BOARD OF REGENTS OF THE UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN SYSTEM

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					  BOARD OF REGENTS OF THE UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN SYSTEM



                       Minutes of the Meeting

                            April 6, 2000
                             11:15 a.m.
                           Room 325/326
                          The Pyle Center
                         702 Langdon Street
                         Madison, Wisconsin




UW - STEVENS POINT ENROLLMENT PLAN 2001-2007…………………………..……………..1

UW - COLLEGES ENROLLMENT PLAN 2001-2007………………………………..……..………..4
   BOARD OF REGENTS OF THE UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN SYSTEM



                                 Minutes of the Meeting

                                      April 6, 2000
                                       11:15 a.m.
                                     Room 325/326
                                    The Pyle Center
                                   702 Langdon Street
                                   Madison, Wisconsin



Present: Regents Alexander, Axtell, Barry, Boyle, Brandes, De Simone, Gottschalk,
Gracz, Marcovich, Mohs, Olivieri, Orr, Randall and Smith

Unable to Attend: Regents Benson, James and MacNeil



                           - Regent President Orr presiding -


UW-Stevens Point Enrollment Plan 2001-2007

       Chancellor Thomas George presented UW-Stevens Point's plan, which is titled
"Central Wisconsin Idea: Partnerships". The plan has three main themes: 1)
Commitment to traditional students; 2) Enhanced access for adult learners; and 3)
Strengthening Central Wisconsin's workforce and economy.

        In the area of serving traditional students, the chancellor noted that freshman ACT
scores continue to rise. In 1999 they averaged 22.8 for all students and 21.5 for minority
students. Similarly, the fall 1999 freshman class included 40 valedictorians, up from 21
in 1998. Student retention rates from spring 1999 to fall 1999 were 83% overall and 74%
for minority students. The goal is to increase those rates and to move the percentage for
minority students up to that of other students.

        Plan 2008 goals include: 1) Increasing the ethnic diversity of the student
population with an emphasis on student retention; 2) increasing the ethnic diversity of the
faculty; 3) helping multicultural students succeed academically, emotionally, and
socially; 4) educating the campus and surrounding community on the value of diversity;
and 5) creating a more respectful and comfortable climate for all to live and work.
               Minutes of the Board of Regents Joint Meeting with Wisconsin Technical College System Board, April 6, 2000



        The six-year graduation rate at UW-Stevens Pont is 55%, which is tied with UW-
Eau Claire for first place in the comprehensive universities. Only UW-Madison has a
higher rate. The minority student graduation rate of 34% compares with an average of
28% for the UW comprehensive universities.

         The university's plan includes three categories of partnerships: 1) Partnerships
with regional institutions in collaborative degree programs, which leads to growth in job
skills; 2) Partnership with regional, national, and international business in the
Communivercity Park, which leads to job growth; and 3) Partnership with foundations
and agencies in the Global Environmental Management Education Center, which leads to
growth of international activity.

        Chancellor George noted that adult students have significant geographical and
time constraints, face rising employer expectations, want increased employability
options, and want increased income levels. With an average per capita income ranging
from $20,000 to $24,800 in Wood, Marathon and Portage Counties, adult learners do not
have a great deal of money to spend for coursework. In addition, UW-Stevens Point
delivers programs and courses to teachers in the largest K-12 district in the state,
stretching 159 miles from Portage to Rhinelander and 91 miles from Marshfield to
Shawano. A number of corporations are involved in collaborative degree programs,
including Sunrise Medical, Consolidated Paper, Sentry Insurance, Rice Clinic,
Weyerhaeuser Paper, the Marshfield Clinic, Figi's Greenheck Fan, Pioneer Bank, Wausau
Financial Systems, and Kraft Foods.

        Turning to Communivercity partnerships, Chancellor George cited the following
quote from Regent President San Orr's statement to the Legislature's Joint Committee on
Finance in March 1999. "I believe the UW System is Wisconsin's greatest hope for
continued economic success and its future quality of life. Through… an ever-increasing
number of important partnerships with Wisconsin business and industry, and the sheer
volume of capable graduates who enter the state's work force each year…the UW System
Is crucial to our success as a state and a people." In that regard, the Chancellor noted that
Lands End came to Stevens Point because of the presence of the university. It is
projected to employ 1,000 people by 2005, and more business partners are being sought.

        With respect to target enrollment numbers, UW-Stevens Point plans growth from
7717 FTE students in fall 1999 to 7793 students in fall 2007. The increase will be in
adult access.

        Chancellor George introduced Provost Bill Meyer to speak about the UW-Stevens
Point's collaborative degree programs. In 1997, the university conducted a survey of area
businesses. Of 1,054 responses, 79% were interested in a degree, and of that percentage,
91% indicated that they were likely to enroll. Since the program was launched in the
spring of 1998, 246 students have participated. Those students have an average age of
33, and a range in age from 20-73. Fifty-seven percent are females, and over 80% are
employed full time.




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               Minutes of the Board of Regents Joint Meeting with Wisconsin Technical College System Board, April 6, 2000



       Future plans include expanding cooperative degree program offerings and
extending them to more sites. Program offerings today are in Business Administration
and General Studies. In the future, the university hopes to offer Computer Information
Systems and Technology and New Media Arts. Access sites currently are located in
Wausau, Marshfield, and Stevens Point. In the future, the university hopes to add sites in
Wisconsin Rapids (at Mid-State Technical College) and Waupaca (at Waupaca High
School).

        In partnerships with K-12 education, graduate program opportunities will be
expanded to new sites. Other plans include instruction in integrating technology into the
curriculum, summer institutes for science teachers, and professional development for new
teachers. All of these will have a positive impact on the Central Wisconsin work force.

       Current offerings in certificate programs include PAPER Academy technical and
management certificates. Offerings in technology and leadership are being piloted.
Potential future offerings include health promotion/safety, medical technology, computer
mediated communications, and computer science.

        Describing plans for a Communivercity Park, Chancellor George said that its
mission is: "to provide a high-quality environment for the development of a training
center and a location for enterprises that would add value to the existing socio-economic
base of Central Wisconsin." The goals of the park would be to provide: 1) an
environment for faculty/private sector collaboration; 2) a teaching/learning training
center with Mid-State Technical College; 3) a friendly environment to encourage
new/expanded business ventures; 4) employment opportunities for students and
graduates; 5) venture capital opportunities; 6) shared services - counsel, direction,
expertise; 7) a high-tech facility for the 21st century; and 8) to determine and obtain a
revenue stream.

        The idea for the park was generated by a task force, formed in 1998, consisting of
UW-Stevens Point, Mid-State Technical College, the Portage County Business Council,
and county and city leadership. The group reviewed business parks at UW-Stout and
Southern Illinois University at Edwardsville. In 1999 a firm was employed to survey
Central Wisconsin businesses and faculty at UW-Stevens Point, UW-Marshfield and
UW-Marathon County. Survey data confirmed support for teaching, learning, and
training space development, and support for a 5,000 - 7,500 square foot incubator and
multi-tenant facility. A focus group was formed to identify training needs requested by
area businesses and to discuss training delivery.

        The Communivercity Park will promote improved economic development
through: training partnerships, workforce improvement, business expansion, graduate
placement, patent and licensing support, and establishing a multi-tenant facility. Next
steps will be to determine revenue sources for a training center, funding options for a
multi-tenant facility, discussion with UW System legal counsel and WiSys experts on
patents and licensing; and work with the Portage County Business Park to attract outside
firms.



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               Minutes of the Board of Regents Joint Meeting with Wisconsin Technical College System Board, April 6, 2000



        With regard to international partnerships, Chancellor George noted UW-Stevens
Point's longstanding relationship with Jagiellonian University in Poland. UW-Stevens
Point also has a dual degree program in computer information systems with Germany's
Magdeburg University. UW-Stevens Point ranked 13th among comprehensive
universities in the country for the number and percentage of students studying overseas in
1998-99. In 1999-2000, UW-Stevens Point's 427 participants made up the largest group
in the 30-year history of the university's international program. This is the highest
number among the UW comprehensive campuses. The enrollment of foreign students at
UW-Stevens Point is over 230, the highest among the UW comprehensive campuses.
Eighty percent of these students come from Asia, the five leading countries being
Singapore, Japan, Korea, Indonesia and Hong Kong. Foreign students contribute $4.6
million per year to the local economy, which translates to $11.5 per year, if a 2.5
multiplier is used.

        Chancellor George introduced Dean Victor Phillips, of the College of Natural
Resources, to speak about Global Environmental Management Education. The purpose
of the planned center is to build partnerships through education for a sustainable future.
Dean Phillips remarked that the College of Natural Resources at UW-Stevens Point is a
premier institution for this type of education. It has won numerous awards and, along
with Colorado State University's natural resources college, has the highest undergraduate
enrollment in the nation (about 1400). Programs in the College of Natural Resources
take an integrated approach and a holistic view, combined with hands-on practical
training and valuing Wisconsin's strong conservation heritage. Another main attribute of
the college is its international programs in which 2500 students and all faculty have
participated.

         The GEM Center unifies the college's vision of the future, including a world class
facility, public and private sector partnerships, internet global village classrooms, and
interactive programs. The focus of the Center is on education, rather than technical
assistance. Broadened student experiences will equal better preparation for jobs in
Wisconsin, and increased international contacts will result in more opportunities in the
global marketplace.

        Noting that Wisconsin aspires to be a leader in that marketplace, Dean Phillips
referred to Governor Thompson's global initiatives, including the Wisconsin International
Trade Center and W3 - Wisconsin Works Worldwide. The planned GEM Education
Center would fit into these plans. Noting that partnerships and support are crucial to the
center, Dean Phillips indicated there is strong potential for non-state dollars from private
industry, private foundations, natural resource agencies, federal sources, and non-
governmental organizations.

       It is hoped that the GEM Center will be constructed and fully operational by
2010. Expected outcomes are expansion of job opportunities, global perspective for
managing Wisconsin's resources, expansion of Wisconsin's conservation ethic, cultural
enrichment, and enhanced outreach and partnering with Wisconsin businesses.




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               Minutes of the Board of Regents Joint Meeting with Wisconsin Technical College System Board, April 6, 2000



        The concept of the GEM Center is exciting, Regent Axtell commented, noting
that, with provision for distance education, there would be opportunity to import and
export courses from anywhere, including overseas, and for obtaining revenues by doing
so. He inquired about similar centers around the UW System in other disciplines. Senior
Vice President Ward replied that there are some in existence and cited as an example the
UW-Oshkosh Center for Family Businesses.

        Regent Olivieri asked if there is a distance education component to the
collaborative degree programs. Replying in the affirmative, Chancellor George said that
about 30% involve distance education. Faculty also travel to education sites, with most
courses being held in the evening. Regent Olivieri asked if employers pay for the
courses, to which Provost Meyer replied that over 50% of the courses are paid for by
employers. In response to a question by Regent Olivieri about areas in which distance
education is used, Chancellor George replied that it is used in teacher education and also
in some short courses. He added that on-line programs will generate revenue eventually,
after recovering up-front investments.



UW Colleges Enrollment Plan 2001-2007

        Chancellor William Messner began the presentation by noting that the goal of the
UW Colleges has been to clarify their niche in the educational environment. To that end,
the Colleges adopted "The Best Start" as their slogan. As institutions of access, the
Colleges provide the best start to a degree for a wide range of students. When they
transfer, UW College students fare better in UW 4-year institutions than other transfer
students, including those from other parts of the UW System. It is the goal of the UW
Colleges to be recognized as the premier provider of general education, because that is
the specialty of UW College faculty.

