Free Sample Letter of Sympathy to Get Out of Contract - Download as DOC by ace38860

VIEWS: 84 PAGES: 21

More Info
									      NFTY-STR
     2003-2004
Songleader’s MANUAL




     Prepared by Josh Goldsmith


For help, questions, or comments, feel
       free to contact josh at:
      4900 Bridgehampton Blvd
         Sarasota, FL 34238
           (941) 921-9831
         jag121842@aol.com



                  1
        A SONGLEADER’S MANUAL
What follows in the next five pages is a compilation of liberally borrowed
highlights of the OSRUI "Guidelines for Songleaders" by Gerard W. Kaye,
intended for the young songleaders that work at the OSRUI summer camp. I
have modified it to reflect NFTY-STR, and added many of my own thoughts
and impressions particularly relevant to our region.

INTRODUCTION
Songleaders play an important role in the life of NFTY-STR. Your impact on
the lives of NFTYites alike is central to the elements of ruach as well as a
vital focus of all learning in our community. There is virtually no other
person with the impact that the songleader has.

As a result of this potential influence, your responsibility is similarly
substantial. What you teach, both by example as well as by plan, will stay
with all who hear you for years!!! YES, that means that you are a role model
in our community!!! What you choose to do shapes the repertoire of our
region and the role the songleader has in the region. Act carefully, but do so
boldly. You steer the prayer and song of our region. And most importantly,
as you lead our region in prayer, do it with a smile—it’s the best example
you could possibly set.

                 ROLE OF THE SONGLEADER
                 First and foremost, the songleader is to fulfill this title
                 precisely. Songleaders in NFTY-STR function in order to
                 facilitate the musical preparation of the community. If you
                 do anything less or more than that, you are not fulfilling
                 your role as songleader.

                 Therefore, a first conclusion is that the songleader
                 NEVER functions as a performer during sessions. How
                 can you tell how you are perceived? If NFTYites are singing
with you, you are doing your job; if they are just watching you, you have
failed in some respects. You either have selected a song that the region
doesn’t know, a chosen a song that is difficult to sing, or put yourself in a
performance space where others feel uncomfortable participating. If others
are not singing, you are doing the wrong thing. Fix it. Figure out how
to get them involved in song. Do not lead a song that the region doesn’t
know or will not be able to sing. Do not do lofty cantorial solo pieces—YUK,
they make me want to throw up! Do things the region knows; make sure
NFTYites can sing along with you. Also, regular applause is typically due of a
performer, not an effective songleader.


                                      2
Next, a songleader is a great teacher. In order for NFTYites to sing with you
they must know both lyric and melody of the song you are singing.
Introducing complicated verses or melodies because they are pleasing or
challenging to you is only appropriate when you have brought the people
participating in the song and praying with it to the level where they can
undertake the challenge. Again, when you hear only you and the other
songleaders during song sessions or services, your task is not being fulfilled.
ON A SIDE NOTE: You are the songleader, and responsible for the musical
well-being of our region. Do not let the person who writes a services talk
you into doing their favorite version of a song because they love it; only do
songs that the region knows, songs that fit well with the theme of the
service or other event.

Finally, songleaders do their job best when they do it in context. Context
calls upon you to be aware of the mood of the region...NFTYites worn out by
weather or earlier programming, frustrated by the weekend, tired because of
the time of day, or focused on upcoming activities (and a dozen other
variables that only the best can perceive) will not be the best participants,
and it is your job to tailor your leading to suit the mood of the group. This is
the hardest part of being a songleader, and very difficult to do in a group.
Work diligently at leading the group in what the group wants. A slow ballad-
like tune after a big lunch on a miserably hot and humid day is unlikely to
generate much enthusiasm. Be sure to decide in advance what you are
looking for in terms of results before you begin, and be willing to work with
the group you are leading even up to the last minute to make programs run
smoothly and work with the mood of the group.


INSTRUMENTS
Most songleaders lead with guitar, though it is also possible to lead with a
strong voice and either another instrument or no
instrument at all. Your guitar is, of course, an
important part of your presentation. While any
good guitar can be used, songleaders have
traditionally been most effective with a steel
stringed instrument, as the steel strings give your
instrument a bigger sound. For various reasons,
you may find another instrument to be more
useful for you. Do keep in mind that your
instrument must be a support for your voice and a
prop that can be used to cue your group. Also
note that if you are buying a guitar, a guitar with an electric pick-up is a
great investment—it removes all of the problems of ineffective amplification,
and—voilà, people can hear you playing.


                                       3
Capos are songleader killers. Capos have been the undoing of more
songleaders than any group of twelve year old boys. When your group is
ready to sing and you lose the moment of opportunity because you are
fretting over where the Capo belongs, kids tend to lose patience and you
lose confidence. Know in advance what key you need for the voice
capabilities of your group. Use Capo placement as an opportunity to
explain another idea or two about the song and punctuate the end of your
sentence with your guitar and Capo in the same way as a good speaker uses
hand gestures, eyeglasses or a pause to convey their readiness to proceed.
If you have nothing to say in a key change, remember that there are usually
multiple songleaders working at once; while some conclude a last song,
others can place the Capo in the correct location for the next song. Work
out beforehand how this will happen in a service or song session, and you
eliminate many problems. Not knowing where the Capo belongs before you
begin is your most dangerous problem, for fiddling with keys or trying to
sing a song where neither you nor other participants can sing it will kill your
voice and the mood you have worked so diligently to set.

