Beyond Borders_ March 2011

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					Beyond Borders
A BARRICK GOLD REPORT ON RESPONSIBLE MINING • MARCH 2011




          GLOBAL MINING
          LOCAL DEVELOPMENT




                                Inside: How Barrick’s mines
                                deliver benefits in Tanzania,
                                Argentina, Peru and Nevada
    BEYOND BORDERS NEWS
    Barrick earns international recognition for
    corporate responsibility
    Listed on Dow Jones Sustainability Index,
    NASDAQ’s top 100 companies

    Barrick has been named to the Dow Jones
    Sustainability World Index (DJSI), ranking
    the company as a top performer in corporate
    social responsibility for the third consecutive
    year. The DJSI is one of the world’s foremost
    indices of corporate responsibility and tracks
    the performance of 2,500 leading companies
    worldwide.
      “This recognition is the result of an enormous
    team of hard-working professionals, who
    understand our obligation to mine responsibly         BARRICK CEO, AARON REGENT
    and are committed to leadership. Barrick’s
    ranking as one of the world’s sustainability leaders validates their efforts and
    demonstrates how seriously they take this responsibility every day,” said Aaron
    Regent, Barrick’s president and CEO.
      Launched in 1999, the DJSI independently evaluates long-term economic,
    environmental, and social performance using objective benchmarks to identify
    the top performers in sustainability. Barrick was first listed on the DJSI World
    Index in 2008, and has been part of the North American listing since 2007.
      Barrick has also been ranked among the top 100 companies in the world by
    the NASDAQ Global Sustainability Index. Barrick is the only Canadian mining
    company to earn a spot on the NASDAQ listing. It features companies that
    have taken a leadership role in sustainability reporting, including carbon
    footprint, energy usage, water consumption, hazardous and non-hazardous
    waste, employee safety, workforce diversity, management composition and
    community investing.
      “We are also very pleased to be ranked as a global leader for our sustainability
    and self-reporting practices by the NASDAQ Global Sustainability Index,”
    said Regent. “These rankings provide an objective tool for socially responsible
    investment (SRI) groups and investors to assess the social and environmental
    performance of companies. We are also reaching out directly to this growing
    segment of the investment community to increase dialogue and promote a
    greater understanding of our company and our industry.”

    BARRICK RECOGNIZED FOR CARBON, WATER DISCLOSURE PROGRAMS
     In 2010, Barrick was named a climate disclosure leader by the Carbon
    Disclosure Project for the company’s reporting practices and climate change
    strategy. Going forward, Barrick will participate in the Water Disclosure
    Project to promote transparency and understanding of global industrial
    water use.
       In addition, Barrick tied for third out of 100 companies benchmarked in a
    multi-industry study ranking the water reporting practices of publicly traded
    companies, and was singled out as having the most comprehensive water
    accounting of all companies assessed. The study was conducted by Ceres, a
    Boston-based coalition of investors, with analytical support from Bloomberg
    and UBS.

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                                                                      Barrick first Canadian mining company
F E AT U R E S T O R I E S                                            to join Voluntary Principles
                                                                      on Security and Human Rights



Barrick helps Chile rebuild after earthquake                     4

Barrick extends free internet to remote towns                    5

Major new funding for Dominican clean-up                         7

Weathering the recession in Nevada                               8

Golden possibilities: mining in Tanzania                        12

Barrick supports Shoshone language preservation                 15    Barrick is committed to protecting human rights at its operations
                                                                      around the world. In late 2010, Barrick became the first Canadian
Barrick helps farmers see green in fields of red                 18
                                                                      mining company to join the Voluntary Principles on Security
Community relations at Australia’s Super Pit                    21    and Human Rights, a set of guidelines by which companies in
                                                                      the extractive sector can maintain the safety and security of their
Argentina, Peru see huge benefits from mining                    24    operations while ensuring respect for human rights.
                                                                        “Barrick’s admission by government, NGO and corporate
Award-winning project helps farmers in Peru                     29    participants reinforces our strong commitment to implement and
                                                                      advance these important human rights principles. We welcome
Fighting disease in the Dominican Republic                      30
                                                                      this opportunity to be part of a constructive dialogue on industry
Barrick strengthens grievance procedures                        32    challenges and the future of security and human rights in the
                                                                      extractive sector,” said Aaron Regent, Barrick’s president and CEO.
Barrick responds to serious allegations in                      34      The company is currently advancing the implementation of
Papua New Guinea                                                      the Voluntary Principles, engaging with NGOs, extractive sector
                                                                      companies and government members, while working closely with
Confronting violence against women                              35    local communities. This is particularly important in the complex
in Papua New Guinea
                                                                      environments in which Barrick operates and faces ongoing challenges
Employees drive responsible mining culture                      36    – and where the company is further strengthening its compliance
                                                                      with these human rights principles.
Environmental update                                            39      The implementation and consolidation of the Voluntary Principles
                                                                      and audit protocol are a high priority for Barrick in 2011. Moving
                                                                      forward, this will assist in improving performance in the security and
                                                                      human rights area.

                                                                      NEW INITIATIVES TO STRENGTHEN CORPORATE GOVERNANCE
                                                                      The company is also undertaking two new corporate social
                                                                      responsibility (CSR) initiatives to further strengthen Barrick’s global
                                                                      performance. To enhance expertise in CSR at the most senior level of
                                                                      the company, Barrick will be establishing an external CSR Advisory
                                                                      Board that will provide advice and guidance on challenging social
                                                                      and environmental issues and encourage further innovation and
                                                                      leadership. The company intends to establish the advisory board
                                                                      in 2011, comprised of external experts and representatives of key
                                                                      stakeholder groups.
INSIDE: LEARN HOW BARRICK IS STIMULATING ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT            Barrick will also appoint an independent director to its Board of
AND CREATING JOBS IN NEVADA (PAGE 8), TANZANIA (PAGE 12), ARGENTINA   Directors to support the company’s commitment to corporate social
AND PERU (PAGE 24).                                                   responsibility. A search is underway to fi ll this position in 2011.

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BEYOND BORDERS NEWS                                                        One year later:
                                                                           Barrick helps Chile rebuild after
                                                                           devastating earthquake

                                                                           More than 100 students in the small community of Aquelarre
                                                                           have returned to class for the first time since their school was
                                                                           severely damaged by the 8.8-magnitude earthquake that struck
                                                                           Chile in February 2010.
                                                                             Barrick funded the reconstruction and expansion of the
                                                                           school, which was the first in the country to be fully rebuilt
                                                                           following the earthquake. The new school has a sports field,
                                                                           better classrooms, and more space for recreational activities.
                                                                             Barrick also installed a computer lab in the school as part of
                                                                           the Class 21 program. This collaborative educational partnership
                                                                           with the Cisneros Foundation, Intel and Barrick aims to bridge
                                                                           the digital divide by introducing computer technology to
                                                                           classrooms in underserviced regions of Chile.
                                                                             “We were extremely pleased to help the community with
                                                                           this project, which has put more than 100 children back in the
                                                                           classroom after a difficult period,” said Igor Gonzales, president
                                                                           of Barrick’s South America region. “Our task does not end here,
                                                                           however, because we’re also supporting the reconstruction of
                                                                           Boyeruca School, and a boarding school in Vichuquén.”
                                                                             In addition to rebuilding local schools, Barrick is also helping
                                                                           to restore damaged heritage buildings in the region. The town of
                                                                           Vichuquén is designated as a national historic site in Chile, but
                                                                           many of the area’s colonial façades and structures were badly
                                                                           damaged in the earthquake.
                                                                             To assist, Barrick engaged experts from Peru’s state
                                                                           construction agency SENCICO, which has pioneered
                                                                           earthquake-resistant construction techniques for adobe




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buildings. These professionals held workshops to train local
residents and tradespeople on how to rebuild and preserve the
region’s historic architecture.
  Barrick also signed an agreement with Chile’s National
Monument Commission and the municipality of Vichuquén
that will see the company contribute money and technical
expertise to reconstruction efforts.
  In the immediate aftermath of the earthquake, 250 volunteers
from Barrick and two partner organizations worked to build
emergency homes in several quake-affected communities.
Barrick supported the construction of 200 emergency houses,
the first phase of a $5 million, long-term plan for reconstruction
in Chile’s coastal region of Maule, which was hit hard by the
earthquake and subsequent tsunami. Following the earthquake,
the company also donated 8,000 litres of water, mattresses,             INTERNET ACCESS ALLOWS HUASCO VALLEY SCHOOLS TO PARTICIPATE
pillows and blankets to local residents, many of whom had lost          IN BARRICK’S CLASS 21 PROGRAM, WHICH BRINGS MODERN COMPUTER

their homes.                                                            TECHNOLOGY TO UNDERSERVICED CLASSROOMS.


IGOR GONZALES, BARRICK’S REGIONAL PRESIDENT FOR SOUTH AMERICA (LEFT),   Barrick extends free WiFi to remote
AND VICHUQUÉN MAYOR ROMÁN PAVEZ HAND OVER AN EMERGENCY HOME TO
A LOCAL WOMAN.
                                                                        Chilean communities
                                                                        Building on efforts to increase internet access in the remote
                                                                        communities of Chile’s Huasco Valley, Barrick has enabled
                                                                        residents in the rural towns of Carrizalillo, Nicolasa and
                                                                        Maitencillo to connect to the internet.
                                                                          In agreement with the local municipality, the company is now
                                                                        providing free WiFi internet connectivity to the Freirina area,
                                                                        enabling families and their children to connect to a world of
                                                                        learning beyond the classroom. For many, it will mean access to
                                                                        new information.
                                                                          “The fact that these isolated communities are now able to
                                                                        access free internet is a major improvement in the lives of
                                                                        more than 100 families, and vastly improves the quality of
                                                                        education for children in and around these remote rural areas,”
                                                                        said Rodrigo Rivas, Barrick’s director of Corporate Affairs
                                                                        in Chile. The Mayor of Freirina, Roberto Bruzzone, added,
                                                                        “Providing internet access is so important to the children in
                                                                        this area, because it allows them to have the same educational
                                                                        opportunities as those students who attend urban schools.”
                                                                          Education is a strategic focus of Barrick’s community
                                                                        programs. The internet initiative goes hand in hand with
                                                                        Barrick’s Class 21 program, which is already providing laptops
                                                                        to schools across the region. The Class 21 initiative is offered by
                                                                        Barrick, in partnership with Intel and the Cisneros Foundation,
                                                                        supplying computers and soft ware to students in rural
                                                                        communities.
                                                                          Barrick has already provided internet access to the town of
                                                                        Alto del Carmen. In 2009, Barrick funded the installation of
                                                                        new towers that provide over 5,000 residents with dependable
                                                                        wireless internet access.