       The goals of the UW College's enrollment plan are: 1) to maintain the traditional
student base; and 2) to aggressively expand the non-traditional student base.

         The traditional student base will be maintained through providing a number of
benefits that students value: 1) a small campus experience, including ample opportunity
to interact with faculty, and a place where students are known and feel comfortable; 2)
Guaranteed transfer to other UW institutions to complete their degrees. (1100 students
have participated so far in this successful program). 3) Leveraging the advantages of
institutional size.

       The numbers of non-traditional students will be expanded through: 1) Vital and
innovative programs, including certificate programs; 2) collaborative partnerships; and 3)
distance learning.




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               Minutes of the Board of Regents Joint Meeting with Wisconsin Technical College System Board, April 6, 2000



       Turning to enrollment history, the Chancellor noted that from 1993-1996, the
Colleges lost 20% of their enrollment. This loss, which was felt across all campuses, has
been made up since 1997. Now the Colleges rank second in the UW System in the
number of new freshmen (3700) and third in overall headcount undergraduate enrollment
(11,000).

       For Enrollment Management 3 (1995-2000), the FTE objective was 7,538. For
EM 21, the Colleges are setting a conservatively estimated goal of 8,241, a nine percent
increase. This would be accomplished by an increase of three percent in traditional
students and a 43% increase in non-traditional students. While this would be a nine
percent increase over the EM 3 target, it is a seven percent increase over actual
enrollments.

         Chancellor Messner then outlined several strategies that will be employed to
achieve the enrollment goals, the first being expanded collaborations with other UW
institutions. Nine UW College campuses currently offer collaborative degrees with UW
baccalaureate institutions. Currently there are collaborative programs with UW-Stout,
Eau Claire, Oshkosh, Stevens Point and Milwaukee. Planned collaborations include an
engineering program to be offered through collaboration among the UW Fox Valley,
UW-Platteville and UW-Oshkosh, and a BA Degree offered collaboratively by UW
Manitowoc and UW-Milwaukee. The goal is for all College campuses to have
collaborative programs with baccalaureate institutions, with some graduate and certificate
programs included in the future.

        The second strategy is effective use of resources, the first of which is distance
learning. There currently are enrollments of 400 in online courses and 800 in compressed
video courses. Enrollments in both areas have grown rapidly, and the Colleges plan to
work with Learning Innovations to expand online offerings. The second key resource is
faculty. Because the Colleges have the oldest faculty in the UW System, with an average
age of 50, there will be the opportunity to hire record numbers of new faculty in the
coming years. In doing so, the Colleges will look for faculty with skills in learning
technology and with interest in flexible scheduling and working with non-traditional
students. Professional development also will be provided to current faculty.

        The third strategy is to meet the needs of non-traditional students. In this regard,
evening classes have increased by 21% in the past two years, and 11 of 13 campuses
offer AAS programs totally in the evening. Because non-traditional students want
services as well as programs, advisors will be put in place to recruit, advise and retain
adult students, using monies provided in the current biennial budget. For the next
biennium, there will be a request for funds to provide multiple delivery systems to
support adult students and also to provide computer labs, libraries, and tutoring.

        The fourth strategy involves outreach, including expansion of diversity through
pre-college programs. Two hundred and fifty-four students participated in 1998-99 pre-
college programming. Three new programs in 1999-2000 are estimated to serve about
120 more students: UW-Fox Valley program (June 2000), UW-Marinette/College of the



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               Minutes of the Board of Regents Joint Meeting with Wisconsin Technical College System Board, April 6, 2000



Menominee Nation Joint Pre-college program (November 1999), and UW-Washington
County Bilingual Science and Art Pre-college Program (December 1999). Next year, an
additional $160,000 will be provided to mount more programs; and the UW Colleges will
continue to work with UW-Milwaukee on diversity initiatives.

       Another expanding outreach effort is the Youth for Understanding program,
which involved 70 students at UW-Richland and 42 students at UW-Marinette in 1999-
2000. The program will be expanded to UW-Fox Valley this year with 20 participants.

       High school initiatives include the Youth Options program, with 558 students
(192 FTE) in 1999-2000, and the Academic Alliance, with 25 students at UW-Richland.

       Concluding the presentation, Chancellor Messner noted that the UW Colleges
enrollment plans are in the best interest of their local communities and can play an
important part in brain-gain strategy, especially in the adult market.


        In discussion following the presentation, Regent Alexander inquired about why
more students do not participate in the guaranteed transfer program. In reply, Chancellor
Messner explained that the program requires that a student identify the institution to
which they wish to transfer within the first 30 credits, and some students do not make that
decision until later. However, participation in the program is not required in order to
transfer successfully.

       Regent Alexander noted that 30% of students at the UW-Barron County are on
academic probation and asked how the Colleges deal with this type of a problem.
Chancellor Messner indicated that 30% is an unusually high figure but that the Colleges
do have higher rates of students on probation simply because they admit students who are
less well prepared. The faculty is looking at the situation and crafting solutions,
including advising for better course placement.

         Stating that he is impressed with the success of the UW Colleges marketing
efforts, Regent Olivieri asked if there are any remaining problems in transfer of students
to the four-year institutions. Chancellor Messner replied that transfer has worked much
more smoothly in the last three-five years, partly because of the guaranteed transfer
program and partly because the institutions simply are working better together.

       In response to a question by Regent Olivieri as to the reasons for continuing
growth in use of compressed video, Chancellor Messner remarked that one reason for its
popularity is that, unlike on-line courses, students can participate in compressed video
without needing to embrace the technology. Another reason is that on-line learning is
much different from a classroom and not appropriate for all students, although on-line
enrollments are expected to grow to about 1000 in the future. Provost Marie Wunsch
added that much of the growth in compressed is explained by the fact that it is used to
make courses offered at large campuses available to the smaller campuses.




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               Minutes of the Board of Regents Joint Meeting with Wisconsin Technical College System Board, April 6, 2000



         Asked by Regent Barry to comment on the expanded transfer agreement between
the UW System and the Wisconsin Technical College System, Chancellor Messner said
that it presents many increased opportunities for students, but that the missions of the two
systems need to be kept separate.

       Regent Mohs noted that in recent years, communities have shown a renewed
investment in and appreciation of their College campuses. He asked if that is a factor in
the dramatic enrollment increases, to which Chancellor Messner replied in the
affirmative.

       Regent Smith concluded the discussion by congratulating Chancellor Messner for
the successful articulation and marketing of the UW Colleges’ mission.


       The meeting was adjourned at 12:50 p.m.




                                                                    _____________________________
                                                                         Judith Temby, Secretary




   BOARD OF REGENTS OF THE UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN SYSTEM


               MINUTES OF THE JOINT MEETING WITH THE
             WISCONSIN TECHNICAL COLLEGE SYSTEM BOARD


                                       Thursday, April 6, 2000
                                             3:30 p.m.
                                      Room 325/236 Pyle Center
                                         702 Langdon Street
                                        Madison, Wisconsin




                                                                                                                        7
               Minutes of the Board of Regents Joint Meeting with Wisconsin Technical College System Board, April 6, 2000




INTRODUCTORY REMARKS
 Remarks by Anne Reid, President of the Wisconsin Technical College System Board……………..1
 Remarks by San W. Orr, Jr., President of the Board of Regents……………………………………. 2

MISSION DISCUSSION
 Remarks by Katharine Lyall, President of the University of Wisconsin System……………………2
 Remarks by Edward Chin, State Director of the Wisconsin Technical College System…………….3
 Transfer Working Group Report……………………………………………………………………..4

STATEMENT OF GUIDING PRINCIPLES ON STUDENT TRANSFER……………………...7

BACCALAUREATE DEGREE COMPLETION; MULTI-INSTITUTIONAL ARTICULATION
AGREEMENTS; GENERAL EDUCATION………………………………………………………8

ADL CO-LAB PRESENTATION………………………………………………………………...…9
 Examples of Cooperative Efforts: Chippewa Valley Technical College, UW-Eau Claire,
 UW-Stout………………………………………………………………………………………….…11
 Examples of Cooperative Efforts: UW-Parkside and Gateway Technical College…………………12
 Examples of Cooperative Efforts: Milwaukee Area Technical College and UW-Milwaukee
 Minority Teacher Program………………………………………………………………………….. 13




                                                                                                                        8
   BOARD OF REGENTS OF THE UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN SYSTEM


                       JOINT MEETING WITH THE
             WISCONSIN TECHNICAL COLLEGE SYSTEM BOARD


                                Thursday, April 6, 2000
                                      3:30 p.m.
                               Room 325/236 Pyle Center
                                  702 Langdon Street
                                 Madison, Wisconsin



Present: Regents Alexander, Axtell, Barry, Benson, Boyle, Brandes, DeSimone,
Gottschalk, Gracz, Marcovich, Mohs, Olivieri, Orr, Randall and Smith

Unable to attend: Regents James and MacNeil


                              Regent President Orr presiding


         In opening remarks, Regent President Orr noted that this was an historic meeting -
the first time the two boards have met together in formal session. He introduced Anne
Reid, President of the WTCS Board.


Introductory Remarks


Remarks by Anne Reid, President of the Wisconsin Technical College System Board

        Stating that the WTCS Board was pleased to meet with the Board of Regents,
President Reid noted that, while both boards could take pride in the opportunities
available to Wisconsin students, they have been challenged by the Governor and
Legislature to create a seamless educational system. That challenge has resulted in the
actions that the boards will take today. The vision for the WTCS, she stated, is to be the
premier provider of technical education in the state. She thanked the Transfer Study
Committee for its work and expressed the hope that today's actions would be a first step
toward a more seamless system.
                          Minutes of the Board of Regents Meeting/UW Extension Enrollment Planning 21, April 7, 2000



Remarks by San W. Orr, Jr., President of the Board of Regents

        Regent President Orr explained that this meeting had two main goals: 1) to
discuss and clarify the respective missions of the two educational systems; and 2) to
further the ongoing process of improving students' ability to transfer from one institution
to the other. The following structure for the meeting had been agreed upon:

       Discussion of the respective missions of the two systems will be led by UW
System President Katharine Lyall and Edward Chin, State Director of the Wisconsin
Technical College System. The mission discussion will be followed by a report of the
joint UW/WTCS Transfer Study Committee. After that, the boards will convene
independently to take action on behalf of their respective systems. Once that portion of
the meeting is complete, the two boards will reconvene in joint session to hear
presentations on current WTCS/UW collaborations.


MISSION DISCUSSION


Remarks by Katharine Lyall, President of the University of Wisconsin System

        President Lyall began her remarks by commenting that the citizens of Wisconsin
are justifiably proud of the exceptional quality of post-secondary education in this state,
with both the WTCS and UW Systems enjoying national reputations for excellence. The
purpose of this meeting is to forge new ways to collaborate in order to better serve the
needs of students and the state.

         In undertaking these new initiatives, the two systems will be doing so within the
context of their complimentary missions. The mission of extending knowledge through
excellence in instruction, research and public service is fundamental to every UW
institution, the President explained, although how this excellence is achieved varies by
institution. In addition to an overall mission, each UW institution has its own select
mission that guides its directions and purposes. In addition, while the select mission
defines the uniqueness of an institution in part, academic program array further portrays
the institution's special character. The faculty of each institution, through their role as
primary shapers of the curriculum, determine how the select mission is brought to life.

