SHANNON SALMON RESTORATION PROJECT Shannon Fishery Board

Document Sample
SHANNON SALMON RESTORATION PROJECT Shannon Fishery Board Powered By Docstoc
					         SHANNON SALMON 
        RESTORATION PROJECT 
                    
     
     
     
     
     
     
          Shannon Regional 
     
            Fisheries Board 
     
     

     
                    
        DRAFT MANAGEMENT PLAN 
                    

            OCTOBER  2008 
 
                                                                           Shannon Salmon Restoration Project
                                                                                                              

Table of contents 
 
Introduction ................................................................................................................... 3 
Policy and objective ....................................................................................................... 5 
Distribution of salmon in the Shannon .......................................................................... 6 
History ............................................................................................................................ 7 
Review of current management protocols .................................................................... 8 
Adult fish passage .......................................................................................................... 9 
Smolt passage .............................................................................................................. 11 
  Smolt loss to predation ............................................................................................ 11 
  Smolt delay at the dams .......................................................................................... 11 
  Smolt passage through turbines .............................................................................. 12 
  Survival measured by coded‐wire‐tagged smolt groups ......................................... 12 
  Turbine survival on the River Lee. ........................................................................... 12 
Habitat issues ............................................................................................................... 13 
Water quality ............................................................................................................... 14 
Conservation measures ............................................................................................... 15 
Ecological issues ........................................................................................................... 16 
Genetics ....................................................................................................................... 17 
                                               .
  Assisted natural recolonisation ............................................................................... 17 
Education ..................................................................................................................... 19
 
 
 
 
 




                                                                                                                           -2-
                                                           Shannon Salmon Restoration Project
                                                                                              

IInttroducttiion  
  n roduc on
The  decline  of  the  wild  Atlantic  salmon  in  the  River  Shannon  since  the  1920s  has  been  a 
topic  of  much  debate  over  the  years.    Many  viewpoints  have  been  put  forward,  from 
different interest groups, as to what were and are the main causes for this decline.  While it 
is  necessary  to  review  the  reasons,  the  main  thrust  of  this  plan  is  to  move  the  debate 
forward and look to the future.   
 
Even before the construction of the Ardnacrusha hydro‐electric installations in 1929, which 
could  be  described  as  the greatest event  affecting  salmon  survival  in  the  Shannon system, 
various  sources  lamented  the  poor  state  of  salmon  stocks,  particularly  in  the  middle  and 
upper  regions.    Additional  impacts  and  pressures  on  the  salmon  of  the  Shannon  today 
include: 
  
         Fish passage issues at many weirs, dams, culverts and other man‐made barriers 
         Water pollution from a variety of sources 
         Habitat degradation due to agricultural and drainage practices 
         Forestry practices  
         Peat harvesting  
         Over‐fishing  
         Introductions of non‐native fish and other invasive species 
         Water abstraction and the growing demand for water 
         Major road development 
         Urbanisation 
         Marine survival 
         Fish diseases 
 
Today  salmon  stocks  are  at  an  all  time  low  and  it  is  critical  that  concerted  actions  are 
undertaken immediately to avert the extinction of the wild stock in the system.  Salmon are 
listed under Annex II of the EU Habitats Directive and the stocks in the lower Shannon are in 
as  healthy  a  state  as  in  many  other  rivers.    But  it  is  incumbent  that  Ireland  makes  every 
effort  possible  to  restore  depleted  stocks  and  therefore  to  re‐establish  the  salmon 
population in its former numbers throughout the Shannon catchment. 
 
The  Shannon  Regional  Fisheries  Board  has  initiated  this  project  to  take  a  fresh  look  at  the 
issues  facing  salmon  survival  in  the  Shannon  and  its  tributaries  upstream  of  Limerick  City.  
The idea is to examine all possible factors by accessing the best scientific opinion, from both 
within and outside Ireland, together with the implementation of the latest developments in 
fisheries research and management techniques such as radio‐tracking.   
 
It is envisaged that the expertise and knowledge gathered in this project will be of service as 
a blueprint for restoring other derelict salmon fisheries. 
 


                                                                                                 -3-
                                                        Shannon Salmon Restoration Project
                                                                                           
 
A steering group and a technical committee have been formed which include staff from both 
the Shannon Regional Fisheries Board, the Electricity Supply Board (ESB) and expert salmon 
biologists  from  Marine  Institute,  Central  Fisheries  Board  and  University  College,  Cork, 
together with Board members of the Shannon Regional Fisheries Board.  The Board wish to 
thank the Technical Group for their expertise and dedication to this project.  
 
Any plan to restore the Shannon salmon will not be successful without the full support of the 
many  stakeholders  in  the  catchment  and  of  the  ESB  who  have  a  pivotal  role  in  fisheries 
management on this great river.  
 




