PRISON CATERING SERVICES by wanghonghx

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									   Prison Service
       Order                             PRISON CATERING SERVICES




         ORDER
        NUMBER
            5000




Date of Initial Issue       09/04/2008
Issue No.                   294
This replaces the earlier version of PSO 5000 issued in August 2005
PSI Amendments should be read in conjunction with this PSO

Date of Further
Amendments
PSO 5000                                                                                     Page 1


PRISON CATERING SERVICES

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY



STATEMENT OF PURPOSE

1.     This Prison Service Order (PSO) is being re-issued in place of the earlier edition of PSO 5000
       issued in August 2005.
       The earlier version of PSO 5000 is cancelled and existing copies must be destroyed.

2.     As part of on-going work to improve the quality and effectiveness of catering, the PSO has
       been revised and updated. The revisions contain the latest legislative requirements and
       guidance on all aspects of food safety and production. It is the responsibility of all staff and
       managers involved in catering to make sure they are both aware of and implement food
       safety legislation. Not doing so could lead to serious consequences.

3.     Providing meals and food for prisoners is a key issue in maintaining order and control
       within establishments, helping to meet the decency agenda - including meeting the needs
       of a diverse prisoner population - and can help improve prisoners‟ health. This PSO is
       designed to ensure that the Prison Service can best meet these challenges whilst at the
       same time maintaining compliance with all relevant food safety legislation. Compliance will
       be monitored by Governors, Area Managers, Area Catering Managers and Standards Audit
       Unit.

4.     The PSO is underpinned by the Performance Standard 04 on catering and food.


DESIRED OUTCOME

5.     The PSO applies to all food provision in establishments including staff messes, clubs,
       prisoner visits and food bought by prisoners through the retail contract. It provides clear
       instructions to Governors and caterers on the legal requirements and the steps needed to
       ensure that all meal provision within establishments is carried out safely, decently and
       within a defined agreed policy framework which minimises any risk to the consumer.



MANDATORY ACTIONS

6.     Governing governors and directors of contracted-out establishments must ensure that all
       catering staff complies with the Food Safety Act 1990 and all subordinate legislation,
       including applicable EU food law. Catering staff must ensure that any prisoners working in
       catering areas comply with all requirements. All mandatory instructions shown in italics
       throughout this PSO must be fully implemented at all times.


RESOURCE IMPLICATIONS

7.     The revisions address areas where current guidance and working practices require
       updating, enhancement or clarification. The changes will assist staff in carrying out their
       duties and improve efficiency and compliance with legislative requirements and Prison
       Service standards. There are no additional resource requirements.


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PSO 5000                                                                               Page 2


IMPLEMENTATION DATE:                               21st April 2008




(signed)




Ian Poree
Director of Operational Policy



Further advice or information on this PSO or the systems contained within it can be sought
from:


Advice and assistance is available from Area Catering Managers. A telephone hotline for immediate
advice is available on 0116 228 2047.




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PSO 5000                                                                             Page 3



CONTENTS

CHAPTER 1 - FOOD SAFETY MANAGEMENT
CHAPTER 2 - MEAL PROVISION
CHAPTER 3 - HEALTHY CATERING FOR A DIVERSE PRISONER POPULATION
CHAPTER 4 - FOOD SAFETY AND MANAGEMENT OF FOOD AT POINT OF SERVICE

Annex 1    - Food Safety Policy Statement
Annex 2    - Hazard Assessment Matrix
Annex 3    - Food Flow Chart
Annex 4    - Hygiene of Environment Inspection Form
Annex 5    - Pest Control Record
Annex 6    - Establishment Food Comments Record
Annex 7    - Illness Incident Record
Annex 8    - Kitchen Temperature Control Flow Chart
Annex 9    - Examples of Risk Assessment
Annex 10   - Staff/Visitors‟ Food Safety Health Questionnaire
Annex 11   - Hygiene and Health & Safety Training Record
Annex 12   - Induction Programme for Food Handlers in HM Prison Service
Annex 13   - Training Flowchart
Annex 14   - Sample Surveys
Annex 15   - Multi-Choice Weekly Menu
Annex 16   - Pre-Select Menu; Prisoners‟ Choice Slip
Annex 17   - Wing Requirements Record
Annex 18   - Wing Totals Order Form
Annex 19   - Trolley Confirmation Slip
Annex 20   - Menu Content Descriptions
Annex 21   - Menu Suitability Chart
Annex 22   - Kitchen Journal HB003
Annex 23   - Value of Waste Monitoring
Annex 24   - Food Quality Assessment
Annex 25   - Food Standards Agency Guidance on Food Served to Adults in Major Institutions




