2000-01 Annual Report - ANNUAL REPORT 2000 -2001

Document Sample
2000-01 Annual Report - ANNUAL REPORT 2000 -2001 Powered By Docstoc
					ANNUAL REPORT 2000 -2001
Highlights
February 2000
Federal Budget announced $160 million in funding to Genome Canada

Summer 2000
5 Genome Centres incorporated

Fall 2000
275 proposals for large-scale projects and science & technology
platforms are received by the 5 Genome Centres

November 2000
Initial screening leaves 73 proposals for vetting by Centres

December 2000
Of the 73 proposals, 31 chosen for review by Genome Canada

January 2001
Submissions by the 5 Genome Centres of their business plans
+ 31 large-scale projects and science & technology platforms

February 2001
Additional $140 million in federal funding announced - total funding
by Government of Canada now reaches $300 million

March 2001
International panel of experts reviews proposals

April 2001
Announcement of 17 large-scale genomics research projects and
5 related science & technology platforms worth $270 million -
Genome Canada to fund $135 million
Contents
Mission                                                 page 3
Objectives                                                   4
Message from the Chairman                                    5
President’s Report                                           7
Auditors’ Report to the Directors (attached booklet)
Financial Statements (attached booklet)
    - Statement of Financial Position
    - Statement of Operations
    - Statement of Changes in Net Assets
    - Statement of Cash Flows
Notes to Financial Statements (attached booklet)
Genome Atlantic                                             14
Genome Québec                                               15
Ontario Genomics Institute                                  16
Genome Prairie                                              17
Genome British Columbia                                     18
Large-Scale Projects and Related Science & Technology Platforms
(back pocket)
Board of Directors                                          19
Scientific & Industry Advisory Committee                    20
Executive Officers & Staff                                  20
Corporate Information                                       21
    - Head Office
    - Telephone
    - Facsimile
    - Website
    - E-mail
    - Auditors
    - Legal Counsel
    - Annual General Meeting
                                PAGE 02
Mission
Genome Canada is a not-for-profit corporation
dedicated to developing and implementing a
national strategy in genomics research for the
benefit of all Canadians. To this end, Genome
Canada has received $300 million from the
federal government to establish 5 research
centres across the country.

Genome Canada and these 5 Genome Centres
(Atlantic, Québec, Ontario, Prairie and BC) will
work closely with other partners, such as
provincial governments, the private sector and
national and international foundations to ensure
that Canada becomes a world leader in
genomics research in key selected areas, such
as agriculture, environment, fisheries, forestry
and health.
                       PAGE 03
 Objectives
  Genome Canada will:
❙ Bring together industry, governments, universities, hospitals,
  research institutes and the public in support of the national
  genomics research program

❙ Establish 5 Genome Centres across Canada: one each in
  British Columbia, the Prairies, Ontario, Québec and the Atlantic
  provinces, to provide leading-edge technologies to researchers and
  cross-disciplinary training of the necessary workforce in all
  genomics-related fields

❙ Support large-scale genomics projects that draw on existing
  Canadian strengths and expertise, and whose scale and scope
  are such that they cannot currently be funded at internationally
  competitive levels, through existing mechanisms

❙ Put in place research infrastructure to support the major science
  and technology platforms essential for the large-scale projects
  including, but not limited to, functional genomics and proteomics,
  genomics sequencing, genotyping, bioinformatics and new
  technology development

❙ Ensure leadership in ethical, environmental, legal and social issues
  related to genomics (GELS)

❙ Effectively communicate the results of genomics research to the
  public, thereby helping Canadians to understand the relative risks
  and rewards of this type of research

❙ Foster Canadian participation in international genomics research
  programs

❙ Encourage investment in genomics research by others

❙ Create and realize economic, industrial and social benefits to Canada
                                  PAGE 04
“ Before us are vast stretches of the unknown,
 the unanswered and the unfinished. At Genome
 Canada, we believe Canadians have an important
 contribution to make to unlocking that future, to
 revealing its mysteries and extending its benefits
 to improve health, crops, forests, fish and the
 environment.”
                         PAGE 05
❚   Chairman’s Message
    Publication of the human genome sequence prompted numerous
    reports of the potential significance of genomics in identifying genetic
    determinants of rare and common diseases, their diagnosis, and the
    implementation of new technologies to bring about their eradication.

    For the first time, we are on the verge of comprehending the biological
    basis of our shared humanity, while understanding the tiny genetic
    differences that contribute to our uniqueness.

    We are on the threshold of developing drugs geared specifically to an
    individual’s DNA and of developing disease-resistant crops that may
    well send hunger the way of smallpox.

    In this dynamic new field, Canada must become not simply a participant,
    but a leader. That is the belief underlying the creation of Genome Canada.
    Our goal is excellence – encouraging those who seek it and rewarding
    those who achieve it.

    In undertaking our mandate, we are mindful that genomics research,
    for all of its wonders, also brings worries. That is why each of the five
    centres across Canada will devote part of their resources to studying the
    ethical, environmental, legal and social issues associated with genomics.

    Scientific research today simply cannot be conducted in isolation, but
    must be informed by input from Canadians of all walks of life. In fact, it
    is only through inclusion and information that we will maintain public
    support or, indeed, deserve it.

    There is little doubt that we are only at the dawn of what will come to
    be known as the age of genomics. Just as the internet entered and enlarged
    our lives, transforming the way we work, shop and communicate, so
    genomics will transform our understanding of health, disease and even
    life itself.

    Before us are vast stretches of the unknown, the unanswered and
    the unfinished. At Genome Canada, we believe Canadians have an
    important contribution to make to unlocking that future, to revealing its
    mysteries and extending its benefits to improve health, crops, forests,
    fish and the environment.

    We look forward to becoming one vehicle through which those
    contributions are realized.




    Henry G. Friesen
    Chairman
                                       PAGE 06
“ It is always exciting and challenging to be
 present at beginnings. This has been a year of
 firsts as Genome Canada evolved from words
 in a budget speech, to 5 world-class centres
 overseeing 17 large-scale genomics research
 projects and 5 related science and technology
 platforms.”
                       PAGE 07
❚   President’s Report
    It is always exciting and challenging to be present at beginnings. This has
    been a year of firsts as Genome Canada evolved from words in a budget
    speech, to 5 world-class centres overseeing 17 large-scale genomics
    research projects and 5 related science & technology platforms.

    It was a year of goals set and decisions made; a year when Canada
    staked its claim to stand among the leaders in this exciting new field of
    genomics.