                                                                                             -4-
                                                           Shannon Salmon Restoration Project
                                                                                              
Polliicy  and  objjecttiive
Po cy and ob ec ve
The Shannon Regional Fisheries Board is committed to the restoration of salmon throughout 
the  Shannon  catchment.    It  sees  the  new  salmon  management  regime  as  an  appropriate 
opportunity  to  initiate  fresh  efforts  to  restore  the  wild  natural  stock  in  all  parts  of  the 
catchment,  in  association  with  the  ESB.    This  vision  will  be  achieved  through  partnership 
with  other  stakeholders,  in  a  realistic  time‐frame  and  through  best  scientific  advice  and 
management.  The Board will act as a promoter and facilitator in this complex area and, if 
necessary,  demand  compliance  with  conservation  measures.    While  this  plan  specifically 
deals  with  salmon,  the  biodiversity  of  the  catchment  will  also  benefit  as  this  plan  is 
implemented.  
 
In developing a realistic time scale, the Board is mindful of the work of the ESB over the last 
75 years on the Shannon to restore and manage salmon, the scientific knowledge gathered, 
the present status of the stock and the changes in salmon management in recent years.  It is 
also  aware  of  the  efforts  around  the  world  to  achieve  similar  goals.  Cognisance  must  be 
taken of the many changes to the fisheries environment. 
 
With the active support of  the  many  stakeholders  in  the  catchment, the  realisation of  this 
vision should be attainable within 25 years. 
 
The delivery of the Board’s objective will require an incremental management process with 
real and deliverable targets. There will be a mix of data‐gathering and ground‐works, which 
will require constant active review, informing the way forward.  The buy‐in of the public is 
important, but will only be forthcoming if real progress is seen to be made and they have an 
understanding of the process. 
 
While not specifically mentioned in the plan the Board would also seek to have an economic 
value  put  on  the  salmon  fishery.    There  needs  to  be  a  balance  between  ecology  and 
economics  but  heretofore  it  has  been  difficult  to  put  a  value  on  the  importance  of  a 
particular species.  Currently there are methodologies being developed which will enable the 
economic value of wild salmon be established to the different stakeholders.   
 
This Plan sets out the areas which we need to be address to achieve the Board’s objectives. 
We believe that this plan is achievable socially, financially and practically.  
 
Following the public consultation process the Document will be refined with time‐bound 
deliverables.    It  will  then  be  necessary  to  seek  out  funding  streams  and  partnerships  to 
finance the plan. 
  
 




                                                                                                 -5-
                                                          Shannon Salmon Restoration Project
                                                                                             

Diisttriibuttiion  off  sallmon  iin  tthe  Shannon    
D s r bu on o sa mon n he Shannon
Prior  to  the  construction  of  Ardnacrusha  dam  salmon  were  widespread  in  the  Shannon 
catchment,  accessing  all  major  rivers  and  tributaries.  The  occurrence  of  considerable 
numbers  in  the  upper  reaches  of  the  catchment  can  be  documented  from  a  variety  of 
sources.    A.  E.  J  Went  wrote  “Prior  to  the  erection  of  the  hydro‐electric  plant,  salmon 
ascended  the  River  Shannon  and  spawned  in  quantity  in  some  of  the  upper  parts  of  the 
river.  Even in the upper reaches of Lough Key there was a profitable net fishery in the lake 
and large numbers of salmon spawned in the Boyle River and in certain rivers flowing into 
Lough Allen”.   
 
The distribution of salmon throughout the catchment has also been impacted upon by water 
quality and habitat degradation.  Juvenile salmon areas with water quality less than Q3 will 
be unproductive and it is clear that the salmon habitat has been reduced  since the 1970’s 
and requires rehabilitation.  
 
Surveys  carried  out  in  1990  and  1991  by  the  Central  Fisheries  Board  and  consultants  on 
behalf of the ESB showed that naturally‐spawned salmon were essentially absent upstream 
of Athlone.  The reduction in the wild salmon run as a consequence of the Shannon Scheme 
may  in  part  explain  this  observation.    However,  in  addition  to  the  two  major  dams  at  the 
lower end of the catchment, there are a number of smaller hydro‐schemes, weirs and other 
man‐made  barriers  that  may  affect  upstream  fish  passage.    For  example,  in  1993  Aztec 
concluded that the status of juvenile salmon populations in the Nenagh, Ballyfinboy, Graney 
and  Woodford  river  systems  were  unsatisfactory.  “The  capture  of  significant  numbers  of 
trout at most electrofished sites indicated that impaired habitat quality does not explain the 
restricted distribution or low relative abundance of salmon recorded in the study.  The most 
likely explanation for these findings is an inadequate spawning escapement to these rivers in 
recent  years”.    More  recently,  modifications  at  the  Tarmonbarry  weir  are  known  to  have 
impeded the upstream passage of salmon and brown trout in 2005, and it is very probable 
that this weir and that at Athlone have had a significant negative impact on fish passage.  
 
