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Program Review Self-Study for Academic Year 2001-2002 The Senior

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					Program Review Self-Study for Academic Year 2001-2002:
                         The Senior-Year Experience Program

                              Department of University Studies

SELF-STUDY

I. Brief Program Overview

In order to have a better understanding of the long standing connection between Kennesaw State
University and The National Senior-Year Experience Movement, the subsequent development of
The Senior-Year Experience Program, currently housed in the Department of University Studies,
a concise history and overview is necessary for accurate programmatic decision-making.

Having already served more than 500 KSU students since 1996, KSU 4401 has emerged as an
institutional capstone course preparing college seniors for the post-university experience as
productive global citizens, through the process of portfolio development, utilization of campus
resources, community service, and aligning students with resources that give graduates a
competitive advantage, such as the ICAPP study of what employers want from University of
Georgia System graduates.

In the May 15, 2001 Kennesaw State University Commencement Program, approximately 503
seniors were listed as successfully graduating. In spring 2001, approximately 108 seniors
enrolled in KSU 4401: Senior Seminar. Although an elective course, KSU 4401 attracts a strong
percentage of seniors preparing for college graduate.
The Senior-Year Experience Program, which consists of the KSU 4401: Senior Seminar
continues to develop from its early academic roots at Kennesaw State University.

President Betty Siegel is credited with beginning The Senior-Year Experience Movement. Thus,
there is a rich academic history that is generated from Kennesaw State University. (A detailed
timeline of the development of The Senior-Year Experience is contained in section II. B. The
Quality of the Faculty Supporting the Program).

In 1990, John Gardner, former Director of the National Resource Center, University of South
Carolina, Columbia, in conjunction with President Betty Siegel of Kennesaw State University
and Marietta College, the first Senior-Year Experience Workshop at the Students in Transition
National Conference. For a detailed academic tracing of the Senior-Year Experience movement
onsult:www.sc.edu/fye/401/401infopiece/history.htm.

According to John Gardner, the definition of national movement entitled The Senior Experience
has been outlined as follows (www.sc.edu/fye/sye_info.htm):

The senior year experience is a very flexible concept. Indeed it can be made to mean whatever its
advocates, proponents, and developers want it to mean. It can be used to describe a solely
academic initiative as in a senior capstone course or it can be used to describe a myriad of other
appropriate programmatic initiatives to strengthen the final period of undergraduate education
such as a career planning initiative, a senior service project or internship requirement, or an
achievement or recognition ceremony. Thus, the senior experience is by no means solely or
primarily a set of academic initiatives and experiences.

The senior experience refers to the total experience of seniors inside and outside the classroom,
as provided by the faculty, student affairs officers, academic administrators, and seniors
themselves. The senior experience focuses on efforts to help seniors make meaning of the senior
experience, bringing closure, connectedness, integration, and reflection to the diverse set of
activities they have experienced as undergraduates. The senior experience also involves a last
concluding effort on the part of the institution to help students graduate with the kinds of skills
they will need to be successful in the work force or in graduate school in the immediate or long
term future.

A. What is the Senior-Year Experience? A brief history of The Senior-Year
   Experience and its Kennesaw State University Academic Roots:

In his text The Senior Year Experience: Facilitating Integration, Reflection, Closure, and
Transition, John N. Gardner acknowledges…”Betty Siegel, President of Kennesaw State
University, for inspiring him to develop a senior capstone transition course at the University of
South Carolina by emulating her outstanding leadership example in developing and teaching
such a course for Kennesaw Seniors.

In 1990, President Betty Siegel designed and implemented for first course addressing the needs
of graduating seniors from Kennesaw State University. At the request of a student, the president
was asked to offer a class for seniors to help them prepare for graduation. The student requested
that much like the first-year experience, which assists students in successfully transitioning to the
university, the senior-year experience would assist the student in successfully transitioning from
the university.

The Senior-Year Experience Program has several pivotal academic starting points at Kennesaw
State University. In 1990, Kennesaw State University co-sponsors the first Senior-Year
Experience conference in an attempt to identify how to better serve the needs of graduating
seniors. Concurrently, President Betty Siegel offers the first Senior Seminar course in 1990 in
response to a student’s request to better assist seniors graduating from the university. The
National Senior-Year Experience Movement begins in 1990.

From 1990-1994, President Betty Siegel and Dr. Michael Tierce taught the Senior Seminar
which was housed in the Department of Communication. This department was the academic
home for the First-Year Experience Program, hence the connections of the First-Year Experience
and Senior-Year Experience is established.

Between 1994-1996, two important academic needs surface that supported the further
development of the Senior-Year Experience movement at Kennesaw State University.
First, while serving as Chair of the Department of Communication, Dr. Joan E. Leichter
Dominick addressed the concerns of the majors regarding their successful transition from the
university to that of productive citizen.
 In October 1996, Dr. Joan E. Leichter Dominick, along with Dr. Linda Noble, Dr. Ralph Frey,
and Dr. Dorothy Zinsmiester were sent to the Students in Transition Conference. We attended
the Senior-Year Experience Workshop, sponsored by John Gardner of the National Resource
Center. We were asked to bring back academic ideas to implement at the university.
Concurrently, President Betty Siegel asked to have her section of Senior Seminar offered in
spring 1997.

In 1998, Dr. Joan E. Leichter Dominick becomes the first Director of the Senior-Year
Experience Program, while still fulfilling her responsibilities as Chair of the Communication
Department.

In 1999, KSU 4401: Senior Seminar is approved by the U.P.P.C, making it the first institutional
capstone course at the university.

In spring 2000, the first KSU 4401 course taught and by fall 2000 the first multiple sections of
KSU 4401 are offered.

 The current curriculum design of KSU 4401 was based on a COM 490: Learning Comes to Life
course offered in the Communication Department in spring 1997. This course was team taught
by President Betty Siegel, Ms. Sybil Myers, Director of Volunteer Kennesaw, and Dr. Joan E.
Leichter Dominick. While a Governor’s Teaching Fellow 1996-1997, Dr. Joan E. Leichter
Dominick developed the curriculum design for this course as her academic project. With the
guidance of Ms. Sara Eby-Ebersole, Speech-Writer for Governor Zell Miller, and Advisory
Board Member for Kennesaw State University and the Department of Communication, the first
COM 490: Learning comes to Life was conceptualized.

