Docstoc

GCSE HISTORY 2010 How to get a Grade C or Better on Paper 1

Document Sample
GCSE HISTORY 2010 How to get a Grade C or Better on Paper 1 Powered By Docstoc
					                    GCSE History Revision Guide 2010


                     GCSE HISTORY 2010
    How to get a Grade C or Better on Paper 1
                   Exam Date Wednesday 9 June 2010
   To gain a Grade C you only need to hit the mid mark for each question as
   well as the comprehension question, which are straight forward

   To gain a Grade A you can achieve this by getting the lowest mark for each
   question that has a Level 3 answer.

   To gain a Grade A* you would need to gain the top mark for each Level 3
   question.

   Think – this means you do not have to gain full marks to get an A* - you can
   fail gain 20% of the available marks and still get the top grade.

                 Paper 1 International Conflict
   Section A
   You must answer 2 out of 3 questions in Section A
   You will be asked questions on 5 of the following topics
1 . Why did tension increase in Europe between 1900 and 1914?
2. Why did the assassination at Sarajevo lead to the outbreak of war in
1914?
3. How did the Treaty ofVersailles establish peace?
4. Why did the League of Nations frequently fail in its aims to keep the
peace?
5. How did Hitler challenge and exploit the Treaty of Versailles in the
period 1933 to March 1938?
6. Why did appeasement fail to prevent the outbreak of war in 1939?
7. Why did the USA and USSR become rivals in the period 1945 to 1949?


   Section B
   You must answer the question on Britain in the Second
   World War.
   You will be expected to know about the following topics.
How did Britain resist and contribute to the defeat of Germany in the
Second World War?
How did the war change life in Britain?




                       History Department 2010                                    1
                 GCSE History Revision Guide 2010




               Questions and Answers


1)‘What does the source tell us about……..?'

    •   You must use the source NOT your own knowledge.
    •   Bullet points will gain you marks.
    •   If there are statistics, quote examples. Compare figures and trends




2) ‘How accurate/reliable is the view/opinion in the
source…..?

        •   Identify the opinion/view in the source – is it true?
        •   Comment on WHO wrote the source, WHEN it was written and
            WHY it was written.
        •   Comment on what was going on at the time it was written or
            produced.
        •   Compare what it says to your own knowledge.

3) “Describe ……….”

•   Mention several points or write in detail aboput one point.
•   Have a beginning, a middle and an end.


4) “Which of the following is the most important ……?”

•   Describe Explain Assess
•   Describe and explain the importance of each point.
•   Make a judgement as to which was the most important.
•   Point out any links between the two.
•   Write 3 separate paragraphs.

Section B Britain in the Second World War

1) “What does the source tell us about….?'

•   You must use the source NOT your own knowledge.
•   Bullet points will gain you marks.

•   If there are statistics, quote examples. Compare figures and trends




                     History Department 2010                                  2
                  GCSE History Revision Guide 2010



2 ) “Why was the poster published...?”

•   Explain why the poster was produced, what was happening at the time,
    what problem was it trying to address.
•   Explain the appeal of the poster, the message, the audience, emotions
    it is trying to provoke, or the action it wants people to take and why.



3) ‘How useful is the source…?'

•   Say the source is useful because it contains the following
    information....
•   Say the source is useful because of WHO? WHEN? and WHY? it was
    produced.
•   Say the source has limitations because it does not tell us this.........
•   Say the source has limitations because of WHO? WHEN? and WHY?
    it was produced.


4) “Do you agree with the interpretation in this source..?”

•   Paraphrase the argument.
•   Agree and disagree with the interpretation, comment on WHO?
    WHEN? and WHY? the source was written.
•   Agree and disagree using your own knowledge. Did it happen this
    way? Was this the most important reason? What other events have not
    been considered?




                      History Department 2010                                  3
                          GCSE History Revision Guide 2010


What follows are overviews of the key areas you will be tested on in Paper 1. Identify
the key areas, use the information below to help you answer the last question on each
section - Which was the most important event? Use the information to help you to
construct arguments and to assess which events are important and why? You must be
able to compare two events and make a judgement about which is more important and
why.

         Q1 Why did World War One break out in 1914?

         Introduction
         There were several causes which saw World War I break out in 1914.
         Tensions between the Great Powers increased between 1900-1914 over
         issues such as the arms race, imperial rivalry, the alliance system and the
         Schlieffen Plan. These tensions boiled over with the assassination at
         Sarajevo which saw Europe slide into war.

