1 were quickly
                                  1                            s Post-call
                                                               Sitting in sign-out rounds with the head of the anesthesia
    followed by acts of compassion.                            department. An incessant telephone ring. A commuter
       While thousands of terrified people fled                plane collides with the World Trade Center in the overly
                                                               crowded skies above Manhattan. Tragic, but not unthink-
    from the World Trade Center complex, health                able; a veritable “traffic accident” in the skies.
    care professionals hurried toward it to see                s 10 minutes pass
                                                               Another plane collides, and the realization that we live
    how they could help. Alumni from the School
                                                               three blocks from ground zero jolts my heart. “They are
    of Medicine were among them. Two alumni                    going to level Manhattan” is my next thought. The tower
                                                               collapses, as does my pulse. I do not know whether my
    living in New York City who were directly
                                                               husband is safe.
    affected by the attacks offered to share their             s 20 minutes pass
    experiences.                                               A phone call home is answered by “Your call cannot be
                                                               completed as dialed.” Emptiness, fear, immediate intense
                                                               loneliness.
                                                                  Please, God, don’t let the next time I see my husband be
                         Bridget (Casey) Vedder, M.D. (’98),   on a victim’s stretcher.
                         is a resident in the department of       An urgent call to his company brings news that he is
                         anesthesiology at Bellevue Hospital   alive and out of harm’s way. A sigh of relief.
                         in New York City, about 2.5 miles     s 30 minutes pass
                         north of the World Trade Center.      With calm resolve, I proceed to the ER — it is there I need
                         She was just coming off her           to be. Airway compromise secondary to smoke inhalation
                         overnight shift on the morning of     and critical care of the multiple trauma victim are what
                         Sept. 11.                             residency training prepares one for.
                                                                  My hands working to stylet endotracheal tubes, fill syringes

6   Grand Rounds • Winter 2001
                                                                                                        Photos by Douglas Terry, M.D.




with “Suxx” or “Roc” or Etomidate to care for victims.
   Victims, it is rumored, may number 10,000 per tower.
   Confusion is paramount in a disaster. Calming those
around me by telling them what we need to have pre-
pared.
   Just keep occupied.                                         was who that became so readily tragic.
s One hour passes                                                 I fought back tears.
My mind wanders.                                               s Three hours pass
   In medicine, I was trained to remain unaffected by the      I was fine. I was functional.
tragedy of the human condition.                                   My emotions were stored and neatly packed away. I was
   Flailed limbs with pulsatile vessels perfusing the white    busy preparing for the victims who might need intuba-
sheets instead of vital tissues.                               tions or sedation or pain medication or critical care man-
   Open skulls where memories of kindergarten were once        agement.
stored.                                                        s Four hours pass
   Otherwise healthy individuals who were in the wrong         s Five hours pass
place at the wrong time. Follow the algorithms, put pres-      s Six hours pass
sure on the vessels, do not jump away. Concentrate on the      We have thousands of doctors and nurses and respiratory
treatment of the pathophysiology.                              therapists and clerks and X-ray techs and pharmacists and
   Put your shattered emotions aside.                          engineers and cooks and even transporters.
s Two hours pass                                                  We have hundreds of ventilators and oxygen tanks and
The first victim arrives in the trauma bay.                    Ambu-bags and IVs and chest tubes and Swan-Banz
   A firefighter’s uniform envelops the remains of a hero’s    catheters and …
life. His partner carrying his helmet. His silence palpable.      We had open CAT scanners and angiographic suites and
   Dead on arrival.                                            ICU beds and operating rooms … and … and … and …
   My soul leaves me for a moment.                                Thousands of victims who never came.
   What, why, where, when and how were unimportant. It

                                                                                               Grand Rounds • Winter 2001               7
                                                                     ers themselves. Throughout that day, I treat asthmatics and
                                                                     COPD patients who had walked the few miles from
                                                                     ground zero; cardiac patients who were forced to breathe
                                                                     the acrid smoke; a hysterical teenager who witnessed vic-
                                                                     tims jumping from windows before the towers collapsed.
                                                                       Late that night some of the heroes from the front lines
                                                                     arrive — firefighters who sustained corneal abrasions from
                                                                     the dirt and soot while trying to save lives. Before I go
    Douglas Terry, M.D. (’01) is a first-year resident in emer-      home in the early morning hours of Wednesday, Sept. 12,
    gency medicine at New York Methodist Hospital, which is          we receive the news that 12 firefighters from the Park
    about three miles from where the World Trade Center              Slope Fire Department, located two blocks from New York
    once stood.                                                      Methodist, are missing.

                s Tuesday, Sept. 11                                  s Wednesday, Sept. 12
                The morning begins like any other day. My            I am up early on Wednesday morning. A fellow resident
                alarm goes off at 9:15, and I begin to get ready     and I take the subway to lower Manhattan. The train takes
                for my 10 a.m. shift in the pediatric emergency      us about 12 blocks from ground zero. We make our way
                department at New York Methodist. With my            past a dozen police and military checkpoints and enter
                radio tuned to the local news station, I brush my    what looks like a war zone.
                teeth. There is a building burning somewhere.           Four blocks from ground zero we don surgical masks, as
                   I make coffee and continue to look for a clean    the air had became unfit to breathe. We are surrounded by
                pair of scrubs. It is two buildings on fire, and a   burned-out buildings and emergency response vehicles.
                plane has crashed.                                   We walk through six inches of ash as we make our way to
                   I got ready to shower. Passenger airplanes hit    Stuyvesant High School, the forward triage center. Once
    the World Trade Center.                                          there, we, along with many others from the emergency
       I go out the window and up my fire escape. I look across      medical community, volunteer our services. We spend the
    the east river and toward the New York skyline beyond. I         morning and afternoon helping to treat injured rescue
    see the now infamous scene of the twin towers ablaze. A          workers and victims who were just making it out of the
    thick black cloud of smoke draws a line directly from            area surrounding the former twin towers.
    ground zero to my neighborhood in Park Slope, Brooklyn.             Never have I been more honored to work with a group
       Bits of ash float through the air around me. Standing in      of people in my life. Physicians and nurses worked dozens
    disbelief for a few minutes, I realize I have an important       of hours in a row, stopping only for naps and quick
    job to do.                                                       snacks. Patients are triaged quickly and are treated or sent
       I dash out my front door and across Sixth Avenue. I           via ambulance to one of the surrounding hospitals. Many
    hurry through the security checkpoint set up at the              heroic officers and firefighters need only a hot meal and a
    entrance of the emergency department. Dr. Joseph Bove,           place to relax for a few short minutes before returning to
    chairman of the emergency medicine department, and Dr.           their grim work.
    Theodore Gaeta, director of the emergency medicine resi-            My experiences on Sept. 11 and the days that followed
    dency program, are there. They oversaw the transforma-           taught me some of the same lessons that many Americans
    tion of an already busy ED into a mass-casualty treatment        learned during that time — that life is precious, and we
    center. Our hospital’s disaster plan was implemented, and        aren’t untouchable here in the United States. But most
    I am absolutely confident in our ability to treat the victims    importantly, I learned that my friends and colleagues at
    who are to come.                                                 New York Methodist Hospital are talented, selfless profes-
       In the coming hours, it becomes apparent there would          sionals. When called upon, they are ready and able to deal
    never be huge numbers of victims arriving from the tow-          with such a tragedy.
8   Grand Rounds • Winter 2001
                                                    The Class of
                                                   2005 dons the


