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					Raising standards, improving lives

 Middle School Conference

 The new Ofsted framework
 Ceri Morgan HMI.




 February 2010
Raising standards, improving lives
Overview of the session
   Overview of the revised inspection
    arrangements, including
      attainment
      safeguarding
   Key features relating to the inspection of
    teaching, learning and the use of assessment
    and ‘what inspectors look for’
Raising standards, improving lives

 Figure 1: Overall effectiveness of schools inspected between September 2007 and July 2008
 (percentage of schools)


    Middle deemed primary schools (28)       7     54                  36       4

    All primary schools, excluding middle
                                              13     50                33       4
               deemed (6047)




  Middle deemed secondary schools (88)        14   38             40        9

  All secondary schools, excluding middle
                                              17     40           34        9
              deemed (1064)

                     Outstanding            Good   Satisfactory    Inadequate




    Percentages are rounded and do not always add exactly to 100.
    Figures in brackets indicate the number of schools inspected.
Raising standards, improving lives
An overview of the revised
inspection arrangements



February 2010
Raising standards, improving lives
The revised Framework gives priority to:
   proportionality
   promoting improvement: inspectors make specific recommendations
    based on their diagnosis of the school’s strengths and weaknesses
   evaluating the achievement & well-being of pupils & assessing the
    extent to which schools ensure that all pupils, including those most at
    risk, succeed
   evaluating learning and teaching and the use of assessment to
    support learning; focusing on the classroom
   evaluating the effectiveness of leadership and management and the
    school’s capacity to improve
   a strong focus on users: engaging school’s staff in dialogue
    throughout the inspection; better engagement with pupils and parents
Raising standards, improving lives
Attainment
inspectors should take account of
   the attainment of the oldest year group for which the school provides,
    up to the end of statutory schooling
using published data as a starting point
   national test and examination results set against national benchmarks
    as indicated in RAISEonline
   patterns in the data over the last three years, noting particularly any
    evidence of performance significantly (as shown in RAISEonline) above
    or below the national average
   attainment of different groups, including boys, girls, minority ethnic
    pupils, looked after children, pupils eligible for free school meals and
    other groups identified by the school
and where relevant
   the extent to which specialist subject attainment targets have been met
Raising standards, improving lives
Attainment: using other information to get the full picture
 Test and examination results available in school but not yet
  validated or benchmarked nationally
 Current attainment, including:
     school data, including results of, for example, optional
      standard assessment tests (SATs), GCSE module tests and
      moderated coursework
     the school’s track record in assessing standards of
      attainment, including the accuracy of previously predicted
      grades and the quality of teacher assessment
     standard of attainment confirmed by pupils’ current work
Raising standards, improving lives
Attainment: weighing all the evidence
   The judgement about attainment is based largely on the published
    data, but …
   Where possible, an up-to-date insight into the current standards of
    pupils work should be used to explore patterns in the historical data
    - for instance to confirm that low attainment by a particular group
    in a previous year was an isolated occurrence
   If there is compelling evidence that current attainment is
    substantially different from the historical data, it should inform the
    judgement

Track record – performance of groups – observation of current practice
Raising standards, improving lives
Learning and progress
‘The starting point … is the quality of learning experienced by the pupils across
    the school’
The judgement takes account of how well pupils:
   acquire knowledge, develop their understanding, learn and practise skills
    and develop their competence as learners across a range of subjects
   enjoy their learning as shown by their interest, enthusiasm and
    engagement across a range of subjects
   make progress relative to their starting points, using contextual value-
    added and other value-added measures
   with special educational needs and/or disabilities make progress relative to
    their starting points
Raising standards, improving lives
Learning and progress

What do we know about past progress? Evidence from data up to 3
  previous years
   contextual value-added data for the school overall (and the learning achievement tracker
    for post-16) as indicated in RAISEonline (and the sixth form PANDA)
   data presented by the school, including information provided by external bodies – for
    example FFT
   any analysis of past progress carried out by the school including whether pupils reach
    challenging targets


