Docstoc

REAL ESTATE SECURITIES

Document Sample
REAL ESTATE SECURITIES Powered By Docstoc
					                               1




REAL ESTATE SECURITIES
 WOMEN IN INVESTING (W.I.N.)
     PHILADELPHIA, PA
    SEPTEMBER 23, 2009
2    Table of Contents
    I. Commercial Real Estate (CRE)


    II. Real Estate Investment Trusts (REITs)


    III. Outlook for Commercial RE and REITs
3




    Commercial Real Estate (CRE)
4   Commercial Real Estate
    Size of U.S. CRE market is about $3.5 trillion
           40‐50% is investment grade
    Capital intensive
    Highly leveraged
           80‐90% LTVs
    Tangible asset
    Cyclical
           Recession (Acquisition)
           Recovery (Development)
           Expansion (Disposition)
           Contraction (Raise capital)
5   CRE Lags the Overall Economy
     Job growth is the main driver of CRE demand
            Household formation (multifamily)
            Discretionary spending (retail, industrial, lodging)
            Employment (office)


     Job growth is a lagging economic indicator




    According to Korpacz Investor Survey, most of the commercial RE sector will
    feel the effects of the current recession for another two years, or more.
6   Four Quadrants of CRE Capital
    Debt Capital
           Private Debt – Mortgages (On‐balance sheet lenders)
           Public Debt – CMBS


    Equity Capital
           Private Equity – Direct RE investment
           Public Equity – REITs
7




    Real Estate Investment Trusts (REITs)
8   Size of REIT Market
    $400‐500 billion of commercial real estate properties owned
           10‐15 percent of investment‐grade commercial real estate
           More than 29,000 properties nationwide
           All major property sectors (multifamily, office, retail, lodging, industrial)
           All major geographic regions
    3 types of REITs:  Equity, Mortgage, Hybrid
           95% of REITs are equity REITs
    $230 billion equity market capitalization
    139 publicly traded REITs in the FTSE NAREIT REIT Index
           Including residential mortgage REITs
9   U.S. REITs
    Congress enacted the Real Estate Investment Trust (REIT) Act of 1960 
    providing small investors with an inexpensive vehicle for real estate 
    investment
            Strictly pass‐through entities
    A company qualifies as a REIT by satisfying the criteria specified in the tax 
    code, which include the following: 
            at least 75% of gross income must come from real property rents or interest 
            from mortgages on real property 
            at least 75% of total assets must be invested in real estate 
            at least 90% of its taxable net income must be distributed to shareholders
10   U.S. REITs
     Tax Reform Act of 1986 allowed REITs to internally manage their business
            REITs transformed into operating companies
     Modern REIT Era began in 1992
            Private CRE firms entered the public market under the REIT structure during 
            the last real estate downturn
            Public equity (stock market) was used to recapitalize CRE in the 1990’s
     REIT Modernization Act of 1999 enabled REITs to form taxable REIT 
     subsidiaries 
            Able to provide their tenants with specialized services that fall outside of the 
            purview of real estate investing
11   Stocks versus Real Estate
     REITs are a form of securitized RE that trades in the stock market
     Stock market characteristics
            Daily pricing
            Liquidity
            Going concern value based on expected revenues, cash flows, and earnings
            CRE market characteristics
            Use of leverage 
            Property (business) fundamentals driven by local economy (demand) and new 
            construction (supply)
            Asset values reflect CRE pricing


      REITs fluctuation between their stock market and CRE market valuations.
12




     Current CRE and REIT Outlook
13   CRE Fundamentals Deteriorating
     Vacancy rates rising for all property types
            Too much office space, including shadow space
            Too much retail space
            Too many apartments and competing rentals (condos, homes)
     Rents are down and net effective rents are down further
            Retail – percentage rents are down due to lower same store sales
            Office – tenant improvements (TIs) are up
            Apartments – concessions are up
            Net operating income (NOI) is down significantly
            Operating costs are declining at a lesser rate
14   Critical Juncture for CRE
     Increasing number of property owners cannot make payments, nor do they 
     have the additional equity needed to refinance
            40‐50% decline in underlying values
            TALF only available to borrowers who can refinance at low LTVs
     Transaction activity almost at a standstill
            $135 billion in default with a run‐rate of $10 billion per month
            Banks face capital shortfalls and will be forced to stop extending 
            loans and begin ridding their balance sheets of troubled assets
            Regional and community banks are feeling the most stress now
                        Click to edit Master title 
15



     About $1.5 
     trillion in CRE 
     debt exists in 
     the U.S. 
     financial 
     system.