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BEYOND BORDERS NEWS




Barrick partners with the
Nature Conservancy to boost biodiversity in Australia


Barrick is piloting the Nature Conservancy’s Development by                 the cost-effectiveness of mitigation efforts and direct funding to
Design conservation program at its Kanowna mine in Western                  higher-value conservation efforts.
Australia. Development by Design blends conservation planning                 “This approach includes a modelling tool that will give us an
with a hierarchy of mitigation approaches – first to avoid, then            advance look at our operational impact and add to Barrick’s
minimize, and finally “offset” or compensate for biodiversity               expertise in mitigation planning,” said Williams. “The Nature
impacts.                                                                    Conservancy will develop a set of offset options and Barrick can
  “This science-based approach will help us to implement                    then select the most effective and cost-efficient offset portfolio.
Barrick’s biodiversity standard, which took effect in July                  The offsets will be instituted to meet the obligations set out in
of 2009,” said Bill Williams, Barrick’s vice-president of                   Barrick’s biodiversity standard.”
Environment. “Our standard commits all Barrick projects and                   The project agreement took effect on Jan. 1, 2011, and is
operating sites to strive for no net loss of biodiversity.”                 scheduled for completion by September of this year.
  The Nature Conservancy is the world’s largest conservation
                                                                              In 2008, Barrick became the first mining company to become a member
organization. Barrick is one of only a few companies to pilot
                                                                              of the International Leadership Council of the Nature Conservancy. The
Development by Design. The program is intended to reduce
                                                                              Council is considered to be one of the world’s leading business forums to
conflicts between development needs and conservation, increase                address significant global conservation and environmental issues.




                                      Biodiversity advisory panel
                                      to help protect sensitive species in the Dominican Republic
                                      In the Dominican Republic, a second pilot project to protect local species near the Pueblo Viejo project
                                      is now underway. For the first time, Barrick has appointed a biodiversity advisory panel comprised of
                                      leading academics and experts knowledgeable about biodiversity and conservation in the Dominican.
                                      The panel’s role will be to evaluate and advise the company in this area. Barrick has conducted
                                      extensive research to better understand and identify potential biodiversity offset projects, with a
                                      particular focus on protecting two indigenous frog species: the yellow tree frog and the giant tree frog.


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Barrick doubles funding for
environmental clean-up in the
Dominican Republic

At the site of the Pueblo Viejo project in the Dominican
Republic, Barrick is leading one of the mining industry’s most
ambitious environmental rehabilitation projects.
  The large-scale clean-up effort was necessitated by the
improper closure of a former mine on the Pueblo Viejo
property in 1999. Over the years, the old mine caused extensive
contamination of soil and local waterways. Barrick has
completed rehabilitation of the operating areas of the project to
international standards.                                                “It was initially proposed that if the clean-up cost $75 million,
  In addition to site rehabilitation, Barrick has agreed to fund     the company would contribute $37.5 million and the state would
and manage the clean-up of the surrounding area, which will          contribute the other half, but in the end Barrick offered to take
help to improve local living conditions. Under the original          on the full cost of remediation,” López said. “Every element and
project agreement, the Dominican government was responsible          substance there was hazardous and was handled according to
for historic impacts outside the project area.                       the highest environmental quality standards in effect in any
  “Despite the fact that the contract between the company and        developed country,” he said.
the state stipulates that Barrick is only responsible for cleaning      Construction at Pueblo Viejo is underway and production
up the environment in the areas it is developing, the company        is scheduled to start in the first quarter of 2012. The project is
has also taken on the rehabilitation of other zones outside that     operated by Pueblo Viejo Dominicana Corporation (PVDC), a
area,” said Octavio López director of Mining at the country’s        company jointly owned by Barrick (60 per cent) and Goldcorp
Trade and Industry ministry.                                         (40 per cent). Total expected mine life is more than 25 years.



                                                      2010 ECONOMIC VALUE ADDED
                                                      Globally, Barrick’s operations are a catalyst for social and
                                                      economic development and have a direct impact on improving
                                                      the standard of living for communities in and around the
                                                      company’s mine sites and projects.


                                                       over $9 billion                   invested in economic
                                                                                         development, including local and
                                                                                         regional purchases, wages, taxes
                                                                                         and royalties.


                                                       over $31 million                  invested in social development,
                                                                                         including health care, education,
                                                                                         infrastructure and sustainable
                                                                                         development programs.




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    Weathering
    the recession
                                               Barrick provides jobs,
                                               security and an air of optimism
                                               in recession-battered Nevada




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             Looking out the front door of his home in Reno, Nevada, John Dobra can see
             three “For sale” signs on neighbouring properties. On his drive into work as
             professor of economics at the University of Nevada, he passes many more. The
             signs are indicators of a depressed housing market and the outward symbol of
             a state in economic crisis.
                Nevada continues to lead the nation in bankruptcies, foreclosures and
             joblessness. Although Las Vegas, the state’s largest city, continues to draw
             tourists to its famed casinos, gaming has been hit hard by recessionary pres-
             sures. Those who are still coming to Sin City aren’t spending as much as in
             past years, and the growth that has driven Nevada’s prosperity for decades
             has ceased. The result is a state-wide record-high unemployment rate of more
             than 14 per cent – and at least 15 per cent in Las Vegas.
                “We are not doing well,” Dobra said. “The recession has had a significant
             effect on the state’s economy.” People are losing their houses, jobs and life
             savings.
                But drive along Interstate 80 toward Elko County and signs of the reces-
             sion begin to disappear. Here, in this large but sparsely populated pocket of
             northeastern Nevada, a different story is unfolding. The unemployment rate
             in Elko County hovers at eight per cent, well below both the state average and
             the national rate. Much of the area’s prosperity is linked to mining, which
             is the largest employer and main source of income in several rural Nevada
             counties.
                While some industrial mineral producers have been hurt by the slowdown
             in new home construction, metals such as gold, silver and copper are riding
             nearly a full decade of rising prices. Located deep in the heart of mining
             country, the Elko area is blessed by the largest gold deposits in North America.
             Barrick operates five mines in Nevada and holds interests in two others.
                Barrick is continuing to invest in its U.S. operations, infusing more than
             $1 billion in capital into mine expansions in Nevada and Montana and hiring
             approximately 800 new employees in the last five years.
                “There is no comparable industry that could be holding up like this in a
             recession,” Dobra said.

             NEW JOBS
             After 11 years working in the construction industry, Romney Natapu began
             contemplating a change in career last year as he noticed a state-wide slowdown
             in new home construction.
               “I came to the conclusion that it was time to try something different,” the
             37-year-old said.




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   In July, Natapu landed a job as a miner at Barrick’s Goldstrike operation about
60 kilometres northwest of Elko. “I never thought mining could be this exciting,” he said.
“I am looking forward to learning more about the opportunities in this industry.”
   Natapu is one of the hundreds of new faces Barrick has hired in the last few years. The
company directly employs more than 3,500 people in Nevada and its operations generate
thousands more indirect jobs in the community. It is estimated that the mining industry
supports more than 50,000 indirect jobs across the state.
   The average annual wage of a Barrick employee in Nevada is well over $60,000, about
$20,000 higher than the average income in all occupations statewide. “Even during
times of economic hardship in the United States, we are providing our employees with
family-sustaining wages, as well as something that is very rare right now in Nevada – job
security,” says Michael Brown, Barrick’s vice president of Public Affairs in the United
States.
   David Klaas couldn’t agree more. He arrived in Elko County just a few months ago to
begin a job as senior controls engineer at Barrick’s Cortez mine. After being laid off from
his job in the forestry sector in Oregon, Klaas set off with his wife and three children
across the country looking for work. It was a difficult year and a hard adjustment for
a family used to living in one place. It took more than a year of job hunting, but Klaas
finally settled in Elko.
   “For the first time in a long time, I feel a sense of security for my job,” he said. “I am
excited to be in a dynamic field that has opportunities for me.” As for his family, they are
happy to be settled again. “The kids like their school and my wife is glad to be close to
her family in Oregon,” Klaas said. “The lifestyle in Elko is terrific. The town is friendly
and thriving.”

TAX REVENUES
As Nevada’s largest gold producer, the taxes Barrick pays on its net proceeds are a big
boost to state coffers. As the state struggles with an estimated $1 billion budget shortfall,
Barrick and other large mining companies have helped Nevada close this gap by prepaying
their net proceeds of mining taxes for 2009 and 2010.
  “To date, Barrick has prepaid more than $120 million in taxes on expected production
in several Nevada counties,” Brown said.




DAVID KLASS (ABOVE LEFT) AND ROMNEY NATAPU (ABOVE CENTRE) BOTH RELOCATED TO ELKO AFTER
SECURING STABLE, HIGH QUALITY JOBS WITH BARRICK. THE MINING INDUSTRY IN NEVADA IS BOOMING AT
A TIME WHEN THE REST OF THE STATE IS STRUGGLING WITH HIGH UNEMPLOYMENT AND FALLING TOURISM
REVENUES.