What do we know about current progress? Evidence drawn from:
   pupils’ records
   any analysis of progress carried out by the school, including the progress made by
    different groups of pupils
   lesson observations
Raising standards, improving lives
Learning and progress
What contributes to the overall judgement?
   The overall judgement about learning and progress is determined
    by the full range and weight of evidence about:
       the quality of learning
       past progress
       current progress

   It is about more than the most recent set of examination results -
    the new framework sets CVA and other value-added measures in
    the context of actual learning in the school
Raising standards, improving lives
Achievement
 This judgement takes account of the pupils’ attainment
  and the quality of learning and progress - for all pupils
  and for pupils with special educational needs and/or
  disabilities
 Inspectors make this judgement after making the
  judgements on attainment and learning and progress
 The evaluation schedule explains:
    how this is done
    the impact of the judgement on achievement on the
     overall effectiveness judgement
Raising standards, improving lives
Scenarios to consider…
If attainment is low (grade 4) but learning and progress are
    outstanding (grade 1), achievement may be graded …
     2 (good) - if the majority of the other outcomes for pupils are
       outstanding the school could be judged to be an outstanding
       (grade 1) school.

If attainment is average (grade 3) but learning and progress are good
    (grade 2), achievement may be …
     2 (good) - again, if the majority of the other outcomes for pupils
       are outstanding the school could be judged to be an outstanding
       (grade 1) school.
Raising standards, improving lives
Scenarios to consider…
   In a high attaining school there is no guarantee that overall
    effectiveness will be judged outstanding – this would usually only be
    considered when …
       the effectiveness with which the school promotes equal
        opportunity and tackles discrimination
     the quality of pupils’ learning and progress
     the school’s capacity for sustained improvement
    are at least good … and
     the majority of judgements about the quality of provision are
        outstanding

   Finally - the term ‘likely to’ is used in the evaluation schedule – there is
    a strong emphasis on the importance of inspectors weighing the
    balance of evidence and applying their professional judgement within
    the context of the school
Raising standards, improving lives
Section 5 safeguarding judgement takes account of:
   The effectiveness of the school’s arrangements, including links with
    key agencies, for ensuring the safety of its pupils
Including –
      clear policies and strategies for ensuring the safeguarding and
       welfare of children
      clear management responsibilities – designated staff
      appropriate recruitment and vetting
      up-to-date high quality training for staff
      encouragement of reporting about poor/abusive practices
      reasonable steps to ensure pupils’ safety
      identification of concerns about possible abuse or neglect
      effective recoding of information relevant to safeguarding
       concerns
      support for pupils to keep themselves safe
Raising standards, improving lives
Demonstrating effectiveness
 How safe are your pupils, and:
   how do you know that pupils feel safe and know what this
      means – any examples of improvements made?
     how do you know that pupils use safe working practices?
     how can you show robust risk assessment especially for the
      vulnerable pupils?
     how can you show effective working with the LSCB – and what
      impact has it had?
     how can you show safeguarding is prioritised – in business
      plans? Staff training?
Raising standards, improving lives
Scenarios - outstanding primary school practice
   Strong culture of partnership with all local agencies
   All safeguarding provision viewed from the perspective of the
    learners. CYP know who they can turn to if they have an issue
    of concern and see the school as a haven
   Parents’ views sought regularly and any issues raised dealt with
    promptly and effectively
   Robust risk assessment of vulnerable pupils and vulnerable
    situations
   Yet open and welcoming school which uses CRB checks
    positively and as a route to other opportunities for
    volunteers/helpers
Raising standards, improving lives
Scenarios - a case study of inadequate safeguarding
   Pupils’ views (more than 20% of those surveyed) confirm that they do
    not feel safe at school
   Bullying incidents are not dealt with well and CYP report little action
    when incidents are disclosed
   Parents’ views often dismissed or underplayed – little support to keep
    themselves safe
   Climate in the school supports these views
          safeguarding is not taken seriously – little attempt to ensure
           that children are safe
          little or no risk assessment
          safeguarding training for staff not sufficiently prioritised
          vetting and barring inadequate
          safeguarding regulations and duties not met
Raising standards, improving lives
Key features relating to the
inspection of teaching, learning and
the use of assessment and ‘what
inspectors look for’