B. How has the Senior-Year Experience Program been designed to fit the needs of
seniors at Kennesaw State University?

Academically housed in the Department of University Studies, The Senior-Year Experience
(SYE) Program currently consists of an elective course entitled: KSU 4401 Senior Seminar. The
course is an elective for upper division course that prepares the student for the post-university
experience. Having served over 500 students since the course inception, KSU 4401 Senior
Seminar provides the preparatory time for students to connect the mission of higher education to
their new roles as leaders in society. The course addresses reflection on the college learning
experience, career preparation, graduate school preparation, community service and preparation
for the student’s emerging role as citizen in the national and global arenas.

 The Senior-Year Experience Program has been referred as being only a course, which sounds
detrimental, at best. KSU 4401 is currently designed to serve the seniors both inside and outside
the course. The course vision is described as the place seniors can come to have advanced
institutional advising (Career Services, Presentation Technology Center, Instructional
Technology Center, Small Business Development, and CAPS – Graduate School Assistance in
applications and scholarships), begin networking for career and graduate school, learn
competitive process of portfolio design and presentation, get involved in community service,
connect with the alumni association, and begin to take their place as college graduates and
productive citizens. KSU 4401 has emerged as one of the first institutional capstone courses of
its kind in the nation.

According to The First National Survey of Senior Seminars/Capstone Courses conducted by
the National Resource Center, University of Columbia, South Carolina in 1999, the 864
respondents from Private and Public Universities reported
(www.sc.edu/fye/resources/surveys/survey_sye):

70.3% of respondents indicated that senior seminars and capstone courses are discipline- or
department-based. 16.3% of respondents indicated that these courses are interdisciplinary, 5.8%
of respondents indicated that these courses are transition courses intended to focus on
preparation for work, life choice, life skills, or life after college, 4.6% of respondents indicated
that senior seminars and capstone courses are "other" types, and 3% of senior seminars and
capstone courses are career planning courses.

As noted in the Kennesaw State University 2001-2002 Undergraduate Catalog (p. 188):

Senior Seminar (KSU 4401): This institutional capstone course provides a structure for seniors
to bring closure to their undergraduate experience while preparing for the transition from the
university to the community at large. Within a structure learning community from a variety of
disciplines, students will discuss the meaning of their undergraduate experience and develop an
understanding of their role as alumni and productive citizens of the work force, community,
state, nation and the world. Through the preparation of a reflective portfolio, involvement in a
service-learning project, and a critical discussion of their short and long term goals, the students
will prepare for the post-university experience.

Students Served for KSU 4401: According to the Office of Institutional Research, of the Fall
2000 course demographics reveal that of the 108 students registered, 20 students were minority,
55% were female, 12 were international students, more than 50% of the students were registered
for 12 hours or less, and the average student GPA was 2.84. The percent of minority students
taking KSU 4401 is higher than the university-wide percentage of minority students enrolled at
KSU. Most of the students are from the College of Business, the College of Humanities and
Social Science, with a smaller student group from the College of Science and Mathematics, the
College of Education, the College of Health and Human Services, and the School of the Arts.

The student client base for this course has been students that need more academic guidance in the
preparation process for graduating from the university, therefore, supporting the need for the
institutional capstone class KSU 4401. The First National Survey on Senior Seminars and
Capstone Courses supports the same gender distribution findings for taking elective senior
seminars, that is, women tend to take elective senior courses for post-university preparation (see
appendix for Gender rations of Senior Seminars and Capstone Courses (N=26) for further
information consult the following address
www.edu/fye/resources/surveys/sye_graphics/sld019.htm)

After seeing this data, the assumption could be made that female students make up the majority
of college students today, however, the qualitative observation is that female students take KSU
4401 for the mentoring guidance that is often not provided for them. Also, many of our students
are first generation college graduates; therefore, needing more directed mentoring for their
successful transition to post-university life.

II: Summary Conclusions of Strength of the Program’s Overall Quality:

The recommendation is to enhance or expand the program, based on strong student course
evaluations, successfully preparing students for post-university life, strengthening students
emerging alumni connections, and supporting the mission of Kennesaw State University and the
University of Georgia System.

The Senior-Year Experience Program, which currently consist of the institutional elective
capstone course KSU 4401: Senior Seminar has produced a quality academic product which is
academically aligned with the addressing the needs of the graduating students, future employers,
graduate programs, service organizations and the global community. The course connects the
mission of the university, the mission of higher education, the needs of the global community to
the needs of the emerging college graduate. The course provides the learning environment for the
student to prepare for their role of a productive citizen. This course follows a national academic
trend organized by the National Resource Center, at the University of South Carolina, Columbia.
The student evaluations of all the course sections are positive, underscore the productivity of the
course, and provide quality material for the students. Over 500 KSU seniors have taken this class
since its inception that stands as an academic testament to the strength of the course.

The quality and productivity of this program should be ranked strong to above average due to
the leadership role that the Senior-Year Experience Program has provided for other institutions
implementing such a program, for the innovative workbook produced by the teaching faculty of
KSU 4401 (publisher Houghton/Mifflin notes that this is a new academic direction and featured
it as a model of a custom print text at their conference in Toronto, Canada, August 2001), and for
the consist growth of students taking this institutional elective class. Considering the cost of this
program has been significantly low the academic payoffs have been significantly high. Seniors
taking KSU 4401 share that they are better prepared for transitioning from the university

II. A: Curricular Adherence to Quality Program Guidelines and/or Accreditation Standing
in Discipline:

In this area, the program should be rated strong or above average:

The SYE Program is still early in its academic development. The program has created new
academic ground by offering one of the first institutional capstone courses for seniors. According
to John Gardner, academic leader of the Senior-Year Experience, KSU has taken a national
leadership role it the movement. Therefore, there is no existing model for the SYE Program,
therefore, making a comparison to a model program next to impossible. KSU is taking the
academic leadership in the development of this national movement. While trying to meet the
academic needs of the students, discover how the program should be best developed, while not
having a national academic model for the program makes the progress slow and frustrating at
times.
The good news is that SYE program has been a low cost academic program yielding high student
satisfaction profits. In order to enhance the growth of the SYE Program, the budget for the
program needs expansion to be able to best achieve the aforementioned plans of program
development. The SYE Program, although early in growth and development, is academically at
the forefront of the Senior-Experience movement which mission is to provide college seniors
with a place to honor and reflect on their learning experience while preparing for the role of
productive national and global citizenship. The SYE Program provides the underpinnings to
achieve the major mission of higher education, that is, to produce productive citizens.