The current fish census coverage for the catchment is inadequate with only one facility, the 
Ardnacrusha Borland lift, capable of producing a complete count.  No fish counters exist at 
Parteen Dam (although the trap gives absolute numbers for the period from September to 
December), Ardnacrusha boat‐lift, Meelick, Athlone, Tarmonbarry and the outflow of Lough 
Allen. No fish counters are in place on any of the tributaries even those such as the Suck and 
Little Brosna known to get small runs of salmon.   

                                                                 Fish counter recommendations 
         Counters should be placed in all major fish passage facilities, starting at Parteen Dam 
         in 2008.   
         Map salmon migration routes 
 


                                                                                               -6-
                                                          Shannon Salmon Restoration Project
                                                                                             

Hiisttory 
H s ory
The  River  Shannon  has  long  been  associated  with  salmon  and  has  supported  important 
commercial fisheries at various points from the outer estuary to the top of the catchment on 
the Boyle River.  Memories of some of these fisheries still survive, including the Abbey River 
and Killaloe, and the scale of the catches is well documented.  At various times commercial 
fisheries were located in the freshwater channel at Athlone, Tarmonbarry and Boyle.  In the 
estuary various fishing engines, such as stake nets and traps, were operated in addition to 
draft  netting.    More  recently  a  commercial  fishery  (closed  since  the  1980’s)  operated  at 
Thomond Weir near the Island Field in Limerick City.  The Shannon was an important tourist 
salmon  angling  river,  supporting  internationally  important  rod  fisheries,  particularly  in  the 
lower reaches near Doonass, Castleconnell and Lower Lough Derg.  Parallel to these licensed 
fisheries  illegal  fishing  or  poaching  continued  throughout  the  Shannon  system,  particularly 
during spawning time.  According to historical reports, from the 1850s onwards the level of 
poaching was severe, further reflecting the extent of the salmon runs at that time. 
 
The  construction  of  Ardnacrusha  and  Parteen  Dams  had  a  dramatic  impact  on  the  salmon 
population in the Shannon, with an immediate reduction in commercial catches in the Lower 
Shannon.  Legal catches in the Limerick District are reported to have dropped from a high of 
414,000 pounds in 1927 to 42,000 pounds in 1939.  The large multi‐sea‐winter salmon were 
severely impacted with the loss of  spawning beds  in Castleconnell  and restricted access to 
habitat  above  the  dams.    The  Shannon  Scheme  incorporated  a  fish  ladder  to  facilitate  fish 
passage at Parteen Dam but none was provided at Ardnacrusha.  Subsequently a Borland lift 
was constructed at Ardnacrusha Dam in 1959  

                                                                    Historical recommendations 
        Review historical reports, commercial fishery returns and angling log books  
        Collect and collate local and national newspaper articles 
        Collect anecdotal reports from knowledgeable people with an interest in the 
        Shannon 
         




                                                                                               -7-
                                                         Shannon Salmon Restoration Project
                                                                                            

Reviiew  off  currentt  managementt  prottocolls  
Rev ew o curren managemen pro oco s
Management  protocols  have  been  developed  over  many  years  to  conserve  salmon  on  the 
River  Shannon.    In  particular,  specific  protocols  have  been  developed  by  the  ESB  under 
scientific advice with respect to fish passage, hatchery management and stocking strategies. 
In  1995,  a  summary  outline  of  these  was  documented,  in  particular  with  regard  to  an 
electricity  generation  regime  to  improve  smolt  access  and  survival  through  the  dams.    A 
management  protocol  for  the  Borland  lift  has  been  developed  and  strategies  devised  for 
management of genetic aspects of the brood stock and consequent stocking practice.  ESB 
annual  reports  give  some  detail  of  day  to  day  operations.    In  1992,  the  ESB  produced  a 
document outlining plans for a special study of the River Brosna, which enters the Shannon 
upstream  of  Lough  Derg.    It  was  to  include:  assessment  of  juvenile  salmon  populations; 
requirements  for  restocking;  census  of  adult  salmon  escaping  to  spawn  in  the  system; 
estimation  of  smolt  numbers  migrating  from  the  system;  recreational  fishery  catch  ‐and‐
effort  data  collection  and  analysis  and  habitat  assessment.    Notwithstanding  their 
effectiveness,  there  is  a  need  for  an  independent  review  of  these  management  protocols, 
particularly  in light of  evolving  international  experience.  Recommendations from Shannon 
Salmon Restoration Project technical meetings stress the need for a review of current data 
to look for environmental trends that might be significant as important triggers for life stage 
events, such as spawning run through the dams.    
Current  procedures  are  being  examined  and  progress  is  being  made  which  must  be 
continued. 
 