        The core mission of the two doctoral institutions includes an expectation to
conduct organized programs of research. Their select missions speak to their unique
roles in the UW System. UW-Madison is the state's land grant university, with a
statewide, national and international mission. UW-Milwaukee is a major urban doctoral
university with a mission to meet the diverse needs of Wisconsin's largest metropolitan
area.




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                          Minutes of the Board of Regents Meeting/UW Extension Enrollment Planning 21, April 7, 2000



        The comprehensive institutions offer a core of liberal studies that supports
baccalaureate and masters degrees in the arts, letters and sciences, as well as specialized
professional and technical degrees and pre-professional curriculum. Their mission
includes scholarship and creative endeavor that support their degree programs. Through
their select missions and program array, the comprehensive institutions respond to the
particular needs of their regions and of the state.

        The UW Colleges share the university's overall responsibility to disseminate
knowledge, expand information and enrich culture. Their select mission is to provide
qualified students of all ages and backgrounds with the proficiencies and breadth of
knowledge to prepare them for baccalaureate and professional programs. Finally, UW
Extension's select mission is to provide jointly with other UW institutions and
Wisconsin's counties a program to apply university research, knowledge and resources to
meet the educational needs of the citizens of Wisconsin where they live and work.

         The Wisconsin Idea that the boundaries of the university are the boundaries of the
state has expanded to include a global audience, President Lyall observed. Through
distance education, students around the world now have access to the resources of UW
institutions. In conclusion, she noted that for over 150 years the UW has made a major
contribution in helping the state develop a prosperous economy, a quality environment
and a safe and civil society. It is necessary, she stated, to continue to move forward to
meet the needs of the state and learners everywhere, keeping in mind, as written in
Chapter 36 of the statutes: "That basic to every purpose of the UW System is the search
for truth".



Remarks by Edward Chin, State Director of the Wisconsin Technical College
System

        Stating that this meeting marks an important milestone for post-secondary
education in Wisconsin, Dr. Chin felt the agreement between the boards will foster
creativity to develop programs responsive to student needs. In doing so, each system will
function within its own mission and the whole will be greater than the sum of the parts.
The principle purposes of the Technical College System are to provide: 1) occupational
education, training and retraining programs, including the training of apprentices; and 2)
customized training and technical assistance to business and industry in order to foster
economic development and the expansion of employment opportunities.

         Additional purposes are to: 1) Provide education opportunities for high school
age students; 2) facilitate the transition of secondary school students into postsecondary
vocational education; 3) provide a collegiate transfer program; 4) provide community
services and avocational or self-enrichment activities; 5) provide education in basic
skills; and 6) provide education and services to address barriers created by stereotyping
and discriminating and assist minorities, women and the handicapped or disadvantaged to
participate in the work force.



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                         Minutes of the Board of Regents Meeting/UW Extension Enrollment Planning 21, April 7, 2000



        Dr. Chin pointed out that, under law, the WTCS could not increase college
transfer programming without the approval of the Board of Regents and the UW System
could not do occupational programming without the approval of the WTCS Board. The
WTCS offers a systemwide total of 538 associate degree programs, 57 two-year technical
diploma programs, 278 one-year technical diploma programs, 147 short-term technical
certificates, and three liberal arts transfer programs. In 1998-99, the WTCS institutions
enrolled 57,667 FTE students, only 7 1/2% of whom were enrolled in college parallel
offerings. The WTCS institutions serve students from a wide range of age groups and
backgrounds, including 11,000 college graduates who have enrolled for occupational
upgrading.


Transfer Working Group Report

         Regent President Orr noted a provision in the 1999-2001 biennial budget that
requires the President of the UW System and the Director of the WTCS to submit a report
on efforts made to coordinate transfer credits from the WTCS to the UW System. The
report requires a plan to coordinate the transfer of credits for additional programs and a
timetable for implementing the plan. A Transfer Study Committee was formed to
facilitate response to this mandate and charged to: 1) report on past and current policies
and practices that facilitate transfer of credits for the WTCS students who transfer to UW
system campuses; and 2) develop a plan to further facilitate the transfer of credits.

       To report on the committee's recommendations, Regent President Orr introduced
the Co-Chairs of the Transfer Study Committee: UW System Senior Vice President
David J. Ward and Jim Urness, Assistant State Director for the Wisconsin Technical
College System.

       Assistant Director Urness noted that, as educational requirements in the
workplace have changed and advancement has become more dependent on credentials,
students and employers have come to advocate for improved credit transfer between the
WTCS and UW Systems. Students have two motivations for wanting transfer
opportunities increased: 1) career advancement has become increasingly dependent on
having a baccalaureate degree; and 2) students and parents want to know that they can
build on their postsecondary technical college experience to advance their careers.

       Employers also have two motivations for increasing transfer opportunities: 1)
Employers want to upgrade the management and professional skills of their workers; and
2) employers also want managers and professional staff with stronger technical
backgrounds.

       Mr. Urness noted that, since creation of the WTCS and the UW Systems, transfer
opportunities have been limited. Rather, the goal of state policymakers was to limit
duplication of effort and expenditure by creating two distinct postsecondary education
systems with sharply delineated missions. The UW System's mission is to focus on
teaching, research and service, while the WTCS' mission is to enable students to acquire



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                         Minutes of the Board of Regents Meeting/UW Extension Enrollment Planning 21, April 7, 2000



the occupational skills training necessary for participation in the work force. The WTCS,
Mr. Urness, emphasized, has no desire to change its historic mission.

         The current transfer agreement, ratified by the two boards in 1989, contained the
following key elements: 1) It reaffirmed the mission of each system; 2) it supported
development of program-to-program articulation agreements; 3) it permitted UW
institutions to accept up to 15 credits in general education from WTCS; and 4) it
established joint efforts to counsel students on appropriate postsecondary educational
options.

         Current transfer activity from the WTCS to the UW System involves about 2,600
students each year. WTCS transfers constitute about 18% of all transfers to UW
institutions. In addition, the WTCS and UW institutions have entered into nearly 380
program-to-program articulation agreements to provide transfer opportunities. Groups
who would benefit from improved transfer opportunities include employed individuals
with technical college credit seeking to upgrade and expand the skills and knowledge
they bring to the workplace, and WTCS graduates seeking to complete their
undergraduate education for career advancement and personal enrichment.


       Beginning the second portion of the presentation, Dr. Ward referred to the
biennial budget provision requiring a joint report by July 1, 2000 from the UW System
and the WTCS on current efforts to coordinate transfer of credits from the WTCS to the
UW; a plan to coordinate transfer for additional programs; and a timetable for
implementation of the plan. In response to this requirement, a Transfer Study Committee
was appointed by President Lyall and State Director Chin in January. Governor
Thompson appointed Dr. Karl Hertz as his representative to the committee.

        The Committee recommended: 1) A new statement of principles governing
transfer from the WTCS to the UW System; 2) creation of several new baccalaureate
completion programs; 3) development of multi-institutional articulation agreements; 4)
inclusion of math and science courses in those general education courses eligible for
transfer; and 5) that the UW and WTCS systems work together to seek state support for
the development and implementation of new degrees and marketing efforts.

        The purpose of the Baccalaureate Degree completion programs is to: 1) provide
graduates with an AAS from any of several related WTCS programs with the opportunity
to obtain a baccalaureate degree from a UW System institution; 2) build on the technical
expertise gained by the student at WTCS institutions; and 3) provide upper level major
and professional course work, together with expanded general education in written and
oral communication, mathematics, science, humanities, and social sciences.

         The purpose of multi-institutional articulation agreements, Dr. Ward continued, is
to simplify the complexity of the 378 agreement matrix. While those agreements had laid
the groundwork for transfer opportunity, it now is time to move forward to the multi-
institutional level. These new agreements would: 1) Match the common learning



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                         Minutes of the Board of Regents Meeting/UW Extension Enrollment Planning 21, April 7, 2000



outcomes from similar programs offered at several technical colleges with a related major
at a specific UW institution (such as, ADN to BSN at UW-Green Bay, Childcare and
Development to Early Childhood Education); 2) provide WTCS graduates with an AAS
the opportunity to obtain advanced standing in completing a related UW major at a
specific UW institution.

        The new Statement on Guiding Principles, which would replace the statement
adopted in 1989, reaffirms the historic missions of the two systems and provides a
framework for revising the UW System undergraduate policy on transfer. It commits the
UW System and the WTCS to: 1) work together to establish baccalaureate completion
options; 2) continue to counsel students about the different missions of the state's two
postsecondary education systems; and 3) work cooperatively to monitor the performance
of transfer students to ensure that program goals are met.

        Concluding the presentation, Dr. Ward outlined steps to be taken after adoption
by the two boards of the Statement of Guiding Principles and adoption by the Board of
Regents of recommendations on development of new baccalaureate completion
programs, creation of multi-institutional articulation agreements, and inclusion of two
courses in math and/or science as transferable general education. The Transfer Study
Committee will complete its report by mid-May 2000. The heads of the systems will
present their report to the Legislature by July 1. The UW System will revise its
undergraduate transfer policy to reflect the new guiding principles on student transfer,
and in cooperation with the WTCS, the UW System will begin implementing the specific
recommendations approved by the Board of Regents.

        Mr. Karl Hertz, Governor Thompson's representative to the Transfer Study
Committee, read a letter from the Governor (Exhibit A) commending the WTCS and the
UW System for shaping the historic agreement being acted upon at this meeting. He
asked the boards to tackle in coming years such critical issues as promoting technology
transfer, retaining highly skilled graduates and reforming teacher preparation.

        Noting the Governor's long interest in a seamless system of education, Mr. Hertz
said that the actions to be taken at this meeting move toward that goal. He felt the
flexibility these actions would give to those with associate degrees would be a great
advantage for them as they move forward in their careers. While the areas of early
childhood and nursing are mentioned specifically for multi-institutional agreements, he
was pleased that the Committee saw those areas as a beginning for this type of
agreement, not an ending. He also was encouraged by the increase in transfer of general
education credits through the addition of math and science courses. In summary, Mr.
Hertz commented that the agreement is good for business and makes education more
available to the people of Wisconsin.

        Lori Lettman, a student in marketing at Southwest Wisconsin Technical College,
noted that she views her associate degree as a beginning to her education. She plans to
study for a bachelor's degree and then a corporate law degree. Stating that she had met
many roadblocks in the way of fulfilling her plans, she expressed the hope that the



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                              Minutes of the Board of Regents Meeting/UW Extension Enrollment Planning 21, April 7, 2000



Governor's vision of a seamless system of education becomes a reality. She felt the
agreements to be acted upon at this meeting are steps in the right direction.

        Regent Barry, who represents the WTCS Board on the Board of Regents, recalled
that in 1989, Delmar DeLong, the President of the WTCS Board at that time, made the
reaching of an agreement on transfer a major goal. His efforts eventually led to adoption
of the first statement. Noting that the transfer system under the new agreement still will
be complex, Regent Barry commented that more multi-institutional, if not statewide,
agreements will be needed in the coming years. Noting that students transfer both from
the WTCS to the UW and from the UW to the WTCS, he remarked that excellent
advising will be necessary because students' choices will be vast.


       The joint meeting was recessed at 4:25 p.m., at which time the boards convened
independently.



------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------



       Adoption by the Board of Regents of the following resolution was moved by
Regent Axtell and seconded by Regent Gottschalk:

         Statement of Guiding Principles on Student Transfer

         Resolution 8106:                     That the Board of Regents adopts the Statement of
                                              Guiding Principles on Student Transfer from the
                                              Wisconsin Technical College System to the
                                              University of Wisconsin System.