T         he instruction labels sewn inside the
          starched white coats stacked neatly
in large brown boxes were simple enough —
                                                  white coat and
                                                      promises to
                                                                            to become the kind of physician you would
                                                                            like to take care of you.”
                                                                               The White Coat Ceremony has become a
machine wash, tumble dry. But when first-         pursue scientif- rite of passage for incoming student-physi-
year medical students slipped into the jackets                              cians. Standing before honored guests, fami-
during the White Coat Ceremony at St.               ic excellence ly, friends and faculty, students enter into the
Francis Xavier College Church, the instruc-                                 medical community through “cloaking” with
tions were more powerful.                            and compas-            their first white coats. They then recite the
   “As you begin this awesome journey                                       Code of Professional Conduct, vowing to
toward becoming doctors of medicine, you             sionate care.          focus on compassion, competence, commit-
should strive to become the kind of physician                               ment and patient respect.
whom you would like to take care of your                                       Traditionally, students receive their coats
grandparents, or your parents, or your spouse or your        in the latter part of their second year, when clinical contact
child,” said Jay Noffsinger, M.D., professor and director of begins in earnest. But Arnold P. Gold, M.D., a pediatrician
medical education in the department of pediatrics and        from the Columbia University College of Physicians and
recipient of the School’s Golden                                                          Surgeons in New York, felt stu-
Apple Award for Teaching in 2000                                                          dents should be given white
                                                     By Marie Dilg
and 2001. “Indeed, you should strive                                                      coats much sooner — at the start

                                                                                                 Grand Rounds • Winter 2001   9
                                                                                                                           Frist-year students Tina
                                                                                                                           Kearney (second from
                                                                                                                           left) and Julie Riley (cen-
                                                                                                                           ter) celebrate with family
                                                                                                                           members




                                                                                   her coat for the first time, she also experienced a range of
                                                                                   emotions.
                                                                                     “I felt excited, proud, intimidated, a little nervous,” she
Susan Heaney,      of their education and training — as a means of impress-        said. “The ceremony makes it all real. This is it. I’m enter-
M.D., cloaks       ing upon them the inestimable importance of profession-         ing this profession.”
David Boudreault   alism, empathy and humanism in medicine.
                      The foundation that bears Gold’s name launched the           More Than Just a Ceremony
                   first White Coat Ceremony at Columbia in 1993. It has           Prior to the church ceremony, the school’s alumni associa-
                   since sponsored ceremonies at more than 100 schools of          tion sponsored a luncheon for the first-year students and
                   osteopathy and medicine throughout the United States,           alumni. Jerome Basinski, M.D. (’63), a retired ophthal-
                   including the first one held at the School of Medicine in       mologist from Belleville, Ill., recalled receiving his white
                   1998. The school and the alumni association have co-spon-       coat unceremoniously at the end of his sophomore year.
                   sored the annual ceremony since.                                   “The first day I put on my white coat, someone called
                      “You have been given the talent and the means to be a        me ‘doctor,’” Basinski said. “I felt like maybe I was a doc-
                   doctor,” said guest speaker Theodore Dubuque Jr., M.D.          tor but with a small ‘d.’ It was quite humbling but fulfill-
                   (’52), president of the CRUDEM Foundation, a missionary         ing at the same time. Frankly, putting on the white coat
                   hospital in northern Haiti where many SLU alumni donate         was right up there with getting married or having my first
                   their time. “Return the gift by helping those who have no       child. I’ll never forget it.”
                   way of obtaining help on their own. There is nothing more          Emil DiFilippo, M.D. (’66), can attest to that. He
                   satisfying at the end of a busy day than to reflect on the      remembered the exact day he received his first white coat
                   fact that you’ve had the good fortune to help people who        — June 1, 1965.
                   wouldn’t have received help if you weren’t there.”                 “Until I put on that white coat, it was all about lectures
                      Moriah Heyen of Gillespie, Ill., was one of the first-year   and labs,” said DiFilippo, an orthopedic surgeon in private
                   students standing near the altar where faculty members          practice in the St. Louis area. “Now it was time to put all
                   cloaked the 150 incoming future doctors as parents and          that knowledge to the test. I took the responsibility very
                   grandparents snapped photos and wiped away tears.               seriously and still do.”
                      “It’s a bit overwhelming,” Heyen said. “I feel like a door      DiFilippo also recalled that his white coat didn’t stay white
                   is opening, and I’m both excited and nervous to be walk-        for long. More than 30 years ago when he was doing clini-
                   ing through it.”                                                cals, doctors did all their own lab work and changed dress-
                      When Theresa Schwartz of Centralia, Ill., slipped into       ings. Plus, he was on call the night he received his coat.

    10             Grand Rounds • Winter 2001
                                                                                                                       Dean Patricia
                                                                                                                       Monteleone,
                                                                                                                       M.D., with Paul
                                                                                                                       H. Young, Jr.,
Edward O’Brien, Jr., M.D. (‘67), cloaks Matthew Brugger                                                                M.D. (‘75), at a
                                                                                                                       reception follow-
                                                                                                                       ing the cloaking
                                                                                                                       ceremony
   “It was rumpled and messy by the end of the day, but it
was a privilege to wear it in any shape,” he said.
   Dr. Barbara (Briscoe) Sterkel’s, (’75), first white coat was
                                                                                                                       Henry Lattinville,
short, just like the ones handed out to the class of 2005,
                                                                                                                       M.D. (‘48), chats
to distinguish students from doctors.
                                                                                                                       with a first-year
   Some refer to them as “trainee coats.” For Sterkel, the
                                                                                                                       student
coat was a repository for her stethoscope, notebook, reflex
hammer, penlight or whatever else she needed.
   “Nobody called me doctor on the first day,” she said. “In
fact, a patient called me ‘girlie.’ But it wasn’t about what I
was called or what I wore. It was about feeling a deep
commitment to care for patients, even though my medical
knowledge and experience were limited at the time.”
   Sterkel, chief of diagnostic services at the Veterans
                                                                        Why White?
Administration hospitals in St. Louis, said she came to this
year’s luncheon and ceremony to get a glimpse of the              The white coat is the universal symbol of the med-
future of the medical profession and offer her support.           ical profession, but how did it come to be?
   “The ceremony is a great way to acknowledge the                   According to historians, the coats surfaced in the
achievements of students who met the standards to be              late 19th century. Science had damaged the reputa-
here,” Sterkel said. “At a time when there’s a shortage of        tion of medicine by demonstrating that many of its
physicians, I think it’s tremendously important to make           cures were useless. According to research by Valerie
students feel valued. I do what I can to support the train-       Jones at the Columbia University College of
ing process.”                                                     Physicians and Surgeons, many of those practicing
   James Swierkosz, Ph.D., assistant dean for students and        medicine at the time were branded quacks and
associate professor of microbiology, said he hoped the            charlatans while scientists were admired. Figuring
White Coat Ceremony and luncheon would become a                   that inventors who transmitted messages instanta-
long tradition supported by the school’s alumni.                  neously and revolutionized transportation certainly
   “Although the students won’t actually wear the white           could provide advances in curing disease, the med-
coats for any significant period of time during their first       ical profession turned to science. Physicians seeking
year or two, I think the cloaking ceremony emphasizes to          to represent themselves as scientists thus adopted
them that they are entering a way of life and not just a          the scientific lab coat as their standard of dress.
phase of life,” Swierkosz said. “It represents the beginning         Originally, lab coats were beige, but in its zeal for
of a profession, not just the start of another year of school.    new aseptic techniques, the medical profession
I also think the ceremony underscores the more humanis-           decided to go with white. The color represented
tic elements of our curriculum, such as medical ethics,           purity, goodness and cleanliness. But perhaps most
communication skills and the compassionate regard for             importantly, the white coat was viewed as a cloak of
death and dying, to which we’ve been dedicated for                compassion.
decades.”