         The Alliance System divided Europe into two armed camps.

         •   Supposed to maintain peace, Balance of Power
         •   Triple Entente, Britain, France, Russia.
         •   Central Powers, Germany, Austria-Hungary, Italy.
         •   The Entente was a friendly agreement not a military alliance.
         •   Germany feared encirclement, increased tension

         The Arms Race increased fear and suspiscion..

         •   Naval race between Britain and Germany, Dreadnoughts.
         •   Build up of armies on continent.
         •   German fear of ‘Russian steamroller'.

         Imperial Rivalry as Germany wanted ‘a place in the sun'.

         •   Germany tried to split Anglo-French Entente with Moroccan Crisis,
             1905.
         •   International conference supported France, Germany humiliated.
         •   Austria-Hungary annexed Bosnia, 1908 – Russia demands
             compensation.. Rejected by other powers.
         •   Serbia afraid of Austrian expansion Germany attempts to split Britain
             and France again over Morocco, 1911. (Panther).
         •   Britain threatens war, Germany humiliated again, ties between Britain
             and France grow stronger. Triple Entente strengthened.
         •   Germany and Austria-Hungary pushed closer together, Alliances
             strengthened.

         Assassination at Sarajevo the spark that ignited all the tensions.

         •   Archduke Franz Ferdinand and wife killed at Sarajevo.
         •   A-H blames Serbia, ultimatum. Germany supports AH, blank sheque.
         •   Russia mobilises to support Serbia.


                              History Department 2010                                  4
                        GCSE History Revision Guide 2010


       •   Germany attacks France, Schlieffen Plan, invades Belgium.
       •   Britain uses Treaty with Belgium(scrap of paper) to enter war.

       Schlieffen Plan devised so Germany can fight both France and Russia
       and win.

       •   Plan devised in 1905, aim to beat France quickly, then turn on Russia.
       •   Assumes France to be defeated in six weeks, Russia to be slow to
           mobilise.
       •   Assumes Britain will not enter war. All 3 assumptions prove to be
           false.

       THINK

       •   Which event caused the war?
       •   Which events were long term cause and which were short term causes?
       •   How are the events linked together?
       •   Who was to blame for the war?
       •   Could war have been avoided?



Describe questions have been asked about the following;
DESCRIBE
   • Events after the assassination at Sarajevo leading to World War One.
   • The Alliance system in 1914.
   • The assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand.
   • The Schlieffen Plan (has appeared twice)
   • The Moroccan Crises of 1906 and 1911.



These have been the topics for the question on ‘Which is more important…’

Which was more important as a cause of the First World War

   •   the Moroccan Crises, 1905 and 1911;
   •   the assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand at Sarajevo in Bosnia, 1914?

Which was more important as a reason for the increasing tension in Europe in the
years 1900 to 1914;

   •   The alliance system;
   •   The Bosnian Crisis, 1908-1909?

Which was the greater danger to the peace of Europe in the years 1905-1914;

   •   The rivalry between France and Germany in Morocco;
   •   The rivalry between Austria-Hungary and the Serbs in the Balkans


                            History Department 2010                                 5
                         GCSE History Revision Guide 2010


Which was the most important reason for Great Britain joining the First World War in
1914;

   •   The Arms (Naval) Race with Germany, 1906-1914
   •   The Schlieffen Plan?

Which caused more tension between the Great Powers in the years 1905 to
1911:

   •   events in Morocco, 1905-1911
   •   events in Bosnia, 1908-1909

Which was the more important reason for the outbreak of the First
World War in 1914:

   • the arms race
   • the assassination of Franz Ferdinand in Sarajevo in
     1914?



Q2 Why did World War Two break out in 1939?


       Introduction
       There were several reasons why World war Two broke out in 1939. The
       Treaty of Versailles was harsh and resented by Germany who wanted to
       change it. The League of Nations proved to be too weak to maintain the
       peace. Hitler was determined to rip up the Treaty and redraw the map of
       Europe. Britain and France were anxious to avoid a war and tried to
       appease Hitler in order to keep the peace.



       The Treaty of Versailles was a compromise peace that satisfied no one.

       •   The Big Three, Wilson, Clemenceau and Lloyd George could not
           agree.
       •   Germany resented the peace calling it a ‘Diktat'.
       •   Germany was angry about the military terms, territorial terms and
           reparations.
       •   Germany was angry about the ‘War Guilt Clause'.
       •   Many people from all countries criticised the treaty.