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             MICHAEL BROWN, BARRICK’S VICE PRESIDENT OF PUBLIC AFFAIRS IN THE UNITED STATES (LEFT)
             PICTURED WITH ENTERTAINER MARIE OSMOND AT SOUTHERN NEVADA’S RUN FOR THE WISH EVENT.




             BARRICK ANSWERS THE CALL TO HELP NEVADA’S FAMILIES

             As Nevada struggles to return to more prosperous times, a growing focus of
             Barrick’s philanthropic work in Nevada is helping families in need.
               The responsibility for providing essential services, such as emergency food
             assistance, is increasingly falling to the private sector, and Barrick is answering
             the call. By supporting Three Square, southern Nevada’s only food bank, Barrick
             has joined with other companies and philanthropists to help nearly 100,000
             food-insecure Nevadans each month, including approximately 40,000 children.
               Established in 2007 and modelled on best practices from top food banks in
             Feeding America’s national network, Three Square has quickly become one of
             the most innovative and productive food banks in America. It is also Southern
             Nevada’s largest hunger-relief organization, serving Las Vegas and four rural
             counties encompassing over 40,000 square miles.
               Barrick’s role in the fight against hunger is critically important in Nevada as
             Three Square has become a national-model food bank. Three Square is piloting
             new initiatives aimed at getting more food to more hungry people – faster and
             more efficiently. Once tested, these new initiatives will be replicated by other
             Feeding America food banks across the country.
               “We’re very proud of our partnership with Barrick,” says Julie Murray, Three
             Square’s president and CEO. “Together, we are providing food – and hope – to
             Nevada’s most vulnerable residents when they need our help the most.”
               Barrick is also supporting the Make-A-Wish Foundation in southern Nevada
             through event sponsorship. Barrick was a Platinum Sponsor for the 10th annual
             five-kilometre Run for the Wish event held on Feb. 5, 2011. Michael Brown,
             Barrick’s vice president of Public Affairs in the United States, was among more
             than 6,000 runners who participated in the event. The Make-A-Wish Foundation
             is a not-for-profit organization that grants wishes to children from two to
             eighteen years of age with life-threatening medical conditions.




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                                                                Golden possibilities:
                                                                Mining and
                                                                economic development
                                                                in Tanzania


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For many years, Evodius Fulgence struggled with the irony of
his business model: selling small electrical appliances in an area
where residents had little to no access to affordable electricity.
   “Business was not good,” the young entrepreneur said. “The
demand for electrical appliances such as televisions, fans and
music systems was very low.”
   The Tanzanian town of Kakola, population 17,000, is where
Fulgence operates his business. The town’s only source of power
used to come from expensive and dirty diesel generators.             EVODIUS FULGENCE ARRANGES GOODS ON THE SHELVES OF HIS ELECTRICAL
Operating these generators is pricey and power was considered        SUPPLY SHOP IN KAKOLA, A TOWN THAT NOW HAS RELIABLE ELECTRICITY
a luxury. “I spent a lot of money running a diesel generator for     THANKS TO A PARTNERSHIP WITH BARRICK.
my business,” Fulgence said. “I could not use some appliances
because the power produced from generators was inadequate.”          Over the last decade, mining companies alone have invested
Fulgence would keep his business open only during daylight           $2.5 billion in the country.
hours, fearing for his own security once the town went dark.           Gold has quickly overtaken agricultural products as
But today, Fulgence has no such worry. “I have extended my           Tanzania’s largest export. In 1999, exports of the country’s
working time up to 10 p.m.,” he said.                                traditional products, such as tea, coffee, tobacco, cotton and
   The turnaround came in 2008 when Barrick partnered with           cashews, were relatively equal to that of gold. Less than a
TANESCO, the national power utility, to bring electricity to         decade later, gold exports are at nearly 700 per cent more than
Kakola and surrounding areas for the first time. As the large        the other products combined.
wooden electricity poles went up in the community, so too did          Even at this early stage, more than 50 per cent of Tanzania’s
Fulgence’s sales.                                                    total export income comes from six gold mines. Four of these
   “The electrification project has improved my life, doubled my     are ABG properties: North Mara, Bulyanhulu, Tulawaka
customers and doubled my income,” he said. Fulgence is taking        and Buzwagi. Exports from gold mining currently bring in a
advantage of the town’s newest commodity by introducing              substantial $770 million annually and are expected to double in
new products, such as DVD players, to his shop. He even plans        the next six years.
to open a second store selling refrigerators, deep freezers and        While industry critics have focused on corporate income
microwaves.                                                          tax rates, a macroeconomic study by the World Gold Council
   His success story is a familiar one in towns where electrical     confirmed that Barrick is among the largest single taxpayers in
supply is reliably available. “Businesses tend to gravitate to       the country. In 2009 alone, the Tanzanian government received
places that can provide essentials such as electricity,” says Greg   approximately $73 million in payments from the company in
Hawkins, CEO of African Barrick Gold (ABG). “We want these           the form of payroll taxes, royalties and other levies.
communities to develop and we know that by extending the
power supply here, businesses will flourish and quality of life
will improve.”
   In the last decade, Barrick has invested more than $100
million to extend the national electricity grid to its four mine
sites and the communities that surround them. “Th is is a big
benefit that we as a company can offer to our neighbouring
communities,” Hawkins said. Electrification of rural
communities is only part of Barrick’s contribution to the
growth of Tanzania’s economy.
   Since the late 1990s, when the first large-scale gold mines
began production in Tanzania, the country has benefitted from
the extraction of its most valuable resource.
   The commodity has already placed the African nation among
the continent’s top destinations for foreign direct investment.

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         70%               abg revenue retained in tanzania (2009)


       Local goods
       and services              40%

                                                            Imported goods
       Local salaries                                       and services
                                20%              30%

       Taxes, royalties
       and communities            10%



KEEPING MINING REVENUES IN-COUNTRY                                           at around $1 per day and finding reliable, long-term employment
ABG has invested over $1.6 billion in capital in Tanzania to date.           can be a challenge. Chiwaligo says his company is now planning
In fact, the vast majority of revenue generated from Barrick’s               for the future.
operations in Tanzania is retained in the country. In 2009, 60 per              “We have a plan to introduce sustainable development projects,
cent was paid out to local employees as well as in payments for              particularly income-earning projects, that will help members
local goods and services. Another 10 per cent was paid in taxes              of the society change their economic welfare,” he said. “We will
and royalties and was invested to benefit communities. ABG                   also train board members to acquire leadership and management
spent only about 30 per cent on imported goods and services from             skills in areas of people management and recruitment.”
outside Tanzania. Thus, out of the total revenue ABG generated in
2009, roughly 70 per cent was retained in the country.                                                INVESTING IN EMPLOYEE TRAINING
  Overall, more than 46 per cent of the value of mined minerals                                         Perhaps one of the most significant
generated by the mining industry is kept in Tanzania, paid                                              outcomes of a strong mining sector is the
out through taxation, government contributions, employment                                              ability for Tanzanians to carve out solid
salaries, training, infrastructure, procurement within Tanzania,                                        careers in a constantly evolving industry.
and corporate social investments. The total contributed is nearly                                       The mining industry has spent more than
$3 billion thus far. With mineral extraction set to ramp up in the                                      $35 million to train local employees to
next few years, that number will increase.                                                              work in the sector. In 2009 alone, African
                                                                                                        Barrick Gold invested $1 million in skills
                                                                             GODLIVER MANUMBU
CREATING NEW JOBS IN MINING                                                                             development.
Large-scale mining employs nearly 15,000 Tanzanians, more                       Take, for example, Godliver Manumbu. She began her career
than the total of those employed in all the utility sectors                  at Barrick as a personal assistant to the general manager at the
combined. Barrick alone has 4,200 employees in its mines and                 local mining office in Buzwagi. After a year, she was appointed
hires an additional 5,000 contractors.                                       as the mine team-building co-ordinator, focused on employee
   Indirect employment is even greater. It is generally believed             business understanding and conflict management. During this
that for every job in the mining sector, three indirect jobs                 time, Manumbu continued her education, receiving a Bachelor
are created. Approximately 50,000 Tanzanians are currently                   of Arts in sociology with a major in human psychology.
employed in jobs related to mining. Barrick’s local procurement                 “I was promoted to take up the role of Community Relations
policy ensures that, whenever possible, all supplies are sourced             Manager,” Manumbu said. For two years, she worked in the
at a local or regional level. Although large-scale supplies are              role until she was promoted to Community Relations systems
not always available for purchase in developing countries such               co-ordinator, a job she currently occupies.
as Tanzania, Barrick has created a local supplier development                   For Shufaa Lukoo the story is much the same. She was working
program to increase the capacity of local businesses.                        in sales at a local hotel when she heard about a job opening with
   Since July 2010, Nyemo Chiwaligo has been working with                    Barrick. She started as a document controller and received two
Barrick to supply a steady stream of recruits for work at the                promotions in just two years. Since becoming a quality systems
Bulyanhulu mine in Tanzania’s Lake Zone region. Chiwaligo’s                  manager, Lukoo has not only increased her take-home pay, but
company, IBUKA, is creating an inventory of skills available in              has also received training opportunities.
the local labour market and matching it to Barrick’s labour needs.              “While with Barrick, I had an opportunity to gain my Masters
Through its partnership with Barrick, the company is creating                in Business Administration,” she said.
employment opportunities for local residents. IBUKA itself is                   Godliver and Shufaa represent just two of the many success
poised to earn upwards of $50,000 annually for its work. This is a           stories made possible by the presence of mining companies such
significant amount in a country where the average income hovers              as Barrick.

14                                                                                                                                  March 2011
                                                                                                               B E YO N D B O R D E R S |   A BARRICK GOLD REPORT ON RESPONSIBLE MINING




                                                                                              Sustaining a
                                                                                              Native American
                                                                                              culture
                                                                                              Barrick supports Shoshone
                                                                                              language preservation program




                                                                  When Stephanie Tabibian was a young child, she spent countless hours sitting at
                                                                  home with her great-grandmother listening to the beautiful sounds of Shoshone
                                                                  being spoken. A member of the Duck Valley Indian Reservation in Owyhee,
                                                                  Nevada, Tabibian would travel with her grandfather to Idaho every weekend to
                                                                  visit her elderly relatives and listen to them speaking their native tongue.