                                                                                           Grand Rounds • Winter 2001                11
      Finding the Dollars to
        Support the Dream
                          The student financial planning office helps
                              students thrive in the face of debt



                                                         By Marie Dilg




     F   irst-year medical student Danessa Hoki stared at the
         computer screen. “Wow,” she said, and it wasn’t the
     good kind of wow. It was the stunned kind of wow. The
     document on the computer screen detailed Hoki’s finan-
                                                                    or didn’t pursue this year could be explored again. Maybe
                                                                    she could look at her monthly budget once more to see if
                                                                    there’s another inch of fat to trim.
                                                                      “We’re not trying to scare anyone,” said Hettinger, who,
     cial aid profile, and it indicated that if she continued to    in addition to working with students, coordinates the
     borrow at her present rate, she would owe more than            activities of the counselors in the SFP office. “We’re trying
     $215,000 by the time she graduated in 2005. Hoki’s loan        to educate students and put the decision-making into
     payments would be almost $3,600 a month for 10 years.          their hands. Student debt is an enormous burden, and if
        “That’s a lot of money,” Hoki said. “It’s scary.”           we can help them get things under control now, then
        Karla Hettinger, coordinator in the School of Medicine      they’re that much better off in the future.”
     student financial planning (SFP) office, agreed, but she
     assured Hoki that it didn’t have to be this way. With the      Sticker Shock
     click of a few computer keys, Hettinger identified a num-      A report from the School of Medicine’s executive advisory
     ber of ways Hoki could improve the situation. Maybe her        board (EAB) scholarship task force found that the cluster-
     family could help by paying interest on the loans now          ing of debt for the class of 2001 was $179,999. Task force
     while she is in school. Maybe when Hoki gets married           members estimated that these alumni would need an
     next year and begins sharing expenses, she could reduce        annual income of $400,000 to comfortably begin repay-
     some of her borrowing. Maybe next year some of the             ment following graduation. Most students, however, enter
     lower-interest loans or scholarships Hoki didn’t qualify for   into residencies of three-to-eight years. During that peri-

12   Grand Rounds • Winter 2001
                                                                    sponsored scholarships. About 86 per-
                                                                   cent of the students attending SLU School of
                                                                  Medicine receive loans and/or scholarship money.

                                                               Currency Curriculum
                                                               Federal lending laws mandate that schools administering
                                                               loans provide borrowing students with entrance and exit
                                                               interviews to discuss their financial aid and debt profile.
                                                               Some schools do this by sending students home with a
                                                               videotape and a budget sheet. But the School of Medicine
                                                               goes substantially beyond the minimum. “We’re not just
                                                               about meeting requirements,” Fenton pointed out. “We’re
                                                               about establishing relationships.”
od, interest accumulates and, in many instances, borrow-          Several years ago, the SFP office began developing and
ing continues. By the time they finish residencies, their      implementing a comprehensive debt management cur-
debt level may reach $500,000.                                 riculum that is woven throughout a student’s education.
   “You can see why control is so critical,” said Mary         The program is unique to the school and continues to
Fenton, assistant dean, student financial planning. “Our       evolve and expand on a yearly basis.
goal is to help people realize they can go to medical school      The SFP office decided to expand services because
regardless of their income bracket, but they have to exer-     fourth-year students seemed to exhibit genuine surprise at
cise some discipline. Tuition and fees are fixed. We can’t     their exit interviews. Hettinger said it was not uncommon
do much about that, but we can focus on how to gain con-       to hear them say, “I owe that much? I had no idea.”
trol over all other costs.”                                       “They just kept signing off on loan papers not realizing
   There are nearly 80 different sources of University-        what they were getting into,” she said.
administered funds for covering tuition, fees and living          There is almost no way a SLU School of Medicine student can
expenses — some ranging from a couple hundred dollars          say that now. The debt management curriculum begins with a
a year to a full scholarship. Students also can apply for      group entrance interview and debt management presentation
federally backed loans, federal scholarships and state-        mandated for all first-year students as part of their orientation.

                                                                                                    Grand Rounds • Winter 2001      13
                                                                     $1,000 less each of their four years and investing the
                                                                     money instead ($70,000 by age 65 based on an interest
                                                                     rate of 8.25 percent) and how much they could save by
                                                                     giving up a $3-a-day latte habit ($63,000).
                                                                        After the economist laid the fiscal foundation, Joseph
                                                                     Flaherty, M.D. (’90), assistant professor of internal medi-
                                                                     cine in the division of geriatrics and a member of the EAB
                                                                     scholarship task force, addressed the students.
                                                                        “It’s easy to get loans,” Flaherty told them, “but you have
                                                                     to be careful about what you get. Be careful, conscientious
                                                                     and cautious. I took out some horrible, high-interest loans
                                                                     when I started medical school because I didn’t know bet-
                                                                     ter, and I was in denial. I figured what’s another $1,000?
                                                                     Now I know.”
     Hoki (right) meeting with coordinator Hettinger and                Flaherty illustrated his point by telling students about
     counselor Lynda Whitson (standing)                              two classmates — one who refused to part with a dime
                                                                     and the other who borrowed heavily to support both his
       At this year’s presentation, an economist explained to        education and his entertainment. The latter always had
     students how much money they could save by borrowing            money to buy dinner and drinks for friends. He even bor-


                                           Physicians HEAL Themselves

     To help pay his way through the School of Medicine, Steve          Medical school administration supplied the Class of ’84
     Milligan, M.D. (’84) worked six months before starting          with a list of alumni and a bank of phones. The students
     classes and the summer between his first and second             took the materials and organized a weeklong phone-a-
     years. Still, he couldn’t cover costs, and in his second year   thon.
     he was forced to secure a loan. There were only a few loan         “It was an easy idea to sell,” recalled Molloy, a general
     sources available for graduate medical education in the         surgeon at the VA hospital in Cincinnati. “The alumni I
     early ’80s, and they offered only a small amount of money.      called remembered what a financial struggle it was to get
     The only loan that allowed students to borrow as much as        through school. They liked the idea of supporting some-
     they needed was the federal Health Education Assistance         thing that directly benefited students who were in the
     Loan. It was easily obtainable, but the interest rate usual-    same position they once were.”
     ly was two points higher than the prime rate, which at the         The 1982 phone-a-thon raised $64,000 — most of
                           time was between 16 and 18 percent.       which was divided among stu-
                               “It was obscene,” said Milligan, a    dents in need, including Milligan
                           family physician in Pueblo, Colo. “I      and Brown. Molloy was on an
                           did the math and figured that if I        Army scholarship and did not
                           borrowed $17,000 through HEAL,            need assistance, but he said he felt
                           I’d have to pay back almost               it was important for his class to
                           $350,000 down the road because            work together on the project.
                           even though HEAL allowed me to               The phone-a-thon has become
                           defer payments until I was in private     an annual early spring tradition at
                           practice, each time I didn’t make a       the School of Medicine. It’s one
                           payment, the interest was added to        solicitation call Brown looks for-
                           the principal amount. That meant I        ward to.
           Milligan                                                                                                Molloy
                          would be paying interest on the inter-        “It’s a good feeling to get the call
     est. It was unfathomable.”                                      every year and know that a student-led program continues
        So Milligan decided to do something about it. After talk-    to thrive,” said Brown, an oncologist at St. Joseph Hospital
     ing with classmates who were equally frustrated by their        in Chicago.
     lack of loan options, Milligan and fellow second-year stu-         The loan pool, which was named the Medical Alumni
     dents Mark Molloy, M.D. (’84) and Susan Brown, M.D.             Revolving Student Loan Fund, is valued at nearly $4 mil-
     (’84) came up with the idea of creating a reusable, low-        lion today. More than 900 students have been granted
     interest loan pool for students.                                loans since 1982 — some have received as much as
        “The plan was to raise money for a pot that eligible stu-    $18,000. The default rate is less than one percent. The
     dents could dip into if they needed it,” Milligan explained.    national default rate on student loans is more than 10
     “Those students eventually would pay back the money so          times that.
     the next student in need would have resources available.”