        Regent Olivieri stated that he would vote in favor of the resolution as a step
toward a seamless educational system. He expressed concern about limits on credit
acceptance and hoped there would be further actions in the future to expand transfer
opportunities. Regent Alexander concurred and Regent Gracz added that he agreed as
long as courses are similar and on the same level.

        Regent Barry cautioned that it will be necessary to maintain the distinct missions
of the two systems, and Regent Brandes concurred that care must be taken in that regard.

        Put to the vote, Resolution 8106 was adopted unanimously by the Board.
        Upon motion by Regent Randall, seconded by Regent Alexander, the following
resolution was adopted unanimously by the Board of Regents.



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                         Minutes of the Board of Regents Meeting/UW Extension Enrollment Planning 21, April 7, 2000




Baccalaureate Degree Completion; Multi-institutional
Articulation Agreements; General Education

Resolution 8107:                    That the Board of Regents authorizes UW institutions
                                    to:

1. Baccalaureate Degree Completion. Create 2+2 degree
        completion programs and utilize existing degree completion and
        extended degree programs that enable WTCS students graduating
        with an associate degree of applied sciences to transfer as a third
        year student into a:

        a.   companion bachelor of science or applied science degree program in a
             related field of study, including a degree in Industrial Management that will
             be implemented by the Fall semester 2000; or

        b.   broad-based bachelor of applied arts or sciences degree program for which
             the Office of Academic Affairs will seek authorization during the 2000-01
             academic year.

2. Multi-institutional Articulation Agreements. Develop 2+2 and
        other multi-institutional articulation agreements between WTCS
        and UW institutions in appropriate program areas where course
        content alignment and consistency are determined to exist, starting
        with pilot agreements in Nursing (to be implemented no later than
        January 1, 2001) and Early Childhood Education (to be
        implemented no later than September 1, 2001).

3. General Education Transfer Credits: Increase the Limit on
        General Education Transfer Credits, effective in the Fall semester
        of 2000, up to:

        a.   15 credits of general education coursework within the areas of
             communications, behavioral sciences and social sciences from WTCS
             programs leading to an associate degree of applied sciences; and, in
             addition;

        b.   two courses in mathematics and/or natural sciences.




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                              Minutes of the Board of Regents Meeting/UW Extension Enrollment Planning 21, April 7, 2000



     The meeting was adjourned at 4:35 p.m., at which time the joint meeting for the
WTCS and UW System Board reconvened.


------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------


ADL Co-Lab Presentation

       Introducing the presentation, UW-Extension Acting Chancellor Al Beaver
observed that the Wisconsin Advanced Distributed Learning (ADL) Collaborative
Laboratory is a remarkable initiative, involving the UW System, the WTCS System, and
the Department of Defense.

        Ed Meachen, UW System Associate Vice President for Learning and Information
Technology, spoke first, noting that the Co-Lab is located physically in the Pyle Center,
but virtually throughout the state. As background to the project, Mr. Meachen explained
that the federal government, the corporate sector and higher education have been moving
toward distributed learning along parallel lines since about 1995. The Department of
Defense took the lead for the federal government, recommending in 1996 that all its
education and training begin implementing network-based programs wherever
appropriate. The result was an Executive Order, issued in January 1999, that launched
the Department of Defense's ADL Co-Laboratory.

         Its vision is to provide access to the highest quality education and training, that
can be tailored to individual needs, and delivered cost effectively, anywhere and anytime
it is required. To make this vision a reality, network-based learning would need
standards before it could become cost effective and viable. The place of standards in
distributed learning is analogous to the place of a standard gage for railroad tracks in the
growth of the rail industry.

        Standards also are important to the corporate world in providing employee
training that is flexible and extensible. Their systems, however, have been proprietary,
and changing providers has proved costly and time-consuming. Therefore, like the
federal government, corporations began to seek standards to move course content easily
from one distributed learning system to another. Corporations supported a host of
standards organizations; however, these groups often worked in isolation from each other
and developed parallel, not merged, standards.

        During this same period in the late 1990s, higher education was experimenting
with distributed learning on the Internet. In Wisconsin, the Board of Regents' 21st
Century Study paralleled the directions of the federal government and corporate trainers.
The Study report stated: "Instructional technology and distance education are essential
for expanding and improving the student learning experience for all students on campus
and returning adults. The underlying goal is to use these tools to develop an enhanced
student-centered learning environment and to remove time and place as barriers to



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                          Minutes of the Board of Regents Meeting/UW Extension Enrollment Planning 21, April 7, 2000



learning." The UW System set out to realize this vision through such initiatives as
Learning Innovations, Web-based learning utilities, and The Pyle Center. Similarly, the
WTCS began developing distributed learning curricula through creation of distributed
learning objects and implementation of its Virtual Campus. Higher Education also ran up
against proprietary roadblocks in development and reusability of curricular content in the
new distributed learning environment.

       The immediate payoff for the ADL Co-Lab partnership is the development of
standards. The Defense Department has taken a lead in bringing all the standards
organizations together to agree on a set of simplified core standards for distributed
learning, and a draft currently is waiting to be tested and applied to courseware.

        Standards, Mr. Meachen noted, are rules that make the job easier for faculty,
curricular designers and others. If faculty found the technology easy to use, they would
be more willing to experiment with it. Standards make distributed learning cheaper,
easier to use and allow movement of content from system to system as the technology
changes. The Co-Lab also brings to the table the corporate sector, supplier of many of
the tools used to create and manage network-based learning. Vendors realize it is in their
best interests to supply customers with standards compliant products or risk loss of
business.

         Mr. Meachen introduced Judy Brown, Emerging Technology Analyst, who
welcomed by distance appearance Mike Parmentier, Director of Readiness and Training
Policy and Programs, in the Department of Defense. Mr. Parmentier noted that the ADL
initiative is a collaboration across government, industry and academia. There are three
Co-Labs - two in the Department of Defense and one in the UW System. Ms. Brown
noted that on January 10, 2000 the UW and WTCS entered into a partnership agreement
with the Department of Defense to locate the ADL Co-Laboratory in Madison. Because
the Co-Lab is virtual as well as physical, all UW and WTCS campuses, as well as
government and corporate partners will have access. Mr. Parmentier added that, because
there are so few Co-Labs, the Madison Co-Lab could expect to do business with a very
large number of people who will be anxious to share in what is produced - knowledge,
specialized skill training, etc.

         Ms. Brown noted that, to date, a Leadership Team has been formed, and working
committees based upon current projects are starting work. The physical lab is under
development with donations being sought. Current Co-Lab projects are: 1) Research and
development of learning technologies; 2) testing of ADL compliant tools to enhance
teaching and learning; 3) compliance testing for learning objects; 4) intelligent tutors: 5)
assessment tools; and 6) learning management system exploration. To date, WTCS has
received at no cost three intelligent tutoring systems to assist in teaching basic skills. The
tutor allows students to work and get feedback directly from the tutor. Instruction is
tailored for each student, including remedial instruction. WTCS has tested the tutors in
two districts, with positive reviews from faculty and students. Mr. Parmentier added that
collaboration is at the heart of the project. All ADL participants operate in their own self
interest, but each will receive added benefit from participation of the others. He



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                          Minutes of the Board of Regents Meeting/UW Extension Enrollment Planning 21, April 7, 2000



predicted that this type of effort will lay the foundation for the learning environment of
the future.

        Mr. Meachen identified benefits to Wisconsin as development of standards, easy
access to experts, access to testing and evaluation of distance learning, maintaining
Wisconsin's leadership in distance learning, and the UW/WTCS partnership. The Co-Lab
partnerships will serve students and will help Wisconsin become an exporter of
education.


Examples of Cooperative Efforts: Chippewa Valley Technical College, UW-Eau
Claire, UW-Stout

        UW-Eau Claire Chancellor Donald Mash began the presentation by noting that
the partnership involves three institutions in the same geographical region that bring
unique strengths to serving the needs of the area. The partnership among the institutions
serves an area known as Wisconsin's Technology Valley, because of the large number of
technology-based companies in the area. Each institution complements the other in
pursuing a regional agenda for development.

        UW-Stout Chancellor Charles Sorensen reported that on March 29, the heads of
the three institutions had signed a document pledging to work together to meet the needs
of the Chippewa Valley. This includes developing collaborative, state-of-the-art
curricula to meet the education and training needs of the Chippewa Valley workforce;
pursuing enhanced transfer of credit among the three institutions; and addressing and
refining cooperative, complementary partnerships and procedures in order to advance
workforce development.

        Among topics being considered are a masters degree in engineering to meet the
needs of the valley and requesting funding for a presence in all area technology parks to
identify needs in training and to collaborate to meet those needs.

         William Ihlenfeldt, President of Chippewa Valley Technical College (CVTC)
predicted that workers of the future in the Chippewa Valley area will attend all three
institutions at different times in their careers, making high quality, seamless education
very important to them. Due to partnerships with UW-Eau Claire and UW-Stout,
Chippewa Valley Technical College is the third largest transfer institution in the system.

        Each of the three institutions has a distinct mission, yet all are committing to
support of business in the Technology Valley. Through a partnership with UW-Stout,
CVTC has a presence in the Stout Technology Park, and through a partnership with UW-
Eau Claire, a presence in Gateway Park in Eau Claire. Other projects involve focused
learning centers which expose area high school students to CVTC's state of the art
equipment and technology. Today, Mr. Ihlenfeldt remarked, businesses come to the
valley and stay due to the quality of the workforce.




                                                                                                                 10
                          Minutes of the Board of Regents Meeting/UW Extension Enrollment Planning 21, April 7, 2000



       Concluding the presentation, Chancellor Mash commented that the resolutions
adopted at this meeting by the Board of Regents and the WTCS Board will create a
platform to enhance partnerships such as 2+2 programs among the three Chippewa
Valley institutions.


Examples of Cooperative Efforts: UW-Parkside and Gateway Technical College

        Beginning the presentation, UW-Parkside Chancellor Jack Keating said that the
overall purpose of cooperative efforts between Gateway Technical College and UW-
Parkside is to work together for the benefit of students and to assist the region's economic
prosperity. Of UW-Parkside's 12,000 graduates, he noted that 10,500 continue to live in
the area.

        Turning first to transfer of students between the two institutions, the Chancellor
indicated that there are 10 program articulation agreements in place. Such agreement not
only became more numerous over the years, they also encompassed transfer of more
credits. For example, under former articulation agreements, only 15 credits in general
education and 10 credits in business transferred to UW-Parkside's accounting or
marketing programs. Under the current Bachelors Degree Completion model, the
Gateway Associates Degree can transfer 48 to 51 credits to UW-Parkside's Bachelor's
Degree in Business Management.

       With the action taken at this meeting by the WTCS Board and the Board of
Regents, degree completion programs will be expanded. Still to be accomplished, the
Chancellor indicated, is concurrent enrollment at both institutions, for example in radio
broadcasting at Gateway and the communication program at UW-Parkside.

         Sam Borden, President of Gateway Technical College, spoke of partnership
activities in regional workforce development and economic growth. The purpose in the
short run is to understand the skills gap between the current workforce and the needs of
employers in the region, particularly given the importance of manufacturing. In the long
run, the purpose is to raise awareness of the steps needed to attract high-tech, high-wage
industries to the region. Funding for these efforts will come from $1 million provided by
the Wisconsin Department of Commerce for training projects and their planning and from
$750,000 provided by the UW Department of Labor for consortium building, research
and planning.