                                                                  Although she had never been formally taught to speak Shoshone and only recog-
Images courtesy of the Great Basin Indian Archive.




                                                                  nized some words and phrases, these weekend trips sparked a love of the language
                                                                  and started her on a path that is rare among her peers – a dedication to learning
                                                                  Shoshone fluently and preserving the language for future generations.




                                                     March 2011                                                                                                                     15
A BARRICK GOLD REPORT ON RESPONSIBLE MINING   | B E YO N D B O R D E R S




EACH YEAR BARRICK SPONSORS 20 SHOSHONE TEACHERS TO TRAVEL TO THE
UNIVERSITY OF UTAH FOR A TEACHER TRAINING WORKSHOP.




   “This is my life’s work,” the 22-year old University of Oregon
student said. “I believe that we have a really high chance of
bringing this language back.”
   The once-widespread language is now in danger of completely
dying out. Experts put the number of fluent Shoshone speak-
ers at less than 4,000 across the United States – perhaps even
less. The vast majority of these speakers are elders and most
only know the language in its original oral form. Passing the
language along to subsequent generations has proved to be a
challenge.
   The preservation of the Shoshone language and the cultural
significance it holds for the Shoshone people is the focus of a
Barrick-sponsored program at the University of Utah.
   Since 2007, Barrick has provided annual funding for the
Shoshone Language Project at the University’s Center for
American Indian Languages. The aim of the project is to create
learning and teaching tools for the disappearing language. It
builds upon the work of Wick R. Miller, an anthropological
linguist who collected recordings of more than 500 narratives
and songs by fluent Shoshone speakers during the late 1960s and
early 1970s.
   “The original funding from Barrick allowed us to complete
the transcription, translation and a first proofreading of this
collection,” said Marianna Di Paolo, associate professor in the
department of linguistics and administrator of the program.
“Completing this work was a very important milestone in the
preservation of the traditional oral culture of the Shoshone
people.”
   Through Barrick’s continued support, the project has grown
to include a genealogy database containing family relationship
information for the speakers interviewed by Miller and an
ongoing electronic dictionary which already includes more than
30,000 words translated from Shoshone to English.
   “The basic work on preserving and disseminating the
Wick R. Miller Collection materials has spun off into various
activities, including claymation fi lms, children’s storybooks,
teacher training workshops, and many others,” Di Paolo said.
   Bill Upton, Barrick’s director of Environment for Barrick
North America, has been administrating the program on the

16                                                                         March 2011
                                                                                B E YO N D B O R D E R S |   A BARRICK GOLD REPORT ON RESPONSIBLE MINING




                                                                        IN 2009, 10 STUDENTS PARTICIPATED IN THE SHOSHONE YOUTH LANGUAGE
                                                                        AND APPRENTICESHIP PROGRAM AT THE UNIVERSITY OF UTAH. BESIDES
                                                                        GETTING A CHANCE TO EXPERIENCE POST-SECONDARY EDUCATION, THESE
                                                                        STUDENTS WORKED ON PROJECTS DESIGNED TO REVIVE THE DECLINING
                                                                        SHOSHONE LANGUAGE FOR THEIR COMMUNITIES.


                                                                        company’s behalf since the beginning. “We have had nothing
                                                                        but positive feedback from communities about this program,” he
                                                                        said. “It has been very successful.”
                                                                           While the program receives support from the University and
                                                                        government grants, Barrick has been the sole corporate sponsor
                                                                        of the initiative, donating more than $700,000 to date.
                                                                           One of the most exciting aspects of the program is the
                                                                        Shoshone Youth Language and Apprenticeship Program, held
                                                                        at the university each summer. High school students from
                                                                        various Shoshone tribes travel to Salt Lake City for a six-week
                                                                        paid internship. They live in dormitories, study the Shoshone
                                                                        language and work on preservation projects.
                                                                           Two years ago, Tabibian was one of the participants. The
ABOVE: STEPHANIE TABIBIAN                                               program helped her along her path towards language studies
AND OTHER YOUNG SHOSHONE                                                at the University of Oregon and fostered a sense of hope that
SPEAKERS ARE DEDICATED TO                                               Shoshone can be revived. She is returning this summer to work
PRESERVING THEIR LANGUAGE                                               as a research assistant.
WITH SUPPORT FROM BARRICK,                                                 “When I first started learning Shoshone, my grandpa was
WHICH HAS SPONSORED A
                                                                        skeptical that the language could be learned in a few hours a
SHOSHONE LANGUAGE PROGRAM
                                                                        day,” she said. “But he has been impressed.” Tabibian says her
AT THE UNIVERSITY OF UTAH
                                                                        grandfather – a fluent Shoshone speaker – is now teaching him-
SINCE 2007. LEFT: HIGH SCHOOL
STUDENTS IN THE SHOSHONE
                                                                        self how to read and write in the language using the tools created
LANGUAGE AND CULTURE PROGRAM                                            by the program. “The elders find the idea of language revival
PRODUCE TRADITIONAL ART.                                                very exciting,” she said.
                                                                           To help along those elders who want to pass their language
                                                                        skills on to younger generations, Di Paolo and her team at the
                                                                        university have created teaching curriculums and hold annual
                                                                        teacher workshops. The next one is planned for April, 2011.
                                                                           Barrick will sponsor travel and accommodation costs for 20
                                                                        Shoshone teachers to attend the workshop. Di Paolo says that
                                                                        getting young people to speak the language again is a big task,
                                                                        but important to the identity of the community. “I can see that
                                                                        the Shoshone people want to keep their language alive and I
                                BRIAN MASON, ENVIRONMENTAL              want to help them,” she said.
                                SUPERINTENDENT AT RUBY HILL, HAS           For Tabibian, knowing the language of her ancestors speaks
                                ASSISTED MEMBERS OF HIS COMMUNITY       to the core of her identity as a member of her tribe. “It provides
                                (DUCK VALLEY) IN PARTICIPATING IN THE   you with an understanding as to why songs are sung and what
                                LANGUAGE PROGRAM.                       meaning each song has,” she said. “It is part of what makes you
                                                                        who you are.”

  March 2011                                                                                                                                         17
             Barrick
     helps farmers see green
         in fields of red



18                         March 2011
                          SUN-DRIED TOMATOES NOW
             BIG BUSINESS FOR ARGENTINA FARMING COMMUNITIES




                Jose Seeman shakes his                                 head as he walks through
                acres of dried-out onion                               fields in his hometown of
                Jachal, in the foothills of Argentina’s Andes Mountains. “This is a community
                of about 20,000 residents and we’ve always mainly relied on onion production,”
                says Seeman, an experienced local farmer. “But that’s a practice whose time has
                run out. It has no future.”
                 Long considered the onion capital of Argentina, Jachal’s history of single-crop
                farming led to soil degradation and over-saturation of the commercial market.
                Low crop yields meant that farmers in this tight-knit community, located near
                Barrick’s Veladero mine and the company’s Pascua-Lama project, lacked a sus-
                tainable income. A low standard of living also meant no capital to invest back
                into their business.
                 “With onions, you get farther and farther behind,” said Nelson Jofre, another
                local farmer. “Ten years go by and maybe just one year is a good one, so it’s not
                profitable anymore. It’s bad. Really bad.”
                 Barrick helped to launch a sun-dried tomato exporting initiative to help
                Jachal farmers in Argentina develop a sustainable livelihood and expand their
                production and markets. In 2005, an agreement was signed between Barrick
                and the Jachal Farmers Association to assist local farmers to diversify their
                crops, improve productivity and sell their produce on the international market
                at competitive prices. The government of San Juan province was also a signa-
                tory to the agreement, which was warmly welcomed by the struggling farming
                community.
                 Barrick also upgraded existing irrigation systems, which improved soil
                conditions and crop yields for farmers in both Jachal and the neighbouring
                Iglesia community.



March 2011                                                                                          19
A BARRICK GOLD REPORT ON RESPONSIBLE MINING   | B E YO N D B O R D E R S