II. B: The Quality of Faculty Supporting the Program

I.         KSU 4401 should be rated Very Strong or Exemplary in this area.

This section includes current teaching faculty and an overview of current faculty and
administrative stakeholders of the Senior-Year Experience Program.

Current Teaching Faculty:

As of fall 2000, the faculty for KSU 4401 has increased to four teaching faculty:

Ms. Karen Andrews, Director of Career Services
Dr. Deborah Smith, Learning Support Programs
Mr. Richard Grover, Director of Service-Learning Programs
Dr. Joan E. Dominick, Director of the Senior-Year Experience Program

Continued faculty interest develops in teaching upcoming sections. This can be traced as a direct
result of the November 17, 2001 workshop sponsored by Dean Joanne Fowler and Dr. Rebecca
Casey, Chair of Learning Support Programs. Ms. Kathy Matthews, Director of the Freshmen
Year Program and Dr. Joan E. Dominick, Director of the Senior-Year Experience Program,
along with teaching faculty in both programs held a workshop for administrators and faculty
across the university for an update of programs and to develop faculty interest in teaching and/or
academically connecting with these programs.

In addition to the current teaching faculty, there are been administrators, faculty, staff, and
students supporting the growth and development of the Senior-Year Experience Program. Under
this sub-section is provided a detail history of the emergence of the Senior-Year Experience
Program at Kennesaw State University, listing the stakeholders of the program.

There has been campus-wide interest in encouraging students to take KSU 4401, custom fitting
KSU 4401 for exclusive use in a College of the university, and/or importing parts of the course
into existing senior capstone courses.

Overview of Senior-Year Experience Program Faculty/Administrative Stakeholders:

1990:
   •    President Betty Siegel listens to one student and the Senior-Movement begins
   •    Students in Transition Conference is held with John Gardner, National Resource
        Center and President Betty Siegel, Kennesaw State University sponsoring the
        First Senior Experience Workshop.
   •    President Betty Siegel and Dr. Michael Tierce teach Senior Seminar housed in the
        Department of Communication – which also is the academic home for the academic
        bookend course – First-Year Experience.

1990-1994:

   •    President Betty Siegel and Dr. Michael Tierce teach the Senior Seminar.

1996:

   •    President Betty Seigel sends Dr. Joan E. Dominick, Dr. Linda Nobel, Dr. Ralph Frey, and
        Dr. Dorothy Zinmeister to the Senior-Year Experience Conference
        In San Antonio, Texas. October 1996 to plan a SYE Program at Kennesaw State
        University.
   •    John Gardner credits President Betty Siegel with starting the SYE Movement.
   •    Governor’s Teaching Fellows (GTF) Award: Dr. Joan E. Dominick receives GTF Award.
        She chooses to develop the academic template for the Senior-Year Experience Course,
        which subsequently becomes the Senior-Year Experience Program in 1998.
   •    Distinguished Teaching Award: Dr. Joan E. Dominick receives this esteemed award at
        Kennesaw State University.
   •    Regents Distinguished Professor of Teaching and Learning: Dr. Joan E. Dominick
        receives the award at Kennesaw State University. B

1997:

   •    COM 490: Learning Comes to Life is taught in the Communication Department
        In spring 1997, President Betty Siegel, Sybil Meyer, and Dr. Joan E. Dominick
        Teach the new version of the Senior Seminar Course. Dr. Linda Noble coins the title of
        the course. Fourteen students sign up to begin the new movement…
        The course design was the Governor’s Teaching Fellow’s project of Dr. Joan
        E. Dominick. Sara Eby-Ebersole, speechwriter for Gov. Zell Miller, was the mentor of
        the project.

1998:

   •    Dr. Joan E. Dominick becomes the Director of the Senior-Year Experience Program, now
        housed in the Department of Learning Support. Also, the academic home for the First-
        Year Experience Program. Dr. Rebecca Casey and Dr. Joanne Fowler mentor the
        program.
   •    Dr. Joan E. Dominick works with John Gardner for mentoring assistance from him.
   •    John Gardner writes The Senior Experience: Facilitating Integration, Reflection, Closure
        and Transition. Dedicates text to President Betty Siegel for inspiring him regarding the
        Senior-Year Experience Movement.
   •    Senior-Year Experience Council formed summer 1998. Members appointed by Deans.
        Members: Dr. Charles Aust, Dr. Linda Webb, Dr. Christina Horne, Dr. Virgina Watson,
        Dr. John Gentile, Dr. Jane Campbell, and Dr. Fred Roach. Act as advisory council, which
        meet regularly until the KSU 4401 was approved by UPCC in fall 1999.
   •    Ken Honea, Communication Intern, and Dr. Joan E. Dominick develop her faculty
        Webpage linking Senior-Year Experience and First-Year Experience Programs. Senior
        learning modules are developed that will become textbook in 2001.
   •    Kathy Matthews, Director of First-Year Experience and Joan E. Dominick, Director of
        Senior-Year Experience begin their collaborative presentations that will extend local,
        national, and international levels – weaving the programs together.
   •    Dr. Joan E. Dominick commits to teaching both KSU 1101 and KSU 4401 to have clear
        academic picture of entering and graduating from the university.