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PSO 5000                                                                                     Page 4


CHAPTER 1: FOOD SAFETY MANAGEMENT

1.1    The Prison Rules 1999; as amended by the Prison (Amendment) Rules 2000 and the
       Prison (Amendment) (No. 2) Rules 2000

       Food
       24 - (1) Subject to any directions of the Secretary of State, no prisoner shall be allowed,
       except as authorised by a Healthcare professional such as is mentioned in rule 20(3), to
       have any food other than that ordinarily provided.

       (2) The food provided shall be wholesome, nutritious, well prepared and served, reasonably
       varied and sufficient in quantity.

       (3) Any person deemed by the Governor to be competent, shall from time to time inspect
       the food both before and after it is cooked and shall report any deficiency or defect to the
       Governor.

       (4) In this rule "food" includes drink.

Introduction

1.2    The principles and requirements of food safety law apply to all areas under Prison Service
       management control that provide food products for consumption by prisoners and staff -
       this includes not only establishment kitchens but also staff messes, clubs, training facilities,
       wing kitchens and shops. The management system within this PSO reflects the majority of
       the conditions, processes and practices required. However, establishments will be required
       to make sure any control point particular to their operation is also covered. Further
       clarification or guidance on all food related matters must, in the first instance, be sought
       from Prison Catering Services Policy Unit.

Mandatory Provision

1.3    In order to ensure compliance with all current food safety legislation the following
       mandatory provisions must be implemented:

               The food business operator (Governor) must ensure that those engaged in food
                handling activities are competent to do so;

               All food supply, transport and storage arrangements will comply with relevant food
                safety legislation;

               All food facilities, processes and practices must comply with relevant food safety
                legislation;

               A fully documented HACCP system showing daily monitoring including time and
                temperature control is in place;

               The written food safety policy (Annex 1) must be prominently displayed in the main
                kitchen.




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Legislative Requirements

1.4       The Food Safety Act 1990 is primarily concerned with food standards and is subsequently
          supported by European legislation. Regulation (EC) No 178/2002, also known as the
          General Food Law Regulation, defines „food‟, „food business operator‟ and „food
          businesses‟.

                „Food‟ means any substance or product whether processed, partially processed or
                 unprocessed, intended to be, or reasonably expected to be ingested by humans.

                „Food business‟ means any undertaking, whether for profit or not and whether public
                 or private, carrying out any of the activities related to any stage of production,
                 processing and distribution of food.

                „Food business operator‟ means the natural or legal persons responsible for
                 ensuring that the requirements for food law are met within the food business under
                 their control. In the public sector this means the governing Governor and in the
                 private sector, the Director of an establishment.

1.5       Regulation (EC) No 852/2004 replaced the Food Safety (General Food Hygiene)
          Regulations 1995 and provides general catering rules. The execution and enforcement of
          the aforementioned EC Regulation was provided by the Food Hygiene (England)
          Regulations 2006 (similar legislation was made in the devolved administrations). In broad
          terms the regulation requires:

                Food business operators to implement a food safety management system based on
                 Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Points (HACCP) principles. This includes
                 identifying stages which are critical to food safety and to ensure that adequate
                 controls for each point are established, implemented, maintained and reviewed;

                That food premises are kept clean and maintained in good repair. That the
                 condition and the design and layout of the rooms are to permit good food hygiene
                 practices, including protection against contamination between and during operations
                 and refers particularly to fabric, structure, walls, floors, ceilings and equipment;

                That adequate facilities must be provided for cleaning, disinfection and storage of
                 working utensils and equipment and adequate provision must be made for washing
                 of food.

1.6       Food Hygiene (England) Regulations 2006 requires the food business operator to ensure
          that all food is kept at the correct temperature:

                Chill Holding Requirements. Food which supports the growth of pathogens or the
                 formation of toxins, must not be kept above 8°C1, unless

                 a)      It is hot food on display;
                 b)      There is no health risk;
                 c)      It is canned or dehydrated (until opened); and
                 d)      It is raw food intended for cooking or further processing.