    Following the announcement of its financing in the Federal February
    2000 Budget, Genome Canada hit the ground running. By the end of
    the summer, 5 Genome Centres had been established to coordinate
    genomics research in their respective regions – one centre each in British
    Columbia, the Prairies, Ontario, Québec and Atlantic Canada.

    These Centres bring together industry, government, universities, hospitals
    and research institutes to pursue cutting-edge genomics research.

    By November, the Centres had received 275 proposals for large-scale
    projects and science & technology platforms and begun the rigorous
    process of deciding which of these to fund.

    The number and quality of these submissions were clear testimony both
    to the need for significant resources and to the necessity of a coordinated
    national strategy.

    Following an initial screening, 73 proposals were vetted by the regional
    Centres and 31 were chosen for review by Genome Canada.

    In February 2001, the federal government provided an additional $140
    million in funding – a strong endorsement of the approach we have
    adopted and a clear demonstration of its commitment to making Canada
    a leader in genomics research.

    In March, an international panel of experts reviewed the 31 proposals
    and made the final selection. In determining which of these projects
    would be funded, a number of criteria were used, including: the
    scientific excellence of the project; the quality and experience of the
    researchers involved; the potential for research training; management
    and organizational effectiveness; the potential for economic benefits;
    and the quality of the program for addressing the ethical, environmental,
    legal and social issues of the projects.

    On April 4th, the first slate of projects was announced, comprised
    of 17 large-scale genomics research projects and 5 related science &
    technology platforms worth $270 million, of which Genome Canada
    will fund half, namely $135 million. A complete list of the projects,
    along with a brief description of each, is contained in the back pocket of
    this Annual Report.
                                        PAGE 08
The stated objective of Genome Canada is to “support a national
genomics research initiative, for the benefit of all Canadians”. There is
no doubt that genomics holds the potential to transform our lives – from
the medicine we receive and the food we eat, to the preservation of our
natural resources and our relationship with the environment.

It is also a vital component of the knowledge economy, with a premium
on invention, imagination and innovation. Our goal is to create a
research environment second to none, so that our young researchers will
be able to do their very best work right here at home and so that
researchers from around the globe will be drawn to Canada.

Quite simply, we want to brand Canada as a leader in genomics around
the world.

To do that, we have adopted a national strategy based on regional
strengths. We have fostered partnerships across jurisdictions, borders
and industries. And we have ensured that there is no overlap or
duplication, so that the resources we have will be effectively used and
wisely employed.

In the year ahead, we will build on existing strengths and develop
new ones. A second round of financing of genomics projects will be
announced in the Spring of 2002.

We will enhance our capacity to communicate with Canadians so that
their views and values are reflected in our work.

In the coming year, we will also reach beyond our borders to pursue
international partnerships. Indeed, that process has already begun with
the recent Framework Agreement on Scientific Collaboration between
Genome Canada and the Karolinska Institutet of Sweden.

It has been said that “well begun is halfway done.” In 2000, Canada’s
entry onto the world genomics stage was indeed well begun, but we still
have a long way to go. At the moment, Canada stands second in terms
of patenting activities in the U.S. and sixth in the world in terms of the
publication of scientific papers.

Our goal is to improve our overall rating so that we stand second only to
the United States within five years – an ambitious, but achievable objective.

With the quality of our researchers and the strength of their commitment,
I am confident that that goal will be achieved.




Martin Godbout,
President
                                     PAGE 09
“ Our goal is to create a research environment
 second to none, so that our young researchers
 will be able to do their very best work right here
 at home and so that researchers from around
 the globe will be drawn to Canada.”
                         PAGE 10
   FINANCIAL STATEMENTS




YEAR ENDED MARCH 31, 2001
Auditors’ Report To The Directors
                                                                               agricu
We have audited the statement of financial position of Genome Canada
as at March 31, 2001 and the statements of operations and changes in
net assets and cash flows for the year then ended. These financial
statements are the responsibility of the Corporation’s management. Our
responsibility is to express an opinion on these financial statements
based on our audit.

We conducted our audit in accordance with Canadian generally accepted
auditing standards. Those standards require that we plan and perform an
                        health
audit to obtain reasonable assurance whether the financial statements
are free of material misstatement. An audit includes examining, on a test
basis, evidence supporting the amounts and disclosures in the financial
statements. An audit also includes assessing the accounting principles
used and significant estimates made by management, as well as
evaluating the overall financial statement presentation.

In our opinion, these financial statements present fairly, in all material
respects, the financial position of the Corporation as at March 31, 2001
and the results of its operations and its cash flows for the year then ended
in accordance with Canadian generally accepted accounting principles.




Chartered Accountants
Québec, Canada
June 18, 2001




                      forestry




                                                                                 eth
                                     PAGE 01
ulture   Genome Canada
         Financial Statements
         Year ended March 31, 2001




             Financial Statements                   page

             Statement of Financial Position          3

             Statement of Operations                  4

                                     environment
             Statement of Changes in Net Assets       4

             Statement of Cash Flows                  5

             Notes to Financial Statements            6




                                        fisheries




hics
                                        PAGE 02
Genome Canada
Statement of Financial Position
March 31, 2001, with comparative figures for 2000


                                                                     2001              2000


  ASSETS
  Current assets:
     Cash and cash equivalents                                 $     6,466,152   $ 160,000,000
     Short-term investments                                         40,050,434                 -
     Grant receivable from the Government of Canada (note 6)       140,000,000                 -
     Interest receivable                                             2,553,841                 -
     Other accounts receivable                                         68,217                  -
                                                                   189,138,644       160,000,000


  Investments (note 2)                                             117,350,919                 -
  Capital assets (note 3)                                              60,882                  -


                                                               $ 306,550,445     $ 160,000,000




  LIABILITIES AND NET ASSETS
  Current liabilities:
     Accounts payable and accrued liabilities                  $      287,102    $             -
  Deferred contributions (note 4)                                  306,202,461       160,000,000
  Net assets:
     Net assets invested in capital assets                             60,882                  -
  Subsequent events (note 6)
                                                               $ 306,550,445     $ 160,000,000


  See accompanying notes to financial statements.
                                                    PAGE 03
Genome Canada
Statement of Operations
Year ended March 31, 2001




  Revenues:
    Amortization of deferred contributions (note 4)             $      3,933,858


  Expenses:
    General and administrative                                         1,918,418
    External committees                                                  515,440
    Grants to genome centers                                           1,500,000
    Depreciation                                                          13,231
                                                                       3,947,089


  Deficiency of revenues over expenses                          $         (13,231)


  See accompanying notes to financial statements.




