Docstoc

Update On IEEE 802

Document Sample
Update On IEEE 802 Powered By Docstoc
					              Update On IEEE 802.11n and Related Companies 
                                   Alan J Weissberger 
                               aweissberger@sbcglobal.net 
Introduction: 
The IEEE 802.11n standard promises a 4x (or more) improvement in performance over 
today's 802.11a/g standards.   Not only is the basic speed much greater (130 M to 270M 
bit/s per channel) than today’s WiFi, but the MAC is more efficient and channel bonding 
is permitted.  The increased performance along with an extended coverage area has 
created a firestorm of questions and uncertainty within the IT community. 

While a ratified IEEE 802.11n standard isn't expected for another 18 months (at the 
earliest), several vendors have already starting shipping “Pre­N” products, leading more 
organizations to explore how the upcoming standard should play into their WiFi upgrade 
plans.  Given the influx of these pre­standard products and the associated hype within the 
networking industry, IT administrators need to get a head start on understanding the 
technology behind 802.11n and how this important WiFi standard will affect, not only 
their wireless networks, but their wired infrastructures as well. 
In this article, we examine highlights from an 802.11n webinar, WiFi Alliance Plans for 
802.11n Standardization, 802.11n Company Developments, and look at "smart WiFi" and 
802.11n for in­home IPTV distribution. 


802.11n Webinar 
               th 
On December 6  , 2006, Xirrus (an “innovator of Wi­Fi technology for the enterprise”) 
sponsored a webinar that provided an overview of 802.11n and how this higher performing 
wireless network would impact network infrastructures. 
Here are a few highlights from the webinar: 
   ‐  The increased 802.11n traffic volumes could strain today’s infrastructures.  This 
      includes router and WiFi controller backplanes, wired network bandwidth (some 
      vendors offer one or two Gig Ethernet ports on their pre­standard 802.11n 
      equipment), and power requirements 
   ‐  802.11b clients seriously degrade 802.11n performance and most of the benefits 
      of 802.11n are in the 5 GHz band.  Hence, enterprise networks are moving to 
      802.11a and dropping 802.11b. 
   ‐  Channel bonding ­an 802.11n feature­ doesn’t add value in enterprise 
      deployments. It’s best to have multiple channels available so Access Points (Aps) 
      can work around interference problems. 
   ‐  Higher data rates may require 802.11n on both sides of the link.  802.11n will


                                            1 
   provide higher capacity in the enterprise; increased range (coverage) and speed in 
   the home. 
‐  Dual Radio 802.11n APs will require Gig Ethernet wired connections and ports. 
‐  Current WiFi gear cannot handle 802.11n speeds, especially if data is encrypted 
   (as it should be for privacy).  Most deployed WiFi equipment (wireless 
   routers/switches and APs) will therefore require a fork­lift upgrade to 
   adequately support 802.11n. 




                        Figure 1. Image courtesy of Xirrus


‐  ­Xirrus claims they are the only truly upgradeable 802.11n platform on the market 
   today. It was designed from the ground up to support the standard once ratified 
   because it has the following features: Firmware­upgradeable MAC, Replaceable 
   Radios, 2Gbps Switching Fabric, Dual Gigabit Uplink Ports – these are needed to 
   handle the higher throughput of 802.11n. 
‐  ­Xirrus says it allows customers to upgrade from 802.11a/b/g Wi­Fi Arrays to 
   802.11a/b/g/n. “Customers who sign up for the Xirrus 802.11n Upgrade 
   Guarantee Program will receive a factory upgrade to 802.11n radios and 
   associated new software for an incremental cost over their initial investment,” 
   said Dirk Gates, CEO of Xirrus. 



                                         2 
   ‐  ­802.11n standardized and certified gear isn’t expected to be available on store 
      shelves until 2008.   The final IEEE standard is targeted for completion in March 
      2008. 
   ‐  Users interested in multi­vendor interoperability should wait for the 802.11n 
      standard to be completed along with inter­op testing and pressing business needs 
      to deploy this technology in the enterprise. 
WiFi Alliance Plans for 802.11n Standardization 
The following table provides a summary comparison between the various 802.11 
standards. 
                                WiFi Comparison Table 
                                   802.11b  802.11g  802.11a         802.11n 
             IEEE Ratified           1999         2003    1999         2008 
               Frequency           2.4GHz  2.4GHz  5GHz           2.4GHz/5GHz 
      Non­overlapping Channels        3            3       12          3/12 
            Base Bandwidth         11Mbps  54Mbps  54Mbps  65Mbps /65Mbps 
           Channel Bonding           No           No      No            Yes 
          Max Bandwidth Per 
                                   11Mbps  54Mbps  54Mbps  130Mbps/270Mbps 
              Channel 


Frustrated with the slow progress being made in the derailed 802.11n standards process 
(often fraught with bickering amongst companies with competing proposals), the Wi­Fi 
Alliance which represent some 250 companies declared it would certify devices based on 
the Draft 2.0 of the 802.11n specifications which are due to be voted on by the Standards 
committee next March.  It seems the Wi­Fi Alliance is happy to establish itself as the 
arbiter of a de facto industry standard. 
The WiFi Alliance will certify the next generation of WiFi gear in two waves:

   ·  The first phase will be based on draft 2.0 of the standard, to be released in March 
      2007.

   ·  The second phase will certify equipment against the full, final version of the IEEE 
      802.11n standard, and is expected sometime in the first half of 2008.