14   Grand Rounds • Winter 2001
rowed enough money to                                            sonal loans due to credit problems — and is questioning
take a vacation the sum-                                         whether they can finish school,” said Fenton, who in her
mer before his fourth year.                                      28 years of advising students has seen many struggle.
Flaherty told the students                                          Students are required to visit with their counselor at
that this classmate was                                          least once a year for a fiscal check-up and to complete a
unable to buy a home for                                         final review in the form of an exit interview in their fourth
years and is working extra                                       year. The SFP office also offers financial planning seminars
hours and moonlighting                                           a couple of times a year. They are not required but are
to pay off his debt.                                             strongly recommended.
   “Student debt has
reached proportions that                                         Ongoing Relationships
influence lifestyle deci-                                        The relationship developed between student and coun-
sions and, more impor-                                           selor during the four years does not end when a student
tantly, career decisions,”                                       graduates. SFP resources are available to any SLU School
Flaherty told them. “You                                         of Medicine graduate in residency no matter where they
lose a lot of freedom in the              Fenton                 are working, as well as to any residents working at Saint
future if you make poor                                          Louis University Hospital, regardless of where they went
choices now.”                                                    to school.
                                                                    Most residents apply for deferments, which can be a
One on One                                                       cumbersome process. Craig Calhoun, M.D. (’99), a resi-
In addition to the group interview, the debt management          dent in the department of anesthesiology at Saint Louis
curriculum requires that first-year students have an in-         University Hospital, works 60-plus hours a week and has
depth personal interview with an SFP counselor, such as          four children. The SFP office helped him patch together
the one that took place between Hoki and Hettinger. The          the financial aid quilt that got him through medical
student’s loans, scholarships, budget and financial goals        school, and he turns to the office annually for help in
are examined in detail. Students also are mandated to sub-       renewing his deferment applications.
mit a credit report.                                                “I have the knowledge to take care of this myself,”
   “It forces them to look at the report and see what cred-      Calhoun said. “But I don’t have the time, and it’s nice to be
itors see,” Fenton said. “Some sit there and realize they        able to contact my counselor and be done with it.”
have 15 Visas with open balances or that they’re charged            The counselors act as liaisons between residents and
to their maximum limits. We try to help students under-          lenders if anything goes wrong with a loan — even if the
stand that credit cards can be unnecessary evils.”               loan wasn’t through the school.
   The average undergraduate student carries three credit           On one occasion, a resident called in a panic because a
cards in his or her wallet. The average graduate student         bank was threatening to put him into default on an under-
carries six. Signs are posted throughout the SFP office list-    graduate loan because it claimed he failed to return the
ing the phone number to call if a student wants her name         proper deferment forms.
removed from credit card mailing lists.                             “We faxed them our copies (which had been sent six
   One of Hoki’s financial goals is to pay off the credit card   months prior), and he was taken care of,” Fenton said. “It
debt she accrued as a student at Georgetown University.          can take up to 10 hours to clean up a situation. What res-
She has since cut up her credit cards, but the debt will         ident has time to do that? Plus, we know the lenders. We
haunt her for some time, and it is one of the reasons she        know how to get past the person at the front desk.”
is borrowing heavily now. Hettinger applauded Hoki’s                There was a time when Mary Fenton was the office of
decision to cut up the cards but advised her to cancel           student financial planning. She was the sole member until
them as well to reduce solicitations. Hoki took further          1978 when she added a counselor and administrative
control of her budget by moving recently to a smaller            assistant. Fenton’s office now has two counselors who
apartment farther from school to save a couple hundred           assist more than 600 students, a coordinator who oversees
dollars a month. She says her entertainment budget is            the counselors’ work and advises residents, and an admin-
nonexistent.                                                     istrative assistant. Although Fenton’s office has changed,
   “It’s not fun going through my financial history like         her philosophy has not.
this,” Hoki said, “but I see the value in it.”                      “We’re giving students the tools to function,” she said.
                                                                 “Medicine today is no longer just medicine. There’s a
Simple Living                                                    business side to it, and if we can give our graduates a good
The SFP office does not expect students to take a vow of         understanding of their personal finances, I believe they’re
poverty or adopt a monastic lifestyle, but counselors do         going to understand their business finances better. They’re
believe that ramen noodles for dinner and milk crate fur-        going to understand how to work things out so they can
niture are good enough. If you live like a doctor now,           do things other than make money. They can spend more
you’ll live like a student later, Fenton warns.                  time with their family or friends or volunteer somewhere
  “Nothing’s worse than seeing a student in front of you         and truly become men and women for others.”
who’s met his or her federal loan limit and can’t get per-


                                                                                                   Grand Rounds • Winter 2001    15
 Reflections
                                   Sit in on a candid conversation with

                                   the leaders of the division of allergy

                                            and immunology




     In      some ways, they are strikingly similar. Both
             Raymond Slavin, M.D., and Mark Dykewicz,
     M.D., attended the University of Michigan-Ann
                                                               Raymond Slavin, M.D. (’56)
                                                               Professor of internal medicine and molecular microbiology
                                                               and immunology
                                                               Director of the division of allergy and immunology
     Arbor for undergraduate studies — albeit almost 30        Joined faculty in 1965
     years apart. They both attended Saint Louis               Research interests: Hypersensitivity lung diseases — espe-
     University School of Medicine. They both complet-         cially allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis, allergic
                                                               fugal sinusitis and relationships between the upper and
     ed their allergy and immunology training at               lower airways
     Northwestern University Medical School.                   Hobbies: Music, art, the New York Times crossword puz-
       In other ways, they are strikingly different. Slavin    zle, jogging (before he ruined his back) and tennis
     has been known to break into song in the lab or
                                                               You earned your medical degree at SLU, trained else-
     dress as a bee when giving injections to his allergic     where for a couple of years and came back.
     patients. He admits he is a ham. Dykewicz rarely is       Yes, I have a tremendous fondness for SLU, but frankly, I
     seen at the school without a tie or, at the very least,   came back because the school was the only place that
     a crisply pressed shirt. He admits he can be intense.     would have me (laughs). Actually, I had just finished my
                                                               fellowship in allergy and immunology at Northwestern
       Their mutual respect and passion for their work,        and had come to the conclusion that I wanted to be in
     however, have made them a powerful team. Slavin           academic medicine. The opportunity to leave an imprint
     is an internationally known researcher with more          on medical students, who I hoped would progress geo-
     than 300 papers to his name. He is a popular              metrically as they went out into the field, was very appeal-
                                                               ing. So I began casting about, looking at medical schools
     teacher and a beloved clinician who has been voted        that had no full-time allergists. There were plenty — I’d
     as one of the top physicians in St. Louis.                say 80 at least. My wife and I sent out a barrage of inquires
       Dykewicz recently was appointed chair of the            in 1964 and didn’t get a single encouraging response.
     FDA’s pulmonary and allergy drug advisory com-            They ranged from, “We’d love to have you, but we don’t
                                                               have the money,” to my favorite from a chairman who
     mittee. He has published more than 80 papers, and         wrote, “Number one, we don’t have a full-time allergist on
     his training materials are in demand worldwide.           faculty, and number two, we don’t intend to have one.”
       Combined, they have dedicated more than 40              Well, I had a wife, four kids and a dog to support, so when
     years of their professional lives to the School of        my chief at Northwestern asked me to stay on, I stayed.
                                                                             My first day at work was a Saturday, and I
     Medicine. Following are conversa-                                       gave about 110 shots and came home at 2
     tions with the two noted allergists.          By Marie    Dilg          p.m. It was important work but not very sat-