                                                                              “I started two years ago and this season I’m going to double
                                                                           the amount I planted last year, just because the results are so
                                                                           good,” said Marcelo Balmaceda, a local tomato producer. Nearby,
                                                                           Marcelo Tejada is also seeing excellent results with his tomato
                                                                           crops. “Barrick has been helping us,” Tejada said. “They’ve always
                                                                           helped us with the supplies we need. They’ve been providing us
                                                                           with lots of things that have been making all this possible.”
                                                                              Since the start of the initiative in 2007, Barrick has invested
                                                                           nearly $600,000 to help local farmers get their operations off
                                                                           the ground. The company has been involved in every step of the
                                                                           project’s development, hiring professional agrologists to provide
                                                                           training and quality control to producers keen to be part of the
   In the year following the agreement, a group of 10 local farmers        burgeoning industry. As part of the company’s contribution,
agreed to participate in a small pilot project to see how tomatoes         quality seedlings appropriate for the climate have also been
would take to the climate. Barrick offered training, technical             provided to ensure a high rate of success.
support and advice to these farmers and organized instructional               The success of the sun-dried tomatoes produced by farmers in
visits to successful large-scale farms in other parts of San Juan          San Juan province is having an international impact. In Brazil,
province. A total of 10 hectares were sown that year. The harvest          where sun-dried tomatoes are becoming a mainstay of the diet,
was processed at a drying facility owned by Prune SA in San Juan,          importers are reportedly thrilled with the high-quality product.
where the fresh tomatoes were turned into the popular sun-dried               “The Argentine sun-dried tomato, and especially this brand El
product.                                                                   Plata from San Juan, is one of the finest you’ll find in the market,”
   The results from the first year were impressive, yielding a             said Hermes Verniano, a representative of the Fornello company
healthy tomato crop and providing the farmers with a sustainable           in Brazil. “It has a nice texture, good consistency and a flavour that
income for the first time in decades. In the subsequent growing            makes it stand out from the dried tomatoes of other countries.”
season, the cultivation area was doubled to 20 hectares and results           Since the product began appearing in Brazil, its sales have
were equally promising.                                                    grown year after year, providing the farmers in San Juan with a
   “We found that the international market for sun-dried toma-             tidy profit and an increased demand for their produce.
toes was growing and the product produced in San Juan province                The eastern slopes of the Central Andes Mountains are now
was of excellent quality,” said Julio Claudeville, Corporate Affairs       ablaze with tomato plants and a renewed economic optimism for
manager for Barrick Argentina. “That made the producers enthu-             the future of agriculture. “Th is is opening up a whole new future
siastic about the crop and gave them confidence in continuing on           for us,” said farmer Jose Seeman. “Giving us a chance to diversify
a larger scale.”                                                           our farms.”
   In 2009, Barrick worked with local partners to construct a
tomato drying facility in Jachal to serve the home-grown industry.
That year, more farmers expressed an interest in starting tomato
operations. In all, 23 producers took part with 50 hectares of land
sown in Jachal and Iglesia. The industry is primed to grow with
each coming year.
   “Tomato production has generated a lot of interest,” said
Alberto Ray, a local farmer hired to manage the new drying plant
in Jachal. “A lot of people have become involved and it’s turned
into a good business.”
   What began with a batch of modest tomatoes baking in the
blazing sun has turned into big business in San Juan province
and prosperity for local farming families. Today, both Jachal and
Iglesia are becoming world-renowned for their production of
sun-dried tomatoes and local farmers are reaping the economic
benefits.

20                                                                                                                                  March 2011
                     B E YO N D B O R D E R S |   A BARRICK GOLD REPORT ON RESPONSIBLE MINING




Australia’s Super Pit mine
engages community
with “open door” approach
                             Widely known across Australia as “the Super Pit”,
                             KCGM is an iconic gold mine that brings together
                             115 years of mining history in the middle of
                             “The Golden Mile”, once reputed to be the richest
                             square mile on earth.
                                The mine is adjacent to the Outback city of
                             Kalgoorlie in Western Australia, which has
                             been sustained by the mining industry for over
                             a century. Today, the KCGM operation is jointly
                             owned by Barrick Gold and Newmont and is the
                             largest open-pit gold mine in Australia.
                                Despite a long history of mining in the area,
                             KCGM has no shortage of challenges when it
                             comes to community relations. The mine and the
                             community are literally neighbours. Subdivisions
                             run along the mining lease boundary on the
                             western side and a major road hugs the edge of
                             the open pit. When your neighbour is running
                             massive haul trucks 24 hours a day, moving 89
                             million tons of material per year, and blasting
                             rock on a routine schedule, you may have to deal
                             with some concerns.
                                KCGM employs an “open door” policy that
                             encourages all community members to bring
                             forward their issues or concerns. The mine
                             has embraced its role as a vital member of the
                             Kalgoorlie community, and has stationed its
                             Community Relations team in the town itself to
                             facilitate this open-door approach.
                                The hub of this activity is the Super Pit Shop,
                             an innovative space that combines community
                             relations activities, multi-media educational
                             material, and tourism. Opened in 2005, the shop
                             welcomes more than 28,000 residents and tourists
                             every year.
                                “The shop is a place where everyone is welcome
                             to learn more about KCGM, ask questions and
                             even raise concerns,” says Holly Phillips, acting
                             Community Relations manager. “We have a

March 2011                                                                                21
A BARRICK GOLD REPORT ON RESPONSIBLE MINING   | B E YO N D B O R D E R S




BELOW: FIREWORKS LIGHT THE SKY OVER THE OPEN PIT AS KCGM CELEBRATES
ITS 20TH ANNIVERSARY WITH A HUGE COMMUNITY PARTY. RIGHT: BARRICK
CEO AARON REGENT (LEFT) VISITS THE SUPER PIT SHOP, A PLACE FOR THE
COMMUNITY TO GET INFORMATION AND RAISE CONCERNS. BOTTOM RIGHT: KCGM
EMPLOYEES HOST A BBQ CELEBRATION WITH THE COMMUNITY, UNDERSCORING
THE MINE’S CLOSE RELATIONSHIP WITH ITS NEIGHBOURS.




very open approach and welcome the chance to speak with
community members on a regular basis.”
   Because of its location adjacent to the community, KCGM
fields concerns about blasting activity, noise, dust and air
emissions. The mine has systems and protocols in place to
minimize the impact on the community. Where problems do
occur, Phillips and her team facilitate an official grievance
mechanism for people who wish to escalate their concerns.
   In addition to the community office, the mine also operates a
24-hour telephone hotline that local residents can use to report
their concerns or ask questions.
   Beyond community engagement, the Super Pit Shop is also a
magnet for tourists, who come to Kalgoorlie to learn more about
its gold mining history and to see the Super Pit itself. Described
by one local newspaper as Kalgoorlie’s answer to the Eiffel Tower,
the Super Pit is a matter of local pride.
   The shop sells a variety of souvenirs, and reinvests the profits
in community sponsorships and various programs, allowing
the town to further benefit from tourism. Items include Super
Pit merchandise, books, model CAT trucks and the company’s
very own mascot – KC Bear. A popular but expensive choice is
gold splatters from the mine’s processing facility, created during

22                                                                         March 2011
                    B E YO N D B O R D E R S |   A BARRICK GOLD REPORT ON RESPONSIBLE MINING




             the gold-pouring process. The shop sells these rare Golden Mile
             mementoes with a certificate of authenticity.
               The shop also runs a tour of the mine on the third Sunday of
             every month. Although just one part of its community relations
             approach, the Super Pit Shop is helping KCGM maintain a
             positive relationship with the local community, embedding the
             mine in the town itself.

             LOCAL FOCUS MEANS BIG BENEFITS FOR KALGOORLIE

             KCGM spends more than $260 million a year with local
             suppliers in the Goldfields region. The mine is a significant
             user of local business, and 36 per cent of its suppliers have a
             local office in Kalgoorlie. The mine’s economic impact is huge.
             Every year, KCGM injects $82 million in salaries and benefits
             into the community, plus $22 million in taxes and royalties to
             government.
               The Super Pit is also a residential operation, which means
             that 99 per cent of its employees live in the community they
             work in. Not only that, all staff and contractors are encouraged
             to participate in KCGM’s volunteer program. In 2010 alone,
             mine volunteers spent more than 720 hours volunteering in the
             Kalgoorlie area.
               While maintaining economic viability is vital, the Super Pit
             operations need the support of the local community to reach full
             potential. KCGM actively employs measures to ensure that the
             operations are environmentally responsible and that factors
             such as blasting activity, noise, dust, saline water seepage and
             sulphur/metal emissions are carefully monitored and reduced,
             so as not to leave a footprint that is detrimental to both the
             environment and the local community.
               KCGM’s goal is to continue to build a good relationship with
             the community through its Consider, Communicate, Contribute
             principles. To expand on this, the key aims are to:

             • Consider all cultural, social and heritage issues when planning
               any activity
             • Consider buying local first
             • Commit to employing local residents or those willing to
               relocate
             • Communicate openly and effectively with both employees and
               the community
             • Listen to the community about its concerns and expectations
             • Contribute positively through sponsorship, support and
               participation
             • Encourage employees through training and resources to
               improve community relations

March 2011                                                                               23
A BARRICK GOLD REPORT ON RESPONSIBLE MINING   | B E YO N D B O R D E R S




Poverty levels fall as economic activity surges




24                                                                         March 2011
                           B E YO N D B O R D E R S |   A BARRICK GOLD REPORT ON RESPONSIBLE MINING




in mining regions of Argentina and Peru

                        BARRICK’S PIERINA MINE IN PERU BEGAN PRODUCTION IN
                        1998. A NEW STUDY SHOWS PIERINA HAS HAD A PROFOUNDLY
                        POSITIVE IMPACT ON LOCAL COMMUNITIES, WHERE POVERTY
                        HAS DECLINED SIGNIFICANTLY SINCE THE MINE OPENED, AND
                        LITERACY RATES ARE ON THE RISE. POVERTY RATES IN THE
                        DISTRICT OF JANGAS, LOCATED CLOSEST TO THE MINE, HAVE
                        PLUMMETED FROM 80 PER CENT IN 1993 TO 31 PER CENT BY
                        2007, SITTING WELL BELOW THE NATIONAL AVERAGE.




 March 2011                                                                                     25
VELADERO MINE JUMP-STARTS DEVELOPMENT

Perched high in the southern Andes Mountains of Argentina
sits Barrick’s Veladero mine. The prolific gold and silver mine is     LOCAL VALLENAR BUSINESSMAN ABDÓN BARAQUI IN HIS
                                                                       SUPERMARKET IN ARGENTINA.
located some 375 kilometres northwest of the city of San Juan.
Since construction of Veladero began in 2003, the mine has
fostered an economic revival of sorts. The province has seen an
increase in jobs and new investment, and a marked decline in
the poverty rate.
   The mine’s positive impact is documented in a recent study by
the Chilean consultancy firm Consultora Malthus. “Veladero has
created a more stable and diversified economy in the province
of San Juan,” the study noted. “Positive employment trends,
sectoral activity and growth in local tax revenues are all clear
signals of Veladero’s direct and indirect impact.”