1999:

   •    COM 490: Learning Comes to Life is put before the UPPC and becomes for the first
        institutional capstone course for seniors at Kennesaw State University.
   •    KSU 4401: Senior-Year Experience is taught by Dr. Joan E. Dominick
   •    March 1999: Survey of Departmental and College Capstone Courses – Chairs Surveyed.
        Report included in Program Review.
   •    February 1999 – Dr. John Gardner of the National Resource Center, meets for a vision
        and workshop meeting for the First-Year and Senior-Year Experience Programs. First
        academic linkage of the bookend courses begins.
   •    April 1999 – Senior-Year Teleconference attended by Senior-Year Experience Council
        and Friends. Dr. Joan E. Leichter Dominick pre-recorded interview is televised during the
        SYE Teleconference. She discusses the academic plans for the SYE Program at
        Kennesaw State University. The SYE Teleconference is shown across the United States,
        Canada, and Mexico. Dr. Joan E. Leichter Dominick begins role as global expert in the
        movement of the Senior-Year Experience Program. Students in the Senior-Year
        Experience Seminar are invited to attend the SYE Teleconference. Resulting from this
        meeting, a student publishes an article on the SYE Program in the Talisman.
   •    April 1999 - President Betty Siegel holds a vision meeting of Senior-Year Experience
        Council and Friends to define immediate and long-term goals of the program.
   •    Senior-Year Experience List-Serve: Dr. Joan E. Dominick joins the SYE group for
        tracking the global trends of the movement. From this group, hears about the academic
        success of using student portfolios. Portfolios are introduced to the SYE curriculum and
        the First-Year Experience Curriculum as a way of empowering students in tracking their
        college learning experience.

2000:

   •    Fall 2000 multiple sections of KSU 4401 are taught.
   •    Workshop is held to attract faculty to teach in Senior-Year Experience.
   •    Student Portfolio’s are introduced in both KSU 1101 and 4401 to academically align
        students in bookend institutional courses. Effort to connect Citizenship and Career results
        from this learning assignment.

2001:

   •    The Complete Graduate: A Workbook for College Seniors is authored by Dr. Joan E.
        Dominick, Karen Andrews, Director of Career Services, and Dr. Debbie Smith, adjunct
        instructor for the Department of Learning Support. Dick Grover, Director of Service
        Learning contributes a chapter. All current KSU 4401 professors contribute to project.
        Published by Houghton-Mifflin, Vivendi International – text is featured at the National
        Conference for Houghton-Mifflin for its innovation and representation of a new college
        market. Sales force in the East, West, and Central United States division promote the
        custom-print text outside the Kennesaw State University market.
   •    President Betty Siegel sponsors presentation at the International First-Year Experience
        Conference. Dr. Joan E. Dominick, Kathy Matthews, Dick Grover, and Sylvia Inman
        present the First-Year Experience story of KSU and discuss connection to Senior-Year
        Program. John Gardner features passages, the KSU First-Year, Senior-Year, and
        Service-Learning magazine, at the conference.
   •    Dr. Anne Hicks-Coolick, Department of Human Services, College of Health and Human
        Services, begins the process of allowing the student majors to substitute their existing
        capstone course HS 4498 Capstone Seminar in Human Services for KSU 4401 Senior
        Seminar to fit the academic needs of their majors.
   •    Dean Larry Peterson, Dr. Al Panu, and Dr. Ralph Rascati meet with Dr. Joan E.
        Dominick, and plan to offer the first section of KSU 4401 for seniors in the College of
        Science, Mathematics, and Computer Science. Scheduled to be team taught with Dr.
        Ralph Rascati and Dr. Joan E. Dominick, Spring 2002.

II. C: The Quality of the KSU Facilities, Equipment, Learning Support Resources &
Practicum Placements Supporting the Program

KSU 4401 Program would be rated above average.

Students of KSU 4401 take advantage of resources across the university as part of the
institutional advising section of the course. The resources of Career Services, CAPS, ITS, PTD,
Volunteer Kennesaw, Small Business Development and the Alumni Association are incorporated
in the course curriculum, giving students ample opportunity to be prepared for the post-
university experience.

Identifying, showcasing, and the continued development of productive citizenship skills are the
central mission of KSU 4401. Students participate in optional volunteer programs, non-credit
technology training courses, non-credit Small Business Development courses, work with CAP
counselors for graduate school preparation, and connect with Career Services for successful
employment placement.
The Alumni Association plays a critical role in KSU 4401. Future KSU alumni are made aware
of the continued services provided for graduates, such as, use of the library, ITS courses, and
networking within the Alumni Association.

KSU 4401 is a course that prepares students for the post-university experience through the
utilization of KSU facilities both as a student and future alumni, thus developing their strong
connection to Kennesaw State University.

As a result of taking KSU 4401, four students have become peer facilitators for KSU 1101, with
a fourth student planning to serve in spring 2002. Students chose either an internship or student
assist position to co-facilitate in KSU 4401. Seniors served as academic mentors, assisted first-
year students in developing reflective portfolios, and lead teaching sessions. The connecting of
KSU 1101 and KSU 4401 through student peer facilitation has been a very successful academic
endeavor for student success.

II. D: The Quality of the University’s Annual Financial Investment in the Program’s
Operation and Growth for the Program Delivery and Support

In this area, the program should be rated satisfactory or average:

The Departmental Chair of University Studies has access to detailed budgetary information
regarding this program.

The annual financial investment has been the redirection of the current Director of the Senior-
Year Program from the Department of Communication to the Department of University Studies.
The current Director teaches a full academic teaching load each semester - four courses each
semester (fall – two KSU 1101/two KSU 4401; spring - one KSU 1101/three KSU 4401;
summer if needed- one KSU 1101/one KSU 4401).

The Director of Service-Learning currently teaching three sections of KSU 4401 during fall,
spring, and summer semesters as part of his faculty appointment.

The Director of Career Services currently teaches one section of KSU 4401 during the fall and
spring semesters.

One adjunct instructor has taught a section of KSU 4401.

II. E: Use of Advanced Technology for Program Delivery and Support

In this area, the program should be rated strong or above average.

In KSU 4401, students receive training from ITS and PTD in a variety of technological areas.
Students are offered training to develop CD portfolios.

For the Senior-Year Program, the Departmental Website further development is a prime goal for
this coming academic year of 2001-2002.
II. F: Quality of Program Advising, Enrollment Management & Student Services for the
Program

In this area, the program should be rated very strong or exemplary:

KSU 4401 continues to be enriched by the involvement of sectors of the university designed to
assist seniors in their transition to graduation. Sectors that have assisted are: Career Services,
Student Life, Instructional Technology Services, Presentation Technology Department, CAPS,
Small Business Development, Library (Rare Book Room-Commencement), and the Alumni
Office.