Genome Canada
Statement of Changes in Net Assets
Year ended March 31, 2001



                                                                       Invested in
                                                                    Capital Assets
  Balance, beginning of year                                    $               -
  Deficiency of revenues over expenses                                    (13,231)
  Investment in capital assets (note 4)                                   74,113


  Balance, end of year                                          $         60,882


  See accompanying notes to financial statements.
                                                      PAGE 01
                                                           04
Genome Canada
Statement of Cash Flows
Year ended March 31, 2001, with comparative figures for 2000


                                                                        2001               2000


  Cash provided by (used in):
  Operations:
    Deficiency of revenues over expenses                         $        (13,231)   $             -
    Items not involving cash:
      Depreciation                                                         13,231                  -
      Amortization of capital contributions (note 4)                   (3,933,858)                 -
                                                                       (3,933,858)                 -


    Increase in deferred contributions (note 4)                         6,749,609        160,000,000


    Change in non-cash operating working capital:
      Increase in other accounts receivable                               (68,217)                 -
      Increase in accounts payable and accrued liabilities               287,102                   -
                                                                        3,034,636        160,000,000
  Investments:
    Purchase of investments                                          (354,902,422)                 -
    Sales and maturities of investments                               198,408,051                  -
    Purchase of capital assets                                            (74,113)                 -
                                                                     (156,568,484)                 -


  Increase (decrease) in cash position                               (153,533,848)       160,000,000


  Cash and cash equivalents, beginning of year                       160,000,000                   -


  Cash and cash equivalents, end of year                         $      6,466,152    $ 160,000,000


  Supplemental cash flows information (note 5)
  See accompanying notes to financial statements.
                                                       PAGE 05
Genome Canada
Notes to Financial Statements
Year ended March 31, 2001




 The Corporation was incorporated on February 8, 2000 under the Canada Corporations Act as
 a not-for-profit organization and has the following objectives:
 (a) Develop and establish a co-ordinated strategy for genomics research to enable Canada to
    become a world leader in a few selected areas such as health, agriculture, environment,
    forestry and fisheries;
 (b) Provide leading-edge technology to researchers in all genomics-related fields through
    support to five (5) Genome Centres across Canada, located respectively in British Columbia,
    the Prairies, Ontario, Quebec and the Atlantic;
 (c) Support large-scale projects of strategic importance to Canada, which are beyond current
    capacities by bringing together industry, government, universities, research hospitals and
    the public;
 (d) Ensuring leadership in the area of social, environmental, ethical and legal issues related to
    genomics by organizing intellectual resources and to effectively communicate genomics to
    the public, helping Canadians understand the relative risks and rewards of genomics; and,
 (e) Encouraging investment by other Persons to fund genomics research.


 1. Significant accounting policies:
    (a) Cash and cash equivalents:
        Cash and cash equivalents consist of cash on hand and balances with banks as well
        as all highly liquid short-term investments. The Corporation considers all highly liquid
        short-term investments as those having a maturity of less than three months from the
        date of acquisition.
    (b) Investments:
        Short-term and long-term investments are valued at the lower of cost and market value.
        For fixed term investments, the discount or premium arising on purchase is amortized
        using the straight-line method over the remaining term.
                                                 PAGE 06
Genome Canada
Notes to Financial Statements (continued)
Year ended March 31, 2001




 1. Significant accounting policies (continued):
    (c) Revenue recognition:
        The Corporation follows the deferral method of accounting for contributions, which
        includes grants from the Government of Canada.
        Externally restricted contributions and related investment income are recognized as
        revenue in the year in which the underlying expenses are incurred. A receivable is
        recognized if the amount to be received can be reasonably estimated and collection is
        reasonably assured.
    (d) Capital assets:
        Capital assets are stated at cost. Depreciation is provided for using the following
        methods and annual rates:

             ASSETS                                                      METHODS             RATES

        Furniture and fixtures and office equipment                      Straight-line           20%
        Computers and software                                         Declining balance         50%
        Telecommunication equipment                                    Declining balance         30%

    (e) Use of estimates:
        The preparation of financial statements in conformity with generally accepted accounting
        principles requires the use of estimates and assumptions that affect the reported
        amounts of assets and liabilities, disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities and the
        reported amounts of revenues and expenses. Accordingly, actual results could differ
        from these estimates.




                                                                2001              2001             2000


  2. Investments:
                                                         Carrying               Estimated
                                                          Value                 Fair Value
    Government of Canada bonds                   $  47,769,573              $  47,913,159    $            -
    Provincial bonds                                24,928,241                 25,400,181                 -
    Mortgage – backed securities                     9,995,435                 10,172,482                 -
    Corporate bonds and debentures                  34,657,670                 35,189,861                 -
                                                 $ 117,350,919              $ 118,675,683    $            -

    The interest rates at the end of the year range from 4.88% to 12.5% and maturity dates vary from
    December 31, 2001 to June 1, 2008.
                                                      PAGE 07
Genome Canada
Notes to Financial Statements (continued)
Year ended March 31, 2001


                                                                                   2001                  2000


  3. Capital assets:
                                               Cost             Accumulated        Net book             Net book
                                                                depreciation        value                value
    Furniture and fixtures and
       office equipment                  $     16,796           $    1,400     $     15,396         $              -
    Computers and software                     55,991               11,665           44,326                        -
    Telecommunication equipment                 1,326                  166            1,160                        -
                                         $     74,113           $   13,231     $     60,882         $              -




  4. Deferred contributions:
    The Corporation receives grants from the Government of Canada to be held, invested,
    administered and disbursed in accordance with the related funding agreement between
    Genome Canada and the Government of Canada.
    Deferred contributions related to expenses of future periods represent these unspent
    externally restricted grants and related investment income, for the purpose of providing
    grants to eligible recipients and the payment of operating and capital expenditures in
    future periods.
                                                                                                Cumulative from
                                                                                              inception through
                                                                                                      March 31,
                                                                2001                2000                   2001

    Grants from the Government of Canada:
      Received                                    $             -         $ 160,000,000         $ 160,000,000
      Receivable (note 6)                             140,000,000                     -           140,000,000
    Investment income (1)                              10,210,432                     -            10,210,432
                                                      150,210,432           160,000,000           310,210,432

    Less:
      Amount amortized to revenues                       (3,933,858)                      -         (3,933,858)
      Amount transferred to net assets
        invested in capital assets                           (74,113)                     -             (74,113)
                                                         (4,007,971)                      -         (4,007,971)