Your voice is another important instrument which you bring to your work.
Abuse of this renders you completely useless as a songleader and marks
amateurs. Remember                                  that shouting is never
singing either for you or                           for NFTYites. Remind
them, too. And don’t                                forget those perpetual
songleader aids, cough                              drops, tea with honey,
and water, water,                                   water!!! (I have been
known to devour over a                              gallon in a day!)

We also use                                         instruments other than
guitar, especially                                  including a hand drum,
involved in services and especially songsessions. These instruments can
change the mood entirely, and lead to gorgeous services.

PLANNING FOR SONG SESSIONS AND SERVICES
Songleading at services requires you to know the various t'fillot in the siddur
or service booklet you are using (as well as the pages they are on.) Sitting
during the amidah because you don't know the chords and must fumble with
a NFTY Chordster is extremely distracting to all who join in prayer. You are
better off "bagging" the guitar and using just your voice, but by preparing
beforehand, you eliminate these problems entirely.

Good songleaders know exactly which songs will be taught during the
program and can break down each session's singing into discrete and
teachable units. More on this is the "Repertoire" section.




                                       4
An important part of the plan is knowing how long to sing at a song session
or service. Don’t overdo it! Services will usually require introductory
niggunim or opening songs as well as a variety of closing songs. Try to find
appropriate closing hymns for services that allow for choices other than 613
versions of "Adon Olam." Make sure either that the region knows what you
are leading, or that you have taught it to them. NEVER throw in a random
new melody you like without teaching it in some way.

Great songleaders can indeed change the mood of a session without
resorting to cheap tricks. Resist the temptation. Don't pick on others to
rescue yourself, and don't be self-deprecating. Your community must
believe you to be competent and they really do want you to be. You also
are—you were chosen by the region to represent the region as NFTY-STR
Songleaders, and you are quite competent enough to lead without excuses.
If you mess up, move on without making a big deal about it. Very few
people will even notice your mistake if you do not draw attention to it.

When teaching a song, you may discover that you have less time than you
though you did or that the group isn't catching on as fast as you had hoped.
Don’t feel compelled to teach the entire song at one sitting. It's perfectly
alright to teach just a first verse or even a first line. Please, though, do
remember to come back and teach the balance later. There are thousands of
adult Jews who know only the first two lines of every song ever written!

REPERTOIRE
You must know a wide variety of worship elements, Hebrew
songs, American and foreign folk songs, melodies without
words (niggunim) and just plain funny stuff. You don't
need to know every song ever written - but it couldn't
hurt!

What's not okay? Anything off-color, and references to other
religions (remember that two-religion households are quite
common) are never appropriate. Look for music that enhances the Jewish
teachable moment.

Different ages require different repertoire. Older participants like those at a
NFTY event will have vocal abilities and musical experience often requiring
more complicated melodies and longer songs. However-don't assume this
from day one. Even the most veteran members of the group will want the
security of a few old favorites and simple tunes. This will give you the
chance to learn what they already know, and help you refine your
curriculum.




                                       5
At the beginning of the year, it is a good idea to decide as a group how the
songleaders of NFTY-STR want to influence the repertoire of the region.
With this goal in mind, it is easier to plan what new songs you will teach and
learn over the year.

TEACHING
Teach what you know. Standing in front of the group is not the time to
fumble with words, translations or chords. Before you attempt to teach
any song--even the simplest--be sure that you know every detail of
it intimately. Songleaders lose credibility rather than gaining sympathy
when they look incompetent. Songleaders who look like they haven't had
enough concern for the time of their group will lose their group.

This doesn't mean you'll never make a mistake. You will, and when you do
those you are teaching will support you because they know that this is the
rare exception rather than the rule. Every songleader, even the most
professional, will occasionally stumble. Correct yourself, retrieve whatever
dignity is left and move on.

LEARNING-A Shameless Plug
                 One of the best places to learn the craft of songleading is at
                 the annual Hava Nashira Songleading Workshop
                 (http://www.uahc.org/ hanashir/). The web page is chock
                 full of information—both what you are reading in this
                 manual, and more. And for advice, be sure to join the
                 Hava Nashira mailing list
                 (http://www.uahc.org/hanashir/mlist.html).

                 Our region has, at times, discussed sending songleaders to
                 a training program like Hava Nashira. Stay on top of them,
                 and they will send you to this AMAZING learning
                 experience.

                 You can also learn immensely from everyone around you,
and every event. Get your hands on every Jewish music CD and book you
can (and don’t forget that the Shireinu and any supplements are resources
you cannot live without), and keep learning, learning, learning.




                                      6
   EVERYTHING YOU NEED TO KNOW TO BE A NFTY-STR
     SONGLEADER THAT WASN’T INCLUDED ABOVE

Songleaders are one of the most amazing positions in NFTY-STR, a position
with a huge responsibility and a leadership position parallel to that of all
elected Regional Board members. In the next few pages, I’ll try to give you
an idea of what your job entails—job description, responsibilities, and how to
be amazing at it.