The aforementioned teaching faculty for KSU 4401 joined together this past spring and produced
a custom-print workbook entitled The Complete Graduate: A Workbook for College Seniors.
The text will be ready for Fall 2001. The publishers, Houghton-Mifflin/Vivendi International, are
planning to promote this as a model text for emerging institutional capstone courses and to be
imported into existing college senior capstone courses.

In March 1999 , a Survey of Departmental and College Capstone Courses was implemented, the
results of which were used to enhance the curriculum of KSU 4401.
Departmental Chairs and Faculty suggested what assistance their students could use. Those
needs were: work/family balance, interviewing skills, etiquette, resume production, graduate
school application, letters of recommendation, job search methods, and conflict management.
First suggested as a speaker’s bureau topic bank, these topics have been included in the KSU
4401 curriculum and student workbook. The idea of a speakers bureau, to visit existing capstone
courses, and web delivery of these topics in Success After College need to be re-explored for
delivery.

Connection to Learning Support Programs, University-Wide Sectors, and Academic
Conferences:

A concerted academic effort has been made to connect the First-Year Experience and Service-
Learning to the Senior-Year Program, through the following methods:

   •   Publication of Passages Newsletter, which connects programs: students, faculty, and
       administrators have received copies on KSU campus. Additionally, the
       Newletter has been distributed at presentations made at the American Association of
       Higher Education (Washington, DC – March, 2001) and The 14th First-Year Experience
       Conference (Hawaii – July 2001). Additionally, Chair Rebecca Casey
       designed a flyer for KSU 4401, which was sent to seniors in Spring 2000. This has been a
       regular method of advertising for the upcoming sections of KSU 4401 each semester.

   •   In some sections, the use of student reflective and best of show portfolios are used to
       connect KSU 1101 and KSU 4401, which enhances student learning.

   •   Peer facilitators for KSU 1101 are being recruited from KSU 4401 courses.
       Students have either been paid or designed internships for this academic position.
       The Coles College of Business has been supportive in underwriting an internship
       for a peer facilitator from their division.

   •   The connection of the First-Year Experience Program, Service-Learning Program has
       been presented at the American Association of Higher Education.
       Presentation title: Converging John Dewey and Dow Jones: Enculturating Citizenship
       in an Age of Careerism. (Washington, DC, March 27th, 2001)
       Program presented at the Georgia National Association of Developmental Education: The
       Changing Landscape of Learning Support. (Jekyll Island, April 3rd, 2001) included
       representatives from every area of Learning Support Programs.
       Program presented at the 14th International First-Year Experience Program representing
       First-Year Experience, Service-Learning, Senior-Year Experience, and Volunteer
       Kennesaw. Program title: Civic Engagement in the First-Year Seminar: Building
       Reflective Portfolios for Success as College Student and Global Citizenship.
       International interest has developed in how our programs are connecting and developing.


III. G: Program’s Opportunities for Advancing Levels of Preparation that Give
Graduates Competitive Advantages:

In this area, the program should be rated very strong or exemplary:

In KSU 4401, students are introduced to the national movement of student prepared learning
portfolios. Developed during the undergraduate experience, these student portfolios become the
best of show portfolios used for career and graduate school searches. Students are connected to
the American Association of Higher Education’s Website that tracks student portfolio use across
national universities (www.aahe.org).
Students learn to track their learning history and present their learning expertise to interested
stakeholders. This process of portfolio development gives students the competitive advantages.
Students report that their best of show portfolios have been positively embraced as part of their
interview process and have been credited for getting further along the interviewing process.

The students are taught that other college students across the nation are currently using
portfolios. Why? The portfolio showcases your work beyond the college transcript, while
assisting in academically aligning your career and citizenship goals. Alverno University, the
University of Southern California, and the University of Iowa are just a few institutions that have
adopted the portfolio system for students. These universities assist students in tracking their
learning, systemize their accomplishments, and produce a “best of show” portfolio upon
graduation. The college students at Alverno University use a Diagnostic Digital Portfolio to
track their learning. Check out this innovative approach to developing a portfolio at
http://ddp.alverno.edu/ddpsamp/ddsamp1.html.

Portfolios have become such an important part of academic life, that the American Association
of Higher Education (www.aahe.org) has developed a The Portfolio Clearinghouse database
(http://www.aahe.org/teaching/portfolio_db.htm). This academic database showcases the
various methods of portfolio development across universities. The National Center for Public
Policy and Higher Education produced a state-by-state report card for Higher Education entitled
Measuring Up 2000 (http://measuringup2000.highereducation.org). The report called for
universities across the nation to move towards ways to assess college student learning beyond the
transcript. Creation of student portfolios are a solution which helps students track their learning,
understand what they have learned, prepare for career, and understand their role as future leaders
in the local, national, and global arenas.

The college students at the University of Southern California use the Your Portfolio web system
to track their learning. Consult how the student portfolios are managed at this university at
http://careers.usc.edu/students/services/portfolio.html. Also, the University of Iowa has the Iowa
Advantage portfolio system for their students.

Students of KSU 4401 are taught:

Why are College Student Portfolios so popular today?

   •   First and foremost, they provide an accurate tracking of your learning during your
       academic career.
   •   Secondly, the portfolio process provides the evidence that can be presented to enhance
       your credibility for future employers, graduate schools, military service, scholarships, and
       community engagement.
   •   Thirdly, they provide a concrete baseline of your accomplishments during your college
       years.
   •   Fourthly, the reflective process of the portfolio provides a great opportunity to learn
       about you.
   •   Fifth, they provide academic alignment for your career goals and citizenship
       commitments, both nationally and globally.
   •   Sixth, you can transfer your portfolio to a university Website, CD, or a DVD making it
       easier to display your work while showing off your technology savvy.

How are the College Senior Portfolios designed?

Designing and implementing a College Senior Portfolio has two distinct parts:
Reflective Portfolio: The reflective portfolio is the private collection of evidence work during
the college years. This includes work performed in class, on campus, at work, and in the
community. The purpose is to help to reflect on accomplishments, learning experiences, what the
student would like to develop, and what the student would like to highlight. The reflective
portfolio tracks student progress, identifies passions, and honors their accomplishments.