                                                  $ 146,202,461           $ 160,000,000         $ 306,202,461

    (1) The investment income consists of:
          Interest received                                                                     $       6,749,609
          Interest receivable                                                                           2,553,841
          Gain on disposal of investments                                                                 860,169
          Amortization of discounts/premiums
            from fixed term investments                                                               46,813
                                                                                                $ 10,210,432
                                                      PAGE 08
Genome Canada
Notes to Financial Statements (continued)
Year ended March 31, 2001


                                                                        2001                 2000


  5. Supplemental cash flows information:
    Non-cash transactions excluded from the increase

      in deferred contributions (note 4):

        Grant receivable                                          $ 140,000,000        $              -
        Interest receivable                                            2,553,841                      -
        Gain on disposal of investments                                  860,169                      -
        Amount transferred to net assets                                  (74,113)                    -
        Amortization of discounts/premiums

          from fixed term investments                                     46,813                      -

                                                                  $ 143,386,710        $              -




  6. Subsequent events:
    On April 2, 2001, the Corporation received $140,000,000 from the Government of Canada.

    Moreover, subsequent to year-end, the Corporation approved projects submitted by the genome centres

    for an amount of up to $134,104,057 conditional upon the finalization of revised budgets and

    contractual agreement.
                                                  PAGE 09
                      ISBN 0-9689384-0-X




www.genomecanada.ca
“ Following the announcement of its financing
 in the Federal February 2000 Budget, Genome
 Canada hit the ground running. By the end
 of the summer, 5 Genome Centres had been
 established to coordinate genomics research in
 their respective regions – one centre each in
 British Columbia, the Prairies, Ontario, Québec
 and Atlantic Canada.”
                      PAGE 13
1721 Lower Water St., Suite 407
Halifax, NS
B3J 1S5
Tel.: (902) 421-5645
Fax: (902) 421-2733
E-mail: info@genomeatlantic.ca
Web Site: www.genomeatlantic.ca
Contact: Joe Gillis

Genome Atlantic is a not-for-profit consortium of university, government and other
research partners, which aims to fulfill the mandate of Genome Canada by achieving
world leadership in select areas of genomics research. The consortium will initially focus
on areas in which Atlantic Canada has internationally recognized strengths and those of
importance to the region’s resource economy.
Projects (a complete description is in the back pocket)
The following are the first genomics projects of Genome Atlantic:

     1. W. Ford Doolittle, Dalhousie University
        Understanding Prokaryotic Genome Evolution and Diversity
        Health/Environment
     2. Michael Gray, Dalhousie University
        The Protist EST Program
        Health/Environment
     3. Genome Atlantic
        DNA Sequencing Facility
        Science and Technology Platform

Board of Directors

Timothy Ogilvie                                       Martin Godbout
(Chairman)                                            President and CEO
Dean, Atlantic Veterinary College                     Genome Canada
University of Prince Edward Island
                                                      Anthony J. (Tony) Lucas
Mark Whitmore                                         Chief Executive Officer
(Vice-Chairman)                                       Bio Vectra
Professor Dept. of Physics and Physical
Oceanography                                          Noni MacDonald
Memorial University of Newfoundland                   Dean of Medicine
                                                      Dalhousie University
Carl Breckenridge
Associate Vice-President, Research                    Penny Moody-Corbett,
Dalhousie University                                  Assistant Dean of Medical Research
                                                      & Graduate Studies
Jane Fritz                                            Memorial University of Newfoundland
Professor and Dean
Faculty of Computer Science                           Wynne G. Potter
University of New Brunswick
                                                      Israel Unger
Joe Gillis                                            Dean of Science Emeritus
President and CEO                                     University of New Brunswick
Genome Atlantic

John van der Meer
Director of Research
Institute for Marine Biosciences
National Research Council
                                            PAGE 14
630 René-Lévesque Blvd. West
26th Floor
Montreal, QC
H3B 1S6
Tel.: 514-398-0668
Fax: 514-398-0883
Web Site: www.genomequebec.com
E-mail: info@genomequebec.com
Contact: Paul L’Archevêque

Genome Québec is a not-for-profit corporation, which will work in concert with a large
number of partners, including the governments of Québec and Canada and their
agencies, the private sector as well as national and international foundations, in order to
play a key structuring and mobilizing role in genomics research in sectors of strategic
importance to Québec, including human health, agriculture, environment, forestry and
fisheries. Genome Québec received $40 million over four years from the Ministère de la
Recherche, de la Science et de la Technologie du Québec and $40 million from Genome
Canada. The mission of Genome Québec is to establish Québec as one of the top ten
genomics centers in the world.
Projects (a complete description is in the back pocket)
The following are the first genomics projects of Genome Québec:
     1. John J.M. Bergeron, McGill University
        Montreal Network for Pharmaco-Proteomics and Structural Genomics
        Health
     2. Howard Bussey, McGill University
        Projects in Functional Genomics using Model Organisms
        Health
     3. Thomas J. Hudson, McGill University
        Regulatory Genetics: Identification of Regulatory Polymorphisms
        in the Human Genome
        Health
     4. Bartha Maria Knoppers, Université de Montréal
        Genomics in Society Responsibilities and Rights
        Ethical, Environmental, Legal and Social Issues related to genomics (GELS)
     5. Fernand Labrie, Centre de Recherche du CHUL
        Atlas of Genomics: Profiles of Steroid Action
        Health
     6. Thomas J. Hudson, McGill University
        The Montreal Genomics Node of Excellence
        Science and Technology Platform

Board of Directors

Jean-Marc Proulx                                       Michel A. Bureau
(Chairman)                                             President
President                                              Fonds de la recherche en santé du
Valorisation Innovation Plus Inc.                      Québec

Jean-Claude Cadieux                                    Sylvie Dillard
(Vice-Chairman)                                        President
                                                       FCAR
Jean Brunet
(Secretary)                                            Martin Godbout
Managing Partner                                       President and CEO
Desjardins, Ducharme, Stein, Monast                    Genome Canada

Louis Berlinguet                                       Paul L’Archevêque
                                                       President and CEO
Chantal Brunet                                         Genome Québec
Vice-President, Biotechnology
& Life Sciences                                        Jacques Saint-Cyr
Innovatech Québec                                      Ministère de la recherche
                                                       de la science et de la technologie
                                             PAGE 15
149 College Street
Suite 500
Toronto, Ontario
M5T 1P5
Tel.: (416) 977-9582
Fax: (416) 977-9460
Web Site: www.ontariogenomicsinstitute.ca
E-mail: kknox@oit.on.ca
Contact: Kenneth Knox