                Hot Holding Requirements. Hot food on display must not be kept below 63°C. Food
                 may be kept below 63°C if a scientific assessment has indicated there is no health
                 risk.


1
    Unless the manufacturer recommends a lower storage temperature.

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Hazard Analysis and Control Points

1.7    Article 5 of Regulation (EC) No 852/2004 requires food business operators to implement a
       food safety management system based on hazard analysis critical control points (HACCP).

1.8    HACCP is a preventive approach to food safety management. It is designed to control
       significant food safety hazards that are likely to cause an adverse health effect when
       products are consumed.

1.9    HACCP systems are developed and implemented through the application of the following
       seven agreed HACCP principles:

               Conduct a hazard analysis, identify any hazards and specify control measures;

               Determine the critical control points (CCPs);

               Establish the critical limit(s);

               Establish a system to monitor and control the CCPs;

               Establish the corrective action to be taken when monitoring indicates that a
                particular CCP is not under control;

               Establish procedures for verification to confirm that the HACCP system is working
                effectively;

               Establish documentation concerning all procedures and records appropriate to these
                principles and their application.

HACCP in Practice

1.10   It is the responsibility and requirement that Catering Managers conduct, implement and
       document a full hazard analysis of their catering operation.

               Hazard Analysis: A hazard is defined as a biological, chemical or physical agent in,
                or condition of, food with the potential to cause an adverse health effect. The
                catering operation must be examined step by step from the selection of suppliers
                and receipt of raw materials at the point of delivery to the final completed menu item
                at the point of consumption. The Catering Manager must assess all the process
                steps individually, consider what hazards there are, the likelihood of occurrence and
                what action should be taken to best control them. An example of a hazard
                assessment matrix is given at Annex 2.

               Control Points: A control point is a step in a food business process to which control
                can be applied. Control points must therefore be monitored to ensure that steps are
                being carried out correctly. The frequency of monitoring will depend on the nature of
                the step, practicality and the level of confidence that the monitoring procedures give.
                Generally, monitoring should be as simple as possible. An example of a flow
                diagram listing common control points is given at Annex 3. Catering Managers must
                consider each control point and establish the critical control points relevant to their
                operation.




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Control Points

1.11   The following provides a list of the most common control points but the list should not to be
       seen as exhaustive. Catering staff must take into account and implement individual
       aspects of their own catering operation and facility.

               Hygiene of Environment: Arrangements for cleaning all food areas must be
                published, displayed and complied with. [Catering Standard 4; Baseline 4]. A
                member of senior management must make a recorded inspection of all food areas
                at least once a week. [Catering Standard 4; Baseline 19]. (Annex 4). Cleaning
                arrangements must cover:

                a)     Food delivery areas;
                b)     Cleaning the equipment used for cleaning;
                c)     Staff changing facilities;
                d)     Food preparation;
                e)     Food storage;
                f)     Food serving areas;
                g)     Washing-up areas;
                h)     Refuse disposal and collection;
                i)     Wing kitchens / preparation areas.

                Staff who are designated as cleaning supervisors for food related areas must be
                competent in the cleaning methods and agents applicable for the task. [Catering
                Standard 4; Baseline 1]. It is essential to ensure that:

                a)     personnel supervising the cleaning process must be able to show
                       competency in the activities being supervised, e.g. Level 1 Food Hygiene (or
                       above) or BICSc accreditation;
                b)     cleaners must be able to show competency in the tasks that are carried out,
                       e.g. trained to Hygiene Awareness Level 1 (minimum) or BICSc food
                       premises accreditation;
                c)     the methods, materials and equipment used are correct for the task at hand;
                d)     the frequencies at which the various tasks are to be performed are
                       adequate;
                e)     due consideration is given to Health and Safety legislation and guidance;
                f)     the work programmes are monitored and recorded to ensure that specified
                       standards are achieved and maintained;
                g)     there is an effective quality control and inspection system for cleaning all
                       food areas which is complied with and documented.