JOB DESCRIPTION AND EXPECTATIONS
As an appointed regional board member, it is your responsibility to behave
as such. To do so, you should observe the following general responsibilities
of Regional Board members:
   1) Be a role model. Recognize that the members of NFTY-STR look to
      you to set an example. Be aware of your behavior and attitude at all
      times, even when you are not actively leading. Lead by example.
      Never ask someone to do something that you would not do yourself.
   2) Attend all regional events. These include the Regional Board-Elect
                       Retreat/Songleader-Elect Retreat, LLTI, Kallah Planning
                       Weekend, Fall Kallah, Winter Regional, Hatikvah,
                       Nashim or G’varim (if applicable), and Spring Kallah.
                       You will need to arrive one day before participants for
                       both LLTI and Winter Regional. Attendance at Biennial
                       and national events is optional. If you are having
                       financial difficulty in being able to attend all events
                       required by your contract, your temple or the Regional
                       Advisor may be able to help you.
   3) Assist in quieting people down when they should be quiet. Spread out
      during meals and programs. Always help other regional board
      members or program leaders by following their lead and raising “The
      Hand” or standing silently in front of a group to get them to be quiet.
   4) You are expected to attend all programs unless a time slot has been
      pre-approved as a practice time.
   5) Be approachable at all times. Look out for new members, and try to
      involve them in programs and introduce them to new people. Do not
      spend all your time with the Regional Board or songleaders.

   It is also the responsibility of the songleader to:
   1. Serve as a resource on any musical issues. This includes being
        available to assist in songleading at events hosted by NFTY-STR TYGs,
        if possible, and being reachable to answer songleading or musical
        questions.
   2. Lead the musical portion of services, song sessions, friendship circles,
        and any other musical program which may be asked of him/her.


                                      7
   3. Communicate with other songleaders, the Head Songleader, and the
      Religious and Cultural Vice President or other service-leader to make
      sure s/he has received all services before conventions in order to be
      fully prepared in advance.
   4. Assist in leading programs.
   5. Be familiar with the songs the region is comfortable with, and teach
      songs the region doesn’t know before using them in any service, song
      session, or program.
   6. Serve as a role model for all members of NFTY on a local, sub-
      regional, district, regional, national, and international level, and to
      appropriately represent NFTY-STR to others.
   7. Take on any additional duties which may be necessary to fulfill the
      above responsibilities.

Songleaders are also encouraged to be available as a resource at TYG
events, both for their home congregation and for other TYGs. Songleaders
are introduced alongside the regional board at all introductions, and listed
directly below the regional board on all mailings.

THE HEAD SONGLEADER
At songleader tryouts, one songleader will be chosen as the Head
Songleader for the following year. In addition to all responsibilities
listed above, the Head Songleader must also:
    1. Be in charge administratively of other songleaders. This
        includes but is not limited to planning practice times, making
        sure that all songleaders know of upcoming events and are
        prepared to lead at them, and communicating with all other
        songleaders to maintain the cohesiveness of the songleaders.
    2. Communicate with the Religious and Cultural Vice President to get
        services at least two weeks before any event. If difficulties arise, it is
        the responsibility of the NFTY-STR President to guarantee that the
        RCVP gets services to songleaders two weeks before events.
    3. Communicate with Event Coordinators, the NFTY-STR President, and
        NFTY-STR Regional Advisor to determine what songleaders will be
        doing at upcoming events and guarantee that sufficient time is
        allotted for all programs songleaders lead.
    4. Motivate the other songleaders to be fully prepared for all duties.
    5. Ensure that all music that songleaders lead is music with which the
        region is familiar, or teach the music before using it. This
        responsibility may include the proof-reading of services before an
        event, especially to make sure that they are musically coherent and
        cohesive.




                                        8
   6. Ensure that during conventions, many different melodies are used for
       individual prayers, thus maintaining for our region the greatest
       musical repertoire possible.
   7. Guarantee that the MVP knows the last song of any song session so
       that s/he, who is responsible for the Ruach of the region, can
       coordinate cheer sessions to follow song sessions.
   8. Guarantee that the song which corresponds to the regional theme be
       played sufficiently throughout the year.
   9. Be a point person for distributing materials to all songleaders, and the
       liaison between the songleaders and President, RCVP, and MVP.
   10. Run songleader tryouts (if the Head Songleader is an out-going
       senior; if not, the President of NFTY-STR will run songleader tryouts).
   11. Make the final call in the event of any disagreements among
       songleaders.
The Head Songleader will preferably be a veteran songleader, and will be
appointed by the NFTY-STR President at the time of songleader tryouts.
Though it is helpful if the Head Songleader is the strongest guitarist or
musician, the position primarily is administrative, and guarantees that all
music be in keeping with the musical goals of the region for the year; the
person in the position also guarantees that those working with songleaders
understand the role of songleaders and checks to make sure that services
and timing will be correct.
The Head Songleader is directly responsible to the RCVP of NFTY-STR.

THE SONGLEADER-ELECT RETREAT
Each May, after songleader tryouts, songleaders should come together for a
weekend to bond with each other and become comfortable leading together
as a team. During this weekend, a veteran songleader will make sure that
new songleaders are comfortable with all of the basic repertoire a songleader
needs to be familiar with. At the Songleader-Elect Retreat, the songleaders-
elect should develop a list of goals for the year: music they would like to
introduce, repertoire they would like to reinforce, and places to which they
would like to move the region musically. By planning goals for the year and
becoming more comfortable with the region’s repertoire and musical
experience, the songleaders will form a more coherent group for the year to
come. This event may be held in conjunction with the Regional-Board Elect
Retreat.