                                                     Management review recommendations 
        Examine effectiveness of smolt generation protocol 
        Examine effectiveness of fish lift at Ardnacrusha and fish pass at Parteen 
        Determine whether improvements can be made to current management protocols 
        by assessment of available information, such as discharge and fish run data. 
     




                                                                                              -8-
                                                           Shannon Salmon Restoration Project
                                                                                              

Adulltt  ffiish  passage  
Adu sh passage
Since long before the days of the Shannon Scheme, a considerable number of milldams and 
weirs, which probably affect salmon passage, have been in place.  Large obstacles exist such 
as regulating weirs at Meelick, Athlone, Tarmonbarry and the outflow of Lough Allen and in 
at least one case (Tarmonbarry), it is known that fish passage has been severely curtailed at 
times.  There is increased energy expended by fish during delays for migration which in‐turn 
leads to a decrease in energy for spawning.  
 
 
The  construction  of  Ardnacrusha  dam  had  an  immediate  effect  on  fish  migration.    Initially 
experts  believed  that  returning  adult  salmon  would  continue  to  use  the  old  channel  and 
access the middle and upper Shannon via the fish pass constructed at Parteen dam. Shortly 
after  the  dams  became  operational  it  became  evident  that  the  greater  discharge  through 
Ardnacrusha attracted fish up the tail race.  Other than the seldom‐used boat lock, there was 
no access  route  to  the  upper  waters  and many  potential  spawners  either died or failed  to 
reach their spawning grounds.  This effect of the Shannon Scheme was well documented in 
the  media  at  the  time  and  it  is  estimated  that  catches  of  salmon  for  the  Limerick  Fishery 
plummeted from 414,000 pounds to 42,000 pounds after the dam was built.  Furthermore, 
the spawning beds of the  large spring salmon, which the Castleconnell fishery was famous 
for, were lost.  
 
The impact on angling was immediate and the recommendation for salmon fishing upstream 
of  Castleconnell  was  dropped  from  the  3rd  edition  of  the  Anglers  Guide  to  the  Irish  Free 
State.  In  1959  the  recently‐designed  Borland  fish  lift  was  built  at  Ardnacrusha  to  bring 
ascending salmon past the dam and was shown to successfully pass at least a portion of the 
stock arriving through the tailrace.   
 
A  barrier  of  electrified  chains  was  placed  at  the  mouth  of  the  tailrace  in  1930  to  prevent 
salmon  from  entering  it  from  the  old  channel.    The  barrier  was  introduced  as  a  result  of 
considerable political pressure, as it was clear that considerable numbers of fish were being 
delayed in the tailrace.  The electrical barrier was unsuccessful and removed as, according to 
press  reports  it  electrocuted  fish  turning  their  blood  black  and  their  flesh  blue,  rendering 
them inedible (Limerick Leader 17th Jan 1931).   
 
Attempts  were  also  made  to  use  the  boat‐lift  as  a  fish  pass.  This,  however,  also  proved 
impractical as the fish would not face into the still water.  Salmon however do congregate 
downstream  of  the  lock  gates,  especially  when  there  are  high  water  velocities  in  the  tail 
race. 
 
In addition, few juvenile salmon were recorded in the ESB/Central Fisheries Board electrical 
surveys in 1991 upstream of Athlone weir and none above Tarmonbarry, providing further 
evidence of passage problems associated with these structures.  


                                                                                                 -9-
                                                         Shannon Salmon Restoration Project
                                                                                            
 
Technology  has  improved  since  1931  and  the  possibility  of  constructing  a  barrier,  possibly 
electrical, should be revisited.  If such a construction is considered, provision will need to be 
made for the annual migration of smelt which spawn in the tailrace, from February to April.  
 
Fish  movement  throughout  the  catchment  needs  to  be  monitored  using  radio  tags, 
particularly with regard to obstacles to salmon migration. Radio tracking has been used by 
the Shannon Regional Fisheries Board in the past few years to provide valuable knowledge 
on fish movements.   
 
Salmon  passage  is  crucial  and  with  new  technologies  and  engineering  solutions  being 
developed in other countries, it is now timely to re‐address these issues. 

                                                         Adult fish passage recommendations 
         
        Investigate upstream passage at all man‐made obstructions such as weirs, bridge 
        aprons and culverts 
        Investigate new methods of getting fish around the dam, such as spillways and rock 
        ramps 
        Characterise adult salmon movement through the Shannon system  
        Investigate upstream passage at impoundments 
        Investigate passage through fish passes and review protocols for their management 
        Install fish counters at Ardnacrusha boat‐lift, Parteen Dam, Meelick, Athlone, 
        Tarmonbarry and the outflow of Lough Allen.  In addition consider the installation of 
        fish counters for tributary rivers in the catchment. 