               Premises: All food premises must be kept clean, pest free and maintained in good
                repair and condition. [Catering Standard 4; Baseline 3]. Any repairs must be
                undertaken as soon as it is practicable. The layout, design, construction and size of
                food premises must:

                a)     permit adequate cleaning and/or disinfection;
                b)     protect against the accumulation of dirt; contact with toxic materials; the
                       shedding of particles into food and the formation of condensation or
                       undesirable mould on surfaces;
                c)     permit good food hygiene practices, including protection against cross
                       contamination between and during operations, by foodstuffs; equipment;
                       materials; water; air supply or personnel and external sources of
                       contamination such as pests;
                d)     provide, where necessary, suitable temperature conditions for the hygienic
                       processing and storage of products;

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                e)     contain an adequate number of washbasins, suitably located and designated
                       for hand washing only;
                f)     have adequate natural and/or artificial lighting;
                g)     have adequate drainage facilities;
                h)     provide adequate changing facilities for personnel;
                i)     have windows that are either non-opening or be fitted with fly screens;
                j)     have extraction filters located above deep fat fryers/bratt pans, inspected on
                       a weekly basis and should be cleaned or replaced regularly;
                k)     have electric flying insect killing units which are installed correctly, cleaned
                       and maintained regularly;
                l)     ensure all external doors and openings be fitted with fly screens;
                m)     Catering Managers must notify their Area Catering Manager of inspections
                       made by Environmental Health Officers. Any inspections which contain
                       hygiene improvement notices must be reported to Catering Services
                       immediately.

               Pest Control: The Prison Service has a legal duty to keep their premises free from
                infestation and to report infestations to the local authority (Annex 5). Pests include
                any living creature capable of directly or indirectly contaminating food, e.g. birds,
                cats, rats, mice, cockroaches, flies, ants, etc. They can cause expensive
                deterioration to premises and spread dangerous bacteria, contamination and
                disease. Under Regulation (EC) No 852/2004 General Hygiene Requirements
                those engaged in the manufacturing, serving or selling of food must ensure that
                their premises are kept free from any risk of contamination by pests. The Food
                Hygiene (England) Regulations 2006 enables the local authority to apply to a
                Magistrates‟ Court to close the food premises which are infested by rodents or
                insect pests and/or relating to other aspects of hygiene, where the health risk
                condition is fulfilled and, there are serious contraventions of food law.

                a)     Under the Food Hygiene (England) Regulations 2006, penalties for
                       unhygienic food premises can be £5,000 on each charge on conviction in a
                       Magistrates‟ Court. As indicated above, local authorities can apply for
                       immediate closure if there is an imminent risk to health. Penalties in the
                       Crown Court can be unlimited fines and up to 2 years in prison.

                b)     There must be an effective programme in place for the control of pests
                       based on a preventative approach. [Catering Standard 4; Baseline 5]. It is
                       recommended that pest control contractors employed by the establishment
                       should be members of The British Pest Control Association.

               Delivery of Commodities: In order to ensure that all commodities are safe for
                storage and use, all deliveries must meet the following standards:

                a)     All delivery vehicles will be checked and recorded (as suitable for their
                       intended purpose) at the point of delivery and must be clean both
                       internally/externally. Due regard will be paid to the products being carried
                       and prevailing weather conditions;
                b)     The driver (and his/her assistant) must be properly attired in clean, protective
                       clothing;
                c)     Deliveries must not be accepted from vehicles where chemicals and
                       foodstuffs are carried in the same compartments;
                d)     Fresh, raw meat and poultry must be delivered separately from all other
                       products in chilled conditions (below 8°C);
                e)     Food items must not be accepted in dented/damaged/split containers or
                       bags;



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PSO 5000                                                                                     Page 9

                f)    Chilled items must not be accepted if the product temperature taken between
                      packs is above +8C unless the product is excluded from temperature control
                      by legislation;
                g)    Frozen items must not be accepted if the product temperature taken between
                      packs is higher than -12C;
                h)    In the event that a serious problem arises, of whatever nature, from the
                      delivery of a food product, your local Regional Procurement Unit (RPU) must
                      be informed.