NFTY NATIONAL SONG COMPETITION
NFTY-STR (and formerly SER) has a rich tradition of winning or being strong
competitors in the NFTY National Song Competition, which is held every
other year at NFTY Competition. Check the NFTY North American Website or
with our regional advisor for more information on this competition, and then
get out there, write a kickin’ song, and do our region proud!


                                      9
          HOW TO TEACH A SONG IN TEN EASY STEPS
 (A note from Josh: You don’t always need to follow these guidelines exactly.
In different settings, some steps may be altered. I, for example, will not
always sing an entire song through before beginning to teach it. I
sometimes skip step 5 entirely and will flagrantly disregard step 9 from time
to time.)
1. Have the song written out in advance. This may be in a songbook,
blackboard, separate sheet, etc. In any case, you will be five steps ahead if
you're group doesn't have to try to master
both words and music at the same time. If
you write out a songsheet by had, be sure
your writing is legible, and easy to read
given the conditions of the space you are
working in (lighting, etc.) Be sure your
spelling is accurate. If you use
transliteration, check with a Hebrew-
speaker or songleading resource (i.e. the
Shireinu) to make sure the transliteration
is accurate. Some songleaders like to use
slides or overheads. In the right conditions
this can be effective. In our region, I have
found Power Point presentations to be particularly effective in many indoor
settings. Beware that you need to allocate enough time to prepare Power
Point or overheads. You’re going to want to make sure to use Power Point
especially at LLTI and Winter Regional.

2. Briefly introduce the song by name (double check that your name for
the song is the real name and not just the first or key words). Also indicate
the source of the song, and why you are teaching it. There must be a reason
you selected this particular song.

3. Sing through the song once completely alone so that everyone can
hear it at least once and know what the goal is.

4. If a Hebrew song, translate accurately. Here is another time at which
songleaders can be the greatest teachers. Focus not just on the general
sense of the song, but look for words in the song that your group is likely to
know. You may need someone to help you properly translate the Hebrew.
Don't be afraid to ask for the help-this is one key to being a truly
fine songleader. Be a songleader who can really teach and not just
cheerlead. Also, be sure to double check your Hebrew pronunciation. Once
you teach a word, people will swear into their old age that their way (i.e. the


                                      10
one you taught them) is correct. If the song is in a language other than
Hebrew or English, the need for accurate translation is no less important.

5. Cite the source of the text of the song especially when it is from the
Bible or other Jewish text. This is another great teaching opportunity. It isn't
necessary to be able to quote the entire work from which the lyric is derived,
but context is important and a subtle reminder of identity. The same is true
for modern Hebrew songs or what has come to be known as the new
"nusach America" (works by contemporary Jewish composers like Debbie
Friedman, Jeff Klepper, Dan Freelander, et al) when you identify the author
or composer. This helps create yet another attachment to the Jewish world.

                          6. Break the song into short segments for
                          teaching. These may be a few words, a melody
                          chain or a verse. It will vary based upon whether
                          or not your group is already familiar with the
                          words, their age and your prior experience.

                          7. Teach the first segment, which may not
                          necessarily be the first line. You may choose to
                          teach the chorus or another simple line or phrase
as a vehicle to get the group singing. While this is not usual, it is a choice.
Remember that you need to place the segment in its proper place later.
7a. Recite the words first and ask the group to repeat them after
you.
7b. Sing the segment and then ask the group to sing it back with
you.
7c. Repeat the segment and ask the group to sing it back without
your voice (but maintain your accompaniment.) (optional)
7d. Teach each segment and connect the previous segment to it.

The number of times you need to repeat lyrics or refresh the melody line for
your group will depend on how quickly they are able to grasp the song. If
you find that it is taking forever, remember that you don't need to teach the
entire song at one time. Every now and then you may need to review a
verse for the group by yourself as you are teaching so that they can keep in
mind a sense of the musical whole.

7e. Listen carefully to your singers, though, for what they are not doing.
If they are having trouble with the words, go back to that element. If they
are having difficulty with a particular note sequence, review without the
guitar. Sometimes the sound of the instrument detracts from clearly
understanding a melody line. Make sure your singers learn the song
correctly, because once they learn it incorrectly, they are unlikely to ever
relearn the song correctly.



                                       11
7f. Reinforce and compliment every success. Everyone likes to know
that they are doing it right. Your enthusiastic response will encourage your
singers to sing with you even more. [Note: When you use phrases like
"doing it right" you are creating an environment where someone can be
wrong, and many education professionals recommend against that.
“Correct,” if you must, but never make someone "wrong."]

8. When you introduce a song or element, you usually want to ask
those who already know it to let you demonstrate it alone first.
Otherwise, new singers may be intimidated, believing that they are the only
ones who don't know the song. (Someone might also sing it incorrectly or in
a fashion you don't wish to teach at the moment.)