16    Grand Rounds • Winter 2001
isfying to me. My wife and I sat down again that very day         to help patients but not necessarily reverse what’s going
and sent out a second barrage of inquires. I received three       on. We really did help the vast majority of patients who
positive responses that time, the most promising from SLU.        came to see us. I don’t mean to sound arrogant because it
The dean wanted me to start up a new division of allergy,         wasn’t that we were necessarily wonderful physicians; it
and I was more than happy to do it.                               was the medications that had been developed and contin-
                                                                  ue to be developed. Thirdly, being an allergist provided me
Why do so few medical schools have full-time aller-               the opportunity to see both children and adults. It’s the
gists on staff?                                                   one subspecialty in internal medicine in which that’s pos-
It’s puzzling given that allergic diseases are the most com-      sible, and that appealed to me because I had a difficult
mon chronic conditions in the United States. Things are a         time deciding between internal medicine and pediatrics.
little different now, but 30 years ago, fellow classmates         And finally, it seemed like a lot of the advances in the lab-
chided me for pursuing something that wasn’t a “real” sci-        oratory were extrapolated to patient care very quickly. So,
ence. Allergists were known primarily as skin-testers and         it was a brand new field that was wide open and allowed
shot-givers. I had a fellow resident refer to it as “voodoo       me opportunities to do research, teach and see patients.
medicine.” We knew the shots worked, but we didn’t
know why. But the science just hadn’t developed yet. But          How have those opportunities changed over the years?
in 1966, IgE (the protein that causes allergic problems)          Heavens knows it’s a lot more complicated now. Thirty
was identified, and the field took off.                           years ago, you simply did what you were supposed to do,
                                                                  and you were rewarded. You published, you got good
What did that do for the subspecialty?                            reports on your teaching, and you took care of patients.
It improved it greatly until managed care came along.             The biggest change is the emphasis on the bottom line. It’s
Allergy is largely a cognitive specialty. We do skin tests and    the major topic at any meeting I attend. You have to be
injections and evaluate pulmonary function, but allergy is        very aware of your expenses and income, and this requires
not a big money maker, as opposed to gastroenterology or          a great deal more time in terms of billing, record keeping,
pulmonology or cardiology, where extensive procedures             writing HMOs for permission, calling pharmacies. You feel
are sometimes required to get to the bottom of things.            you have less time for the things that drew you into aca-
Thankfully, I’ve been blessed with four chairmen who              demic medicine to begin with. But even with all the
considered my work extremely important.                           changes, I wouldn’t hesitate one second to encourage my
                                                                  grandchildren to enter the field because of the patients. A
You’ve said being an academic allergist can be like               patient’s need for help is the overriding issue, and I try not
swimming upstream, but you love the challenge. What               to dwell on the difficulties of present-day medicine.
do you love about the field and what drew you to it?
Several things. First, my wife, Alberta, suffers from rag-        What do you see in students entering the field today?
weed, grass and mold allergies, and I was intrigued by her        They’re bright as can be, but the biggest change in resi-
injection therapy. Secondly, when I was in the Army at            dents and fellows is that they value their time much more
Fort Huachuca in Arizona, my chief called me to his office        than my generation. They’re not looking to get rich as
to say he was being transferred to Germany, and I was in          much as they are looking to have time for themselves. I’m
charge of the allergy clinic. It was a busy clinic, but I loved   on the rank and tenure committee, where I review appli-
it because most of the conditions I saw were reversible —         cants, and increasingly, their CVs contain their hobbies.
in contrast to other subspecialties where you may be able         I’m just floored at what these kids do — scuba dive,




                                                                                                     Grand Rounds • Winter 2001    17
            mountain climb, play classical guitar. I can’t condemn         until late in my junior year of undergrad. I realized I want-
            them. I think it’s terrific because physicians should be       ed something that involved contact with people. I thought
            well-balanced. But in my day, being a physician was all-       the ability to pursue the intellectual body of information in
            encompassing. It was entirely who you were.                    science and medicine was a very nice match to working
                                                                           with people.
            Who were some of the most influential people in your
            life?                                                          Did you know you wanted to be in internal medicine?
            My mother and father for instilling in me the importance       I was indecisive at first. But then I had an experience in my
            of, and the love of, education and my wife who has taught      third year of medical school that sort of settled it. I was a
            me about music, consumerism, politics, the media and so        student at the VA, and I was at the foot of the bed of a
            many other aspects of life outside of medicine. Any degree     patient who had multiple things going wrong — heart
                     of being well-rounded I owe to her.                   infection, heart failure, skeletal muscle breakdown, renal
                                                                           failure, diabetes, abnormal blood chemistries. I was trying
                    Living or deceased, with whom would you                to figure out how all of this was interacting and making
       “It was a    most like to have dinner and conversation?             the blood chemistries out of whack. It was intellectually
                    At heart, I’m an actor, and I love good humor, so      one of the most challenging moments I can recall. And
    brand new       I’d say Mel Brooks.                                    that’s when I decided to go into internal medicine — to try
                                                                           to have a true understanding of all the complexities of the
 field that was     What do you imagine your legacy will be?               human body. I left medical school with the idea that I
                    I suppose that’s for others to decide, but I hope it   wanted to go into internal medicine, but I was torn
wide open and       has something to do with my teaching. I want           between sub-specializing in allergy or endocrinology.
                    students to leave this school with a solid under-
                    standing     of     allergies    and    treatment.     What tipped the scales?
   allowed me       Unfortunately, primary care physicians often mis-      During my residency at Northwestern, I did my rotation
                    manage allergies largely because most medical          on the allergy and immunology service and saw how much
 opportunities      schools don’t have an allergist on staff and pri-      impact physicians could have on treating these types of
                    mary care doctors just aren’t aware of the             diseases. You really could turn people’s lives around who
to do research,     advances in the field. We frequently see patients      were otherwise debilitated. On other rotations, I saw
                    who’ve been from pillar to post with their pri-        patients with a lot of chronic diseases for whom I would
       teach and    mary care physician, but they do just beautifully      make appropriate interventions by either altering their
                    with the addition of environmental controls and a      medication doses or shifting medications around or other-
 see patients.”     few medications. I’d like to think our students        wise altering the management approach. Patients would
                    wouldn’t put patients through that.                    come back in a month feeling better but maybe only mar-
                                                                           ginally so. On the allergy and immunology service, how-
                     What lies ahead for you?                              ever, patients I’d seen earlier in the rotation usually came
            I look ahead and see myself doing pretty much what I’m         back significantly improved. Patients who couldn’t sleep at
            doing now, at least for the foreseeable future. We seldom      night were getting a full night’s rest. Kids who’d been miss-
            discuss the “r” word at home. My wife says she married me      ing school were back in class. As time went on, I gained a
            for richer or poorer but not for lunch! I suppose if and       greater appreciation for the sophistication of the sub-spe-
            when I retire, I’d like to work in the community, rendering    cialty. This, combined with the gratification of helping
            health care and teaching in the inner city. I’d also go back   patients so completely and the intellectual stimulation of
            to school and take voice lessons. I sing in our Temple         working in an area of study that was really exploding in
            choir, and I’d like to learn more about music and art.         terms of understanding, seemed to be a very compelling
                                                                           opportunity for me.