SAN JUAN’S ECONOMIC OUTLOOK ON THE RISE

Barrick’s construction of the Veladero mine came along at an
ideal time. At the start of the decade, Argentina’s economy
fell into a devastating recession. The country’s gross domestic
product plummeted from $269 billion in 2001 to $102 billion just
one year later.
   Unemployment hit 21.5 per cent and direct foreign investment
(DFI) slumped with the rest of the economy. Foreign companies,
which had pumped $8 billion into Argentina annually from 1992
to 1999, cut their spending to just under $1.7 billion by 2003.
   Largely dependent on agriculture, forestry and other primary
industries, San Juan province suffered the effects of the recession,
along with the rest of the country. Provincial unemployment
hovered at 16 per cent in 2001. Barrick began construction of
Veladero in 2003. That year, the company’s capital spending
program amounted to 36 per cent of total direct foreign invest-
ment into the country. The mine created nearly 1,000 direct jobs,
supporting another 5,000 indirect jobs across the province. Job
opportunities and investment created by the mine helped bring
the provincial unemployment rate down to 6.9 per cent by 2008.

26                                                                                                                       March 2011
                                                                                 “Veladero was a clear sign of faith in San Juan province,
THE CONSULTORA MALTHUS STUDY REPORTED THAT BARRICK HAS INVESTED
                                                                               in the overall Argentine economy, in the policies of the
APPROXIMATELY $850 MILLION BETWEEN 1996 AND 2009 TO BUILD AND OPERATE THE
                                                                               national government after the crisis years of 2002 to 2003,” the
PIERINA MINE IN PERU, WHICH DIRECTLY EMPLOYS 500 PEOPLE AT THE MINE SITE AND
                                                                               Consultora Malthus report concluded.
ANOTHER 1,900 INDIRECTLY THROUGH THE PURCHASE OF LOCALLY PRODUCED GOODS
AND SERVICES.
                                                                                 The report estimates that Veladero, alone, accounts for 23
                                                                               per cent of the province’s economy and has led to a 38 per cent
                                                                               increase in regional employment.
                                                                                 “One of the most significant effects of the mine is that it has
                                                                               diversified the economy,” the study stated. “It has generated new
                                                                               demands and contributed to stable, long-term growth.”
                                                                                 Social conditions throughout the province have also
                                                                               improved. The number of people living in poverty declined from
                                                                               53 per cent in 2003 to 17 per cent in 2008. The infant mortality
                                                                               rate also fell from 20 deaths per 1,000 children to 13.

                                                                               NEW BUSINESSES SPRING UP

                                                                               Further signs of a robust and growing economy are also reflected
                                                                               in the emergence of thriving new businesses. Alejandro Montes
                                                                               Graffigna is one of many local success stories. He operated a
                                                                               small TV and video production company in the city of San Juan
                                                                               prior to the construction of the mine. Today, he is producing
                                                                               safety and training material for Barrick and has been able to
                                                                               grow his business. “We are a direct supplier to Barrick,” Montes
                                                                               Graffigna said. “We have grown from three employees to seven,
                                                                               and we intend to keep growing.”
                                                                                 Similar success stories abound across the province. Noelia
                                                                               Munoz is a 34-year old single mother of five. She lives in Tudcum
                                                                               in the district of Iglesia, about 180 kilometres from the mine.
                                                                               Prior to the opening of the mine, she sold eggs and bread in the
                                                                               local market, which supplies her village of 700 people. When
                                                                               the mine began operating, Munoz and three other local women
                                                                               formed a company called Sabor a Mi (My Taste) and now pro-
                                                                               vides boxed lunches for mine workers. Their company employs
                                                                               four other people. “Our company was born because of Barrick,”

 March 2011                                                                                                                                   27
 WOMEN FROM THE PIERINA COMMUNITY SELL LOCALLY PRODUCED            TRAINING SESSIONS FOR FARMERS IN PERU ARE GUIDED BY “YACHACHIQS”,
 MARMALADES AND CAKES AT A FAIR TO BOOST FAMILY INCOMES.           A QUECHUA WORD THAT MEANS “THE ONE WHO KNOWS AND TRANSMITS
                                                                   KNOWLEDGE.” THE YACHACHIQS ARE FARMERS THEMSELVES, TEACHING FAMILIES
                                                                   HOW TO APPLY IMPROVED AGRICULTURAL METHODS.



Munoz said. She says the entire community has benefitted from      Pierina mine, which is located on the Peruvian side of the Andes.
the presence of the mine, and points to infrastructure as one         The study concluded that by almost any yardstick – be
example. “Thanks to the company, today there are roads in this     it literacy rates, levels of poverty, households with potable
town.”                                                             drinking water, or even colour TV – life has markedly improved
  Other local residents who run businesses, from sign painting     for residents of the surrounding districts of Independencia and
shops to audio-visual production houses, say they have also        Jangas since the Pierina mine opened.
been helped by having a thriving mining operation in the              Pierina is situated about 10 kilometres northwest of the city
region. “Our company was created and started up because of         of Huaraz in the Ancash region of north-central Peru. The
Barrick,” says Pedro Ponte, a 33-year old entrepreneur. He lives   open-pit mine began producing in 1998, with output peaking
with his wife and two children in the city of San Juan. “We        at approximately 900,000 ounces of gold per year from 2001
provide transportation to the workers going up to the mine,” he    to 2003.
said. “We now have approximately 220 employees.”                      According to the Consultora Malthus report Barrick invested
                                                                   approximately $850 million between 1996 and 2009 to build and
THE PIERINA MINE IN PERU TRANSFORMS COMMUNITIES                    operate Pierina, which directly employs 500 people and another
                                                                   1,900 indirectly through the purchase of locally produced goods
Argentina isn’t the only South American country getting an         and services. These are significant numbers in an area where large
economic boost from Barrick’s mines. A second Consultora           portions of the population get by through subsistence farming.
Malthus report also assessed the economic impact of Barrick’s         The district of Jangas is located closest to Pierina and is


                                                                                 Numbers that speak
                                                                                 POSITIVE ECONOMIC IMPACT
                                                                                 OF BARRICK’S VELADERO AND PIERINA MINES


                                                                                 Veladero Mine – Argentina
                                                                             ·
                                                                             ·
                                                                                 Accounts for 23% of San Juan’s gross domestic product
                                                                                 38% increase in regional employment

                                                                                 Pierina Mine – Peru
                                                                             ·
                                                                             ·
                                                                                 Poverty rate in Jangas reduced from 80% to 31% (1993-2007)
                                                                                 Local literacy rates increased from 55% to 76%
                                                                                 Consultora Malthus Independent Studies


28
             A YACHACHIQ GUIDE DEMONSTRATES FARMING TECHNIQUES IN
             THE CAHUIDE COMMUNITY.



                                                                     AWARD-WINNING PROJECT HELPS FARMERS IN PERU

home to about 4,000 people. The study noted a dramatic decline       In Peru, Barrick has partnered with the Farming
in the community’s poverty rate from 80 per cent to 31 per cent      Alternative Institute to implement the Productive
between 1993 and 2007. Illiteracy rates also declined, dropping      Highlands Program, which is helping farmers deal with
from a startling 56 per cent in 1993 to 31 per cent by 2007. Even    the challenges of farming more than 4,000 metres
the rate of higher education improved. A mere one per cent of
                                                                     above sea level.
people in Jangas had completed education beyond high school
                                                                        The community of Cahuide, in the province of
in 1993, but the figure had risen to six per cent by 2007.
  While more urbanized than its neighbours, the people               Santiago de Chuco, relies heavily on rainfall for the
of Independencia also saw a marked improvement in living             irrigation of its land. The Productive Highlands Program
conditions during this same period. Urbanization increased           has been teaching these Peruvian farmers how to use
from 67 per cent to 89 per cent and the poverty rate fell from       new farming technologies and water conservation to
57 to 31 per cent. Illiteracy rates also dropped in the district     increase productivity.
from 36 per cent to 24 per cent. The number of those pursuing a         More than 210 families are now taking advantage of
higher education nearly doubled, going from nine to 17 per cent
                                                                     an irrigation system that features reservoirs that allow
– well above the national average of 13 per cent.
                                                                     farmers to collect and store water all year round. New
  The improvement in living conditions was in sharp contrast
to the rest of the country. By 2007, 40 per cent of Peruvians fell   irrigation practices are just one part of the positive
below the poverty line.                                              changes underway. Simple technologies like organic
                                                                     fertilizers and a water-purifying system, combined
POPULATION IN POVERTY CONDITIONS 1993 – 2007                         with strong community buy-in and participation, are
ACCORDING TO BASIC UNMET NEEDS IN PERU
                                                                     garnering impressive results.
                                                                         One year after the Highlands Project began, the
 0.8
 0.7                                                                 people of the nine hamlets of Cahuide are producing
 0.6                                                                 farming and livestock products they can sell in the
 0.5
                                                                     marketplace, vastly improving their livelihoods. The
 0.4
 0.3
                                                                     project is also being implemented in other communities
 0.2                                                                 in the province.
 0.1
                                                                        The Productive Highlands Program was recently
  0
              1993   2007         1993    2007                       recognized as the first runner-up in the BBC’s corporate
        Independencia district   Jangas district
                                                                     social responsibility World Challenge Competition.

March 2011                                                                                                                  29
A BARRICK GOLD REPORT ON RESPONSIBLE MINING   | B E YO N D B O R D E R S




Barrick takes aim at
tropical diseases in the
Dominican Republic

Recognizing that the key to preventing a deadly outbreak
of cholera and dengue fever in the Dominican Republic is
education, Barrick has recently completed a health prevention
educational program that has reached over 22,000 people. The
global incidence of dengue fever and cholera epidemics has
grown significantly in recent years and is a continuing health
threat in the Dominican Republic, home to the company’s
Pueblo Viejo project. The health program is a direct response to
the need for innovative community-based solutions.
   Newly trained and armed with educational materials, 200
Dominicans travelled to the local municipalities of Cotuí,
Fantino and Maimón to teach residents the latest in disease
prevention and environmental sanitation. Barrick’s teams visited
neighbouring households with the goal of educating residents on
hygiene, family and environmental health.
   “Barrick has had the privilege of working with communities
around Pueblo Viejo to help prevent these contagious and
infectious diseases. This has contributed to the creation of health
networks all around the region since 2009,” says Méjico Ángeles,
Government and Regulatory Affairs manager at Barrick Pueblo
Viejo. The long-term objective of the project is to establish
a permanent community health committee that will help
strengthen local health institutions.
   As an added benefit, Barrick was able to provide temporary
employment for the 200 people participating in the campaign,
many of them youth, adding an economic benefit to this
grassroots health program.
   The importance of this program has been recognized as a
significant factor in reducing the presence of dengue fever in
the province, according to the Health Department of Sánchez
Ramírez. Since the completion of the second phase of the
program there have been no reports of cholera or dengue fever
cases in the region.
   The second phase of this project began in late 2009, sponsored
by the Ministries of Labour and Public Health, Barrick and the
local municipalities of Cotuí, Fantino and Maimón.