       The goal is to encourage long-term thinking, in order to diversify the economic
base and to put together a seamless K-16 education for the area, in part through
"networked" centers of education and industry.




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                         Minutes of the Board of Regents Meeting/UW Extension Enrollment Planning 21, April 7, 2000



Examples of Cooperative Efforts: Milwaukee Area Technical College and UW-
Milwaukee Minority Teacher Program

         The presentation was made by Deryl Davis-Harrison, Assistant Dean, UW-
Milwaukee School of Education, and by Willette Calvin, Milwaukee Area Technical
College, Coordinator of the Cooperative Urban Teacher Education Program (CUTEP).
The program which prepares students for teaching careers, allows students to complete
the first two years of requirements at MATC and then transfer with junior-level standing
to the school of education at a partner school. These include Alverno College, Cardinal
Stritch University, Carroll College, Marquette University, UW-Madison, UW-
Milwaukee, UW-Oshkosh, or UW-Whitewater.

        Ms. Davis-Harrison explained that the program targets students of color and
attracts them to the field of teaching. There is great need, she pointed out, for urban
teachers and teachers of color. In this regard the partnership with MATC is very
valuable. It allows students at UW-Milwaukee and other universities involved in the
CUTEP program to get to know students before they transfer to the university and
address their needs in advance where possible. Such needs might include financial
assistance, an orientation program and introduction to people at the transfer site,
mentoring, advising, etc. Remarking that this program has had a lot of success, she noted
that the articulation agreement with MATC fits well with UW-Milwaukee's "Milwaukee
Idea". The program provides opportunities for students who might not otherwise go into
teaching.

        Willette Calvin described the program, noting that it was begun in 1988 and is
housed at MATC. The program has the following components: 1) Intrusive advising to
make sure students fulfill requirements for transfer; 2) connecting activities with the 4-
year institutions to ease the transition for students; 3) Minority Teacher Education
Internship Program, in which CUTEP students are placed in Milwaukee Public Schools
to work with a cooperating classroom teacher. This paid internship is an important
retention effort; 4) Field placement experience, which is satisfied by completing an
internship for entry into the School of Education; 5) cooperative courses, through which
students take the "Introduction to Teaching" course on UWM's campus while still
retaining their MATC student status; 6) preparation for the pre-professional skills test,
which is a requirement for entry into the School of Education.

        At this time, there are 105 students in the CUTEP program. There are placements
in a number of Milwaukee Public Schools, including the Golda Meir School for the gifted
and talented and the Forest Home Elementary School, with a bilingual program. Eleven
students are serving as paraprofessionals, and seven CUTEP graduates have been part of
the UWM Pathways program which funds 85% tuition for prospective educators.

        In conclusion, Ms. Calvin expressed confidence that MATC's teacher education
partnership with UW-Milwaukee and other institutions will continue to grow and
flourish.




                                                                                                                12
                      Minutes of the Board of Regents Meeting/UW Extension Enrollment Planning 21, April 7, 2000




      The meeting was adjourned at 5:30 p.m.




                                                           _____________________________
                                                                Judith Temby, Secretary




   BOARD OF REGENTS OF THE UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN SYSTEM


                                Minutes of the Meeting


                                      April 7, 2000
                                        9:00 a.m.
                                       Room 335
                                    The Pyle Center
                                   702 Langdon Street
                                   Madison, Wisconsin




Presentation by UW-Extension on its role in Enrollment Planning 21………………1

   BOARD OF REGENTS OF THE UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN SYSTEM



                                        April 7, 2000
                                         9:00 a.m.



                                                                                                             13
               Minutes of the Board of Regents Meeting, April 7, 2000



                                               Room 335
                                            The Pyle Center
                                           702 Langdon Street
                                           Madison, Wisconsin



Present: Regents Alexander, Axtell, Barry, Benson, Boyle, Brandes, DeSimone,
Gottschalk, Marcovich, Mohs, Olivieri, Orr, Randall and Smith

Unable to attend: Regents Gracz, James and MacNeil



Presentation by UW-Extension on its role in Enrollment Planning 21

        Acting Chancellor Al Beaver introduced Provost Kevin Reilly, who in opening
remarks observed that public universities across the country are struggling with two large
questions: 1) How to become more connected with their communities, regions and states;
and 2) how to use the vast array of information technologies to better fulfill their
missions of teaching, research and service. In Wisconsin, he said, UW-Extension will be
at the very center of the answers to those questions because of its know-how in engaging
adult learners and communities, using the most effective new methods and technologies.

         Stating that UW-Extension has a unique role to play in the UW's effort to better
serve adult students, he noted that some Extension programs, such as correspondence
study, began over a century ago; and in more recent times, Extension has worked with
every campus in making the UW more accessible through continuing education.
Through Extension leadership, efforts have been coordinated system-wide in order to
improve service to adults, in particular. Extension has begun to work with each UW
institution to build on the existing credit outreach infrastructure in order to produce more
baccalaureates, certificates and master's degrees designed and delivered for busy adults.
Learning Innovations is using distance technology outreach to help the UW deliver on its
promise of enrolling 1,000 additional students.

         Extension also is assisting the UW to become more student friendly in a variety of
other ways. For example: 1) Online catalogs of online and other distance courses,
including some 200 that are currently offered, plus those in development across the
system; 2) Extension's survey, in partnership with UW System Market Research, of
Wisconsin adult learner needs and interests; 3) Extension's role as the newest state
affiliate of the American Council on Education's College Credit Recommendation
Service. This service is a way to encourage working adults to enroll on UW campuses
and uses UW faculty to evaluate educational programs offered by business, government,
and professional or trade associations for college credit recommendations. Adults who
complete this non-collegiate education can seek college credit for it in degree programs
on UW campuses.



                                                                                          14
               Minutes of the Board of Regents Meeting, April 7, 2000




       Moving into EM 21, Provost Reilly continued, Extension will work with its
campus partners to enable the UW to address the full spectrum of adult education needs,
with adult access centers at each institution to serve as a focal point for this work. The
Pyle Center already is a premier adult access point for the entire UW System.

        Provost Reilly introduced Byron Knight, Director of Wisconsin Public Television,
and Eric Bangerter, Electronic Publishing Manager in Cooperative Extension, to discuss
progress in preparing to use the coming convergence of digital broadcasting and the
Internet to deliver education in new ways to new audiences.

          Noting that public TV provides access to the university, Mr. Knight observed that
it is a trusted appraiser of quality in programs and also provides an entry point to the
Internet. In that respect, public television connects the content of a program to the deeper
content available through the university. The technology involves interactive television -
the convergence of Web information and TV programming. This convergence is
occurring because television is becoming a digital media, like the Web. Web TV imbeds
Web addresses in TV broadcasts and connects to the Internet via a phone line.
Interactive television involves accessing Websites from a TV screen.

        Remarking that Wisconsin Public Television is a leader in the convergence of the
Web and television, Mr. Knight turned to how it is being used for educational purposes.
For instance, county agents were provided with TV program guides and asked to mark
subjects about which they have useful information. This material is put on Web pages
and cross-over links are created from the TV program to the Web page. Examples of
programs are "Wisconsin Supreme Court Debates," "Creating Health," "Earth Angels,"
"Wisconsin Gardener," and "WeekEnd".


        Mr. Bergener demonstrated how the interactive programming works, using the
TV program "The Wisconsin Gardener". By selecting interactive icons that surround the
TV program box, the viewer can get more detailed information on a number of subjects
being discussed from Websites that contain information provided by faculty. Viewers
can also see lists of related courses and even register for them - all online.

         In conclusion, Mr. Knight noted that there are about 36,000 Web TVs in the state
at this time, but that the technology is growing rapidly and gaining acceptance.
Interactive television will be the norm in the future.



         In discussion following the presentation, Regent Axtell inquired as to the cost of
interactive television. Mr. Knight replied that a Web TV box is less than $200 and a
monthly subscription costs $19.95. This makes it a much less expensive way to access
the Internet than to purchase a computer. Cable companies will have this technology
built in to their product.



                                                                                          15
                       Minutes of the Board of Regents Meeting, April 7, 2000




        Regent Gottschalk asked if the UW Hospital is involved in the program, "Creating
Health", and Mr. Knight replied that the hospital is represented on an advisory group for
that program.

      In response to a question by Regent Brandes, Mr. Knight said the boxes that
accompany dishes for satellite TV also will have the technology built into them.

         Regent Orr asked how many people watch "Weekend" on interactive TV. Mr.
Knight replied that, estimating from e-mail messages, the number is fewer than 15 a week
at this early date.

        Concluding the discussion, Provost Reilly made the point that Wisconsin Public
Television is on the cutting edge of this technology and actually is educating others
around the country. From the "Wisconsin Gardener" demonstration, he noted the
advantage of having Cooperative Extension with its subject matter experts located in the
same institution as Wisconsin Public Television. In the future, he predicted that many
UW courses may be linked to TV programs, which will provide another mode of access
to the university and draw in more enrollments.

           The program concluded at 9:30 a.m.




                                                                                  ______________________________
                                                                                       Judith Temby, Secretary




                                         MINUTES OF THE REGULAR MEETING

                                                                  of the

                   BOARD OF REGENTS OF THE UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN SYSTEM


                                                         Madison, Wisconsin

                                               Held in room 325/326 Pyle Center
                                                     Friday, April 7, 2000




APPROVAL OF MINUTES .......................................................................................................................19

REPORT OF THE PRESIDENT OF THE BOARD ...............................................................................19



                                                                                                                                         16
                           Minutes of the Board of Regents Meeting, April 7, 2000



    REPORT ON THE MARCH 22ND MEETING OF THE WISCONSIN TECHNICAL COLLEGE SYSTEM BOARD .........19
    REPORT ON THE APRIL 3 MEETING OF THE HOSPITAL AUTHORITY BOARD ................................................20
    REPORT ON LEGISLATIVE MATTERS...........................................................................................................20
    REPORT ON THE NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF GOVERNING BOARD CONFERENCE .....................................20
    APPRECIATION FOR PRESIDENT LYALL......................................................................................................21
REPORT OF THE PRESIDENT OF THE SYSTEM..............................................................................23
    DISCUSSION ON GRADUATION RATES AND TIME TO DEGREE ....................................................................23
    REPORT ON EFFICIENCIES AND EFFECTIVENESS ........................................................................................26
REPORT OF THE EDUCATION COMMITTEE...................................................................................29
            Minority and Disadvantaged Student; Annual Report..................................................................................... 29
            Implementing s.36.11(22)(b), Wis. Stats., relating to Sexual Assault and Sexual Harassment ....................... 29
            Requests to Trustees of the William F. Vilas Trust Estate .............................................................................. 29
            UW-Madison: Authorization to Recruit: Chancellor..................................................................................... 30
            UW-Madison: Associate or Full Professor College of Letters & Science, Department of Sociology ............ 30
            UW-Madison: New Program Authorization (Implementation): M.A., Russian, East European and Central
            Asian Studies .................................................................................................................................................. 30
            UW-La Crosse: New Program Authorization (Implementation): B.S., Athletic Training ............................ 31
            UW-Whitewater: New Program Authorization (Implementation): B.S.E., Early Childhood Education ...... 31
            UW-Madison: Appointment of Named Professor .......................................................................................... 31
    REPORT OF THE SENIOR VICE PRESIDENT FOR ACADEMIC AFFAIRS ..........................................................31
    NEW PROGRAM AUTHORIZATIONS ............................................................................................................31
REPORT OF THE PHYSICAL PLANNING AND FUNDING COMMITTEE ...................................32
            UW-Madison: Authority to Construct an Ingraham Hall Renovation for TRIO Student Support Services
            Project ............................................................................................................................................................. 32
            UW-Madison: Approval of Budget Increase and Fund Transfer for the Waisman Center Addition and
            Remodeling Project ......................................................................................................................................... 32
    REPORT OF THE ASSISTANT VICE PRESIDENT ............................................................................................33
      Report of Building Commission Actions ..............................................................................................33
      Report on Recent Bids ..........................................................................................................................33
      UW-River Falls: Naming of the Teacher Education Building ............................................................33
            UW-River Falls: Authority to Name the Teacher Education Building ........................................................... 33