               Receipt of Commodities:     When taking receipt of goods the following must be
                carried out:

                a)     Designated persons must be responsible for the receipt of all deliveries;
                b)     Ensure the legal requirements on the temperature of certain foods are met.
                       If the delivery is either chilled or frozen note the temperature recorded on the
                       vehicle‟s temperature gauge and, before unloading, check the temperature
                       of the goods using a digital or probe thermometer utilising the „between the
                       pack‟ method. If the temperature fails to meet guidelines, refuse the delivery
                       and inform the appropriate Regional Procurement Unit (RPU);
                c)     Check the hygiene conditions of the vehicle, driver and food commodities;
                d)     Check the sell/use by date. If it gives less than the warranty period required
                       by the HM Prison food specification the commodity in question must be
                       refused;
                e)     Maintain a record of delivery and inform the Catering Manager of any
                       discrepancies in order that the necessary action can be taken;
                f)     All food deliveries should be checked against the relevant user specification.
                       In the event of any dissatisfaction, notification must be sent to the relevant
                       RPU (Annex 6).

               Storage: All food must be delivered and stored correctly in conditions according to
                its type. [Catering Standard 4; Baseline 9]. Once the food has been accepted,
                excess packaging must be removed and the product placed in suitable correct
                storage without delay. All food stores must be clean, pest free and records of
                temperatures must be maintained and monitored. A maximum of 21 days‟ food
                commodity stockholding should be held by establishments. Catering Managers
                must also ensure that:

                a)    Products are retained in prime condition;
                b)    Effective use is made of available space by efficient storage methods;
                c)    Food is covered and protected from contamination;
                d)    Chilled food must immediately be placed into chilled storage, after removing
                      any unnecessary packaging;
                e)    In order to reduce the risk of cross contamination all raw meat and poultry
                      must be stored in a separate refrigerator to that of cooked products;
                f)    Meat delivered vacuum packed must be placed directly into chilled storage;
                g)    Other meat must be removed from its packaging and placed in suitable
                      covered containers in chilled storage;
                h)    Frozen food must be placed in freezer storage once any unnecessary
                      packaging has been removed. Under no circumstances should any food that
                      has been allowed to thaw be refrozen;
                i)    Dry goods must be placed off the floor into clean, dry and well ventilated
                      storage immediately;
                j)    Relevant information relating to the products shelf life or ingredients is to be
                      retained. Particular regard is to be given to food products which contain
                      known allergens to a minority of consumers, e.g. peanuts/nuts/sesame
                      seeds.


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                NB: When packaging is removed, any relevant information must be retained, e.g.
                shelf life, ingredients, etc.

               Thawing: Where necessary, frozen commodities must be thoroughly defrosted prior
                to cooking. The defrosting will be carried out in controlled conditions in either a
                rapid thaw cabinet; or a refrigerator. The controlled temperature environment inside
                the thawing cabinet combined with air circulation provides the fastest and safest
                practical method of defrosting. If the product, when manually tested, has not
                reached a core temperature of -1ºC, it will require further defrosting before cooking
                or refrigerated storage. When defrosting food in a refrigerator:

                a)     store defrosting items away from other items not requiring further heat
                       treatment.
                b)     Store all raw meat in separate refrigeration. Liquid from thawing raw meat
                       and poultry products contains harmful bacteria and will contaminate any
                       surface it touches. All equipment in contact with defrosting raw meat and
                       poultry will require thorough cleaning and disinfecting after each use.

               Preparation: To prevent or reduce the risk of cross contamination, the following
                must be observed:

                a)     Hands must always be washed prior to starting work and before commencing
                       any process;
                b)     Goods must be removed from the storage location to the appropriate
                       preparation area as late as possible so as to minimise the amount of time
                       they are held at ambient temperature;
                c)     Food commodities must only be processed in the designated area using
                       clean utensils;
                d)     All processed commodities must be returned to their proper storage location
                       as soon as practicable;
                e)     All utensils and work surfaces must be cleaned between each process and
                       any refuse placed into proper receptacles. Sanitise all utensils at the end of
                       each working shift;
                f)     Soiled protective clothing must be changed for clean before commencing any
                       other process;
                g)     Hands must always be washed at the end of each process. Before and after
                       handling „high risk‟ foods, always wash hands in the appropriate wash hand
                       basin before leaving that area;
                h)     Any cuts to the skin must be covered with a blue/distinctive waterproof
                       dressing and the supervisor informed;
                i)     Waste material must be removed from all food preparation areas after each
                       food service. Food waste must be recorded, costed and analysed. [Catering
                       Standard 4; Baseline 12];
                j)     Raw and cooked processes must never take place at the same time in the
                       same preparation area.