                                                                                            - 10 -
                                                             Shannon Salmon Restoration Project
                                                                                                

Smolltt  passage  
Smo passage
The issue of smolt passage is a well‐recognised problem for salmon in rivers impounded for 
hydro‐electric generation.  Mortalities can occur at any stage of the smolt migration due to a 
number of factors: 
 
        natural loss to predation in riverine and lacustrine environments  
        loss to predation in the headrace canal  
        delay in migration causing stress at the dam itself  
        loss due to mechanical abrasion whilst passing through the turbines 
        predation in the tailrace 
        potential loss due to stress on entering the marine environment and to 
        osmoregulatory problems associated with scale loss and other physical impacts 
        direct loss due to reduced predator avoidance capability.  
    
   Studies have been carried out to examine some of these issues:  

                                                                               Smolt loss to predation 
Predation on smolts by other fish species occurs and studies by Eileen Twomey on the Lee 
reservoirs concluded that predation by pike and trout on smolts caused significant mortality.  
This,  together  with  loss  through  the  turbines,  was  considered  to  be  the  principal  factor  to 
the depletion of the salmon stocks.  Highest predation by trout was found at the dam wall at 
Carrigadrohid.    Twomey  estimated  that  pike  could  consume  at  least  20%  of  the  smolt 
population passing through the reservoir. 
 
Significant avian predation may also occur, mainly by herons and cormorants.  Cormorants in 
particular can be destructive, although research carried out by Doherty and McCarthy found 
that predation on smolts near Ardnacrusha was low and that the nearby cormorant colony 
had dispersed prior to the main smolt run.  The study did not assess the indirect effects of 
turbine  passage  in  making  wounded  or  traumatised  smolts  more  readily  accessible  to 
predators. 

                                                                              Smolt delay at the dams 
During  the  annual  run,  smolts  congregated  in  large  numbers  in  front  of  the  dam  wall  at 
Ardnacrusha and failed to exit downstream.  As a conservation measure, water was spilled 
through the boat lock and C. J. McGrath concluded that this provided a passage for a portion 
of the migration.  The effectiveness of this method was never assessed, but it is likely that 
the  delay  prior  to  release  of  the  smolts  resulted  in  significant  mortalities  from  stress  and 
predation.    In  1991  a  smolt  /  generation  protocol  was  initiated  which  arranged  for 
generation  to  take  place  at  night  time  as  well  as  in  daylight  hours.    The  large  build‐ups  of 
smolts ceased, as they presumably passed through the turbines.   




                                                                                                   - 11 -
                                                         Shannon Salmon Restoration Project
                                                                                            
                                                                Smolt passage through turbines 
At  Ardnacusha  generating  station  there  are  3  Francis  turbines  and  1  Kaplan  turbine.    The 
Kaplan is known to be fish‐friendly and operates in a different manner from the older Francis 
design.  A study was carried out by Normandeau Associates Inc. and Fishtrack Ltd in 2004 to 
determine the survival of hatchery‐reared smolts passing through the Kaplan turbine using 
HI_Z Turb’N Tag‐recapture technique.  Although the possibility was considered that hatchery 
smolts  could  have  reacted  differently  to  wild  smolts  in  the  turbine  passage,  this  study 
concluded that the Kaplan turbine will  safely pass more than 90% of the migrating fish.  It 
was noted that 4.3% turbine‐entrained smolts were visibly injured and suffered immediate 
mortalities.    While  this  survey  estimated  entrainment  through  the  Kaplan  turbine,  further 
studies are required to give an over‐view of the effects of the entire generating installation. 
 The  study  did  not  assess  such  indirect  effects  as  physiological  stress  and  increased 
susceptibility to predation and disease. 

                                     Survival measured by coded‐wire‐tagged smolt groups 
The indirect effects of turbine passage on migrating smolts was assessed by examining the 
performance  of  coded‐wire‐tagged  smolt  groups  released  by  helicopter  upstream  and 
downstream  of  the generating station  over  the period 1991  to  1993.  The  overall mortality 
associated  with  turbine  passage  was  estimated  by  M.  O’Farrell  and  his  colleagues  to  be 
8.5%. 

                                                              Turbine survival on the River Lee. 
Although  not  directly  comparable  with  the  situation  pertaining  to  Ardnacrusha,  research 
carried out by Eileen Twomey on the River Lee is relevant none the less.  A conical net, with 
a  live  box  attached  on  the  downstream  end,  was  fitted  into  the  base  of  a  4  megawatt 
turbine. Most of the live fish caught were descaled and she concluded that their chance of 
survival was poor. Dead fish collected had obvious mechanical injuries including decapitation 
and external gashes. Injuries due to pressure were also noted.  Her conclusions overall were 
that turbine damage was a contributory factor to the depletion of the salmon population of 
the Lee. 