     CRE default 
     rates are the 
     highest since 
     1994 and are 
     expected to 
     increase 
     further 
     through 2010.
                     Click to edit Master title 
16



     Regional and 
     community 
     banks have 
     the largest 
     exposure to 
     construction 
     loans.
17   Distressed Selling to Start 
     Over $150 billion in CMBS issued during the buying spree of 2005‐2007 is 
     coming due in 2010‐2012
           Mostly held by commercial banks
     Over $700 billion coming due in 2010‐2012 for on‐balance sheet lenders
           90% held by banks
     CB Richard Ellis, Jones Lang LaSalle, and Cushman & Wakefield are 
     developing online auction sites to sell property and debt
     Investors expect a multi‐year period of distressed opportunities
           Real estate funds
           Hedge funds
           Private equity
           REITs
18   REITs Graduate to the Next Cycle
     REITs survive a full property cycle as public companies
     Debt maturities satisfied through 2010
            Issued $15 billion of new equity in 2009
            Low LTVs enabled access to TALF funds
            Unsecured debt market open to REITs with high credit quality
            Positioned to strategically and opportunistically acquire property
            Accretive acquisitions will mitigate some of the earnings losses
            Will own a larger share of investment grade CRE
            Create value for shareholders



            Expect the stock market to recapitalize the CRE market again.
19   ... but Face Near‐term Headwinds
     More equity offerings may put downward pressure on stocks
           Further recapitalization of balance sheet is dilutive
           Investors already balking at commercial mortgage REIT IPOs
     Earnings expected to trough in the next 12 months
           Guidance on 3rd quarter earnings calls may push out expectations
     REIT NAVs will take on private CRE market values
           REITs currently trade at a 20% discount to private market NAVs
20




     Q & A
                                  Click to edit Master title 
21



     Carolie Burroughs, 
                           Carolie Burroughs has over 10 years of experience as an analyst and portfolio manager of real estate 
             CFA           securities.  In 2009, she founded West End Avenue Advisors LLC (WEAA) and its subsidiary, Arealis
                           Capital.  WEAA is a consulting firm providing independent research and analysis of REITs and real 
      REIT Consultant      estate‐related securities.  Under Arealis Capital, Ms. Burroughs will also seed an opportunity fund 
                           which will invest long and short in various securities and asset classes with a focus on real estate.
                           Prior to establishing WEAA, Ms. Burroughs headed the real estate securities group at Madison 
                           Square Investors (MSI), where she managed about $400 million in institutional assets.  Prior to MSI, 
                           Ms. Burroughs was a senior portfolio manager at ING Aeltus Investment Management, Inc. in 
                           Hartford, Connecticut, overseeing more than $800 million in retail assets.  She managed the real 
                           estate securities portfolios for the firm’s asset allocation funds, and managed the firm’s small cap 
                           mutual fund.  Ms. Burroughs joined Aeltus in 1998 as a quantitative equity analyst to assist the small 
                           cap and REIT portfolio managers.  In 1999, she became the firm’s REIT portfolio manager.  In 2002, 
                           Ms. Burroughs assumed the additional portfolio management responsibilities of the small cap fund.
                            Ms. Burroughs received her B.S. in Mathematics from the University of Connecticut, and M.B.A. 
                           from the Fuqua School of Business at Duke University. She achieved the Chartered Financial Analyst 
                           (CFA) designation in 2001.
                           Ms. Burroughs is a member of the New York Society of Security Analysts (NYSSA), the National 
                           Association of Real Estate Investment Trusts (NAREIT), and the Chicago Quantitative Alliance (CQA).
22

     West End Avenue Advisors LLC
             One Penn Plaza
               36th Floor
         New  York, NY 10119
            212‐786‐7529 (w)
            917‐975‐6379 (c)
     carolie.burroughs@gmail.com

				
DOCUMENT INFO
Shared By:
Stats:
views:25
posted:3/25/2011
language:English
pages:22