       The League of Nations failed to keep the peace or defend the Treaty of
       Versailles.

       •   F rench and British self interest
       •   A bsent powers - USA


                             History Department 2010                               6
                         GCSE History Revision Guide 2010


       •   I neffective sanctions
       •   L ack of an armed force
       •   U nfair treaty
       •   R eaching decisions too slowly
       •   E uropean club, everyone had to agree

       Hitler's Foreign Policy aimed to redraw the map of Europe and scrap the
       Treaty.

       •   Hitler's aims were to create a Greater Germany, to unite all german
           speaking people, to gain lebensraum and to destroy communism
           (USSR).
       •   He began rearming, Britain signed the Anglo-German Naval
           Agreement,1935.
       •   He re-entered the Rhineland, 1936 (demilitarised under the VT)
       •   He united with Austria, 1938 (Anschluss was banned under the VT)
       •   He demanded the german-speaking population of the Sudetenland in
           1938.
       •   These were seen as reasonable by Britain and France as they revised
           the VT.

       Britain followed a policy of appeasement as they wished to avoid war

       •   Many people felt the VT was too harsh and Hitler was reasonable.
       •   The British public were opposed to war.
       •   British rearmament began in 1936, it would not be ready until 1940.
       •   Hitler said he had no further territorial demands in Europe after the
           Sudetenland.
       •   At Munich in September 1938 , Britain, France, Germany and Italy
           agreed that Germany could have the Sudetenland.

       The results

       •   Hitler invaded Czechoslovakia in 1939, Britain abandoned
           appeasement.
       •   The Nazi-Soviet Pact, August 1939, secured Hitler's eastern frontier,
           war would be in the west.
       •   Britain declared war on Germany when Poland was invaded.



Describe questions have been asked about the following;
DESCRIBE
   • How Chamberlain prevented war over the Sudetenland in September 1938.
   • Events after Italy invaded Abyssinia in 1935 and her leaving of the League of
       Nations in 1937.
   • The organisation of the League of Nations and how it was supposed to prevent
       war.
   • How Japan took over Manchuria in 1931-33.


                            History Department 2010                                7
                         GCSE History Revision Guide 2010


   •   The aims of Clemenceau and Woodrow Wilson at the Paris Peace Conference
       in 1919.
   •   The territorial changes made by the Versailles Treaty.
   •   Neville Chamberlain’s policy of appeasement.
   •   How Hitler took control of the Saar in 1935 and the Rhineland in 1936.
   •   How the Treaty of Versailles punished Germany.



These have been the topics for the question on ‘Which is more important…’

Which was more important as a reason for the failure of the League of Nations

   •   Its handling of the Manchurian Crisis, 1931-32;
   •   Its handling of the Abyssinian Crisis, 1935-36?

Which was the more important factor in allowing Hitler to succeed in his foreign
policy in the 1930s

   •   The Treaty of Versailles
   •   Chamberlain’s policy of appeasement?

Which was the bigger threat to European peace in the 1930s;

           •   The re-militarisation of the Rhineland, 1936;
           •   The Nazi-Soviet Pact 1939?

Which part of the Treaty of Versailles caused more anger in Germany:

           o   The loss of territory in Europe;
           o   War Guilt and reparations?

Which of the following events was the greater success in Hitler’s foreign policy:

   •   The re-militarisation of the Rhineland in 1936;
   •   The occupation of the Sudetenland in 1938?

Which of these two events in 1935-1936 made world war more likely to happen in the
later 1930s;

   •   The invasion of Abyssinia,1935-36
   •   The re-militarisation of the Rhineland, 1936?

Which was the greater threat to world peace in the 1930s

           •   the Japanese invasion of Manchuria, 1931
           •   the unification of Germany and Austria
               (Anschluss), 1938




                             History Department 2010                                8
                        GCSE History Revision Guide 2010


Which event of 1939 made war more likely:

           •   Hitler's occupation of Czechoslovakia, March
               1939;
           •   the Nazi-Soviet Pact, August, 1939?

Which was the more important reason for the outbreak of the Second World
War in 1939:

           •   Hitler's aims in foreign policy
           •   Chamberlain's policy of appeasement, 1938-1939?



Q3 Why did the USA and the USSR become rivals in the period 1945
to 1949?


