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Slide 1 - Disaster Recovery Resources

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Slide 1 - Disaster Recovery Resources Powered By Docstoc
					              Daniel J. Alesch, Ph.D.
               Emeritus Professor

BCLC Forum: Next Steps for Improving Local, State,
    and National Disaster Recovery Strategies
            January, 2009 Boca Raton, Florida
   State government has an extremely important
    role in community disaster mitigation,
    response, and recovery.
   Some states are much more prepared to
    perform their role than others.
   Major disaster relief donors want assurance
    that their aid will make a lasting difference.
   The BCLC asked us for our help in identifying
    the “top ten” policies every state should have
    in place to facilitate recovery.
   No fair just sitting in our offices thinking about
    what might be our favorite “top ten”.
   The conclusions would have to flow from what
    has been learned from field research
   in real disasters in real communities and real
    recovery efforts from across America and from
    abroad.
   Since 1995, doing on-site disaster research in a
    dozen states from ocean to ocean and north to
    south.
   Studied more than two dozen communities that
    suffered one or more extreme events.
   Seen almost every kind of natural hazard event.
   Made repeated visits to each of them over the
    years.
   Conducted hundreds of interviews with victims,
    officials, community leaders, and observers.
   Premise: it is not the extreme event that
    is the disaster; the disaster is when bad
    consequences follow the event.
   To know how to intervene to facilitate
    community recovery, we have to
    understand recovery processes.
   But, to understand recovery processes,
    we have to understand how extreme
    events result in community disasters.
   Initial effects on the
    community depend
    on:
       The event itself
       Exposure of the parts
        of the community
       Vulnerability of the
        exposed parts.
                                                     Housing Damaged or
                                                          Destroyed


                                                    Business and Industrial
                                                     Property Damaged or
                                                          Destroyed
Extreme Event of         Structures and
   Significant           Natural Areas
   Magnitude,             Exposed and                Public Infrastructure
 Duration, and             Vulnerable               Damaged or Destroyed
    Proximity

                                                       People Injured or
                                                            Killed


                                                     Livestock and Crops
                                                    Damaged or Destroyed



                                                     Natural Ecosystems
                                                    Damaged or Destroyed



           Figure 1. Illustrative Direct Consequences of an Extreme Event,
                  Given Highly Exposed and Vulnerable Structures.
   It is messy, costly, and inconvenient, and
    painful, but
   Given sufficient resources, it can be rebuilt and
    continue to operate.
   The real disaster comes when adverse
    consequences cascade through the community
    and the community system itself suffers major
    damage.
 Housing Damaged or                              Emotional and
      Destroyed                              Psychological Problems

                                             Migration From the Area
Business and Industrial
 Property Damaged or                          Changed Local Market
      Destroyed                                     Demand

 Public Infrastructure                         Extensive Losses of
Damaged or Destroyed                            Uninsured Assets

                                              Business Closures and
  People Injured or                            Loss of Employment
       Killed
                                                Reduction in Local
                                              Government Revenues
 Livestock and Crops
Damaged or Destroyed                         Increased Costs to Local
                                                   Government

 Natural Ecosystems                             Increased Risk of
Damaged or Destroyed                           Subsequent Events




  Figure 2. Consequences That May Cascade From Immediate Consequences
                           of an Extreme Event
   Recovery is never guaranteed.
   The more initial damage, the more
    likely there will be cascading
    consequences.
   The more cascading consequences,
    the more difficult recovery is.
   Thus, the very best way to “recover”
    is not to suffer a disaster.
   Or, only suffer a mini-disaster.
   It makes sense to make communities
    more disaster-resistant
   But, we can never be entirely
    disaster-resistant , so response and
    recovery are essential.
   Those two conclusions essentially
    define the breadth of the States’ roles
    in helping with community
    recovery.
   REDUCE EXPOSURE TO EXTREME
    EVENTS.
   REDUCE VULNERABILITY TO
    EXTREME EVENTS
   PROTECT PEOPLE DURING THE
    EMERGENCY PERIOD
   ENSURE ADEQUATE INSURANCE
    PROTECTION
   HELP ALL AFFECTED LOCAL
    GOVERNMENT CONINUE
    OPERATIONS
   PROVIDE STAFF SUPPORT AND
    TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE
   EXPEDITE PERMITTING AND
    LICENSING
   LOOK ACROSS THE LOCAL
    BOUNDARIES TO MAP OUT
    REGIONAL RECOVERY
   “SEED” LOCAL RECOVERY WITH
    TIMELY REPAIRS AND INVESTMENTS
   HELP BUILD RESISTANCE AND
    RESILIENCY INTO THE COMMUNITY

				
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