               Cooking: The following points must be followed:

                a)     ALL cooking should be carried out as late as is possible so as to ensure that
                       the minimum amount of time is given to possible food bacterial growth before
                       serving;
                b)     ALL joints of meat (including made up meat products e.g. burgers and
                       sausages) must be cooked for sufficient time to ensure that the core
                       temperature reaches +82°C;
                c)     Poultry and game must be thoroughly cooked so that the core temperature
                       reaches +82°C;


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                d)     Stews, casseroles and similar foods must be stirred periodically during the
                       cooking process to enable heat to be evenly distributed throughout the food
                       after which a minimum temperature of +82°C must be attained;
                e)     Any reheated food product must achieve a core temperature of not less than
                       +82°C. It must then be served without delay or held in a heated cabinet at a
                       temperature which is not less than +63°C;
                f)     In any event, food products that have been reheated must be disposed of
                       when 2 hours have expired;
                g)     Caterers must not, under any circumstances, use left-over/returned food
                       items.

               Cooling: Where hot cooked food is not to be served for immediate consumption it
                must be cooled, without delay, to a core temperature of not more than +5°C. The
                most effective method to be adopted to achieve this is by the use of a blast chiller.
                The cooling of products must be completed within 90 minutes and then placed in a
                refrigerator.

               Hot/Chill Holding & Transport: The following steps must be taken:

                a)     Heated holding cabinets/trolleys must be able to maintain a constant food
                       core temperature of +63°C or above. Hot holding cabinets/trolleys must only
                       be used for food use and not for any other purpose. Hot trolleys must not,
                       under any circumstances, be used to reheat food;
                b)     In some establishments the time delay between the cooking process and
                       serving of food can be influenced by the complexity and length of any food
                       distribution route. In any event, legislative requirements must be met;
                c)     The time lapse between the completion of the cooking process and
                       commencement of service must not exceed 45 minutes. [Catering Standard
                       4; Baseline 10]. The target time will be considerably less than 45 minutes;
                d)     Cold food must either be stored at +5C or less and transported to the
                       serving points in containers capable of maintaining that temperature; Or
                e)     Food must be consumed within 4 hours of leaving refrigerated storage after
                       which it must be disposed of and a record of events kept;
                f)     All food that is to be conveyed to serving units must be carried in suitable
                       covered containers.

               Serving: The steps taken when meals and food are served is a key part of the
                process. The following steps should be taken:

                a)     Hygiene inspection and quality control arrangements for serveries must be
                       complied with and documented;
                b)     All food handlers must wash their hands prior to serving food;
                c)     All food handlers must wear appropriate protective clothing whilst on duty;
                d)     Hot food must be served at or above +63°C. Cold food must be served at/or
                       below +5C;
                e)     All food must be served with the appropriate utensil, e.g. scoops, tongs or
                       spoons, with separate utensils being used for each item;
                f)     During food service, food servers must wear disposable plastic gloves.
                       Sneeze screens where fitted must be in place;
                g)     Unused/left-over food must be discarded;
                h)     All waste material must be removed from food preparation areas at least
                       after each food service;
                i)     All servery containers, utensils and crockery must be cleaned in accordance
                       with prescribed methods;
                j)     A food comments record must be maintained (Annex 4). The contents must
                       be monitored and actioned as necessary;


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                k)     In the event of illness being caused by food consumption, an illness incident
                       record (Annex 7) must be maintained and a Healthcare professional
                       informed.

               Temperature Control: Temperature and process controls together with monitoring
                procedures for all food production processes must be in place. [Catering Standard
                4; Baseline 8]. Maintaining and monitoring temperature control is important. The
                measures set out in the kitchen temperature control flowchart must be met. (Annex
                8).