                                                             Smolt passage recommendations 
        Assess such indirect effects as predation, disease and physiological stress of turbine 
        passage on migrating smolts 
        Assess entrainment on the Francis turbo‐generators 
        Investigate smolt passage at impoundments 
        Investigate smolt movement out of rivers and its timing 
        Examine current smolt passage mitigation protocols, determine if these are being 
        observed and if there is scope for such improvement as use of the boat lock  
        Assess the effectiveness of the use of smolt traps and the transfer of smolts 
        downstream 
        Assess the use of a new device to trap smolts behind dams, which is under 
        development in other countries 



                                                                                            - 12 -
                                                             Shannon Salmon Restoration Project
                                                                                                
Habiittatt  iissues  
Hab a ssues
A key factor in the restoration of salmon in the upper Shannon will be the quantification of 
the  available  habitat  for  salmon  at  all  stages  of  their  life  cycles.    The  current  conservation 
limit for salmon may need to be revised and this can be achieved largely through identifying 
the true available salmonid habitat. 
 
The  River  Shannon  has  been  subjected  to  drainage  and  navigation  works  since  the  18th 
century.    More  recently,  since  the  1950s,  large  scale  drainage  programmes  have  been 
carried  out  on  such  major  tributaries  as  the  Suck,  Brosna  and  Nenagh  rivers.  Although  
recovery  is  evident  on  some  channels,  most  have  not  reverted  to  their  natural  condition, 
resulting  in  a  net  loss  of  quality  salmonid  habitat  to  the  catchment.    Restoration 
programmes  have  been  carried  out  independently  by  anglers,  the  Shannon  Regional 
Fisheries Board, the ESB and also collectively by these in partnership.  Both the extent of the 
drainage programmes and habitat restoration programmes need to be mapped and place on 
GIS. This will necessitate the construction of a project‐specific GIS which may be used to map 
other actions and issues within the catchment.  The construction of this GIS will require the 
provision of dedicated personnel to ensure that data integrity is maintained in a logical and 
hierarchically layered data information system that can be easily interrogated. 
     

                                                                          Habitat recommendations 
         Construct project‐specific GIS that can be shared between partners 
         Map spawning habitats by remote sensing, together with a desk study by fisheries 
         staff 
         Ground truth the habitats through fish surveys 
         Map river areas affected by Office of Public Works, Local Authorities, River Drainage 
         Boards and private drainage schemes 
         Map areas of river where habitat restoration has been undertaken 
         Highlight areas with high survival (using fry densities as indicator of survival success) 
         relative to physical habitat  
         Identify rivers where physical habitat can be improved in the short term  
         Focus stocking efforts (if appropriate) on rivers with good physical habitat quality 
         characteristics (and good water quality) 
         Formulate priority listing for habitats and undertake restoration work in accordance 
         with it 
         Develop monitoring systems to detect adverse development in or on the salmon 
         habitat 
         Ensure any drainage is carried out in a sustainable manner  
         Gather available information on effect of climate change on the catchment and its 
         impact of salmon stocks  
         Continue to engage with authorities on environmentally sensitive ways of carrying 
         out drainage works 



                                                                                                  - 13 -
                                                            Shannon Salmon Restoration Project
                                                                                               

Watter  qualliitty  
Wa er qua y
Water quality in many Irish rivers  and lakes has deteriorated over the last few decades. In 
particular,  the Shannon has  suffered  a decline  in  water  quality  due  to  increased  municipal 
and  agricultural  pollution.  Certain  tributaries  are  now  at  a  level  inimical  to  the  survival  of 
salmon.    This  situation  needs  to  taken  into  account  for  management  of  the  Shannon 
population. 

                                                                  Water quality recommendations 
         On water quality maps, highlight areas with high survival (using fry densities as 
         indicator of survival success) 
         Identify rivers where water quality issues can be targeted in the short term, such as 
         problems associated with identifiable point sources 
         Focus stocking efforts on rivers with good water quality characteristics 
         Develop systems to improve water quality in salmon areas in association with Water 
         Framework Directive 

  




                                                                                                  - 14 -
                                                        Shannon Salmon Restoration Project
                                                                                           
Conservattiion  measures
Conserva on measures
In accordance with the current national salmon management system, only two catchments 
in the Shannon, the Feale and the Mulkear, are open for wild salmon harvesting. The portion 
of the lower Shannon from O’Briensbridge to Thomond Bridge is open for angling on a catch‐
and‐release  basis,  meaning that all  wild  salmon  must be  returned alive.   Under  Section  18 
Authorisation from the Shannon Regional Fisheries Board anglers may keep hatchery fish.  
 