       Introduction
       The war-time alliance between the USA and the USSR began to crumble
       once their common enemy, Nazi Germany, was defeated. Old differences
       in terms of ideology and power politics began to emerge after the war.
       The USA and USSR emerged as Super Powers after the war and clashed
       over the future of defeated Germany and who should have influence in
       Europe.

       Ideological differences had existed before the war.

       •   The USSR was communist, believed in state control of the economy.
       •   The USA believed in capitalism, private property and competition.
       •   The USSR was a one party dictatorship.
       •   The USA claimed to be a land of freedom and democracy.
       •   Both treated the other side with fear and suspiscion.

       The Yalta and Potsdam conferences were supposed to decide the fate of
       post war Europe.

       •   It was agreed to split Germany and Berlin into 4 zones.
       •   Clashes over issues of reparations and ‘spheres of influence'.
       •   Changes in personnel, Truman more hostile to communism than FDR.
       •   Stalin suspicious of Truman, not told of A-Bomb.

       Salami tactics and the ‘ Iron Curtain'

       •   USSR extended influence in Eastern Europe, alarmed the west.
       •   Stalin claimed he was creating a security barrier.
       •   Churchill made his ‘iron curtain' speech as a wake up call to the USA
           to help bring about a halt to USSR expansion.(1946)



                            History Department 2010                                9
                         GCSE History Revision Guide 2010


       Truman Doctrine and the Marshall Plan (1947)

       •   Britain asked for help to stop communism in Greece.
       •   USA agreed, Truman Doctrine committed USA to stopping the
           spreading of communism anywhere in the world (Containment).
       •   USA to be ‘policeman of the world'.
       •   Marshall Plan to give $13 billion to countries to fight poverty and stop
           the spread of communism.
       •   Stalin argued this was the USA trying to control the economies of
           Europe.




       The Berlin Blockade, 1948-49

       •   Stalin angered when USA and Britain combined their zones and new
           currency.
       •   Stalin cut off West Berlin from rest of Germany
       •   USA and Britain fly in supplies, a test of strength.
       •   Stalin backs down, use of force would be an act of war.
       •   Germany split in two, NATO a military alliance directed against
           USSR set up.
       •   Europe divided into two armed camps, Cold War divisions hardened.



Describe questions have been asked about the following;
DESCRIBE
   • Decisions made at the Yalta and Potsdam Conferences of 1945.
   • Events of the Berlin Blockade and airlift in 1948-49.

These have been the topics for the question on ‘Which is more important…’

Which was more important as a reason for the rivalry between the USA and the USSR
during the years 1945 to 1949

   •   Soviet expansion into East and Central Europe;
   •   The Truman Doctrine and the Marshall Plan?

Which was the more important reason for the development of the Cold War;

   •   The Truman Doctrine, 1947;
   •   The Berlin Blockade, 1948-1949?

Which was the more important reason for the development of the Cold War:

                  •   the Potsdam Conference, July 1945?
                  •   the Marshall Plan, 1947


                            History Department 2010                                   10
                       GCSE History Revision Guide 2010


Section B What part did Britain play in the defeat of Germany in the
Second World War?
      Introduction
      Britain went to war with Germany after the invasion of Poland in
      September 1939. For several months there was no fighting, the ‘Phoney
      War', until April 1940 when Hitler launched his attack on western Europe.
      The quick defeat of the French saw Britain left to fight Germany alone,
      until the entry of the USA and the USSR. The combined forces of these
      powers defeated Germany in 1945. There were several events crucial to
      Britains survival against Germany.

      The BEF and Dunkirk, 1940.

      •   The BEF was sent to France to help defend against German invasion.
      •   Blitzkrieg tactics saw a quick defeat of the French and the BEF stuck
          on the defeat at Dunkirk.
      •   Operation Dynamo rescued 340,000 British troops from the beach.
      •   The Royal Navy and small boats rescued the troops, but huge amounts
          of equipment were lost.
      •   The British Army was defeated in its first battle with the Germans.
      •   The defeat was turned into a victory by government propaganda.
      •   The new Prime Minister, Churchill, spoke of a new spirit to fight on.

      The Battle of Britain saw the RAF destroy Hitler's invasion plans,
      Operation Sea Lion.

      •   Before Hitler could invade he needed to control the skies and seas in
          the Channel.
      •   The RAF with the aid of radar, repelled the Luftwaffe.
      •   Hitler accepted he could not invade and instead launched the Blitz, the
          bombing of cities.
      •   Churchill offered thanks to the ‘Few' and Britain gained in confidence.
      •   Britain remained free and a launch pad for US troops against Hitler.
      •   Hitler later turned east against Russia which drained his forces.