REPORT OF THE BUSINESS AND FINANCE COMMITTEE ...........................................................34
    JOINT SESSION WITH EDUCATION COMMITTEE ..........................................................................................34
            Principal Expenditure UW System Trust Funds Elsie Engel Bequest ............................................................. 34
    UW-GREEN BAY INITIATIVE .....................................................................................................................34
    TRUST FUNDS ............................................................................................................................................35
    ADDITIONAL ITEMS ...................................................................................................................................35
EXECUTIVE SESSION .............................................................................................................................35
            UW Madison: Authorization to Appoint at a salary that exceeds the Executive Salary Group Six maximum36
            UW Extension: Authority to Appoint: Chancellor ........................................................................................ 36
            UW Parkside: Honorary Degree..................................................................................................................... 36




                                                                                                                                                                               17
                         MINUTES OF THE REGULAR MEETING

                                          of the

           BOARD OF REGENTS OF THE UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN SYSTEM


                                   Madison, Wisconsin

                             Held in room 325/326 Pyle Center
                                   Friday, April 7, 2000
                                         9:45 a.m.



                                - President Orr presiding -


PRESENT:      Regents Alexander, Axtell, Barry, Benson, Boyle, Brandes, DeSimone,
              Gottschalk, Marcovich, Mohs, Olivieri, Orr, Randall, and Smith
ABSENT:       Regents Gracz, James and MacNeil


APPROVAL OF MINUTES
        The minutes of the March 9 and 10 meetings were declared approved as
distributed.


                                           ---




REPORT OF THE PRESIDENT OF THE BOARD

       Report on the March 22nd meeting of the Wisconsin Technical College
       System Board

       The Board of Regents was provided with a written report of the March 22 meeting
of the Wisconsin Technical College System Board.
                                            -
               Minutes of the Board of Regents Meeting, April 7, 2000



       Report on the April 3 meeting of the Hospital Authority Board

       A written report on the April 3 meeting of the Hospital Authority Board was
provided to the Board of Regents.
                                                         -


       Report on Legislative Matters

       The Board received a written report on legislative matters
                                                         -


       Report on the National Association of Governing Board Conference

        Regent Randall, the Board's liaison to the National Association of Governing
Boards, presented a report on the AGB's National Conference on Trusteeship, that was
held in March. These national conferences, he noted, offer participants an opportunity to
discuss common problems and to exchange ideas and solutions.
         The conference had separate tracks for public and independent institutions. For
public institutions, discussions revolved around three themes: the role of trustees,
institutional finance, and program partnerships and collaborations. Plenary session
speakers were journalist Mark Sheilds, Governor Zell Miller and Professor Roger
Wilkins.
       Roundtable discussion topics included: presidential compensation, governing and
foundation board relations, diversity, quality improvement and accountability, funding of
programs and facilities, and government official and trustee relationships.
        Participants also heard a presentation on the new Center for Public Higher
Education Trusteeship and Governance, which aims to improve relationships between
public higher education and state government leaders.
       From what had been presented at the conference, Regent Randall felt that the
following should be particularly noted:
1. Boards should develop a process for setting tuition, possibly including an index to
   which the student contribution is tied. Models used by private institutions that offer
   generous financial aid packages to offset high tuition should be researched, evaluated
   and discussed before they are adopted.
2. Partnerships and collaborations not only ease funding stress, but enhance
   opportunities to achieve goals like improved retention and access.




                                                                                           20
               Minutes of the Board of Regents Meeting, April 7, 2000



3. Diversity is a complex issue that will only become more complicated in a society
   that becomes more racially blended. Board policies with regard to recruitment and
   retention of students and staff should be reflective of societal needs and legal
   restrictions.
4. Policies related to institutional growth should take into account economic trends and
   state participation. Tepid state support and poor economic forecasting is a recipe for
   long-term stress.
5. Technology, particularly in its instructional applications, has significant cost
   implications. Institutions that deliver instruction via distance technology must
   carefully target their market and consider the potential competition before making
   investments.


                                                         -


       Appreciation for President Lyall

         Noting that on April 1, President Katharine Lyall celebrated her eight anniversary
as President of the University of Wisconsin System, Regent President Orr remarked that
there are very few presidents nationally who have enjoyed such a long and positive
tenure. Since she became president, the UW System has awarded 161,029 degrees, many
of those graduates having gone on to be important contributors to the Wisconsin
economy. During her tenure, the UW System has brought in $2.4 billion in federal grants
and contracts. In addition, almost $1.2 billion in private funds have been raised. Thanks
to President Lyall, there are outstanding leaders in place throughout the UW System;
working relations with the Governor and other state leaders are much improved; there are
many new partnerships with the business community; the student body is better prepared
and more diverse; UW institutions have had the flexibility to develop innovative
programs and build on their unique strengths; and the UW System has been brought into
the age of technology-assisted learning and is reaching out nationally and internationally
with strategic programs in distance education. With all of this, the UW is still the most
efficient system of higher education in the country.
        On behalf of the Board and other colleagues, Regent President Orr thanked
President Lyall for her 19 years of service, not only as President, but as Acting President
and Executive Vice President for the UW System. He noted that she is known nationally
as a pace-setter in reinventing higher education to deliver more relevant and cost
effective programs to students.




                                                                                         21
             Minutes of the Board of Regents Meeting, April 7, 2000



       Regent President Orr presented Resolution 8108, which was moved by Regent
Marcovich, seconded by Regent DeSimone and adopted unanimously with a standing
ovation.


        Resolution 8108:               WHEREAS, the month of April 2000 marks eight years
                                       of distinguished leadership and extraordinary service by
                                       Katharine C. Lyall as President of the University of
                                       Wisconsin System; and

                                       WHEREAS, as the longest-serving UW System
                                       president in state history, President Lyall has guided
                                       one of America’s premier public university systems
                                       through a period of global change and transition with
                                       great wisdom, determination, innovation, diplomacy,
                                       purpose, and success; and

                                       WHEREAS, in the face of contrary opinion and
                                       emerging national trends, President Lyall has stood to
                                       preserve the core values upon which the University of
                                       Wisconsin System was built: free and open debate that
                                       enriches the whole academic environment; and

                                       WHEREAS, under President Lyall’s leadership the UW
                                       System has improved in many crucial areas, including
                                       access to non-traditional students, quality of instruction,
                                       success of research endeavors, breadth and impact of
                                       public service and outreach activities, efficiency of
                                       administrative functions, and preparation of students to
                                       succeed in the global marketplace;

                                       THEREFORE, be it resolved that the University of
                                       Wisconsin Board of Regents congratulates and highly
                                       commends Katharine C. Lyall for eight remarkable
                                       years of leadership of the University of Wisconsin
                                       System.


                                                   _ _ _




                                                                                                22
               Minutes of the Board of Regents Meeting, April 7, 2000




REPORT OF THE PRESIDENT OF THE SYSTEM

       Discussion on Graduation Rates and Time to Degree

       Noting that Regent Alexander had inquired about graduation rates and time to
degree, President Lyall introduced Senior Vice President David Ward to present current
data on these matters.
       Senior Vice President Ward indicated that, in order to gain a perspective on
undergraduate completion, it is helpful to look at three measures: Credits to degree, time
to degree and graduation rates.
         He considered it useful to think in terms of who controls each of these outcomes.
In the area of credits to degree, primary responsibility is carried by the institution in terms
of offering credits, scheduling courses, setting degree requirements and providing
advising. Time to degree is heavily influenced by student choice in terms of credit load,
although the institution also has responsibility. Graduation rates are influenced by a
balance of personal circumstances of the student, tuition levels, debt load and other
factors.
        In 1995, the Board directed each campus to develop a plan to reduce credits to
degree over a five-year period. The overall goal was to reduce attempted credits to
degree from a system-wide average of 145 credits to 140 credits. Reducing the average
by five credits has the effect of opening up seats in courses for thousands of students.
        In 1997-98, the Board's Education Committee, led by Regent Smith, examined the
issue of time to degree. Each campus was required to offer a guaranteed four-year
graduation contract. The purpose was to offer an option to all students and to set an
expectation for students and parents that a degree can be obtained in four years.
         Campuses used a combination of methods to reduce average attempted credits,
including: 1) Reduction of credits required for a BA/BS degree; 2) installation of
automated degree tracking systems; 3) installation of the transfer information system; 4)
encouraging high school students to take advanced placement courses; 5) adoption of
four-year graduation contracts; 6) elimination of course bottlenecks; and (7) advising
initiatives.
         The result, Dr. Ward stated, is that excellent progress has been made in reducing
attempted credits to degree. The goal of 140 credits was reached in 1998-99. Such
initiatives as automated degree audits and increased advanced placement courses should
continue to have a favorable effect on reducing credits to degree.
        Reporting that some progress has been made in reducing time to degree, Dr. Ward
cautioned that a number of factors also are working to lengthen time to degree. Although
every institution offers four-year graduation contracts, there has been limited student
interest. At UW-Stevens Point, for example, only six of 177 students who expressed
interest actually signed the contract. Reasons for non-participation include: 1) Students
do not want to be required to accept enrollment in any available section of a course; 2)
students are unable or unwilling to take the required load; 3) students are not certain of
their major; 4) students plan to participate in an internship; or 5) students plan to study


                                                                                            23
               Minutes of the Board of Regents Meeting, April 7, 2000



abroad. With respect to the third reason, Dr. Ward noted that about one-third of students
come to the UW undecided as to their major and therefore are unable to sign a four-year
contract. Dr. Ward noted, however, that simply making such a contract available is
important because it changes expectations. Because time to degree is correlated with
credits to degree, progress in terms of fewer attempted credits will be reflected in less
time to degree as well.
       There also are factors that lengthen time to degree, including: 1) broader
requirements in terms of internships; 2) expanded opportunities to study abroad; 3)
increased credits required by professional accreditation groups, an example being
requirement of 150 credits before a student can sit for the CPA exam; 4) students with
undecided career goals and majors; 5) multiple majors/minors; and 6) personal decisions
concerning employment, financial issues or changing majors.
        Factors shortening time to degree include: 1) the degree audit; 2) inter-sessions,
which are offered by 9 of 13 UW institutions; 3) distance education offerings; 4) summer
sessions; 5) cost of attendance; 6) class scheduling; and 7) personal decisions concerning
the job market or financial issues.
         The four-year graduation rate system-wide is 21.3%, and the six-year rate is
59.2%, although there is variation by campus with some having a much higher four-year
rate, and others having a higher six-year rate. These rates represent only students who
started at the UW and graduated from the UW. They do not account for students who
start in the UW and transfer to other universities. The six-year rate, which will be about
60% when all data are tallied, actually means that 60% of students who enter the UW
System graduate from the UW System within six years. Of that total, 52% graduate from
the institution where they started. On average, UW institutions have a higher graduation
rate than the national average, which is about 47.6%.
        Dr. Ward then listed a number of factors that affect graduation rates. For
example, increased admission standards in terms of class rank or ACT scores would
increase graduation rates, but would also limit access. Other factors that tend to increase
graduation rates include financial aid, work-study opportunities, academic advising and
other student services, on-campus living and proximity to campus for students living off-
campus, contact with faculty outside of the classroom, program articulation and
collaboration, contact with fellow students and social interaction, academic collaboration
among students, participation in campus life and extracurricular activities, learning
readiness and completion of the ACT core, earlier major choice and career certainty.
       Factors that tend to decrease graduation rates include debt, nonacademic and
family responsibilities, and uncertainty in terms of a major or career.