9. Teach a song the way it was written. Give the composer and your
group the benefit of learning the music as the composer intended it to be.
Composers hear groups singing songs with gimmicks, repeats and
"customization" of words and realize that whoever taught the song either
didn't care or didn't know. Be very careful that you know how the song was
really written and help your NFTYites learn the beauty of the music. Don’t be
fooled by gimmicks and don't be trapped into them. "Schtick" has its place,
but use it with discretion. NOTE: You may choose to flagrantly disregard this
rule. Music changes, often for the better. If the region has sung a sung in a
particular way for many years, it is uncomfortable to teach it a different way.
You might even choose to teach both ways—sometimes you get pretty
harmonies   !
10. Review the song. As you finish teaching a song, review it and then
come back to it near the end of the session. Unless a group is extremely
good or the song turns out to be extremely popular, don't end the session
with a newly-taught work. Let NFTYites build to a climax with a song they
know well as they end a service or songsession.

Teaching is the central core of the songleader's job. If you
 do it well, with enthusiasm and care, you will have great
        success.




                                      12
                   TEN COMMANDMENTS FOR SONGLEADERS:
                              (BY CANTOR JEFF KLEPPER)


                   1. Know your songs inside out. If they are not in
                   English, know what they mean.

2. Select only songs which are appropriate for the time, place, and
ability (age) of the group.
3. Plan the mood(s) you will set at each session.
4. Carefully choose the best key and tempo for each song in each
situation.
5. Create the proper physical space before you begin to sing or teach.
6. Choose the most efficient way to display the words. (Avoid
teaching directly from printed music.)
7. Establish a two-way communication with the group, using praise
and humor when appropriate.
8. Let the group (not you) be the star, and respect their beloved
melodies.
9. Develop partnerships with your colleagues: fellow songleaders,
counselors, advisors, staff, teachers, rabbis, cantors, educators,
pianists, organists, etc.

10.   BELIEVE IN THE POWER OF MUSIC!



                                    13
                 You know you’re a Songleader Extraordinaire if you…
1. Show enthusiasm (“ENTHUSIASM breeds ENTHUSIASM”)
2. PROJECT!! Be loud and articulate!
3. One word: RUACH. Just be it.
4. Be open-minded and flexible—you may be called on at any random moment to provide a
   song or two.
5. Stay positive. Compliment and encourage the group; let them know how good they’re
    going and how beautifully they’re singing.
6. COMMUNICATE (melodies, important Hebrew texts, themes of songs, etc.)
7. Be confident. You are really that good.
8. LEAD, don’t perform. Songleading is all about your interaction with the group.
    Remember: “We before me”
9. Have strong stage presence: enunciation, relaxed body, good posture, and of course…
10....SMILE!!
11. Control the group. Don’t be a dictator, but guide the group with specific directions
   (“Repeat after me,” “Please be seated,” “Everybody dance now!”)
12. Don’t apologize. If you make a mistake, chances are no one even noticed. Play through
   and troubleshoot problems later. As Samuel Beckett said, “Fail again. Fail better.”
13. Stay one level above the group. (aka “The Rule of Levels”)
14. Know your group’s background: what songs do they already know, what songs do they
   need to be taught, what songs are sure-fire winners
15. BE PREPARED!! Know your words, chords, melody, tempo, translation (if Hebrew), before
   you get up in front of the group.
16. HAVE FUN!
17. Keep that ego in check. Songleading is a team effort. Cooperate. Collaborate. Don’t be
   selfish; do what’s best for the group.
18. Use body cues: head nods, pointing, changing your body level, “the kick,” etc.
19. Use vocal cues: “Repeat after me,” “Try that,” “Sing with me.” Feed the group words and
   melody.
20. Choose what is appropriate: for the age or mood of the group—are they mellow,
   energetic?
21. BE YOURSELF. You don’t have to impress anyone. U B U.
22. Practice, practice, practice. Always improve. Always learn more. Expand your repertoire.
Brush up on your Hebrew. Become an expert on T’fillah. Never quit, never expire. Inspire.



                                              14
                       SONGS FOR SERVICES
                          Achsav                    Eili, Eili
MORNING                   Al Kol Eileh              Eitz Chayim Hi
Arise my Love             Am Yisrael Chai           Emet
Ashrei                    Artza Alinu               Esa Enai
Bashana Haba’ah           Bashana Haba’ah           Gesher Tzar M’od
Kumi Lach                 Coming Home               Lo Ira
Ma Tovu                   Eretz Zavat Chalav        My Religion
Modeh Ani                 Erev Shel Shoshanim       Tree of Life
Rise and Shine            Halleluyah                Utza Eitza
Shir Baboker / Pitom      Hatikvah                  Y’hiyeh Tov
 kam Adam                 Hei Artzeinu
This is Very Good         Im Tirtzu                 TIKKUN OLAM
Yotzer Or                 Kachol V’Lavan            Al Sh’losha D’varim
                          Lach Y’rushalayim         Ani Ma’amin
                          L’olam Haba               Ani V’atah
EVENING                   Or Chadash                B’makom
                          Shalom Al Yisrael         Don’t Let the Light Go
Day is Done
                          Shalom Rav                  Out
Erev Ba
                          SIsu et Y’rushalayim      Dona
Erev Shel Shoshanim
                          Tzena                     Dreamer
Hinei Tov M’od
                          Y’rushalayim Shel Zahav   Gesher Tzar M’od
Machar
                          Y’varechecha              Halleluyah Ivdu - Avei
Rad Halaila
                                                    Hold Fast to Dreams
                          ISRAELI SONGS             Im Ein Ani Li Mi Li
SHABBAT
                          Hafinjan                  Im Tirtzu
Bim Bam
                          Hagalshan                 L’olam Haba
Boi Kallah
                          Mitachat Lashamayim       Lo Alecha
Chemdat Yamim
                          Tempo                     World Yet to Come
Chiri Biri Bam
                          Yoya                      Yad B’Yad
D’ror Yikra
                                                    Zum Gali Gali
Ki Eshmera Shabbat
                          FRIENDSHIP
L’cha Dodi
                          Ani Ohev Otach            HUMAN / GOD
Ma Yafeh Hayom
                          Arise My Love              RELATIONS
Mipi Eil
                          Bless This House          Adonai Oz
Mizmor Shir
                          Hinei Ma Tov              Atah Echad
Sabbath Prayer
                          Kumi Lach                 Bayom Hahu
Shabbat Shalom
                          Shalom Chaverim           Esa Einai
Shalom Aleichem
                          Together                  Hashiveinu
Shir Hamalot
                          V’yashvu Ish              Or Chadash
Ten lo Mishelo
                          Yad B’yad                 Ushmor
Ten Shabbat
                          Your Sweaters, My         Vehaier Eineinu
Ya Ribon Olam
                            Shoes
Yom zeh L’yisrael
                                                    “LECH L’CHA”
Yom zeh Mechubad
                          FAITH                     Lechi Lach
                          Bashana Haba’ah           Or Lagoyim
ISRAEL / ZION
                          Eileh Chamda Libi         Ufaratza