30                                                                         March 2011
                                                          B E YO N D B O R D E R S |   A BARRICK GOLD REPORT ON RESPONSIBLE MINING




AS PART OF A BARRICK-FUNDED PROGRAM, PUBLIC HEALTH
EDUCATORS VISIT HOMES TO TEACH PARENTS HOW TO PREVENT
AND TREAT CHOLERA AND DENGUE FEVER. TO DATE, 200 HEALTH
EDUCATORS REACHED MORE THAN 22,000 PEOPLE IN EFFORTS
TO PREVENT THESE TWO DEADLY DISEASES.

March 2011                                                                                                                     31
A BARRICK GOLD REPORT ON RESPONSIBLE MINING   | B E YO N D B O R D E R S




         Strengthening
         Grievance Procedures

Success in the mining industry today depends on being able                 A number of related initiatives are also underway to bolster
to effectively engage with governments, civil society and host             the company’s ability to effectively respond to community
communities. Open dialogue between mine representatives and                grievances, if and when they arise.
local stakeholders allows mining companies to better under-                  “We now have a fully-revised and detailed Community
stand the needs and aspirations of communities, while resolving            Grievance Management and Resolution Procedure which
issues of concern. Barrick’s local communities need to know that           incorporates current best practices in resolution management,
if they have any concerns, they can come to the company for                including issues related to human rights,” says Peter Sinclair,
answers. By being responsive to the issues and expectations of             Barrick’s vice president of Corporate Social Responsibility. “The
stakeholders, Barrick builds the trust that is necessary to achieve        company’s updated procedure has been informed by the UN
long-term support for its operations around the world.                     Special Representative for Business and Human Rights, John
   Although Barrick has had formal and informal grievance                  Ruggie’s ‘Protect, Respect and Remedy’ framework, which is the
mechanisms in place at its operations for some time, the                   standard guiding principle in this area.”
company has been working to strengthen and enhance these                     These procedures also support Barrick’s commitment to the
procedures. Grievance mechanisms are designed to give the                  Voluntary Principles on Security and Human Rights, considered
community a voice, and provide a systematic way to resolve                 to be the gold standard in security practices for extractive
complaints before they turn into something more serious.                   companies operating in developing countries. The revised

32                                                                                                                              March 2011
                                                                          B E YO N D B O R D E R S |   A BARRICK GOLD REPORT ON RESPONSIBLE MINING




                                                                  BELOW: BARRICK CEO AARON REGENT (CENTRE) AND COO PETER KINVER (RIGHT)
                                                                  GREET LOCAL COMMUNITY LEADERS DURING A VISIT TO THE PORGERA JOINT
                                                                  VENTURE MINE IN PAPUA NEW GUINEA.

procedures are currently being rolled out at Barrick sites,
and have already been fully implemented at a number
of sites.
   The company is also working on developing and enhancing
the skill set of its 275 community relations employees in the
field, who are responsible for community engagement and
identifying social risks as they arise, allowing the company to
respond quickly. A modular and comprehensive community
relations training program will include e-learning modules,
workshops, case studies, videos and task sheets. The training
program is designed to build the capacity of all Community
Relations teams across the company.
   By continually challenging and improving upon processes,
procedures and training methods, Barrick is building trust and
delivering meaningful benefits to host communities in areas
where the company operates.

March 2011                                                                                                                                     33
A BARRICK GOLD REPORT ON RESPONSIBLE MINING   | B E YO N D B O R D E R S




Barrick responds to                                                        all our employees to obey the law and to conduct themselves
                                                                           according to high ethical standards, consistent with the
                                                                           company’s Code of Business Conduct and Ethics.
serious criminal allegations                                                  While Papua New Guinea is a highly complex and challenging
                                                                           operating environment, the same expectations apply to every
in Papua New Guinea                                                        employee in every location where Barrick does business, without
                                                                           exception. The company’s deepest concern is for the women who
                                                                           may have been the victims of deplorable criminal acts.
Barrick has taken a series of actions in response to disturbing               Barrick is taking meaningful steps to implement changes to
allegations of serious crimes at the Porgera Joint Venture (PJV)           help prevent incidents like this from reoccurring. This includes
in Papua New Guinea. In late June 2010, the international NGO              a range of initiatives both at the mine site, following a review of
Human Rights Watch provided specific, detailed information                 the security function and grievance mechanisms, as well as in
concerning alleged sexual assaults against local women by mine             the surrounding community. Further funding has been provided
security personnel. This specific information assisted Barrick             to the Porgera District Women’s Association to enhance support
and the PNG police in conducting comprehensive investiga-                  and services to victims of sexual assault and domestic violence
tions, which have recently resulted in a number of arrests and             and engage in community prevention efforts.
employee terminations.                                                         Barrick and the PJV continue to work in close co-operation
   Barrick condemns these alleged criminal acts in the strongest           with the PNG police authorities as they conduct their
possible terms and wishes to see anyone involved brought                   investigation. The company looks forward to continued
to justice under PNG law. These allegations run contrary to                constructive engagement with Human Rights Watch. Barrick
everything we stand for as a company firmly committed to                   is working towards solutions with the community, its own
protecting human rights and human dignity. Barrick takes a                 workforce and other stakeholders to help to address the
zero tolerance approach to human rights abuses. We expect                  pervasive problem of sexual violence against women in PNG.

       CHRONOLOGY                                                              ADDITIONAL ACTIONS UNDERWAY
       June 2010:                                                            • Security: Changes include renewed human rights training and
     • The PJV received detailed information from Human Rights Watch           monitoring of PJV security personnel through a “real time”
       concerning allegations of serious crimes.                               tracking system. Recruitment of more female security staff is also
                                                                               underway.
     • The company promptly contacted the PNG Commissioner of Police
       and requested that a full criminal investigation be undertaken.       • Community Grievance Mechanisms: An expert has been engaged
                                                                               to improve internal and third-party grievance mechanisms.
     • Barrick brought in a 15-member investigative team of experts
       to conduct a comprehensive internal investigation over several        • Research: In addition to enhanced support to the Porgera District
       months.                                                                 Women’s Association, an expert is conducting research on sexual
                                                                               assault and violence against women in PNG to ensure future
     • The PJV also asked a former Chief Ombudsman of PNG to conduct           company-supported interventions are appropriate.
       an independent inquiry into the allegations and report fi ndings
       directly to police.                                                   • Human Rights Compliance: Enhancements to Barrick’s corporate
                                                                               human rights compliance structure will include a formal human
       November 2010:                                                          rights policy and other elements to better detect and prevent
     • Barrick joined the Voluntary Principles on Security and Human           human rights abuses.
       Rights, reinforcing the company’s commitment to these important
       human rights principles.                                              • Capacity-Building: PJV continues to be a leading partner in the
                                                                               multi-stakeholder Restoring Justice Initiative, designed to address
       January 2011:                                                           local law and order problems and build the capacity of the justice
     • The PNG Special Police Taskforce announced arrests and indicated        system.
       that more are anticipated.

     • Zero Tolerance: Following Barrick’s internal investigation,
       employees found to have breached Barrick’s policies were
       terminated – including those who had knowledge of but did not
       report assaults against women and other serious crimes.

       February 2011:
     • Human Rights Watch released a report concerning the PJV.

     • Barrick issued a statement announcing a range of company actions
       and indicated that further dismissals may occur, pending the
       outcome of the ongoing police investigation.


34                                                                                                                                      March 2011
                                                                          B E YO N D B O R D E R S |   A BARRICK GOLD REPORT ON RESPONSIBLE MINING




                                        Porgera
                                  PA P UA N E W G U I N E A



                                             Port Moresby


                                              PACIFIC OCEAN
                                AUSTRALIA




Editor’s Note
Confronting violence
against women in Papua New Guinea
Papua New Guinea has one of the highest rates of family           problem in this country and it has to stop.” Acting PNG Police
violence in the world. Independent studies by human rights        Commissioner Tony Wagambie, who has been leading an
groups and development agencies document a pervasive social       intensive investigation into allegations of assaults on women by
problem that permeates the daily lives of women and girls.        a small group of former security personnel at the Porgera mine,
According to UNICEF, two-thirds of women experience violence      stated, “Enough is enough. Violence against others in any form
in the home. A country analysis by Human Rights Watch earlier     will not be tolerated on my watch.” Arrests have been made.
this year states, “Violence against women and girls is epidemic      Respect for the rights of women is a universal human rights
in Papua New Guinea, with studies indicating that more than       obligation that transcends distinctions between developed and
half of all women in Papua New Guinea have suffered physical      developing countries. Clearly, it is necessary to understand the
assault by a male partner.” AUSAID, the Australian development    complex cultural features of PNG society to allow for appropri-
agency, has described violence against women as a major barrier   ate and effective responses. Rampant crime in some regions and
to PNG’s social, political and economic development. On a visit   limited police resources are also key factors. The government,
to the country in November, U.S. Secretary of State Hillary       the justice and health sectors, credible human rights organiza-
Clinton agreed, participating in a women’s empowerment event      tions, women’s groups and responsible companies all have a
at Parliament House in the capital of Port Moresby.               role to play. At the Porgera mine, improvements to the security
   There are some positive signs that change can occur. The                                         function and enhanced support
National Council of Women was established by the PNG                                                and services to the women in the
Government to promote women’s rights and social justice.                                            community are just some of the
Council President Scholar Kakas believes her country is at a                                        constructive measures under-
crossroads, moving from a traditional to a modern society.                                          way. Barrick is taking important
“We are running gender sensitization programs to help make                                          steps forward and is committed
people understand the importance of why violence is a major                                         to being a part of the solution.
                                                                  COUNCIL PRESIDENT SCHOLAR KAKAS


March 2011                                                                                                                                     35
A BARRICK GOLD REPORT ON RESPONSIBLE MINING   | B E YO N D B O R D E R S




                  Barrick employees give back and




36                                                                         March 2011
                                                                 B E YO N D B O R D E R S |   A BARRICK GOLD REPORT ON RESPONSIBLE MINING




drive responsible mining culture




              Every year, Barrick invests millions of dollars in programs designed to improve
              quality of life for the communities where it operates. Inspired by this work, employees
              are finding ways to personally contribute to these communities, whether close to
              home or in developing countries where poverty is endemic.