26 January 2010
Raising standards, improving lives
Inspection approach: teaching, learning & the
  use of assessment
   Higher expectations: a new judgement about the leadership
    and management of teaching and learning
   A greater emphasis on the impact of teaching - and the use
    of assessment - on outcomes for different groups of pupils
   The key leadership & management judgement looks at
    leaders’ and managers’ success at all levels in embedding
    ambition and driving improvements
   More explicit expectations for governors and an enhanced
    judgement about governance
Raising standards, improving lives
Inspection approach: teaching, learning & the
  use of assessment
Capacity to improve: 3 clear strands which feed into the final
  judgement about the school’s overall effectiveness -
      the school’s track record in improving provision
       especially teaching and assessment and
       outcomes for pupils since the last inspection
      the quality of whole school self-evaluation
      the effectiveness of leadership and management -
       especially in tackling weaknesses in teaching and the
       use of assessment
Raising standards, improving lives
What inspectors look for – teaching, learning
 and the use of assessment
Inspectors evaluate
   how well teaching promotes learning, progress and
    enjoyment for all pupils
   how well assessment is used to meet the needs of all
    pupils
Inspectors consider
   the school’s monitoring information as well as their own
    observations
Raising standards, improving lives
What inspectors look for
 Inspectors do not prescribe the approach to
  assessment that a school should use
 Inspectors consider whether the school’s methods are
  effective and how well schools:
      make reliable judgements about pupils’ attainment, learning
       and progress
      use diagnostic information about pupils’ learning and
       progress to improve planning, teaching and learning
      track pupils’ progress
Raising standards, improving lives
What inspectors look for – some features
Inspectors take into account the extent to which:
   teachers and other adults have high expectations of all pupils
   lesson planning is linked to a current assessment of pupils’ prior
    learning and is differentiated
   teachers and adults ensure that pupils know how well they are doing
   effective questioning is used to gauge pupils’ understanding and
    reshape explanations and tasks where this is needed
   teachers and adults assess pupils’ progress accurately
   teachers and adults are alert to pupils’ lack of understanding during a
    lesson i.e. they use assessment in individual lessons to help pupils who
    are ‘struggling’
Raising standards, improving lives
What inspectors look for - impact on
 outcomes for pupils
   Inspectors will investigate whether any system being used is
    effective in promoting better learning; for example, by helping
    to set a clear direction for learners’ next steps
   Inspectors will not assume that any one system is ‘good
    practice’ in itself; even a system which has many strengths may
    be used ineffectively by some teachers
   Inspectors will ‘credit’ a school where the strategy being used
    is applied consistently and effectively.
   Inspectors will not prescribe how learners should be assessed
Raising standards, improving lives
Self-evaluation: basic questions to address
How good is your provision and how do you know?
This might translate to:
   Achievement – does the school take sufficient account of
    learning/progress and attainment - for all pupils and groups?
   Teaching – does the leadership carry out sufficient monitoring and
    take rigorous action to ensure that teaching promotes effective
    learning for all pupils?
   Assessment – how well do assessment in the classroom and the
    school’s systems promote better learning and progress – and
    ultimately, raise attainment?
   Safeguarding - does the school takes pupils’ fears seriously, try to
    address them through robust action, rigorous monitoring and by
    listening to their views and those of their parents?
Raising standards, improving lives
Main inspection documents:
http://www.ofsted.gov.uk/Ofsted-home/Forms-and-
   guidance/Browse-all-by/Education-and-skills/Schools/Main-
   inspection-documents-for-inspectors
Safeguarding guidance:
http://www.ofsted.gov.uk/Ofsted-home/Forms-and-
   guidance/Browse-all-by/Education-and-
   skills/Schools/Supplementary-guidance-and-resources
Safeguarding FAQs:
http://intranet/NR/rdonlyres/F9AFA750-375D-4917-BF98-
   B9D727832AFF/0/safeguarding_FAQ_181109.doc

				
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