                                                                           Who were some of the strongest influences in your life?
            Mark Dykewicz, M.D. (’81)                                      My father. He was a family practitioner who was very ded-
            Associate professor of internal medicine                       icated to his patients, but I think I saw him work so hard
            Director of the training program in allergy and                that for a long period of time, I was steering away from
            immunology                                                     medicine. Ultimately I came back to medicine, though,
            Joined faculty in 1990                                         because it was the best fit for my interests and personality.
            Research interests: Drug allergy, anaphylaxis                  The example my father set was total commitment to his
            Hobbies: Piano, running, foreign languages                     patients and patient care, and I view that as something to
                                                                           emulate. Dr. Slavin, of course, was and is an influence. His
            What drew you to medicine?                                     lectures during my second year of med school impressed
            In high school, I got involved in a lot of science projects,   me quite a bit and started me thinking about allergy and
            such as the one I did in my senior year on conditions in       immunology as a career. Dr. Roy Patterson at
            the primordial earth atmosphere that were favorable for        Northwestern played a large role in development of my
            the development of life. So I graduated with a strong inter-   professional career as well. He’s been a giant in the field
            est in science, but I didn’t decide to go to medical school    with some 600 or 700 papers. He’s always been very com-

  18        Grand Rounds • Winter 2001
mitted to patient care and committed to learning new               I think many physicians would agree with you that the
things about their treatment.                                      current medical climate has made practice more chal-
                                                                   lenging, but what has made your professional life better?
You said medicine is a good fit for your personality.              I believe the ability to perform online, computer-assisted
What do you mean?                                                  medical literature searches have made it dramatically eas-
Well, I used to think law would have been a good fit for           ier to obtain state-of-the-art medical information for
me because of its intellectual stimulation, but I don’t like       patient care and research. Computer-assisted
its confrontational nature. I considered pursuing a Ph.D.          searches have saved me countless hours of
in biochemistry, but I wanted contact with people, which           time.                                            "The example
I get in medicine. Now being in an academic setting, I’m
able to teach and have an impact on not only medical               What do you consider the most significant
trainees at my own institution, but also as I get more             advances in your field since you entered it
                                                                                                                  my father set
involved at the national level, have impact on literally           15 years ago?
thousands of physicians who take care of countless                 The most significant development in my field was total com-
patients. It’s a multiplier effect, and that appeals to me.        has been the understanding that whether
Plus, I like challenges, and I like overcoming challenges. I       someone develops an allergic immune mitment to his
like to effect change. I guess I’m an interventionist in life,     response is fundamentally governed by a “yin-
so it’s satisfying to my personality that I’m doing things to      yang” balance between two types of immune patients and
change lives, change the state of affairs both directly and        responses involving lymphocytes. Th2 lym-
indirectly.                                                        phocyte responses lead to the production of patient care,
                                                                   IgE allergic antibody responses that cause
What was the best advice you ever received while in                allergy. Th1 lymphocyte responses lead to the and I view that
medical training?                                                  development of non-allergic antibody and cell
Dr. Patterson said patient care comes first whether you’re in      responses that can be protective in modera-
the lab or teaching or seeing a patient. Patients take priority.   tion, or harmful if excessive by causing
                                                                                                                  as something
                                                                   autoimmune disease. As we gain understand-
What advice would you give?                                        ing of how these immune responses are regu- to emulate."
I know it sounds trite, but I’d say do the right thing. I          lated, we are seeing the advent of new biolog-
remember going to a lecture by retired U.S. Army General           ic treatments that can shift Th2 to Th1
Norman Schwarzkopf on what makes a good leader,                    responses and vice versa. This holds promise for revolu-
which can translate into what makes a good professional.           tionizing treatment of allergic diseases.
He had a list of about seven tenets to follow, but he ended
by saying that no matter what you do to meet your                  You recently completed a climb of Mt. Rainier in
responsibilities, you must do what’s right. I think this is        Washington. What’s your next challenge?
especially important in this day and age when so many              It’ll definitely be something more down to earth or on the
physicians are getting frustrated and burned out in the            sea — not climbing a higher mountain. During my
current medical climate. Step back and think what’s the            Chicago days on Lake Michigan, I’d developed sailing
right thing to do, and do it. You can take comfort and sol-        skills that were fairly good, but in St. Louis, these have
ace in having done that.                                           declined considerably. Perhaps I’ll brush up on those skills
                                                                   and head for sailing on a warm body of water.

                                                                                                    Grand Rounds • Winter 2001    19
Alumni Pulse                                                                              From Your
                                                                                          Alumni
                                                                                          Association
Kemme Receives 2001 Alumni                  Greeley Urban Renewal Authority. An           President
Merit Award                                 avid skier, Kemme volunteered as a ski
                                            instructor for the Winter Park National

D      uring Alumni Reunion Weekend,
       Oct. 11-13, Richard Kemme, M.D.
(’56), was presented with the School of
                                            Sports Center for the Disabled Blind
                                            Skier Program. He was a founding mem-
                                            ber of the Greeley Chapter of Habitat for
                                                                                          Fellow Alumni,

                                                                                          Many alumni of the School of
                                                                                          Medicine were directly or indirectly
Medicine’s 2001 Alumni Merit Award.         Humanity, and he is the developer and         affected by the terrorist attacks of
Kemme, who was born in Denver in            owner of three HUD apartment complex-         Sept. 11. We are deeply saddened by
1930, received his bachelor’s degree in     es that provide affordable housing for        the degree of loss in these events. We
pre-medical studies from Regis              senior citizens.                              offer our heartfelt condolences to
University in 1952 before attending Saint      Kemme served four terms on the             those individuals and their families.
Louis University School of Medicine. He     board of the Northern Colorado Medical        Let us pray for each other.
remained in St. Louis for his internship    Center Foundation and recently chaired           The executive advisory board of
and completed four years of specialty       the foundation’s successful $5 million        the alumni association has been
training in orthopedic surgery with Saint   campaign to construct the Monfort             active during the past year. In keep-
Louis University Hospital in 1961.          Children’s Clinic.                            ing with its mandate to offer advice
                                                           Since retiring from private    and perspective, the group identified
                                                         practice in 1989, Kemme has      three areas on which to focus its
                                                         been chair of the Orthopedic     efforts and formed task forces to con-
                                                         Overseas Malawi Africa           centrate on these areas.
                                                         Program. The program                The board recognizes that the
                                                         recruits orthopedic surgeons     School of Medicine has the responsi-
                                                         to serve as short-term volun-    bility to consider the economic impact
                                                         teers to provide orthopedic      of the high cost of medical education
                                                         care and training in develop-    on its students. Several members will
                                                         ing countries. Kemme and his     study the ramifications of the cost and
                                                         wife have made more than a       offer potential remedies.
                                                         dozen trips to Malawi and           The School of Medicine has an
                                                         have spent a total of 24         opportunity to promote the unique
                                                         months in Africa helping train   aspects of Jesuit education at Saint
                                                         local physicians.                Louis University. Several members
                                                            Rotary Clubs International    will define how the school is current-
Richard Kemme, M.D., accepts the Alumni Merit           District 5440 named Kemme         ly perceived internally and externally
Award with his wife, Mary, at his side.                 Rotarian of the Year in 1994      and offer suggestions to refine those
                                                        for his leadership in a suc-      perceptions.
   Kemme was the first orthopedic sur-      cessful campaign to fund and sponsor a           The school has a responsibility to
geon to join the medical staff at the       micro-enterprise Village Bank project in      promote cultural awareness in the
Greeley Medical Clinic and was the chair-   Africa. In 1994, Kemme received the           study and practice of medicine.
man of the clinic’s executive committee     Colorado Medical Society Community            Several members will evaluate how
for 15 years. He was medical staff chief at Service Award. And the North Colorado         the school seeks and values diversity.
the North Colorado Medical Center in        Medical Center Foundation has present-           Brief descriptions of the task forces
1983 and 1984. He was president of the      ed him with their President’s Award.          can be found on the next page. Please
Rocky Mountain Chapter of the Western          Kemme met his wife, Mary Carney            let me know if you have advice to
Orthopedic Association in 1984.             (Nurs ’55), in St. Louis, and they were       offer as we consider these challenges.
   Kemme has been committed to his          married in 1957. They have six children.
community as well. He was the team          Over the years, family and friends have
physician for the Greeley Central High      joined Kemme in climbing 40 of the 54         Regards,
School basketball team and the medical      mountains in Colorado.                        Thomas Olsen, M.D. (’79)
director for the Weld County Crippled          For an Alumni Merit Award nomina-          President
Children’s Society. He was chair of the     tion form, go to medschool.slu.edu or         Medical Alumni Association
Greeley Catholic School Board and a         call Marcia Quint at (314) 577-8106.
commissioner on the board of the