        In discussion following the presentation, Regent Alexander asked what happens
to the 35% of students who leave without graduating and why they are not tracked. Dr.
Ward replied that, although institutions occasionally survey students who leave, they are
not tracked on a systematic basis, which would be a challenging and expensive data
collection process. He noted that there might be a concern about privacy if the
university attempted to track people beyond its enrollment boundaries. Dr. Ward



                                                                                         24
               Minutes of the Board of Regents Meeting, April 7, 2000



indicated that an Occasional Research Brief (ORB) to be presented to the Regents in June
will have a broader explanation of these data. Other national studies, such as an annual
study done by UCLA, also provide data that apply to Wisconsin as well as other states.
        Regent Alexander suggested that consideration be given to offering credits for
such activities as internships and for travel abroad, and that other innovative solutions be
devised to reduce time to degree. He asked if there is any scientific evidence of why it
should take six years to graduate, and commented that the length of time to degree and
the percentage who disappear without graduating is a discouraging message to send
parents and students.
        Although the UW six-year graduation rate is higher than the national average,
Regent Alexander noted that the UW also has seven percent higher FTE enrollment than
the national average, which could account for the higher graduation rate. Referring to
variation in graduation rates among UW campuses, with some having much lower rates
than others, he did not consider it adequate to simply monitor the situation. He suggested
that a committee be convened to devise innovative ways to improve degree completion.
        Regent Mohs observed that people go through education at different paces and
make discoveries as they go along. An extra course, for example, may lead a student to
change majors or strongly influence his or her life in other ways. Many successful
people, he commented, have taken more courses than they needed to graduate. He did
not believe that maximum efficiency in terms of graduating in four years or with a set
number of credits should be the only goal.
        Regent Alexander commented that, although students have some responsibility
for their time to degree, he thought the university's response should be to do whatever is
possible to help students finish in a timely way. He thought a better grasp of all the
variables is needed.
        Regent Brandes commented that she would be concerned about graduation rates
and time to degree figures only if students did everything they were able to do to graduate
in four years, but could not do it because of scheduling or other matters within the control
of the university. She considered it important to look at the larger picture and at the
university's obligation to prepare students for life-long learning. She did not feel it would
be wise to push students to graduate in four years despite all the changes they need to be
prepared for as they enter the next phase of their lives. She had more concern about the
many elements to be considered, both in student's lives and the outside world, than she
had about the statistics themselves.
        President Lyall expressed appreciation to Regent Alexander for raising the issue,
which is an important one for students and the state's economy. She noted that the ORB
to be presented in June will provide greater detail. For example, it is known that many
more students are taking double majors, reflecting their judgment about career
preparation. Some campuses serve primarily commuter students and students who work
large numbers of hours. It would be appropriate, she felt, to look at each institution's
situation individually before reaching any conclusions.
       Noting that there are various actions that can be taken to affect graduation rates,
she remarked that there is balancing to be done between trying to increase graduation



                                                                                             25
               Minutes of the Board of Regents Meeting, April 7, 2000



rates and allowing students leeway to make choices about their education and careers.
For example, one way to increase the graduation rate fastest is to increase tuition rapidly,
although it is doubtful that the UW would wish to do that. From the four-year graduation
contract process, it was learned that students want flexibility to take courses in different
sequences and to take supplemental courses. The real question, she observed, is what
constitutes the right balance between student choices and preferences and the policies that
can be used to increase the statistics. In considering these matters, she hoped it would be
recognized that students are individuals and that it is important for the university to
prepare them for the future, rather than reach a statistical goal for its own sake.
         Referring to Education Committee review of this matter, Regent Smith recalled
that one issue leading to the Committee's study was concern over the additional costs of
education resulting from completion in six years, rather than four. One of the reasons for
instituting the four-year graduation contract was to take off the table the question of
whether course availability permits completion in four years. Today the contract is
available, and students can complete their degree in four years, if that is what they want
to do.
        Regent DeSimone commented that access to education is impeded by
"professional students" who stay enrolled for years beyond what would be needed to
obtain their degree.
        Regent Alexander reiterated that what is important is to do a study of students and
staff on the matter and also to consider ways to grant credit for such educational
experiences as travel abroad, internships and works study programs.
                                                         -

       Report on Efficiencies and Effectiveness

        President Lyall recalled that in 1996 a process was begun of benchmarking the
UW System against 19 other peer institutions across the country. At that time also, a
focus was put on adopting best practices from the public and private sectors and applying
continuous quality improvement techniques across the UW institutions. The purpose of
these steps is both to improve management and to show that the UW is getting the most
from existing resources before deciding whether to request additional funds.
        The report sets forth efficiencies that have been effected in instruction, student
services, and administration. It then reviews the management flexibilities that have been
acquired in recent years and what difference those flexibilities have made. The report
also identifies remaining barriers, the removal of which would help to achieve further
efficiencies.
        Turning to highlights of the report, President Lyall pointed out that the UW
System is the national benchmark for administrative efficiency, spending 5.8% on
administrative overhead, compared to an average of about 10.5% for peer institutions.
The UW System spends about the same percentage (53%) on instruction related activities
as peer institutions, but within that total the UW System spends somewhat more on
academic support, such as advising and computing, and somewhat less on other areas.



                                                                                         26
               Minutes of the Board of Regents Meeting, April 7, 2000



The UW System spends more than the average in research and scholarships and
somewhat less on public service and physical plant operations.
       Significant investments over the last several years have been made in distance
education and administrative computing systems, with most of the funding for these
items coming from reallocation of base budgets or from gifts and grants. A relatively
small portion has come from state funding.
        As an example of administrative efficiency, the President cited a system-wide
license for software that has saved $5 million to date. Other examples are market
research being used to target services to areas where they are most needed and to improve
adult education services, and employment of students to keep instructional technology
staffing up in a market where hiring is very difficult. This has turned out to be a creative
way of giving students hands-on experience, while gaining the services and support
needed to keep computing labs and other technology operative.
        The UW library system, with a single on-line catalog and the ability to move
materials around the state, has saved a great deal of money on acquisitions and reduced
duplication of materials. Learning Innovations represents a way in which new markets
are being reached with very efficient operations in distance learning.
        Management flexibilities also have helped to attain some efficiencies, President
Lyall reported, noting especially the ability to create program revenue and gift positions.
This means that, when funds are available to mount a program, the UW can hire people
and get the work done without having to go through an elaborate state process.
        In addition, the continuing appropriation authority granted in the current budget
allows the UW to spend revenues earned form programs like adult education. These
flexibilities, the president emphasized, have been very important in allowing the UW to
move forward in continuing education and other self-supporting areas where services are
needed.
        Noting that some barriers to efficiency remain, the President indicated that the
state personnel system is increasingly outdated for the university's purposes and is unlike
any system in which peer universities operate. Peers have their own personnel systems
which allow them to move quickly in filling positions and providing services.
         Another issue is charge-backs for state services in the areas of BadgetNet and
state telephone service. These charges are apportioned in such a way that the university
provides a subsidy to other agencies.
        Finally, President Lyall commented that, while pride can be taken in the low 5.8%
administrative overhead figure, she remains concerned about the need for some strategic
investments in the future. For example, consideration should be given to increasing the
investment in technology contracting, which pays off many times over in savings. She
also thought UW institutions need to invest in improving their development offices for
fund raising. An area where a modest increase in investment should be considered is in
federal relations to help UW-Milwaukee and the comprehensive institutions get more
grants and contracts than they currently do. With relatively modest investments in these
areas, the President said, the UW can position itself better for a competitive future.



                                                                                          27
               Minutes of the Board of Regents Meeting, April 7, 2000



        In summary, President Lyall concluded, the UW System continues to do more
with less than its peers and is the national benchmark for administrative efficiency. The
UW uses resources carefully and targets them to goals. Even more can be done if
barriers can be overcome in the area of state operations and if the UW is more creative in
making strategic investments.


       Under President Lyall's leadership, Regent Orr pointed out, the UW has done an
extraordinary job in efficiencies and at this point is "lean beyond lean". Because there
are fewer staff in System Administration now than previously, he asked Regents to
consider before requesting information, whether that information is likely to result in
meaningful policy moves, in order to make efficient use of the limited time of these fewer
staff.
        Regent Barry pointed out that position control extends to the actual number of
faculty and staff hired, and is imposed in addition to state budget control. He suggested
that removing such controls should be one of the highest priorities for the next biennial
budget, with the explanation that state control of the budget is sufficient, and that the UW
needs room to move within that budget as rapidly and efficiently as possible.
        President Lyall concurred that position control puts an increasingly tight bind on
what the UW can do. The university could have the money, the demand for services and
the enthusiasm to deliver them, but no positions available to do it. Noting that none of
the UW's peer institutions have position control, she indicated that they are controlled on
the dollars in their budget and audited on their budget, but do not have the double
constraint of position control.
       Regent Barry noted that part of the UW's administrative efficiency is related to
not having a large personnel function. He suggested that perhaps a cooperative system
with the state could be used to advantage for non-faculty hires, so that the UW could
make use of the best of the state system without increasing administrative costs
appreciably.
        Regent Randall pointed out that some efficiencies have had positive ripple effects.
For example, UW-Milwaukee has been a national model for employing students in
technology positions. There are similar programs for high school students to do similar
work in the Milwaukee Public Schools - work that gives them entrée to jobs and is a
point in their favor when they enter UWM. He considered it important to take into
account these positive impacts when evaluating the effectiveness of efficiency measures.



                                                     _ _ _




                                                                                          28
                 Minutes of the Board of Regents Meeting, April 7, 2000




REPORT OF THE EDUCATION COMMITTEE
          Regent Brandes, Chair of the Education Committee, presented the Committee's
report.
       Unanimously approved by the Education Committee were Resolutions 8109 -
8117. Regent Brandes moved their adoption by the Board of Regents as consent agenda
items. The motion was seconded by Regent Randall and carried unanimously.


           Minority and Disadvantaged Student; Annual Report


           Resolution 8109:                That, upon recommendation of the President of the
                                           University of Wisconsin System, the Board of Regents
                                           accepts the 1998-99 Minority and Disadvantaged
                                           Student Annual Report for submission to the governor
                                           and to the chief clerk of each house of the legislature,
                                           pursuant to s. 36.25(14m)(c), Wisc. Stats., for
                                           distribution to the appropriate standing committees
                                           under s. 13.172(3) Wisc. Stats.



          Implementing s.36.11(22)(b), Wis. Stats., relating to Sexual Assault and
          Sexual Harassment


           Resolution 8110:                That, upon recommendation of the President of the
                                           University of Wisconsin System and pursuant to 1989
                                           Wisconsin Act 177, s.36.11(22)(b), Wis. Stats., the
                                           board hereby accepts the report on implementation of
                                           the Act (the report on orientation programs and
                                           information provided to students on sexual assault and
                                           sexual harassment) and directs that the report be
                                           submitted to the chief clerk of each house of the
                                           legislature for distribution to the appropriate standing
                                           committees under s.13.172(3).