Best of Show Portfolio: The best of show portfolio is the public collection of work that is used
use to introduce the student to potential employers, graduate admission administrators,
community service leaders, or scholarships committees.
The best of show portfolio can be assembled in a three-ring binder, on a CD or
DVD, or a Website. A DVD is used to showcase any presentations or group
projects that showcase your communication, leadership, and group skills.
II. H: Diversity & Global Perspective in the Curriculum, Faculty, and Students of the
Program

The program should be rated very strong or expemplary:

Students Served for KSU 4401: According to the Office of Institutional Research, of the Fall
2000 course demographics reveal that of the 108 students registered, 20 students were minority,
55% were female, 12 were international students, more than 50% of the students were registered
for 12 hours or less, and the average student GPA was 2.84. The percent of minority students
taking KSU 4401 is higher than the university-wide percentage of minority students enrolled at
KSU. Most of the students are from the College of Business, the College of Humanities and
Social Science, with a smaller student group from the College of Science and Mathematics, the
College of Education, the College of Health and Human Services, and the School of the Arts.

The student client base for this course has been students that need more academic guidance in the
preparation process for graduating from the university, therefore, supporting the need for the
institutional capstone class KSU 4401. The First National Survey on Senior Seminars and
Capstone Courses supports the same gender distribution findings for taking elective senior
seminars, that is, women tend to take elective senior courses for post-university preparation (see
appendix for Gender rations of Senior Seminars and Capstone Courses (N=26) for further
information consult the following address
www.edu/fye/resources/surveys/sye_graphics/sld019.htm)

Arguably, the course GPA is over 3.0, thus, raising the question as to why students with lower
GPA’s might be taking this class. A major recommendation is that the grading for KSU 4401
should be changed to match that of the internship programs, which are grading in a
satisfactory/unsatisfactory scale. KSU 4401 should still be worth 3 elective hours because the
students build a reflective and best of show portfolio that represents an entire semester of work,
but the course would be better suited to be considered more of an institutional internship rather
than an academic course. An internship is designed to enhance the theory/praxis base of the
student. KSU 4401 is designed to enhance the theory/praxis base for student’s preparation for
productive global citizenship. However, the student evaluations and unsolicited comments
underscore that students take the course to allow very directed preparation for graduation.

 In KSU 4401, students use Career Services, Instructional Technology Courses, Presentation
Technology Seminars, Small Business Development, Volunteer Kennesaw, Alumni Association,
connect with KSU Alumni, Cobb County Chamber of Commerce, Career Fairs (both on and off
campus), CAPS Graduate School Preparation, and prepare for graduation by visiting and
learning the academic history of the KSU College Mace. Option could be made that female
students make up the majority of college students today, however, the qualitative observation is
that female students take KSU 4401 for the mentoring guidance that is often not provided for
them. Also, many of our students are first generation college graduates; therefore, needing more
directed mentoring for their successful transition to post-university life.

KSU 4401: Connection to national and global issues concerning the Senior-Year Experience
Academic Movement: In the United States of America, public colleges and universities are
refocusing their mission from consuming democracy to producing democracy. What does this
mean? How does this impact our institutions of higher learning? And most importantly, how
does this impact our college students?

What does this mean? Public colleges and universities are being held more accountable by local
and national legislators, all of whom share a concern for the growing lack of community and
decline of civic engagement in society today. Although prepared for careers, there is marked
decline in local, national, and global civic engagement among college graduates today. The
National Center for Public Policy and Higher Education’s study Measuring Up 2000 confirms
the decline of civic engagement at colleges and universities across the United States
(http://measuringup. 2000.highereducation.org/thomasehrlick.cfm)

How does this impact our institutions of higher learning? Public colleges and universities are
charged with producing our future leaders for private and public sector organizations and, most
importantly, producing our future leaders for civic engagement. The university Presidents’
Leadership Colloquium convened by Campus Compact and the American Council on Education
produced the Presidents’ Fourth of July Declaration
on the Civic Responsibility of Higher Education in response to provide a solution for the decline
in civic engagement across colleges and universities (hppt://compact.org/resources/plc-
declaration.html).

What is civic engagement? Civic engagement, which includes engagement on the local, national,
and international arenas, is the willing commitment to accept the charge of citizenship through
community service, modeling of ethical leadership, and a commitment to experiencing the world
with others.

How does this impact the college student? The college student should be taught to produce
democracy rather than just consume democracy by modeling ethical leadership, service, and
encouraging as John Dewey states “experiencing with” other stakeholders in our world.
Encouraging the development of citizenship and civic engagement in every academic setting is
mandatory for every college student in our public institutions of higher learning.

Where are logical points of convergence for introducing and developing civic engagement? The
senior-year experience seminar is logical point of convergence for developing civic engagement.
Methods of developing civic engagement are through the assigning of service-learning and
community service projects in the first-year seminars. Connecting students to international
resources such as the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OCED)
(http://www.oecd.org) and national resources such as The National Center for Public Policy and
Higher Education assist the college students in understanding the bridge between civic
engagement and global citizenship.

How are the senior-year experience seminar at Kennesaw State introducing and developing the
balance of career, civic engagement, and global citizenship? By having the students produce
reflective portfolios that translate into a best of show portfolio, therefore, assisting the students in
the discovery of how they produce democracy through their commitment to career and civic
engagement. The student portfolios create a baseline document of how the student looks
entering and exiting the university. The portfolio helps the student triangulate the goals of career,
civic engagement, and global citizenship, using information from the United States’ and
Georgia’s Department of Labor Statistics and the University of Georgia Systems’ Economic
Development Studies (www. icapp.org). The student portfolios contain nine sections which
include the following: (1) resume; (2) skills; (3) work samples; (4) letters of reference; (5)
awards and certificates; (6) work in progress; (7) civic engagement/community service; (8) civic
engagement/student governance, clubs and organizations; and (9) university plan of study/post-
university plan of study (i.e. graduate school, military, small business development). The
portfolio process assists the senior-year students in making the best decisions for developing and
sharing their time and talents for producing democracy as active world citizens, participating in
global civic engagement, and enhancing their careers for world growth and development.