                                    15
PEACE                    Youth Shall See Visions   DUTY
Adonai Oz                                          Lo Alecha
Bayom Hahu               FREEDOM
Haporeis Sukkat Shalom   Chelki Adonai             PRAISE / SERVICE
Heiveinu Shalom          Dona                      All the World Sings to
  Alechem                                            You
Hinei Ma Tov             CHANUKAH                  Halleluyah
Lo Yisa Goy              Al Hanisim                Hava Nashira
Mi Ha Ish                Light One Candle          Hodu L’Adonai
Not By Might             Maoz Tzur                 Ivdu Et Hashem
Oseh Shalom              Mi Yimaleil               Ko Amar Hashem
Shalom Al Yisrael                                  L’chu N’ran’nah
Shalom Chaverim          RIGHTEOUSNESS             Mipi Eil
Shalom Rav               Mitzvah Goreret           Od Yishama
Shalom, Shalom            Mitzvah                  Shiru L’Adonai
Shir L’shalom            Tzadik Katamar            Ten Lo Mishelo
Ufros Aleinu                                       Tov L’Hodot
Ushmor                   SELF                      V’nomar L’fanav
V’Yashvu Ish             Im Ein Ani Li Mi Li       V’taheir Libeinu
                                                   Yedid Nefesh
WONDER OF GOD            FOR BLESSING              Yism’chu Hashamayim
How Glorious             Livracha
Ma Gadlu                 T’fillat Haderech         REJOICE /
Maoz Tzur                                            THANKSGIVING
Mi Yimaleil              LOVE                      Am Yisrael Chai
Mipi Eil                 Ani Ohev Otach            Ashrei
Shehecheyanu             Arise My Love             Halleluyah
Yedid Nefesh             Dodi Li                   Harachaman
                         Erev Shel Shoshanim       Hava Nagila
REMEMBERANCE /           Kumi Lach                 Hava Nashira
  WONDER OF LIFE         Lo Ish v’lo Isha          Hodu L’Adonai
Adon Olam                Mitachat Lashamayim       Ivdu Et Hashem
Circle Game                                        L’chu N’ran’nah
Day is Done              JERUSALEM                 Maoz Tzur
Dona                     Hallelu L’Yerushalayim    Modeh Ani
Eili, Eili               L’shana Haba’ah           O’ Sing Praises
Livracha                   B’Yerushalayim          Shehecheyanu
This is Very Good        Lach Yerushalayim         Siman Tov
                         Sisu Et Yerushalayim      Ten Lo Mishelo
DREAMS / VISIONS         Yerushalayim Shel         Tov L’hodot
Dreamer                    Zahav
Hold Fast to Dreams




                                   16
                   How to Run a Songleader Tryout
                 A guideline for the NFTY-STR Head Songleader

The tryout should be run by the NFTY-STR Head Songleader, if he or she is an outgoing
senior. If the Head Songleader is not a senior, but there are seniors who have been
songleaders, they should run the tryouts; if not, the NFTY-STR President should run
songleader tryouts.

1. One and a half to two months before the songleader tryouts, the head songleader
should guarantee that songleader tryout applications have been posted on the NFTY-STR
webpage and should email all NFTY-STR presidents/write all TYG Advisors to notify them
of upcoming songleader elections and try to gather excitement about songleader tryouts.

2. Day of songleader application deadline (approx. one week before Spring Kallah): The
head songleader gets a copy of names of all people who have sent in their forms so that
s/he can email them before the convention to let them know about how songleader tryouts
will work.

3. Friday night of Fall Kallah: The head songleader meets with the candidates to talk to
them, make sure they knows what’s going on on Saturday, and how the actual tryout will
run. (see #5 below)

4. Saturday, approximately 30 minutes before tryouts: The head songleader tells all the
people trying out which song/prayer (of the ten listed on the audition form) they are
leading. They can make sticky notes/whatever, get prepared.