           Requests to Trustees of the William F. Vilas Trust Estate


                                                                                                  29
     Minutes of the Board of Regents Meeting, April 7, 2000




Resolution 8111:               That, upon recommendation of the Chancellors of the
                               University of Wisconsin-Madison and the University of
                               Wisconsin-Milwaukee and the President of the
                               University of Wisconsin System, the Board of Regents
                               approve the request to the Trustees of the William F.
                               Vilas Trust Estate for $5,728,825 for fiscal year July 1,
                               2000 to June 30, 2001, subject to availability, as
                               provided by the terms of the William F. Vilas Trust, for
                               Support of Scholarships, Fellowships, Professorships,
                               and Special Programs in Arts and Humanities, Social
                               Sciences, Biological Sciences, Physical Sciences and
                               Music.


UW-Madison: Authorization to Recruit: Chancellor

Resolution 8112:               That the President of the University of Wisconsin
                               System be authorized to recruit for a Chancellor of the
                               University of Wisconsin-Madison, at a salary that
                               exceeds the Executive Salary Group Six maximum.


UW-Madison: Associate or Full Professor College of Letters & Science,
Department of Sociology

Resolution 8113:               That, upon recommendation of the Chancellor of the
                               University of Wisconsin-Madison and the President of
                               the University of Wisconsin System, the Chancellor be
                               authorized to recruit for an Associate or Full Professor,
                               Department of Sociology, College of Letters & Science,
                               and to make an appointment at a salary that may exceed
                               the Executive Salary Group Six maximum (C$60,000-
                               120,000).


UW-Madison: New Program Authorization (Implementation): M.A.,
Russian, East European and Central Asian Studies

Resolution 8114:               That, upon recommendation of the Chancellor of the
                               University of Wisconsin-Madison and the President of
                               the University of Wisconsin System, the Chancellor be
                               authorized to implement the M.A. in Russian, East
                               European and Central Asian Studies.




                                                                                      30
               Minutes of the Board of Regents Meeting, April 7, 2000



        UW-La Crosse: New Program Authorization (Implementation):
        B.S., Athletic Training

        Resolution 8115:                 That, upon recommendation of the Chancellor of the
                                         University of Wisconsin-La Crosse and the President of
                                         the University of Wisconsin System, the Chancellor be
                                         authorized to implement the B.S. in Athletic Training.


        UW-Whitewater: New Program Authorization (Implementation):
        B.S.E., Early Childhood Education

        Resolution 8116:                 That, upon recommendation of the Chancellor of the
                                         University of Wisconsin-Whitewater and the President
                                         of the University of Wisconsin System, the Chancellor
                                         be authorized to implement the B.S.E. in Early
                                         Childhood Education.


        UW-Madison: Appointment of Named Professor

        Resolution 8117:                 That Chancellor David Ward be appointed Charles
                                         Kendall Adams Professor, UW-Madison, effective
                                         January 1, 2001


                                                         -


       Report of the Senior Vice President for Academic Affairs

        Senior Vice President Ward introduced Assistant Vice President for Academic
Affairs, Tess Arenas, to review the 1999 Minority and Disadvantaged Student Annual
Report. As required by statute, Dr. Arenas reported on precollege programs, and the
recruitment and retention of students of color and economically disadvantaged students.
She noted that trends are positive, but much more needs to be done in each of these areas.
A goal-by-goal report on Plan 2008 progress will come before the Board at its September
2000 meeting of this year.
                                                         -


       New Program Authorizations

       The committee heard initial presentations of five new programs:
   B.S., Computer Science, UW-Superior


                                                                                             31
              Minutes of the Board of Regents Meeting, April 7, 2000




   B.A./B.S., Liberal Studies, UW-Whitewater
   B.S., Sport and Fitness Management, UW-Parkside
   M.A., French Studies, UW-Madison
   Masters of Management, UW-River Falls
       These programs will be considered for final approval at the May committee
meeting.


                                                    _ _ _




REPORT OF THE PHYSICAL PLANNING AND FUNDING
COMMITTEE
       The committee's report was presented by Regent Barry, Chair.
       Resolutions 8118 - 8119 were approved unanimously by the Physical Planning
and Funding Committee. Regent Barry moved their adoption by the Board of Regents as
consent agenda items. The motion was seconded by Regent Mohs and carried
unanimously.



        UW-Madison: Authority to Construct an Ingraham Hall Renovation for
        TRIO Student Support Services Project


        Resolution 8118:                That, upon the recommendation of the UW-Madison
                                        Chancellor and the President of the University of
                                        Wisconsin System, authority be granted to construct an
                                        Ingraham Hall Renovation for TRIO Student Support
                                        Services project, at an estimated total project cost of
                                        $270,000, using Institutional Funds.




        UW-Madison: Approval of Budget Increase and Fund Transfer for the
        Waisman Center Addition and Remodeling Project

        Resolution 8119:                That, upon the recommendation of the UW-Madison
                                        Chancellor and the President of the University of


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              Minutes of the Board of Regents Meeting, April 7, 2000



                                        Wisconsin System, authority be granted 1) to increase
                                        the project budget by $928,800 ($829,800 gift and grant
                                        funds, $66,000 program revenue - parking utility funds,
                                        and $33,000 non-GPR institutional funds); and 2) to
                                        transfer $50,000 General Fund Supported Borrowing
                                        from the UW-Madison Utility System Improvements
                                        Project (DFD #96276) to the Waisman Center Addition
                                        and Remodeling project, for a total revised project cost
                                        of $24,538,800 ($24,389,800 gift and grant funds,
                                        $33,000 institutional funds, $66,000 program revenue
                                        funds, and $50,000 general fund supported borrowing).


                                                        -


       Report of the Assistant Vice President


       Report of Building Commission Actions

       Regent Barry reported the Building Commission approved about $6 million for
various projects in the UW System.

       Report on Recent Bids

        The UW-Milwaukee Sandburg Hall contracts are being finalized. Fourteen
projects were bid within budgets while two projects were over budget - the UW-Madison
McKay Center Addition and the UW-Stout Athletic/Recreation project. Negotiations
will continue on these two projects.

       UW-River Falls: Naming of the Teacher Education Building

       The Physical Planning and Funding Committee unanimously approved Resolution
8120. Regent Barry moved its adoption by the Board of Regents and the motion was
seconded by Regent Mohs. Put to the vote, Resolution 8120 was adopted unanimously.




        UW-River Falls: Authority to Name the Teacher Education Building

        Resolution 8120:                That, upon the recommendation of the UW-River Falls
                                        Chancellor and the President of the University of
                                        Wisconsin System, authority be granted to name the




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              Minutes of the Board of Regents Meeting, April 7, 2000



                                        new Teacher Education Building, “The Walker D.
                                        Wyman Education Building.”




                                                   _ _ _




REPORT OF THE BUSINESS AND FINANCE COMMITTEE

       Joint Session with Education Committee

      The Business and Finance Committee met in a joint session with the Education
Committee, with all Regents invited, for presentations on Student Budget priorities for
2001-03 and Plan 2008: Financial Aid Agenda. The meeting was adjourned at 2:17 p.m.


       The Business and Finance Committee reconvened at 2:22 p.m. Regent
Marcovich, Chair, presented the Committee's report. Resolutions 8121 was unanimously
approved by the Business and Finance Committee. Regent Marcovich moved its
adoption by the Board of Regents as a consent agenda item. Regent De Simone seconded
the motion and carried unanimously.


        Principal Expenditure UW System Trust Funds Elsie Engel Bequest


        Resolution 8121:                That, upon recommendation of the President of the
                                        University of Wisconsin System, and the Chancellor of
                                        the University of Wisconsin-Madison, the principal and
                                        income balance of the Elsie Engel bequest become
                                        available for spending.


                                                        -


       UW-Green Bay Initiative

      A vital region and a vital community needs a vital university, Chancellor Perkins
remarked. UW-Green is focused on learning and shaping the quality of life in its region.


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               Minutes of the Board of Regents Meeting, April 7, 2000



Its ideal position enhances public education by pursing a learning-experience focus, not
only in academia, but also in campus life. The university focuses on setting student
expectations and improving retention and graduation rates.
        Provost Cohen stated that meeting the goals of UW-Green Bay's Initiative will
require additional faculty and staff for advising and internships, an adjustment in the
enrollment level and campus facilities for the 21st Century.


                                                         -


       Trust Funds

       Written reports of the Endowment Annual Report and the update on the
Reallocation of Endowment Funds were previously distributed.


                                                         -


       Additional Items

       An update of the Blue Cross and Blue Shield transfer was presented by UW-
Madison Vice Chancellor Torphy. An order issued by the Commissioner, if approved,
would give the Board of Regents responsibility for the appointment of eight of nine
members of a community health advisory and oversight board. Four members would
represent the Board of Regents and the Medical School; the other four would represent
community advocacy groups. Approving five-year plans of the resources for medical
education and research would be the responsibility of the Board of Regents.


                                                     _ _ _

EXECUTIVE SESSION
        At 10:55 a.m., the Board recessed for five minutes. The Board reconvened in
open session at 11:00 a.m., at which time the following resolution, moved by Regent
Smith, was adopted unanimously on a roll-call vote, with Regents Alexander, Axtell,
Barry, Benson, Boyle, Brandes, Gottschalk, Mohs, Olivieri, Randall, Smith and Orr
voting in the affirmative (12). There were no dissenting votes and no abstentions.


       Resolution 8122:             That, the Board of Regents recess into closed session, to
                                    consider annual evaluations, to consider appointment of a
                                    Chancellor for the University of Wisconsin Extension, and
                                    authorization to appoint at a salary above Executive Salary


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              Minutes of the Board of Regents Meeting, April 7, 2000



                                   Group 6, UW-Madison, as permitted by s.19.85(1)(c), Wis.
                                   Stats., and to confer with legal counsel, as permitted by
                                   s.19.85(1)(g), Wis. Stats.,


       The Board arose from executive session at 11:15 a.m., having adopted the
following resolutions:


        UW Madison: Authorization to Appoint at a salary that exceeds the
        Executive Salary Group Six maximum

        Resolution 8123:                That, upon recommendation of the Chancellor of the
                                        University of Wisconsin-Madison and the President of
                                        the University of Wisconsin System, the Chancellor e
                                        authorized to appoint Dr. B. Darrel Florence as a
                                        Research Animal Veterinarian in the Primate Center,
                                        Graduate School, at a salary of A$110,000.


        UW Extension: Authority to Appoint: Chancellor

        Resolution 8124:                That, upon recommendation of the Special Regent
                                        Committee and the President of the University of
                                        Wisconsin System, Kevin P. Reilly be appointed
                                        Chancellor of the University of Wisconsin-Extension,
                                        effective July 7, 2000, at an annual salary of $142,000.


        UW Parkside: Honorary Degree

        Resolution 8125:                That, upon recommendation of the University of
                                        Wisconsin-Parkside Chancellor and the President of the
                                        University of Wisconsin System, the following
                                        honorary degree be awarded by the University of
                                        Wisconsin-Parkside, subject to acceptance by the
                                        nominee:

                                        William Beaty Boyd             Doctor of Humane Letters




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Minutes of the Board of Regents Meeting, April 7, 2000



                                           _______________________________
                                                   Judith A. Temby, Secretary




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