There is a complete ban on salmon angling in all other waters in the catchment.  Each year 
the Standing Scientific Committee of the National Salmon Commission provide advice to the 
National  Fisheries  Management  Executive  which,  most  importantly,  sets  out  conservation 
limits for catchments.  For the portion of the River Shannon upstream of Limerick City, the 
conservation  limit  for  2008  was  set  at  49,524,  breaking  down  as  45,909  1‐sea‐winter  fish 
(grilse or peal) and 3,729 2‐sea‐winter (spring salmon). 
  
Enforcement of the inland fisheries salmon legislation in the Shannon Region is carried out 
by the staff of the Shannon Regional Fisheries Board, with the support of the ESB who have 
engaged the Board to undertake this work in recent years.  Illegal fishing continues to occur 
throughout the Region and co‐operation from the angling sector in combating it is vital. 
 

                                                  Conservation measures recommendations 
        Review current legislation, including Bye‐laws and amend if necessary 
        Introduce individual quotas for each of the main sub‐catchments 
        When stocks recover, review scientific advice and, where appropriate, allow salmon 
        angling under strict conditions. 
        Introduce a log‐book scheme for salmon anglers in the mid and upper Shannon 
        catchments 
        Introduce local fishery management initiatives, such as shortened fishing seasons, to 
        operate within national legislation 
        Introduce a Bye‐law to regulate use of prawn and shrimp throughout the catchment 
        Ensure that adequate resources are available to monitor and detect breaches of 
        regulations 
        Develop systems to involve the public in monitoring and reporting breaches of 
        regulations.   
        Introduce a freefone confidential number to report illegal fishing incidents 




                                                                                           - 15 -
                                                       Shannon Salmon Restoration Project
                                                                                          

Ecollogiicall  iissues  
Eco og ca ssues
The  River  Shannon  has  experienced  considerable  change  due  to  anthropogenic  factors  in 
addition  to  physical  drainage  works,  impoundment  and  water  quality  degradation.    New 
species, such as the roach, not present in the catchment in 1929, are now widespread and 
recent work by the Lough Derg Native Fish Biodiversity Project has documented significant 
changes within the lake: a collapse in the pollan population, changes in brown trout diversity 
and the disappearance of rudd.  In addition to poorer water quality, changes in the habitat 
of  many  tributaries  due  to  drainage  or  water  pollution  now  favour  coarse  fish  over 
salmonids.  The  extent  of  such  habitats  and  the  importance  of  these  changes  need  to  be 
mapped and quantified to plan and direct future management strategies.  An assessment of 
predators particularly during smolt runs will be required and action taken if necessary. 

                                                                 Ecological recommendations 
        Map distribution of juvenile salmon (wild, feral and hatchery) on GIS 
        Highlight areas with high salmon survival (using fry densities as indicator of survival 
        success) 
        Examine extent of such ecological issues as pike densities or relative occurrence, by 
        means of monitoring rod‐caught pike and pike competitions, as in the River Suck 
        Examine competition with introduced fish species such as chub and roach 
        Examine the extent of silt pollution from peat harvesting  
        Examine the level of predation at certain locations 

 




                                                                                          - 16 -
                                                            Shannon Salmon Restoration Project
                                                                                               

Genettiics  
Gene cs
Some  of  the  most  productive  rivers  in  the  Europe  have  been  harnessed  for  hydro‐electric 
power generation e.g. Shannon (Ireland), Conan (Scotland), Linares (Spain).  In Ireland alone 
some  35%  of  the  potential  salmon  producing  habitat  is  impounded  above  hydroelectric 
dams.  In compensation, salmon mitigation programmes were established in most of these 
rivers, in order to make up for the loss of this productivity, to maintain natural runs and to 
preserve  biodiversity.  Despite  best  efforts  of  these  hatchery  programmes  many  of  the 
salmon  populations  above  these  facilities  are  now  effectively  extinct.   The  large  hatchery 
programmes  continue  to  exist  but  are  increasingly  coming  under  the  spotlight  from  cost 
benefit analyses and their success in maintaining fisheries and protecting biodiversity. Most 
of  these  mitigation  schemes  were  developed  many  decades  ago  before  much  of  the 
contemporary information about sub species population genetics was developed.    
 