The Ontario Genomics Institute (OGI) will develop large-scale, functional and applied
genomics research projects, implement an outreach and training program and create an
innovative commercialization strategy. OGI will fulfill the industry’s demand for highly
skilled employees, contribute to the Foundation of Ontario, as well as Canada’s medical,
health and agricultural industries. OGI’s contribution will ensure that Canada is a world
leader in functional genomics and proteomics.
Projects (a complete description is in the back pocket)
The following are the first genomics projects of the OGI:
     1. Janet Rossant, Samuel Lunenfeld Research Institute
        Functional Genomics and Proteomics of Model Organisms
        Health
     2. Peter A. Singer, University of Toronto
        Canadian Program on Genomics and Global Health
        Ethical, Environmental, Legal and Social Issues related to Genomics (GELS)
     3. Lap-Chee Tsui, Hospital for Sick Children
        Genetic Determinants of Human Health and Disease: Annotation of Chromosome 7
        Health
     4. Jack Greenblatt, University of Toronto
        Proteomics Technology Core Facility
        Science and Technology Platform
     5. Stephen Scherer, University of Toronto
        Genome Resource Core Facility
        Science and Technology Platform


Board of Directors

Joseph L. Rotman                                       Bryan Pruchase
(Chairman)                                             Deputy Minister
Chair and CEO                                          Ontario Ministry of Energy,
Clairvest Group                                        Science & Technology

Keith Pinder                                           Louis Siminovitch
(Interim Secretary)                                    Research Director, Emeritus
Innovation Institute of Ontario                        Samuel Lunenfeld Research Institute

James D. Friesen                                       Calvin Stiller
Chair, Banting and Best                                Chair
Department of Medical Research                         Ontario Research and Development
University of Toronto                                  Challenge Fund

Martin Godbout                                         Ilse Treurnicht
President and CEO                                      President and CEO
Genome Canada                                          Primaxis Technology Ventures Inc.

Kenneth Knox                                           Lap-Chee Tsui
Interim President and CEO                              Geneticist-in-Chief
OGI                                                    Department of Genetics
President                                              Hospital for Sick Children
Innovation Institute of Ontario
                                             PAGE 16
3553 - 31 Street NW, Suite 115
Calgary, Alberta
T2L 2K7
Tel.: (403) 503-5220
Fax: (403) 503-5225
Web Site: www.genomeprairie.ca
E-mail: info@genomeprairie.ca
Contact: Randal N. Johnston

Genome Prairie is a not-for-profit corporation established under the Canada Corporation
Act. The vision of Genome Prairie is to be a world leader in genomics research, to
contribute to the development of infrastructure of strategic importance to the Prairies
and Canada, and to establish networks among academic, government and industry
researchers for collaborative, multidisciplinary genomics research.
Projects (a complete description is in the back pocket)
The following are the first genomics projects of Genome Prairie:

     1. Timothy Caulfield, University of Alberta
        Commercialization and Society and its Policy and Strategic Implications
        Ethical, Environmental, Legal and Social Issues related to genomics (GELS)
     2. Graham Scoles, University of Saskatchewan
        Functional Genomics of Abiotic Stress in Wheat and Canola Crops
        Agriculture

Board of Directors

Pete Desai                                            Randal N. Johnston
(Chairman)                                            President and CEO
                                                      Genome Pairie
Ronald C. Beavis
President                                             S. Morgan Jones
Proteometrics Canada Ltd.                             Director, Lethbridge Research Centre
                                                      Agriculture & Agri-Food Canada
Bill Bridger
President                                             Kutty Kartha
Alberta Ingenuity Fund                                Director General
                                                      NRC Plant Biotechnology Institute
Ralph Christian
                                                      Graeme Macaloney
Edna Einsiedel                                        Heritage Medical Research Centre
Professor, Faculty of                                 University of Alberta
Communication and Culture
University of Calgary                                 Bill McBlain
                                                      Associate Vice-President (Research)
Martin Godbout                                        University of Alberta
President and CEO
Genome Canada                                         Peter McCann
                                                      President
Bryan Harvey                                          Ag-West Biotech Inc.
Office of Vice-President (Research)
University of Saskatchewan                            Joseph Martin
                                                      Dean, Faculty of Medicine
Paul Hough                                            Harvard Medical School
Assistant Director                                    Boston, MA, USA
Canadian Health Services Research
Foundation                                            Marsh Sharp
                                                      CEO
Digvir Jayas                                          Dietitians of Canada
Associate Dean (Research)
Faculty of Agricultural and Food Sciences
University of Manitoba
                                            PAGE 17
601 West Broadway, Suite 400
Vancouver, BC
V5Z 4C2
Tel.: (604) 675-6961
Fax: (604) 675-6969
Web Site: www.genomebc.ca
E-mail: info@genomebc.ca
Contact: Roger Foxall

Genome BC is a not-for-profit corporation, which intends to build a world-class and
internationally competitive genomics capability by working with pioneering genomics
scientists in high profile research institutions such as the Universities of B.C. and Victoria,
Simon Fraser University, the B.C. Cancer Agency, Vancouver General Hospital and the
Women’s and Children’s Health Care Centre. Genome BC is focusing its efforts on BC’s
areas of economic and scientific strengths: forestry and salmon; cancer genomics; and
the nematode worm as a genomics model system. Genome BC’s focus on industrial
strengths will improve forestry and aquaculture worldwide, while its healthcare focus will
result in new approaches to the diagnosis and treatment of diseases.
Projects (a complete description is in the back pocket)
The following are the first genomics projects of Genome BC:
     1. William Davidson, Simon Fraser University and Ben Koop, University of Victoria
        Genomics Research on Atlantic Salmon Project
        Fisheries
     2. Julian E. Davies, University of British Columbia:
        Microbial Envirogenomics: Micro-organisms and their Interaction
        with the Environment
        Environment
     3. Victor Ling, BC Cancer Agency
        Cancer Genomics: Studies of Early Stage Cancers
        Health
     4. Don G. Moerman, University of British Columbia
        The Nematode as a Model Organism
        Health
     5. Kermit Ritland, University of British Columbia
        Forestry Genomics: Mechanisms of Wood Formation and Pest Resistance
        in Forest Trees using Poplar, Spruce and Arabidopsis
        Forestry
     6. Genome BC
        Sequencing and Mapping, Arrays, Proteomics, Genotyping and Bioinformatics
        Science and Technology Platform