20           Grand Rounds • Winter 2001
                                                                                               IN MEMORIAM

Scholarship Task Force                      mation to create an identity statement         Robert Heyssel, M.D. (’53), a former
This task force is working to gain a full   that highlights the school’s position and      president of the Johns Hopkins
understanding of the financial chal-        strengths, particularly in light of med-       Hospital, died of lung cancer in June in
lenges facing students who seek to          ical advances such as the human                Seaford, Del. He was 72. Dr. Heyssel
enroll or are enrolled at the School of     genome project and cloning. The task           was noted for his work to improve the
Medicine. The task force will investigate   force will provide a critical mass of          delivery of health care services, espe-
what has been done at other institutions    information to share with applicants, to       cially to the poor. He was a key member
to address the problem of student debt      support our efforts in the upcoming            of a Johns Hopkins group that started
and will make recommendations to the        comprehensive campaign and to guide            the first health maintenance organiza-
dean as to how the school and the EAB       future work of the EAB. Coordinator:           tion for East Baltimore, a poor area
might address these challenges. Co-         Robert Blaskiewicz, M.D. (’75)                 near the hospital that has been revital-
coordinators: Vallee Willman, M.D.                                                         ized. He had a reputation for fighting
(’51), and Edward O’Brien, M.D. (’67)       Multicultural Affairs Task Force               soaring health costs and government
                                            This task force is working to identify         and industry control over medical care.
                                                                                           He published dozens of papers on
Identity Task Force                         minority student, minority resident,
                                            minority faculty and minority alumni           those issues and worked for affordable
This task force is working to identify                                                     housing in the neighborhood. Dr.
the unique characteristics of a Saint       issues. The task force is gathering infor-
                                            mation on what programs are in place           Heyssel was with Johns Hopkins for 24
Louis University School of Medicine                                                        years, serving as the hospital’s presi-
education. In other words, how do we        at Saint Louis University as well as
                                            other institutions. Coordinator:               dent from 1982 to 1992, the year he
define ourselves as a Catholic academic                                                    retired. During his time at Johns
health center in changing medical           Terence Joiner, M.D. (’82)
                                                                                           Hopkins, he oversaw the redevelop-
times? The task force is gathering infor-                                                  ment and a major expansion of the
                                                                                           hospital. Dr. Heyssel is survived by his
                                                                                           wife, Maria, a sister, three sons, two
                                            Many of the hats are used at strictly cer-     daughters and nine grandchildren.
         Hats Off                           emonial functions. Some symbolize the
                                            office or rank of his patients.                James Sammons, M.D. (’51), a former

S      ombreros and Stetsons, kangols
       and kammuries, fedoras and
fezs, baseball and berets — these are
                                               Many patients think of Ravera during
                                            their travels as well, and they bring
                                            back unique and distinctive hats to add
                                                                                           top executive of the American Medical
                                                                                           Association, died of cancer and a heart
                                                                                           ailment in June in Chicago. He was 74.
just a few of the 400-plus hats adorn-      to his collection.                             Dr. Sammons was executive vice presi-
ing the waiting room and offices of            “One of my favorites is a medical           dent of the AMA for 16 years. His
John Ravera, M.D. (’65), a urologist in     school graduation cap from Florence,           appointment in 1974 came at turbu-
Newport Beach, Calif.                       Italy,” Ravera said. “Another favorite is a    lent time for the association. The AMA
   The collection began about 15 years      helmet from the Swiss Guard. It’s made         was approaching bankruptcy, losing
ago on a rainy day when patients in         of pewter and looks like a                     members and taking out monthly loans
Ravera’s office needed a place to hang      Conquistador’s hat.”                           of $1 million just to meet its payroll.
their hats and coats. Ravera brought in        Patients leave two to three hats a          Dr. Sammons is credited with putting
a huge hall tree that used to belong to     week in his office.                            the association’s finances on more
his parents.                                   “Patients tell me the hats are more         solid footing. He raised membership
   Patients began intentionally leaving     enjoyable and certainly more interest-         dues, slashed the number of associa-
their hats so that the antler-esque rack    ing than the old magazines in the              tion committees and councils from 100
would not look bare. One hat led to         office,” said Ravera, who posted the his-      to eight and reduced staff budgets.
another and another and another.            tory of his hat collection on the waiting      When he stepped down, the AMA had
Soon, the rack was completely full,               room wall for curious patients.          nearly $200 million in assets and had
and hats lined the walls of                              Ravera rarely wears a hat,        become one of the most influential
Ravera’s waiting room and the                         but he can’t imagine not being       medical organizations in the world. In a
hallway to his office.                                surrounded by them.                  1984 interview, Dr. Sammons said, “The
   Each of the hats tells a story. A                    “I suppose that wherever I         fiscal crisis motivated us to bring the
 fireman, a policeman, a soldier, a                  go, the hats will go,” he said. “It   AMA into the 20th century and turn it
          chef, a teacher, a butcher,                would seem strange to                 into a modern corporation.” He is sur-
        a baker — all have left hats                 be without them.”                     vived by his wife, JoAnne Halloway, a
 emblematic of their professions.                                                          son, a daughter, two stepchildren and
                                                                                           five grandchildren.


                                                                                           Grand Rounds • Winter 2001             21
                                                                                               IN MEMORIAM

Scholarship Task Force                      mation to create an identity statement         Robert Heyssel, M.D. (’53), a former
This task force is working to gain a full   that highlights the school’s position and      president of the Johns Hopkins
understanding of the financial chal-        strengths, particularly in light of med-       Hospital, died of lung cancer in June in
lenges facing students who seek to          ical advances such as the human                Seaford, Del. He was 72. Dr. Heyssel
enroll or are enrolled at the School of     genome project and cloning. The task           was noted for his work to improve the
Medicine. The task force will investigate   force will provide a critical mass of          delivery of health care services, espe-
what has been done at other institutions    information to share with applicants, to       cially to the poor. He was a key member
to address the problem of student debt      support our efforts in the upcoming            of a Johns Hopkins group that started
and will make recommendations to the        comprehensive campaign and to guide            the first health maintenance organiza-
dean as to how the school and the EAB       future work of the EAB. Coordinator:           tion for East Baltimore, a poor area
might address these challenges. Co-         Robert Blaskiewicz, M.D. (’75)                 near the hospital that has been revital-
coordinators: Vallee Willman, M.D.                                                         ized. He had a reputation for fighting
(’51), and Edward O’Brien, M.D. (’67)       Multicultural Affairs Task Force               soaring health costs and government
                                            This task force is working to identify         and industry control over medical care.
                                                                                           He published dozens of papers on
Identity Task Force                         minority student, minority resident,
                                            minority faculty and minority alumni           those issues and worked for affordable
This task force is working to identify                                                     housing in the neighborhood. Dr.
the unique characteristics of a Saint       issues. The task force is gathering infor-
                                            mation on what programs are in place           Heyssel was with Johns Hopkins for 24
Louis University School of Medicine                                                        years, serving as the hospital’s presi-
education. In other words, how do we        at Saint Louis University as well as
                                            other institutions. Coordinator:               dent from 1982 to 1992, the year he
define ourselves as a Catholic academic                                                    retired. During his time at Johns
health center in changing medical           Terence Joiner, M.D. (’82)
                                                                                           Hopkins, he oversaw the redevelop-
times? The task force is gathering infor-                                                  ment and a major expansion of the
                                                                                           hospital. Dr. Heyssel is survived by his
                                                                                           wife, Maria, a sister, three sons, two
                                            Many of the hats are used at strictly cer-     daughters and nine grandchildren.
         Hats Off                           emonial functions. Some symbolize the
                                            office or rank of his patients.                James Sammons, M.D. (’51), a former