      The Battle of the Atlantic was the one thing that scared Churchill, defeat
      here would destroy Britain.

      •   Supplies of food and equipment crossed the Atlantic from the USA,
          without which Britain would not survive.
      •   U-Boats tried to destroy the supply routes.
      •   By 1943 the use of asdic, sonar, convoys, long range planes won the
          battle.
      •   The USA could now send troops to Britain ready for D-Day in 1944.
      •   The Battle was fought by thousands of men over a huge area.

      D-Day was the opening of the Second Front against Germany in 1944.


                           History Department 2010                                  11
                             GCSE History Revision Guide 2010


         •      US and British troops landed on the beaches at Normandy, 6 June
                1944.
         •      Over 300,000 troops landed in France in the first week.
         •      Paratroopers landed behind lines to disrupt communication.
         •      Over the next nine months the Allied troops advanced through France
                to Germany.
         •      Germany was now fighting on three fronts in the East, Italy and
                France.
         •      Germany was under attack from massive air raids..

          How far was victory down to Britain?

         •      Without US supplies and money we would not have lasted the war.
         •      The Red Army tied up 85% of the German Army.



“Do you agree with this interpretation….” question have been on the
following topics

Is Source H an accurate interpretation of the part played by Britain in the defeat of
Germany in the Second World War? Use Source H and your own knowledge to
answer the question. (10 marks)

Is the view given in Source H an accurate interpretation of the part played by Britain
in the defeat of Germany in the Second World War? Use Source H and your own
knowledge to answer the question (8 marks)

Do you agree with the interpretation of the Dunkirk evacuation given in Source H?
Use Source H and your own knowledge to answer the question (8 marks)

Do you agree with the interpretation given in Source T of the importance of the Battle
of Britain in the Second World War? Use Source T and your own knowledge to
explain your answer. (8 marks)

Source W shows that Bryn Griffiths' life as an evacuee was an improvement on his
life in Swansea. Do you agree with the interpretation that evacuees had a better life in
their new homes? Explain your answer by referring to the purpose of the source as
well as using its content and your own knowledge. (8 marks)


ntact me here.
Source T is about the importance of the evacuation from Dunkirk in Britain's victory
in the Second World War. Do you agree with the interpretation of the importance of
Dunkirk? Explain your answer by referring to the purpose of the source, as well as its
content and your own knowledge. (8 marks)




                                History Department 2010                                 12
                          GCSE History Revision Guide 2010


                        Tips to help you write your answers.

RELIABILITY (WWW.Com)
Did the author have a reason to be biased? (Who?)
What was going on when they wrote the source ?(When?)
Did the author have a specific reason for making the sources? (Why?)
Does the source match up with what you know happened? (Comparisons)


USEFULNESS
Does it offer a unique or different viewpoint? (Who?)
Did the person have a special insight in to what was going on? (When?)
Is it a good example of propaganda? (Why?)
Is the content relevant? (Compare with what you know)

Does it only give a limited view? (When?)
Does the source exaggerate or distort what took place? (Why?)
Is the author trustworthy? (Who?)
What are the limitations of the source? (Compare with what you know?)
What is missing from the account?


The source is useful because of …………….(www.com)…………

The source has it's limitations because of …(www.com)…………

EXTENDED WRITING
Write in clear paragraphs. Each paragraph should contain PEEL
P oint - Your opening sentence should make a point>
E vidence – you should provide examples to support your point.
E xplanation – you should argue how this evidence supports your point.
L ink – you should link your paragraph to the question and to your other
          paragraphs.

 ARGUE
 Phrases to use:
 The most important aspect... Moreover... Sometimes... Despite the view that... On the
 other hand... Notwithstanding... Firstly... Research shows that... Secondly... The
 evidence clearly shows that... Thirdly... Another factor to be considered is...
 However... Opponents declare...but... Nevertheless... On balance...

 EXPLAIN
 Phrases to use:
 Because... The first thing to do is... Another reason... Later on... Although...
 Ultimately... Nevertheless... Contrary to popular belief... The most important... As a
 result... Above all else... Consequently... Despite the fact that... Inevitably...




                              History Department 2010                                     13

				
DOCUMENT INFO
Shared By:
Categories:
Stats:
views:27
posted:3/23/2011
language:English
pages:13