Outreach &

Document Sample
Outreach & Powered By Docstoc
					  Members of an environmental club, working with scallops              Lecture series attendees, after clamming in Napeague
Harbor


                                                            Outreach


 ▪ School groups and tours
      Several groups of students came to the hatchery’s upwelling and grow-out sites to take part in
      the growing and/or experimental process. Curious participators in an East Hampton High
      School science class and its Environmental Awareness Club measured shellfish, sifted sand
      and transferred scallops into clean gear along with hatchery staff and educators. The
      experiences were enjoyed by everyone involved and should continue to build useful
      relationships with students and teachers in the local schools. Community members and
      tourists also came to gain an understanding of the shellfish growing process through guided
      hatchery tours and the staff-led lecture series (see below).

 ▪ Montauk Science Fair
      Not only did school groups come to the hatchery, but hatchery staff also went to the school.
      Hatchery staff member, Jennifer Gaites participated as a judge in the Montauk School Science
      Fair in the spring. Students from 2nd through 8th grade were encouraged to participate, and
      many different projects were undertaken. Students were judged on understanding of the
      scientific process and of their individual or group project, as well as clarity of presentation,
      neatness, and a few other elements. Judges collaborated to award three cash prizes to each
      grade. It was encouraging to see the enthusiasm and understanding in these young people.

 ▪ Largest Clam Contest
       An informational display and members of the hatchery staff could one again be found at the
       East Hampton Town Trustee’s Annual Largest Clam Contest. Participants and community
       members could watch a video of a typical hatchery season, ask questions of the staff, see
       young shellfish from the grow-out system, and guess the number of clams in a dish. The
       clams were counted at the end of the day and the winner was given a contest t-shirt.

 ▪ Television appearances
       Hatchery staff could be found at work on LTV, Plum TV, and Southampton local television
       once again, as previous interviews and videos were re-aired in 2006.

 ▪ Lecture Series
       Information on many shellfish-related subjects was gathered and compiled by hatchery staff
       into a six-part lecture series for public interests. The series of lectures, by hatchery employee
       John “Barley” Dunne, was scheduled to begin in early April. However, because of little


                                                                                                                              43
     initial response from the community, the first lecture, History of Shellfish Enhancement and
     Aquaculture in New York, was cancelled. By the second lecture, it seemed the word had
     gotten out and interested locals showed up to learn about shellfish biology and broodstock
     conditioning. The last four lectures; finished off with an interactive shellfish harvesting
     session, where participants could take and eat their catch; were relatively well attended, with
     several repeat attendees. The series is scheduled to run again in the spring of 2007.

▪ Northeast Aquaculture Conference and Exposition (NACE)??
     Barley

▪ Long Island Shellfish Managers
     John




                                                                                                   44

				
Lingjuan Ma Lingjuan Ma
About