Board of Directors

Indira Samarasekera              Julian Davies                    Vern Paetkau
(Chair)                          Director                         Dean of Science
Vice-President Research          Cubist Pharmaceuticals           University of Victoria
University of British            Canada Inc.
Columbia                                                          Don Rix
                                 Haig Farris                      Chairman
Jeff Lowe                        President                        Cantest Ltd.
(Secretary)                      Fractal Capital Corp.
RBS Lawyers                                                       Bruce Schmidt
                                 Martin Godbout                   Director
Roger Foxall                     President and CEO                Genome BC
President and Interim CEO        Genome Canada
Genome BC                                                         Calvin Shantz
                                 Michael Hayden                   Executive Director
William Davidson                 Director                         Science, Technology and
Dean of Science                  Centre for Molecular             Telecommunications
Simon Fraser University          Medicine and Therapeutics        Division
                                                                  Ministry of Competition,
                                                                  Science and Enterprise
                                              PAGE 18
Board of Directors

Henry G. Friesen                               Arthur Carty
(Chairman)                                     President
Distinguished Professor Emeritus               National Research Council
University of Manitoba
                                               Martin Godbout
Heather Munroe-Blum                            President and CEO
(Vice-Chair)                                   Genome Canada
Vice-President
Research & International Relations             Judith Hall
University of Toronto                          Professor of Pediatrics and
                                               Medical Genetics
Lorne Babiuk                                   Department of Pediatrics
Director                                       University of British Columbia
Veterinary Infectious Disease
Organization (VIDO)                            Kevin M.W. Keough
University of Saskatchewan                     Chief Scientist
                                               Health Canada
Alan Bernstein
President                                      Bartha Maria Knoppers
Canadian Institutes                            Professor, Faculty of Law
of Health Research                             Université de Montréal

Jean Brunet                                    Murray McLaughlin
(Secretary)                                    President and CEO
Managing Partner                               Foragen Technology Ventures Inc.
Desjardins, Ducharme,                          Marc Renaud
Stein, Monast                                  President
Thomas A. Brzustowski                          Social Sciences and Humanities
President                                      Research Council
Natural Sciences & Engineering                 Susan Smith
Research Council                               President and CEO
                                               Royal Bank Ventures Inc.
                                     PAGE 19
Science and Industry
Advisory Committee Members
Michael W. Gray                              Brian E. Ellis
(Chairman)                                   Professor, Agricultural Sciences
Professor, Department of                     University of British Columbia
Biochemistry and
Molecular Biology                            James D. Friesen
Dalhousie University                         Chair, Banting and Best
                                             Department of Medical Research
Rudi Aebersold                               University of Toronto
Professor, Institute for
Systems Biology                              Brian Harling
Seattle, Washington                          Vice-President, Corporate Affairs
                                             MDS Inc., Toronto
Françoise Baylis
Associate Professor                          Charles G. Kurland
Department of Bioethics                      Professor Emeritus
Dalhousie University                         Department of
                                             Molecular Evolution
Howard Bussey                                Upsala University, Sweden
Professor, Department of Biology
McGill University                            Maynard V. Olson
                                             Professor, Division of
Michael Dennis                               Medical Genetics
President and CEO                            University of Washington, Seattle
SignalGene Inc., Montreal
                                             Steven J. Rothstein
                                             on leave from Pioneer Hi-Bred
                                             International Inc., Iowa



Executive and Staff
Martin Godbout                               Anie Perrault
President and CEO                            Vice-President, Communications

Marc LePage                                  Hélène Meilleur
Executive Vice-President,                    Director of Operations
Corporate Development
                                             Genny Cardin
Cindy Bell                                   Analyst
Vice-President,
National Genomics Program
                                   PAGE 20
Corporate Information


Head Office
Genome Canada
155 Queen Street, 9th floor
Ottawa, Ontario
K1P 6L1
Tel.: (613) 751-4460
Fax: (613) 751-4474
E-mail: info@genomecanada.ca
Website: www.genomecanada.ca
Auditors
KPMG LLP
Place de la Cité
2600 Laurier Blvd
Suite 700
Québec (Québec)
G1V 5A9
Legal Counsel
Jean Brunet
Desjardins, Ducharme, Stein, Monast
1150, De la Claire Fontaine Street
Suite 300
Québec (Québec)
G1R 5G4
Annual General Meeting
September 28, 2001, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan
For more information, please contact:
Anie Perrault
Vice-President, Communications
aperrault@genomecanada.ca
                              PAGE 21
                      ISBN 0-9689384-0-X




www.genomecanada.ca
                    agriculture




 health                                  environment

           List and description of the
            17 large-scale genomics
                research projects
              and 5 related science
            & technology platforms

                                           fisheries
forestry




                      ethics
By region                                                       Genome BC




Genome BC

1. Fisheries • William Davidson • Simon Fraser University
  Ben Koop• University of Victoria
Title: Genomics Research on Atlantic Salmon Project
The overall goal of this Simon Fraser University and University of Victoria
project is to co-ordinate all aspects of genomics research on Atlantic
salmon, and use this information to enhance the resources available to
researchers, policymakers, fishers and commercial salmon farmers.
Dr. Davidson, Dr. Koop and their team will map the chromosomes of
salmon and plot genes whose function is already known. That will
enable the researchers to learn more about the structure and function of
a salmon’s immune system. They will also compare specific parts
of the Atlantic salmon genome, to understand how a duplicated gene
reorganizes itself, controls sex-determination, and relates to the genomes
of other vertebrates. Finally, the team will study the way salmon tissue
responds under different conditions, to identify the function of molecules
in response to stress, acclimatization and immunity. This research will
play an important role in increasing our understanding of fish growth
and reproduction and will assist in salmon husbandry.

2. Environment • Julian E. Davies • University of British Columbia
Title: Microbial Envirogenomics: Micro-organisms and their Interaction with
the Environment
This project focuses on novel genomic approaches to study the roles of
microbes in the environment. Biotransformation (or bioremediation) is
critical to organic flux in nature and the core of the project will focus
on the role of Rhodococcus species in this process. The nucleotide
sequence of the bacterium Rhodococcus sp. RHA1 will be determined
and this information will be used to carry out functional and
bioinformatics analyses of the biochemical pathways involved in the
bioconversion of toxic chemicals (such as polychlorinated biphenyls
[PCBs]) under various conditions. In addition, this project will elucidate
global regulatory processes involved in stress response, growth phase,
and metabolic shifts. The objective is to provide a better understanding
of the response of microbial populations to toxic chemical stress which
will lead to more effective environmental clean up and the development
of new types of biological catalysts for industrial processes.