              This year, a group of Barrick employees in Toronto joined forces to make that
              possible. They created CanEducate, an independent charitable organization that
              will provide educational sponsorships to impoverished and at-risk children in
              communities where Barrick operates. In its first fundraising campaign, this
              employee-driven program raised close to $100,000 through staff donations and
              matching funding from the company. The money will help children in remote
              communities around the Bulyanhulu and Buzwagi mines in Tanzania, where
              every year thousands of kids are turned away from secondary school because
              they cannot afford to pay fees.

 March 2011                                                                                                                           37
A BARRICK GOLD REPORT ON RESPONSIBLE MINING   | B E YO N D B O R D E R S




                                                                           CLOCKWISE: VELADERO MINE EMPLOYEES GO PINK TO RAISE AWARENESS AND
                                                                           MONEY FOR BREAST CANCER RESEARCH; BARRICK EMPLOYEES IN TORONTO
                                                                           PARTICIPATE IN A HABITAT FOR HUMANITY BUILD PROJECT; GRIEVANCE OFFICER
                                                                           JOSEPHINE MKONO KISSES HER AWARD FOR EXCELLENCE IN CSR AT THE NORTH
                                                                           MARA MINE IN TANZANIA.

                                                                           In addition to the haul truck, women wore jackets embroidered
                                                                           with pink ribbons, and employees wore a pink sticker on their
                                                                           hard hats. Meanwhile, at the Cowal mine in Australia, the pink
                                                                           haul truck was on display for the mine’s Family and Community
                                                                           open house days.

                                                                           Globally, employee efforts to incorporate CSR considerations into
                                                                           their work are being rewarded and recognized. Barrick has cre-
                                                                           ated a series of annual awards that promote best practices and
Since 2005, employees of Bulyanhulu have actively supported                recognize employees who demonstrate leadership in areas such
needy secondary school students who cannot afford to pay for               as CSR, Environment and Safety. These individuals are helping to
school fees, uniforms and other school expenses. To date more              drive Barrick’s responsible mining culture across the company.
than 120 Bulyanhulu employees sponsored 260 of the most
vulnerable children in 10 secondary schools.                               Tisha Wooley, environmental geologist at the Donlin Creek project
                                                                           in Alaska, was recognized as a CSR Champion for her efforts to
For the second consecutive year, Barrick employees in Toronto              organize an annual winter clothes drive for underprivileged school
and Salt Lake City also volunteered to help Habitat for Humanity,          children in Bethel, Alaska. As the temperature in Anchorage
a not-for-profit organization that builds affordable housing               dips to -70 Farenheit many families cannot afford to buy winter
for families in need. “It is great to have the opportunity to do           clothing for their children, and Tisha has taken it upon herself to
something tangible for the community and to be able to help                answer this need. “To know that 23 to 24 large boxes of items are
families that desperately need it,” said Miguel Pereira, Barrick’s         literally cleared within an hour of doors opening, tells us that our
manager of Planning and Reporting.                                         efforts are welcomed. It’s remarkable how such a simple task can
                                                                           benefit a community.” said Wooley.
In Toronto, employees participated in two Barrick Build Days
finishing the interiors of four homes. In Salt Lake City, employees        Another CSR Champion award winner is Lincoyán Roco Sánchez,
completed a playground at a Habitat project that included the              Mechanical Specialist at the Zaldivar mine in Chile, who dedicates
construction of 21 homes.                                                  his personal time to motivate and organize 240 employees from
                                                                           Zaldivar and other local companies to fundraise and to support
Proving you can have some fun with CSR activities while sup-               parents of children suffering from cerebral palsy and autism in
porting a worthy cause, two Barrick mines in Australia and                 the communities of Antofagasta and La Serena, Chile.
Argentina found a creative way to raise awareness and funds to
support breast cancer research. Both sites painted a massive haul          Around the world, Barrick employees have demonstrated just how
truck pink and organized events for employees in support of the            seriously they take corporate social responsibility and are living
cause. At the Veladero mine in Argentina, pink was everywhere.             the company’s values within and outside of the workplace.

38                                                                                                                                   March 2011
                                                                                B E YO N D B O R D E R S |   A BARRICK GOLD REPORT ON RESPONSIBLE MINING




Environmental
update




MEMBERS OF BARRICK’S SENIOR LEADERSHIP TEAM VISIT A TREE NURSERY AT THE PUEBLO VIEJO PROJECT IN THE DOMINICAN REPUBLIC WHERE
HALF A MILLION PLANTS HAVE BEEN TRANSPLANTED.


Around the world, Barrick operates to high environmental                   Water conservation is an area where Barrick is demonstrating
standards and is committed to continuous improvement.                   leadership, reflected in improved, more systematic management
Consistent with this commitment, in 2010 Barrick’s                      and monitoring of water use at our operations. Three industry-
Environmental Management System (EMS) was implemented at                leading water conservation pilot projects are now underway in
all sites and underwent a third-party review to identify possible       Australia, Tanzania and North American sites. Eighteen Barrick
areas of improvement. The company also completed a three-year           mines are now zero water discharge operations, with all water
risk assessment to review the safety of tailings impoundments           recycled and reused for mining processes on site. In 2011, Barrick
at all operations and closed sites. A tailings guidance manual          will participate in the Water Disclosure Project to contribute to a
was developed to ensure the company is meeting or exceeding             greater understanding of global industrial water use.
industry best practices in this area.                                      For the second year, the company has established regional
   In 2010, the company also set its sights on industry-wide            targets to improve energy and carbon efficiencies at all
issues, such as addressing water use, safeguarding biodiversity,        operations. Overall, Barrick has improved ore processes,
and reducing energy use and greenhouse gas emissions.                   resulting in less GHG emissions per tonne of ore processed.
   Barrick was recognized by the Carbon Disclosure Project as           Using this measure, Barrick’s emissions decreased 15 per cent
a carbon disclosure leader highlighting the company’s public            between 2006 and 2009.
reporting practices and management strategy. The Carbon                    Barrick has long been an advocate of the International
Disclosure Project is the only global climate change reporting          Cyanide Management Code, having achieved Code certification
system that asks companies to disclose their greenhouse gas             at 20 operations. In collaboration with the Mining Association
emissions and climate change strategies. The collected data is          of Canada, the company is taking this commitment one step
made available for use by a wide audience including investors,          further by publicly advocating that Code safety standards and
corporations, policy makers, government bodies, academics               certification become standard practice within the gold mining
and the public. “At Barrick, we have established a global climate       industry.
change program that aims to mitigate our carbon footprint,”                Finally in 2011, Barrick will begin a process to make
said Bill Williams, vice president of Environment. “We will             additional annual environmental data at each operation
continue to report on the progress we are making as we pursue           publicly available.
opportunities to reduce energy, consumption and greenhouse gas
emissions and adopt renewable energy projects at our operations.”       For more information visit www.barrick.com

March 2011                                                                                                                                           39
In 2009, Barrick helped launch a sun-dried tomato exporting initiative to assist Jachal farmers in Argentina to develop a sustainable livelihood program and expand production.
        The results from the first year were impressive, yielding a healthy tomato crop and providing the farmers with a sustainable income for the first time in decades.




                    BEYOND BORDERS IS A REPORT TO STAKEHOLDERS PRODUCED AND PUBLISHED BY BARRICK GOLD CORPORATION,

    FEATURING THE LATEST NEWS AND UPDATES ON BARRICK’S SOCIAL, ENVIRONMENTAL, SAFETY AND ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT PROGRAMS.

                            AS A RESPONSIBLE MINING COMPANY, WE STRIVE TO CONTINUALLY IMPROVE OUR PERFORMANCE.

                                                  WE WELCOME YOUR COMMENTS, QUESTIONS AND FEEDBACK.



                                       TO SUBSCRIBE TO BEYOND BORDERS OR TO RECEIVE BY E-MAIL,
                                                  CONTACT US AT: RESPONSIBILITY@BARRICK.COM


                                  ADDRESS: EDITOR, BEYOND BORDERS, BARRICK GOLD CORPORATION, BROOKFIELD PLACE,

                               TD CANADA TRUST TOWER, SUITE 3700, 161 BAY STREET, TORONTO, ONTARIO, CANADA M5J 2S1



                                                                    EDITOR: NANCY J. WHITE


                                                                DEPUTY EDITOR: ANDY LLOYD


                GLOBAL CONTRIBUTORS: LOU SCHACK (NORTH AMERICA), CARLA ZEGERS (SOUTH AMERICA)


                                       FOR MORE INFORMATION ON BARRICK’S RESPONSIBLE MINING INITIATIVES VISIT:

                                                 WWW.BARRICK.COM/CORPORATERESPONSIBILITY

				
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