S      ombreros and Stetsons, kangols
       and kammuries, fedoras and
fezs, baseball and berets — these are
                                               Many patients think of Ravera during
                                            their travels as well, and they bring
                                            back unique and distinctive hats to add
                                                                                           top executive of the American Medical
                                                                                           Association, died of cancer and a heart
                                                                                           ailment in June in Chicago. He was 74.
just a few of the 400-plus hats adorn-      to his collection.                             Dr. Sammons was executive vice presi-
ing the waiting room and offices of            “One of my favorites is a medical           dent of the AMA for 16 years. His
John Ravera, M.D. (’65), a urologist in     school graduation cap from Florence,           appointment in 1974 came at turbu-
Newport Beach, Calif.                       Italy,” Ravera said. “Another favorite is a    lent time for the association. The AMA
   The collection began about 15 years      helmet from the Swiss Guard. It’s made         was approaching bankruptcy, losing
ago on a rainy day when patients in         of pewter and looks like a                     members and taking out monthly loans
Ravera’s office needed a place to hang      Conquistador’s hat.”                           of $1 million just to meet its payroll.
their hats and coats. Ravera brought in        Patients leave two to three hats a          Dr. Sammons is credited with putting
a huge hall tree that used to belong to     week in his office.                            the association’s finances on more
his parents.                                   “Patients tell me the hats are more         solid footing. He raised membership
   Patients began intentionally leaving     enjoyable and certainly more interest-         dues, slashed the number of associa-
their hats so that the antler-esque rack    ing than the old magazines in the              tion committees and councils from 100
would not look bare. One hat led to         office,” said Ravera, who posted the his-      to eight and reduced staff budgets.
another and another and another.            tory of his hat collection on the waiting      When he stepped down, the AMA had
Soon, the rack was completely full,               room wall for curious patients.          nearly $200 million in assets and had
and hats lined the walls of                              Ravera rarely wears a hat,        become one of the most influential
Ravera’s waiting room and the                         but he can’t imagine not being       medical organizations in the world. In a
hallway to his office.                                surrounded by them.                  1984 interview, Dr. Sammons said, “The
   Each of the hats tells a story. A                    “I suppose that wherever I         fiscal crisis motivated us to bring the
 fireman, a policeman, a soldier, a                  go, the hats will go,” he said. “It   AMA into the 20th century and turn it
          chef, a teacher, a butcher,                would seem strange to                 into a modern corporation.” He is sur-
        a baker — all have left hats                 be without them.”                     vived by his wife, JoAnne Halloway, a
 emblematic of their professions.                                                          son, a daughter, two stepchildren and
                                                                                           five grandchildren.


                                                                                           Grand Rounds • Winter 2001             21
PROFILE OF
  PHILANTHROPY:
  DR. & MRS. ARCHIBALD FORSTER
                                                                                    Dr. Archibald Forster (’47) and his wife, Annemarie, live in Long Beach, Calif. “Arch” was a
                                                                                 successful OB/GYN in the Los Angeles area for more than 40 years. Now he and Annemarie
                                                                                 are enjoying retirement.
                                                                                    The Forsters often contemplated doing something special for Saint Louis University. Arch
                                                                                 was grateful for the medical education he received at Saint Louis University. In addition, he and
                                                                                 Annemarie were appreciative of the Jesuit education that two of their children and one of their
                                                                                 grandchildren also received at SLU.
                                                                                    The Forsters wanted to make a difference in the lives of others. Their wish was to provide
                                                                                 financial assistance to young men and women who hoped to pursue their medical school edu-
                                                                                 cation amid the value-centered curriculum found at Saint Louis University.
                                                                                    After consulting with their professional advisers, Arch and Annemarie selected a gift arrange-
                                                                                 ment known as a charitable remainder unitrust to achieve their philanthropic goals. The uni-
                                                                                 trust provides Arch and Annemarie with income for life. The Forsters also received a charita-
                                                                                 ble deduction and substantial income tax savings when their trust was established. Upon ter-
                                                                                                                                            .
                                                                                 mination of the trust, their gift will create “The A.F and Annemarie Forster Endowed
                                                                                 Scholarship Fund” to provide scholarships to future generations of med-
                                                                                 ical school students.
                                                                                    To learn more about how a planned gift can benefit you and help
Dr. Archibald Forster                                                            Saint Louis University fulfill its mission of education, service and
and his wife, Annemarie                                                          research, contact the Health Sciences Center development and alum-
                                                                                 ni relations office to receive a copy of The Physician’s Creative Gift
                                                                                 Planning Guide.
                                          Contact:




                                                      Kent Hornberger
                                                      Health Sciences Center
                                                      Office of Development and Alumni Relations
                                                      3525 Caroline St., Room 535
                                                      St. Louis, MO 63104-1099
                                                      Phone: (314) 577-8113
                                                      E-mail: hornbergkd@slu.edu




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                                       More than 300 School of Medicine graduates came together to meet old friends and new alumni at Reunion
                                       2001. The oldest in attendance was 97-year-old Cornelius Kline, M.D. (’34), who came from Belleville, Ill.
                                       He attended all alumni events including the dean’s reception, a scholarship breakfast, the reunion dinner and
                                       the alumni Mass. Those who traveled farthest to attend the reunion were Michael Beirne, M.D. (’51), of
                                       Anchorage, Alaska, George Rourke, M.D. (’61), of Kailua-Kona, Hawaii, and David Crudo, M.D. (’81), also of
                                       Kailua-Kona.

                                       To see more photos from Reunion 2001, log onto medschool.slu.edu.



                                                                               Members of the class of
                                                                               ’86 at a private class party
                                                                               hosted by reunion chair
                                                                               Dan Martin, Jr., M.D.




                                                                                           Harmon Harrison, M.D.
                                                                                           (’51), and his wife,
                                                                                           Mary, enjoy a dance at
                                                                                           the Adam’s Mark




                                            Second-year student and
 Reunion Classes                            Reinert Scholarship
                                            recipient Jacqueline
    Support                                 Hellwege with Don
Scholarship Effort                          Fischer, M.D. (’51), and
                                            his wife, Mary, at the
A new program has received gen-             scholarship breakfast
erous support from members of
the five-year reunion classes at
the School of Medicine. In recog-
nition of the rising cost of med-                                                          Members of the class of ‘51,
                                                                                           which had the largest turnout
ical education and the debt level
                                                                                           of the classes attending this
with which students must cope,                                                             year’s reunion
alumni are being asked to consid-
er a gift of $100 or more for
every year since graduation.
These funds become immediately
available as scholarships for cur-
rent, qualified students and are
administered through the office              John McNamara, M.D.
of student financial planning.              (’51), and his wife,
"We've had a tremendous                     Norrine, with second-
response to this program, and I             year student Jason
especially want to thank the                Schlautman. Schlautman
Reunion Giving chairs,” said John           is a recipient of a Reinert
Soucy, director of reunion giving.          Scholarship, which the
“I’m looking forward to recruiting          McNamaras support.
volunteers to be reunion giving             “The contribution is
                                            faceless until you meet
chairs for next year's classes." For
                                            the student,” McNamara
information on the reunion giv-             said during the scholar-
ing program contact John Soucy              ship breakfast
at (314) 268-5962.




                      Mark Your Calendars
                Reunion 2002: October 17, 18 and 19

								
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