The genetic integrity of a population is essential to its long term survival and most scientists 
accept  that  genetic  fitness  should  be  maintained  and  conserved  if  a  population  is  to  be 
protected into the long term. The genetics of salmon on the River Shannon has been studied 
in detail by Tom Cross, Noel Wilkins and other research workers. Their studies showed few 
genetic  differences  between  juvenile  salmon  in  rivers  sampled  upstream  of  the  dam  and 
between  these  fish  and  the  hatchery  broodstock.    They  also  concluded  that  the  genetic 
variability was similar to that in other Irish rivers.  However they did find a higher incidence 
of  genes  that  might  reflect  multi‐sea‐winter  salmon  (MSW)  in  two  tributaries  joining  the 
Shannon  downstream  of  the  dam.    This  could  indicate  that  residual  MSW  populations  are 
still present in these, but either lost from the tributaries upstream of the dam or never there 
in  the  first  place.    Further  study  is  required  with  more  sophisticated  techniques  to 
understand more fully the relationship between the progeny of planted stocks and hatchery 
fish  upstream  of  the  dam.    This  information  could  be  used  to  optimise  future  stocking 
strategies.    In  addition,  it  would  be  desirable  to  describe  the  original  stock  using  archived 
material to compare with potential donor populations in the future.  Possible sources for the 
latter could include the Kilmastulla or the Blackwater Rivers. 
 
Any future changes in the hatchery programme would need to be underpinned and guided 
by  genetic  work  using  state–of‐the  art  techniques.    The  current  hatchery  programme  is 
based on recommendations of Dr. Noel Wilkins, NUI Galway. 

                                                                    Assisted natural recolonisation 
A  proposal  has  been  submitted  for  funding  already  and  represents  a  new  paradigm  in  re‐
establishing salmon populations in river systems harnessed for the production of electricity 
in which they are functionally extinct.   
This project involves other partners in Europe and some of the aims are as follows: 
        Estimate the genetic strength of the residual population.  
        Undertake a genetic assessment of candidate populations as a source of the highest 
        potential and most appropriate brood‐stock for the re‐colonisation trial.  


                                                                                                 - 17 -
                                                          Shannon Salmon Restoration Project
                                                                                             
         Undertake the collection and holding of broodstock.   
         Undertake a programme of assisted re‐colonisation by establishing a number of 
         mobile, temporary satellite egg incubation units for egg development, hatching and 
         fry development, that will be distributed throughout the candidate river and that 
         will aim to mimic natural river specific developmental schedules 
         Undertake monitoring of the recolonisation process 
This will be a demonstration project (proof of concept) of the effectiveness of an innovative 
and  integrated  approach  attempting  to  reproduce  natural  recolonisation  processes  by 
combining  knowledge  of  ecological  and  evolutionary  biological  principles  that  can  be 
harnessed          to           resolve               this       most  difficult  fisheries  management 
problem.                                                                                                 
It is envisaged that the newly established population should act as a strong nucleus source 
population  for  the  re‐colonisation  of  other  adjacent  rivers,  thus  mimicing  natural  and 
historical recolonistion processes. 
       

                                                                       Genetic recommendations 
         Examine historical material that might give insights into the original genetic 
         composition of River Shannon salmon 
         Establish the genetic identity of salmon populations upstream of the dams and 
         contrast with those in hatchery and archived genetic material 
         Assess suitability of current hatchery stock and determine whether broodstock 
         should be brought in from other catchments  
         Set up seed populations through use of local or satellite hatcheries 
                                                    
 




                                                                                              - 18 -
                                                        Shannon Salmon Restoration Project
                                                                                           

Educattiion  
Educa on
The importance of citizen involvement and education is recognised as an essential first step 
in the development of environmental stewardship amongst the general public. The success 
of  conservation  projects  often  depends  on  the  public  acceptance  of  measures 
recommended.  Educational  programmes  conducted  in  tandem  with  conservation  actions, 
are  a  powerful  tool  to  ensure  that  public  awareness  and  acceptance  are  generated.  It  is 
recommended  that  stakeholders  are  targeted  at  various  levels  to  inform  the  public  of  the 
plight  of the  salmon  in  the River Shannon and generate  allies to support projects  for  their 
future  conservation  and  survival.    The  Shannon  Regional  Fisheries  Board  already  runs  a 
number of partnership and educational programmes with stakeholders.  It is recommended 
that these be extended and include juveniles and adult programmes.  
 

                                                                  Education recommendations 
        Agree on the number of school visits to be incorporated into the Something Fishy 
        initiative and Fisheries Awareness Week 
        Conduct adult education and workshops for stakeholders 
        Develop workshops for adults in association with the ESB, targeting community 
        groups and interested parties in salmon conservation 
        Arrange six‐monthly focus group meetings with key stakeholders, including Office of 
        Public Works, Inland Waterways Association, Waterways Ireland, Local Authorities, 
        Heritage Council, angling associations, commercial fishermen and local politicians 
        Issue project promotion brochures, newsletters and DVDs 
        Expand media publicity in TV, local and national press and angling magazines by 
        encouraging articles and interviews by project partners when important milestones 
        have been achieved 

 

 

  




                                                                                           - 19 -

				
DOCUMENT INFO