5. During tryouts, either the NFTY-STR President or Head Songleader announces each
candidate. S/he comes into the room, does their 2 songs in whatever order they
want. After all candidates have tried out, give TYGs about 5 minutes to come together and
write notes (they have been doing this all along, they need pencil and paper for this) about
the different candidates.
Candidates do not see the tryouts of other candidates, and do not participate with their
TYG in making suggestions.
Tryouts can be held in either a social hall or sanctuary. There are benefits to each, but I
think that, in general, a sanctuary is better for getting people to pay attention. People can
still get up and dance in there, and then everyone actually listens, and can sit in a seat for
the slow stuff, etc. (you should probably allot 45 minutes to an hour for tryouts. Teaching a
song can take a long time, and each candidate is doing two things. I've already heard
from three of them, and I've heard that several more people are trying out. we could even
need an hour.)

6. After tryouts (sometime in the afternoon), the Outgoing and Incoming regional
presidents of NFTY –STR and Head Songleader definitely, and the Regional Advisor and
RCVP possibly, sit down, read over the papers TYGs have written (if necessary), discuss
the tryouts and decide how many songleaders to select for the upcoming year, and who
they will be.


                                             17
6. Saturday evening (usually follows Havdalah services): songleaders for next year are
announced. Just as at winter regional, where there is a passing of the flame ceremony,
here, the same occurs for songleaders. Senior songleaders announce the songleaders for
the next year, give them their songleader manuals and toys, pull them aside and
congratulate them, and thank everybody who tried out, reminding them that even if you
don’t get selected the first time you try out, you gotta keep trying.

For bags of goodies—consider cough drops, candles, sticky notes, lighters, picks, pick
holders, lip balm, lots of little junk...it is the responsibility of the Head Songleader/outgoing
Senior songleaders to shop for these things before the event...In 2003, the outgoing
songleaders chose to make CDs of popular and useful Jewish music to present to the
incoming songleaders in NFTY CD Booklets.

It is the decision of the NFTY-STR President and Regional advisor whether they will
accept intent to seek songleader position forms after the day they are due.

                 PROCEDURES FOR SONGLEADER TRYOUTS
Those seeking positions must audition, either by video or audio tape, or live performance,
at Spring Kallah. Candidates must be prepared to teach one song of their choice, and lead
one prayer, selected by the President and/or Head Songleader of NFTY-STR, from the
following selections (from the NFTY Chordster--Shireinu):

    Bar’chu - pg. 111, #186A, 186C (Jacobson, Siegel)

    Sh'ma – pg. 114, #190B, 190C (Pik, Friedman)

    Yotzer Song - pg. 112, #187A (Shankman/Lippe)

    Mi Chamocha - pg. 118, #192C, 192D (Friedman)

    Shalom Rav - pg. 129, #206 (Klepper/Freelander)

    Mi Shebeirach - pg. 146, #226A (Friedman/Setel)

    Shehecheyanu - pg. 146, #225 (Pik)

The final decision on Songleaders is made by the President of NFTY-STR. The opinions of
each Temple Youth Group will be collected from the voting delegates at the Spring Kallah
to assist the President with his/her decision.




                                               18
 For your reference: sample letter from Head Songleader to others trying out for songleader positions.

Shalom-
         As Head Songleader of NFTY-STR, I am contacting you with information regarding
songleader tryouts. Youth group advisors, please distribute this information to any members of
your TYG who might be interested in seeking a songleader position.
         OK, fun kids who are trying out for songleader positions. Here’s some information for you
to take a look at that will give you a basic idea of the responsibilities of a songleader and the way in
which songleader tryouts take place.
         Songleader tryouts are held at Spring Kallah, probably sometime on Saturday. For tryouts,
you should make sure that you can play the ten prayers listed on the songleader tryout form that you
should fill out and turn in to the regional office. If you have not done this, your youth group advisor
should have a copy of the “Intent To Seek Songleader Position” form, and you should send it in
ASAP.
      In addition, at the tryout you will teach one song that is not one of the ten listed on the intent
to seek songleader position sheet. For the song you teach, I generally recommend something
upbeat, with not too many difficult words, that is relatively easy to sing. If you want more advice
on a song, I will be happy to discuss this with you.
     Note: you're going to be a songleader. This means that sticky notes and other memory aids are
permissible, although, of course, you should have the song as near as possible to memorized so that
you don't spend your entire audition looking down at your guitar.
     Those elected as songleaders will be required to attend the songleader training weekend, to take
place at the Regional Board-Elect Retreat on April 25-27th. Save this date.
     During your term as songleader, you are required to attend all regional events. This includes
LLTI, Fall Kallah, Winter Regional, Hatikvah, Nashim or G'varim (if applicable), Spring Kallah,
and the Kallah Planning Weekend (Fall Regional Board Retreat). Attendance at Biennial and any
national events is optional. Songleaders are also strongly encouraged to attend any sub-regional and
TYG events where a songleader is needed (ie TYG services, Social Action Weekend, etc.).
     Also, you should know that in the upcoming years, we will be raising the level of prominence
of the songleader position. Songleaders will have the opportunity to lead programs, and be given
parallel responsibility to the regional board members. This means that people selected to be
songleaders for the upcoming year will be outgoing, personable, charismatic leaders.
     I encourage you to try out, and am available for assistance with songs and music if you want
assistance or have questions before tryouts. I look forward to seeing you there—remember to turn
in your “Intent To Seek Songleader Position” form immediately to the regional office. Also
remember—trying out for songleader is fun, and shouldn’t be too stressful. I wasn’t even chosen as
a regional songleader the first time I tried out, and look where I am now. So at tryouts, just get out
there, give it your best, smile, and make others smile and sing. That’s what a songleader does, so
get out there and give it your all.