II. I: Endowments, Scholarships, Gifts, Grants, and Sponsors for the Program

The program rating should be weak or below average:

Although sounding like a negative evaluation, actually, the academic time has arrived for
exploring support in this area.

II. J: Program Honors & Awards

The program rating should be weak or below average:

Although sounding like a negative evaluation, the program is still very early in its academic
maturation, thus, not being a viable candidate for program honors and awards.

II. K: Exceptional Achievements & Honors of the Program’s Students, Graduates, &
Faculty

The program rating should be very strong or exemplary:

Dr. Joan E. Leichter Dominick, Director of the Senior-Year Experience Program, designed and
implemented the KSU 4401 curriculum as her Governor’s Teaching Fellows 1996-1997 project.

Additionally, she was also awarded the Distinguished Teaching Award and The Regent’s
Distinguished Professor of Teaching and Learning in 1996. Her project for this academic
award was the design and implementation of the current Presentation Technology Center. The
students of KSU 4401 use the facilities of the Presentation Technology Center for the
development of their computer skills and the production of a CD Portfolio. Students have
received training in Introduction to Multi-Media, Adobe Acrobat, Photoshop, and Dream
weaver.

II. L: General Success of the Program’s Graduates

This has not been tracked at this time. However, plans to begin the tracking of KSU 4401
students will be developed.
II. M: Stakeholder Satisfaction with the Program

The rating for the program should be strong or above average:

The student evaluations for Dr. Joan E. Leichter Dominick’s course have been consistently
positive.

As recently stated in an evaluation from summer 2001:

Great class for seniors! Should be a required class! Great examples from seminars, books, and websites.
No improvement needed.

Also, unsolicited student comments continue to be very positive.

For information of the teaching evaluation of Mr. Richard Grover, Director of Service-Learning,
Ms. Karen Andrews, Director of Career Services, and Dr. Deborah Smith, Adjunct Instructor in
the Department of University Studies please consult the Chair. The Director does not have access
to that information.

Faculty stakeholders are so supportive, that they joined together to author the custom print text
The Complete Graduate: A Workbook for College Seniors (Houghton-Mifflin, Boston, Mass.
2001 – now owned by Vivendi International, Paris, France.)

II. N: Selectivity and Academic Achievement of Students & Graduates in the Program

The rating for the program should be strong or above average:

As reported for the Institutional Research Department at KSU, students enrolled in Fall 2001
KSU 4401 had a GPA of 2.84. It can be deduced that students seek out this class for more
assistance in preparing for graduation.

Also, the student enrollment in KSU 4401 reflects the demographics of the institution, with the
exception of the percentage of African American Students. In all fall 2000, 11% of students
enrolled were African American, higher then the 10% enrollment of African Americans at KSU
during that same semester.

KSU 4401 enrolled 3% Asian, 3% Hispanic, 82% White students, which directly reflected the
same demographics for the institution. The only variation was in the area of Multi-racial. KSU
enrolled 1% Multi-racial students versus the 2% attending KSU that same fall 2000 semester.

KSU 4401 enrolled 55% female students and 45% male students that same semester.

Through antidotal and the aforementioned demographics, it can be reported that students take
KSU 4401 who need more assistance or who want more assistance preparing for participating
successfully in the competitive global markets and world community.
II. O: Program’s Responsiveness to Change & Improvement

The program should be rated strong to above average:

The KSU 4401 faculty update information and connect the students to the successful preparation
process for post-university life. The custom textbook is designed to assist the students in the
successful transition process from student to college graduate. The faculty and program continue
to be responsive to change and improvement for the success after college of our students.

III. Summary Conclusion About the Strength of the Program's Overall Productivity

Most of the sub-categories in this portion of the self-study were not applicable to this program.

III. A:   Enrollment of Upper Division Majors in Program

In this area, KSU 4401 should be rated satisfactory or average.

History of Course Enrollment:

A total of 509 students, representing all colleges across campus, have taken the course since its
revision in 1996. Considering that the course is currently an elective and multiple sections of the
course were introduced in 2000, the numbers of students are growing.

Course Section Enrollment:

This past academic year the course section offerings have increased to 11 sections of KSU 4401,
all have which had the average of 25 students.

Students from the Colleges of Humanities and Social Sciences, Business, Nursing, Education,
Science and Mathematics, Visual Art, and Education have been represented in the courses.

Student course evaluations remain consistently positive and direct changes are implemented in
course design based on student suggestions.

The course continues to be featured in the Highlights section for course registration to better
assist students in best selecting the faculty member whose expertise best matches the needs of
the students when preparing to exit the university.


III. B: Annual Bachelor's Degree Productivity of the Program

Not applicable to this program's self-study.

III. C: Program Completion Efficiency & Graduation Rate

Not applicable to this program's self-study.
III. D: Efficiency & Clarity of the Program's Course Requirements

Not applicable to this program's self-study.

III. E: Frequency and Sequencing of Course Offerings Required for Program Completion

Not applicable to this program's self-study.

III. F: Enrollment in the Program's Required Courses

Not applicable to this program's self-study.

III. G: Diversity of the Program’s Upper Division Majors and Graduates

Not applicable to this program’s self-study.

III. H: Instructional Productivity of FTE Faculty in the Program’s Home Department

There is no institutional data available on weighted semester credit hours generated exclusively
for the KSU 4401 Program, and therefore it is difficult to assess the instructional productivity of
FTE faculty accurately. However, based on the following evidence, the productivity appears to
be very strong or exemplary.

   •   Only one full-time faculty member in the Department of University Studies has as her
       central assignment the KSU 4401course: Dr. Joan Dominick, the Director of the Senior-
       Year Experience Program. In addition to her administrative responsibilities, Dr.
       Dominick also teaches within the KSU 1101 unit of University Studies. Therefore, the
       instructional productivity of full-time KSU 4401 faculty is extraordinarily high.
   •   The remaining instructional positions in KSU 4401 are filled by qualified university staff
       who hold a master’s degree and have reassigned time to teach the course.