3. Health • Victor Ling • BC Cancer Agency
Title: Cancer Genomics: Studies of Early Stage Cancer

Dr. Ling and his colleagues at the BC Cancer Agency are developing
techniques to track the way cells transform into malignancies in the early
stages of cancer, by identifying altered patterns of genes and proteins.
Those altered patterns result in gene mutations that are characteristic of
this early stage transformation. The aim of this study is to be able to
perform a genetic analysis on small numbers of cells and identify muta-
tions and altered genes that distinguish early stage cancers from normal
tissues. The research concerns lung, breast, prostate, gastro-intestinal,
oral, lymphoid and myeloid tumors. The team aims to describe the ways
genes are expressed before and after cells begin to grow and divide.
By region                                                    Genome BC




4. Health • Don G. Moerman • University of British Columbia
Title: The Nematode as a Model Organism

Humans and nematodes – transparent, cylindrical worms – may be
widely divergent species, but they have 7,000 genes in common. Dr.
Moerman’s project at the University of British Columbia will investigate
the function of some of these common genes, by working with the
C. elegans nematode. By “knocking out,” or removing some targeted
genes, the researchers will be able to identify what those genes do as the
nematodes develop. This project will obtain targeted mutations, or
knockouts, in 2,000 genes that are similar to human genes. Researchers
around the world can then use those genes. Moerman and his team will
also improve the technology used to create gene knockouts.

5. Forestry • Kermit Ritland • University of British Columbia
Title: Forestry Genomics: Mechanisms of Wood Formation and Pest
Resistance in Forest Trees using Poplar, Spruce and Arabidopsis.

This University of British Columbia project intends to use genomic tools
to increase the scientific community’s understanding about trees’ built-
in defense mechanisms against pests and environmental stress. Dr.
Ritland and his team will also study the mechanisms that control the way
wood is formed. The researchers will sequence tissues from spruce,
poplar trees and from Arabidopsis (a model organism) and bank about
100,000 samples. The project will also identify genetic markers to help
in breeding programs and will map desired traits in forest trees. The team
will also create a physical map of genes from the poplar tree, which is
expected to be the first tree selected for genomic sequencing.

6. Science and Technology Platforms • Genome BC
Title: Sequencing and Mapping, Arrays, Proteomics, Genotyping and
Bioinformatics.
Cutting-edge infrastructure is an essential requirement for innovative
research in genomics. The large-scale projects approved for Genome BC
will depend on existing platform facilities and capabilities being
developed or expanded and some new facilities being established.
Sequencing and mapping and associated bioinformatics will be under-
taken at the Genome Sequence Centre in partnership with the BC
Cancer Agency. Array facilities and associated bioinformatics will be
provided in partnership with the Prostate Centre at the Vancouver
General Hospital. A new Proteomics Center will be operated in partner-
ship with the University of Victoria and a new Genotyping Facility will
be established in association with Xenon Genetics. There will also be a
technology development component of the Centre, located at the
University of British Columbia.
By region                                                    Genome Prairie




Genome Prairie

1. GELS • Timothy Caulfield • University of Alberta
Title: Commercialization and Society and its Policy and Strategic Implications
GELS is an acronym for the ethical, environmental, legal and social
issues related to genomics research. Genome Prairie’s GELS proposal is
headed by investigators from the University of Alberta, the University of
Calgary and the University of Saskatchewan. The overall theme for the
proposal is commercialization and society and its policy and strategic
implications. The proposal will map the development of controversial
biotechnology applications from initial research to commercialization
and will examine the factors that contribute to public controversy. The
researchers will also analyze the nature and source of socio-political
concerns associated with the commercialization of genomics technologies
and attempt to improve the understanding of how the transmission of
information affects consumer behavior relative to genomic technology.
Finally, they will study the way intellectual property is created, managed
and commercially exploited.

2. Agriculture • Graham Scoles • University of Saskatchewan
Title: Functional Genomics of Abiotic Stress in Wheat and Canola Crops.
Dr. Scoles and his team of scientists from across the country will study
the way crops tolerate cold, salinity and other nonbiological stresses.
They will work with wheat and canola, examining the whole plant and
studying these crops at the molecular level. Determining what proteins
and genes are involved in regulating a plant’s response to low
temperatures could provide critical information for farmers. The team
will collect expressed sequence tags (gene markers) from cold-responding
wheat. The researchers will also study canola’s response to metal and
nutrient stresses. The work has the potential to improve agricultural
productivity in Canada and around the world.
By region                                      Ontario Genomics Institute




Ontario Genomics Institute

1. Health • Janet Rossant • Samuel Lunenfeld Research Institute
Title: Functional Genomics and Proteomics of Model Organisms
Proteomics – the study of proteins and their function – is the next
critical wave of genomics research. Dr. Rossant’s project at the Samuel
Lunenfeld Research Institute will study the function of proteins in a
variety of organisms, from bacteria to yeast cells, nematodes (worms),
fruit flies and genetically modified mice. The projects will identify and
characterize protein complexes and protein interactions with other
proteins.

2. GELS • Peter A. Singer • University of Toronto
Title: Canadian Program on Genomics and Global Health
The vision of this research team of Canadian and international scientists
is to optimize the global health benefits and minimize the risks of
advances in genomics through careful social evaluation of these
advances as they occur. The team will anticipate the social implications
of particular technologies before stakeholders’ positions become
deeply entrenched. The program will examine the implications of
genomics/biotechnology for one of the greatest ethical challenges in the
world today—the enormous disparities in global health. They will study
the biotechnology policies of governments in developing countries and
examine their ability to exploit new technologies for the health of their
population; look at multinational corporations’ decision-making on
health-related genomics/biotechnology; identify best practices for the
introduction of vaccines, nutrients and drugs in plants; and gather inter-
national perspectives on regulating genomics research. The researchers
will also examine the impact of genomics on health systems and
insurance, and study issues surrounding transgenic animals. The team
hopes to develop best practice guidelines for governments, corporations
and technology creators.

3. Health • Lap-Chee Tsui • Hospital for Sick Children
Title: Genetic Determinants of Human Health and Disease: Annotation of
Chromosome 7
Dr. Tsui and his team at Toronto’s Hospital for Sick Children are interested
in analyzing one chromosome – human chromosome 7 – and its
influence on human disease. The group has been undertaking a systematic
analysis of chromosome 7 for the past 15 years and proposes to expand
their work by: identifying the remaining gaps and contributing to the
completion of the entire sequence, constructing a gene index map,
performing detailed analysis of regions of biological interest, developing
a comprehensive genetic map and building analytical and computational
tools for annotation of chromosome 7 sequence.
By region                                     Ontario Genomics Institute




4. Science and Technology Platform • Jack Greenblatt • University
  of Toronto
Title: Proteomics Technology Core Facility
The Proteomics Technology Core will include facilities to identify
proteins (Protein Identification Core) and to allow researchers to develop
new technologies for structural proteomics (Structural Proteomics Core).
The Protein Identification Core will be situated in three facilities on
University Avenue, at the University of Toronto, the Hospital for Sick
Children and the Samuel Lunenfeld Research Institute. The Structural
Proteomics Core, also on University Avenue, will be a collaborative
project between the University Health Network and the University
of Toronto.