Sincerely,


Josh Goldsmith
NFTY-STR Head Songleader, 2002-2003
Jag121842@aol.com




                                                    19
(For your reference: By-Law Passed 4/12/03, stating and guaranteeing rights and responsibilities of NFTY-STR
                                     Songleader and Head Songleader)

           NFTY-STR Constitutional By-Law
   Concerning Songleader Duties and Responsibilities
             As Passed By The NFTY-STR General Board On April 12, 2003
                      NFTY-STR Spring Kallah, Coral Springs FL
                            Presented By Josh Goldsmith

 I. As appointed Regional Board members, songleaders should observe all general responsibilities of
 Regional Board members, striving to be role models, being approachable and welcoming new
 members of the region, assisting in quieting people down, and attending all programs unless a time
 slot has been pre-approved as a practice time. Songleaders are introduced alongside the regional
 board at all introductions, and listed directly below the regional board on all mailings.

 II. In addition, songleaders must attend all regional events. These include the Regional Board-
 Elect Retreat and/or Songleader-Elect Retreat, LLTI, Kallah Planning Weekend, Fall Kallah, Winter
 Regional, Hatikvah, Nashim or G’varim (if applicable), and Spring Kallah. Songleaders should
 arrive one day before participants for both LLTI and Winter Regional. Attendance at Biennial and
 national events is optional.

 III. It is also the responsibility of the songleader to:
 1. Serve as a resource on any musical issues. This includes being available to assist in songleading
      at events hosted by NFTY-STR TYGs, if possible, and being reachable to answer songleading
      or musical questions.
 2. Lead the musical portion of services, song sessions, friendship circles, and any other musical
      program which may be asked of him/her.
 3. Communicate with other songleaders, the Head Songleader, and the Religious and Cultural Vice
      President or other service-leader to make sure s/he has received all services before conventions
      in order to be fully prepared in advance.
 4. Assist in leading programs.
 5. Be familiar with the songs the region is comfortable with, and teach songs the region doesn’t
      know before using them in any service, song session, or program.
 6. Songleaders are strongly encouraged to participate in NFTY Song Competition in the years that
      it is offered.
 7. Serve as a role model for all members of NFTY on a local, sub-regional, district, regional,
      national, and international level, and to appropriately represent NFTY-STR to others.
 8. Take on any additional duties which may be necessary to fulfill the above responsibilities.

 IV. The NFTY-STR President shall appoint a Head Songleader at songleader tryouts (held at
 Spring Kallah).

 A. In addition to all responsibilities listed above, the Head Songleader must also:

 1. Be in charge administratively of other songleaders. This includes but is not limited to planning
    practice times, making sure that all songleaders know of upcoming events and are prepared to
    lead at them, and communicating with all other songleaders to maintain the cohesiveness of the
    songleaders.



                                                    20
2. Communicate with the Religious and Cultural Vice President to get services at least two weeks
    before any event. If difficulties arise, it is the responsibility of the NFTY-STR President to
    guarantee that the RCVP gets services to songleaders two weeks before events.
3. Communicate with Event Coordinators, the NFTY-STR President, and NFTY-STR Regional
    Advisor to determine what songleaders will be doing at upcoming events and guarantee that
    sufficient time is allotted for all programs songleaders lead.
4. Motivate the other songleaders to be fully prepared for all duties.
5. Ensure that all music that songleaders lead is music with which the region is familiar, or teach
    the music before using it. This responsibility may include the proof-reading of services before
    an event, especially to make sure that they are musically coherent and cohesive.
6. Ensure that during conventions, many different melodies are used for individual prayers, thus
    maintaining for our region the greatest musical repertoire possible.
7. Guarantee that the MVP knows the last song of any song session so that s/he, who is responsible
    for the Ruach of the region, can coordinate cheer sessions to follow song sessions.
8. Guarantee that the song which corresponds to the regional theme be played sufficiently
    throughout the year.
9. Be a point person for distributing materials to all songleaders, and the liaison between the
    songleaders and President, RCVP, and MVP.
10. Run songleader tryouts (if the Head Songleader is an out-going senior; if not, the President of
    NFTY-STR will run songleader tryouts).
11. Make the final call in the event of any disagreements among songleaders.

B. The Head Songleader will preferably be a veteran songleader, and will be appointed by the
NFTY-STR President at the time of songleader tryouts. Though it is helpful if the Head Songleader
is the strongest guitarist or musician, the position primarily is administrative, and guarantees that all
music be in keeping with the musical goals of the region for the year; the person in the position also
guarantees that those working with songleaders understand the role of songleaders and checks to
make sure that services and timing will be correct.

C. The Head Songleader is directly responsible to the RCVP of NFTY-STR.




                                                   21

								
To top