                                             3 
                              Figure 2, Image courtesy of Xirrus 

Related 802.11n Company Developments: 
­Atheros Communications is putting Gigabit Ethernet in all its 802.11n Access Points. 
“Todd Antes, vice president of marketing for Atheros states, “Gigabit in mass­market 
products is still a rare commodity, because it is more expensive. We want to drive it into 
the mass market. We expect by 2008 that all new 802.11n AP routers will include Gigabit 
Ethernet.” 
Laptops will move to 802.11n next year, said Antes, announcing that some Lenovo 
notebooks will include Atheros chipsets. Rival Broadcom also announced its 802.11n 
chips are in laptops from Lenovo and three other manufacturers last week. 
Gigabit will be used for multimedia services inside the home, said Antes: “It’s not all 
about pulling things off the broadband pipe.” 
­QUALCOMM acquired 802.11n chip start­up Airgo Networks, which possesses 
intellectual property in WLAN technology and has provided WLAN products to both 
manufacturers of Access Points and laptop computers. In addition to supporting Airgo's 
existing business, QUALCOMM will be integrating their 802.11a/b/g and 802.11n 
technology into select Mobile Station Modem(TM) (MSM(TM)) chipsets. The company 
will also use this technology for chipsets on the new Snapdragon(TM) platform, which is 
designed to offer ubiquitous mobile broadband connectivity. 

"Airgo has an extensive history of delivering advanced wireless LAN solutions that have 
revolutionized our industry segment, and we are pleased to become part of the company 
we believe is the global leader in wireless technology and chipsets," said Greg Raleigh, 
president & chief executive officer of Airgo Networks. "This acquisition enables 
integrated products with wireless LAN and wireless WAN capabilities to deliver a 
seamless­connectivity experience for users." 

Airgo has already announced what it describes as the "world's first chipset offering full



                                              4 
support for Draft 2.0 of the IEEE 802.11n Standard". This isn't the second draft of the 
standard, which hasn't been written or voted on as yet. This is the Draft that the Wi­Fi 
alliance say they will certify against rather than wait for the final standard to be ratified. 

Using “Smart WiFi” or 802.11n to Distribute IPTV within the Home 

We previously published an article entitled: Promise of a Cable­ Less House: 
http://www.viodi.com/newsletter/051002/article1.htm 

The basic premise was that 802.11n (or other wireless technology) could be used to 
interconnect TVs, PCs, file storage systems, digital cameras, game consoles, and various 
gadgets.  We have recently learned that Pioneer Telephone­ is using “smart WiFi” 
technology from Ruckus Wireless to distribute IPTV within a home. 

According to Scott Ulsaker, Video Products Manager at Pioneer Telephone, “One of the 
biggest obstacles facing the IPTV deployment is the high cost of wiring and the time 
associated with in­home installation.”  But now, the Ruckus MediaFlex system has 
allowed Pioneer to eliminate one truck roll and reduce installation times from 3.5 hours 
to less than 45 minutes, thereby tripling the number of subscribers brought online each 
day. Users can now enjoy location­free TV while surfing the Internet. 

For more information, please refer to: 

http://www.ruckuswireless.com/products/casestudies/pioneer/ 

Author’s Note:  We can safely assume that the increased speed and range of 802.11n 
(with built in QOS) could be advantageously used to support multiple HDTV/ SDTV 
streams, as well as other media to be distributed within the home environment.  In this 
case, pre­standard 802.11n equipment might be OK for home users, as they would 
probably by all their gear from one vendor (assuming an external 802.11n modem for 
their PC).  However, once 802.11n is integrated into the notebook PC, standard APs and 
wireless switch/routers will be required. 
                                                 th 
The San Jose Mercury News reported on December 11  , 2006 that: FUTURE HOME 
NETWORKS MAY BE A COMBINATION OF TECHNOLOGIES.  Please refer to: 

http://www.mercurynews.com/mld/mercurynews/business/16213086.htm 

The article is somewhat negative about IEEE 802.11n for home use.  It states: “the draft 
has been in the works for years and the early tests of equipment based on it have been 
disappointing, analysts say. Indeed, some question whether throughput of WiFi will ever 
be enough to guarantee that consumers will be able to stream high­definition video 
without seeing a choppy picture.” 
Ben Bajarin, an analyst with Campbell­based Creative Strategies, is quoted in the article: 
``There's no doubt about it, `802.11n' (wireless) can't do it alone.''   That's why he and



                                               5 
other analysts believe that the home network of the future is likely to be a combination of 
multiple technologies. “The base network might run on coaxial or power line wires, but 
consumers will likely extend it using wireless technologies, whether UWB or WiFi.”




                                             6 

				
DOCUMENT INFO
Shared By:
Tags: 802.11n
Stats:
views:23
posted:3/23/2011
language:English
pages:6
Description: 802.11n Wi-Fi Alliance is back in 802.11a/b/g wireless transmission of a standard protocol, in order to achieve high bandwidth, high quality WLAN service, the wireless LAN to Ethernet performance levels, 802.11 Task Group N (TGn ) came into being. 802.11n standard to IEEE 2009, formal approval was obtained, but the use of MIMO OFDM technology vendors have been many, including D-Link, Airgo, Bermai, Broadcom and Agere Systems, Atheros, Cisco, Intel and so on, products include wireless LAN , wireless routers, and has a large number of the PC, notebook PC applications.