III. I: Cost-Effectiveness of Instructional Delivery in the Program's Home Department

There is no institutional data available on the cost of weighted semester credit hours generated
exclusively by the KSU 4401 Program. However, portions of the University Studies
instructional budget are used to pay full-time and part-time KSU 4401 instructors. The
instructional expense per weighted credit hour of instruction in University Studies--$85.00--is
reasonably low when compared to other departments at KSU, suggesting that the KSU 4401
Program does not detract from its home department’s cost-effectiveness.

III. J: Program's Responsiveness to State Needs and Employer Demand for Program
Graduates

The program should be rated strong or above average:
What KSU 4401 does is connect students to what employers want from the University of
Georgia Systems graduates (see www.icapp.org), thereby, empowering students to design and
implement their portfolios featuring the designed skills and talents our global, national, and local
employers are seeking from graduates.

III. K: Position of the Program's Annual Degree Productivity Among Comparable USG
Programs

Not applicable to this program's self-study.

III. L: This Program's Contribution to Achieving KSU's Mission

In this area, KSU 4401 should be rated above average.

KSU 4401 supports the goals and objectives of the university's mission and vision by continued
commitment to excellence, to providing a safe and productive teaching/learning environment
utilizing student services across campus and in the community. .

Additionally, KSU 4401 strives for instructional excellence, while serving a diverse student
body, promoting high levels of student achievement, and making a commitment to life-long
public service, which is the mission of higher education – to produce productive citizens.

IV: Summary Conclusions about Program Viability at KSU:

The Senior-Year Experience Program continues to serve the needs of college students in their
preparation for the post-university experience. The institutional capstone course KSU 4401
provides an academic setting for students to reflect on their college experience, prepare for their
role as global citizens, produce a portfolio to honor their learning, transition successfully to
career and graduate school, and embrace their role has alumni of Kennesaw State University. As
supported in student evaluations of the course, the students value this course. Needed now is the
financial backing to grow this program further. Without future funding, growth of this program
cannot progress.

V: Potential for Mission-Driven Model Program Status

The program should be rated strong to above average:

The Senior-Year Experience Program strongly supports the mission-driven model program
status. As stated in the Program Review Criteria:

Kennesaw State’s institutional mission statement defines program priorities and includes the
aspiration that the university will be “a progressive and exemplary educational institution,
respected for its excellence and leadership in its teaching, service, and research.” Accordingly,
model program development is routinely promoted throughout the university in the non-
academic as well as academic divisions. “Model programs” are typically characterized as:
A)     Progressive (forward-looking, enlightened, change-oriented):
       The Senior-Year Experience Program/KSU 4401 is on the academic cutting edge for
       being one of the first institutional capstone course designed to achieve student success
       after college.

B)     Distinctive (distinguished from others, niched, stands out)
       The Senior-Year Experience Program has developed a niche for efficiently providing
       institutional advisement and utilization of campus services for college seniors.

C)     Exemplary (worth imitating, excellent, a leader)
       The Senior-Year Experience Program is working towards becoming a leader of national
       programs. Already, we have been approached for advice and research for setting up
       equivalent SYE Movements.

       As previously stated in this program review, the faculty of SYE is continually invited to
       present their academic story of the development and growth of the KSU 4401 at the
       American Association of Higher Education and the National Resource Center Conference
       in the national and international academic arenas.

D)     Powerful (strong, influential, impactful)
       The Senior-Year Experience Program is working towards becoming an impactful
       Experience for the students of KSU.

E)     Regionally/nationally recognized (widely known, admired, respected)
       As already mentioned in item C, additionally, the new custom-print textbook has been
       featured at the national conference of Houghton-Mifflin, Toronto, Canada, and August
       2001. The faculty of KSU 4401 is recognized academic groundbreakers in this text
       development area.

VI: Program Quality and Productivity Improvement Plan:

The Senior-Year Experience Program should begin both an expansion of the program itself,
while exploring new and entrepreneurial ways to offer the KSU 4401 course.

First, a satisfaction survey should be administered to former students for KSU. Longitudinal
studies should begin tracking student’s post-university experience.

Second, KSU 4401 should change grading system to be consistent with the grading of
internships. The course curriculum is reflective of an institutional internship rather than a
traditional academic course. This would be a more productive way of evaluating student work.

 Third, all upper division students should be surveyed regarding how the SYE Program can
address their needs as emerging graduates of KSU.
Fourth, new methods of offering the KSU 4401 course needs exploration: a) offerings
exclusively designed for the disciplines, similar to the one designed for the College of Science
and Mathematics, on-line delivery of the course.

Fifth, an Advisory Board needs to be established to guide both the growth of the SYE Program
and inclusion of new course content to assist the emerging college graduate.

Sixth, the SYE Council needs to be re-established and take an active role in giving advice on
ways the SYE program can serve all colleges of KSU.

Seventh, an effort must be made to have a teaching faculty that closing matches the student
demographics of the institution.

Eighth, on-line delivery of the course needs to be explored, as well as, the use of web delivery of
SYE information for all interested stakeholders.

Ninth, the Senior-Year Experience Program Director is currently teaching a fully academic load,
this increased financial backing of the program would allow release time to develop the SYE
Program. The KSU 4401 course has an academic track record for success, now it is time to
develop Senior-Year Experience Program in a broader academic scope.

Tenth, an effort will be made to seek grant funding to support the growth of the Senior-Year
Experience Program.

Eleventh, continue to connect with the First-Year Experience Program/KSU 1101 through the
use of student portfolio development in first-year to senior year, using seniors from KSU 4401 to
peer facilitate in KSU 1101, continue writing in the newsletter Passages (which connects First-
Year, Service-Learning, and Senior-Year Programs), and present the academic connective work
of the First-Year Experience Program, Service-Learning Program, Volunteer Kennesaw, and
Senior-Year Experience Program.

VII: Summary Recommendation:

The Senior-Year Experience Program/KSU 4401 should enhance or expand the program
because:

The Senior-Year Experience Program is designed to assist the student in the successful transition
to the post-university experience. In order for the program to develop, increased financial
assistance is necessary for attracting faculty, offering increased course sections, and achieving
new directions for the program as previously discussed. By implementing the goals in item VII.
Program Quality & Productivity Plan, the exciting growth of this innovative program should
guarantee student success after college.

				
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