5. Science and Technology Platform • Stephen Scherer • University
  of Toronto
Title: Genome Resource Core Facility
The Genome Resource Core’s mandate is to establish a world-class
laboratory with the infrastructure necessary to facilitate innovative
research in genomics. This world-class facility will allow researchers to
isolate and characterize genes involved in particular diseases. National
and international researchers will benefit from the expertise and
resources of this centre.
By region                                                  Genome Québec




Genome Québec

1. Health • John J.M. Bergeron • McGill University
Title: Montreal Network for Pharmaco-Proteomics and Structural Genomics
The aim of this project is to set up a facility to allow researchers to inves-
tigate the function and structure of genes and proteins that can be used
in developing new drugs. The facility will emphasize protein mapping,
identification and characterization. One project, the cell map, involves
mapping and characterizing proteins and how they are associated with
all parts of a cell. Another project, molecular machines, involves using
assays to map and validate protein interactions with other proteins, and
the third, structural genomics, analyzes the structures of key proteins.
The project will bring together investigators who use biochemical, cell
biological, genomics, engineering, DNA chip technology, protein
sequence analysis, and X-ray crystallography, among other innovative
disciplines and technologies.

2. Health • Howard Bussey • McGill University
Title: Projects in Functional Genomics using Model Organisms
Dr. Bussey intends to study genes and proteins from model organisms on
a large scale. The McGill team will characterize 5,000 mutations in
S. cerevisize, and cross mutant strains to one another to identify poten-
tial lethality. The researchers will use genes from yeast, fruit flies and
worms to study interactions between proteins.

3. Health • Thomas J. Hudson • McGill University
Title: Regulatory Genetics: Identification of Regulatory Polymorphisms in the
Human Genome.
Dr. Hudson and his team at McGill University have set out to identify
regulatory polymorphisms in the human genome – genes that regulate
our susceptibility to common diseases. They will use three different
approaches to screen 1,000 candidate genes. When they have spotted
potential candidates, they will validate them and study their function by
inserting them into transgenic mice. The team will also construct a
specialized database to store their data and make it available to the
public through the Internet.
By region                                                 Genome Québec




4. GELS • Bartha Maria Knoppers • Université de Montréal
Title: Genomics in Society: Responsibilities and Rights
This project involves researchers at universities throughout Québec, who
will examine the ethical, legal and social issues involved in two
broad areas: population research and accountability. The first research
component includes the study of: DNA sampling, banking, other uses as
well as, transfer and confidentiality mechanisms in order to develop and
propose standardization and harmonization of approaches. The second
research component on accountability will examine the issues of
professional responsibility and liability for the communication of
genetic information for reproductive counseling, for recruitment,
confidentiality, follow-up, and communication with the public as well as
for oversight mechanisms for all genomics research. They will also look at
issues surrounding the creation and use of transgenic animals and plants
in research and medical treatment, the preservation of biodiversity, and
the protection of the environment. The project will involve comparing
international policies and reviews on the issues, using focus groups and
interviews, and ethical analysis. The research team will also update the
HumGen website that provides information on these topics, and will
create a think tank and rapid action response team to respond to
researchers’ ethical concerns about genetic research. The project will
also create a second Internet site, called TransGen, to address the
scientific, ethical and legal issues surrounding the genetic manipulation
of plants and animals.

5. Health • Fernand Labrie • Centre de Recherche du CHUL
Title: Atlas of Genomic Profiles of Steroid Action
Dr. Labrie and his team will study the changes in gene expression that
occur with steroid treatment. Using mouse organs and cells, they will
determine the patterns that occur when steroid hormones are present
and absent, and where they mediate hormone action. They will identify
hormone-regulated proteins and will map the cell types responsible for
changes in transcription – the process by which RNA is synthesized from
DNA. Using novel bioinformatics techniques, the researchers will link
datasets and information about the function of proteins, linking them to
the location of chromosomes. The team will develop a package of data-
base, analysis and visualization software to integrate data from various
sources. The researchers will also develop models and tools to evaluate
models to assess gene candidates, which play roles in regulating steroids.

6. Science and Technology Platform • Thomas J. Hudson • McGill
  University
Title: The Montreal Genomics Node of Excellence
The Montreal Genomics Node is an organization that includes scientific
research groups from McGill University, Université de Montréal, Centre
hospitalier de l’Université de Montréal, and the NRC Biotechnology
Research Institute. Most of the equipment and administration for this
facility will be housed on the McGill campus. The other institutions will
host other key activities. Among them will be a technology consortium,
a bioinformatics network and a component which will offer genotyping,
sequencing, the production of DNA chips, mass spectrometry analysis
and informatics services to groups outside of the large-scale projects.
By regions                                               Genome Atlantic




Genome Atlantic

1. Environment • W. Ford Doolittle • Dalhousie University
Title: Understanding Prokaryotic Genome Evolution and Diversity

Dr. Doolittle and his international and domestic collaborators are
investigating the genomes of prokaryotes – organisms (like bacteria)
characterized by the absence of a nuclear membrane and by DNA that
is not organized into chromosomes. The goal of the research is to
understand the evolution of prokaryotes and the role that the lateral
transfer of genes or blocks of genes between lineages and species plays
in the evolution and adaptation of prokaryotes. The investigations
assume that the processes that have shaped the evolution of these
bacteria are fundamentally different from the way other organisms have
evolved. The researchers will develop new statistical tools for analyzing
the genome sequence data for prokaryotes and interpreting data that are
of universal interest to students of evolutionary biology.

2. Health • Michael Gray • Dalhousie University
Title: The Protist EST Program

Protists are unicellular organisms. This project intends to determine the
protein-coding capacity of a wide variety of protists, by sequencing DNA
libraries. The project will obtain extensive data and express sequencing
tags, or gene markers, from more than 20 of these organisms. Dr. Gray
and his team hope the data will provide answers to major evolutionary
questions at each stage of the cell’s evolution and the evolution of
corresponding genes. The project will include the creation of a database,
located and operated through the University of Montreal.

3. Science and Technology Platform• Genome Atlantic
Title: DNA Sequencing Facility

This Centre will combine its resources with an existing facility at the
NRC’s Institute for Marine Biosciences, creating a single, seamless
facility, which will support research on DNA sequencing. The facility will
include a lab information management system.