Food Contamination and Poisoning

1.12   The 3 most common causes of food contamination are:

               Food poisoning bacteria or other micro-organisms or their toxins (poisons which
                they produce) e.g. Salmonella species or Staphylococcus aureus;

               Foreign bodies, e.g. glass and paper etc;

               Chemical contaminants, e.g. washing-up liquid or rinsing agent;

1.13   Common reasons for food poisoning are:

               Food prepared too far in advance;

               Inappropriate storage, e.g. food stored at room (ambient) temperature (not
                refrigerated or kept hot);

               Cooling food too slowly before refrigerating;

               Inadequate reheating - not reheating food to a high enough temperature;

               Using cooked food contaminated with food poisoning bacteria;

               Inadequate cooking, e.g. under-cooking meat and meat products;

               Not thawing frozen meat and poultry for sufficient time;

               Cross contamination from raw to cooked products;

               Infected food handlers;

               Poor hygiene practice.

1.14   The following areas are significant in reducing the risks associated with the most common
       reasons for food poisoning:

 Risk reduction                                   Examples
 Supplier Monitoring                              Supplier audit
                                                  Supplier performance
                                                  Product recall
 Personnel                                        Health screening
                                                  Personal hygiene
 Education and training                           Hygiene education
                                                  Enhanced craft skills
                                                  Management and systems

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 Process Control                                   Receipt
                                                   Storage
                                                   Cross contamination
                                                   Defrosting of frozen foods
                                                   Preparation
                                                   Cooking
                                                   Temperature controls
                                                   Refuse disposal, storage and collection
                                                   Food service
                                                   Use of left-over food
 Premises                                          Cleaning procedures
                                                   Cleaning schedules
                                                   Pest control
                                                   Equipment
                                                   Building maintenance
                                                   Daily/weekly checks
 Monitoring                                        Catering Manager
                                                   Line Manager
                                                   Area Catering Manager/SAU
                                                   Pest Control Operative
                                                   Environmental Health Authority

Minimising the Risk of Microbiological Contamination in all Food Areas

1.15   Food poisoning bacteria:

           Bacteria                           Source                              Prevention
 Salmonella                         Raw meat, eggs, poultry            Thorough        thawing   and
                                                                       cooking; avoid raw milk,
                                                                       pasteurisation
 Staphylococus                      Human – through nose, mouth,       Avoid handling food; use
                                    skin, cuts and boils               utensils; avoid coughing and
                                                                       sneezing on food; adopt good
                                                                       personal hygiene practices
 Clostridium                        Animal and human excreta, soil     Storage above +63°C; rapid
                                    dust, insects                      cooling, refrigeration
 Escherichia                        Human sewage, water, raw           High standards of hygiene;
 Coli (E.Coli)                      meat                               thorough cooking; avoid cross
                                                                       contamination
 Camphylobacter (virus)             Raw poultry, milk, sewage,         Thorough cooking above
                                    meat     carcasses,  cross         +82°C; avoid handling food;
                                    contamination                      adopting high standards of
                                                                       hygiene
 Novoviruses                        Handled foods, ice desserts,       Pre washing of salads and
                                    salads, fruits, raw shellfish      fruit; avoid handling

1.16   By adopting good practice, the risk of possibly eating infected food may be reduced by:

                procuring all food from centrally contracted suppliers;

                washing all raw fruit, vegetables and salad crop;

                avoiding the consumption of high risk raw foods, typically raw milk, home made
                 mayonnaise or other raw egg dishes;




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               In all cases, good personal hygiene is essential. Particular care must be given to
                hand washing prior to food handling together with clean protective clothing.

1.17   In order to ensure that contamination by Escherichia Coli O157 is minimised in your kitchen
       it is essential that you follow these key requirements:

               Do not receive food products from any unauthorised source;

               Purchase your raw meat products from the contracted supplier;

               Always keep raw meat separated during delivery, storage, issue and preparation;

               Clean effectively and sanitise all food contact equipment;

               Prevent cross contamination;

               Use colour coded equipment and a separate area for raw meat;

               Separate refrigeration for all raw meat;

               Cook thoroughly all meat products, especially burgers, sausages, pies and minced
                meat products;

               Do not purchase or use raw milk.

Salad, Fruit and Vegetable Food Items

1.18   It should not be assumed that salad and vegetable crop food items have been pre-washed.
       If salads or vegetables are not to receive any cooking before serving and consumption, it is
       a requirement that all such foods are washed thoroughly in potable water (a weak sterile
       solution is preferable) in a clean bowl or food sink which has been properly sanitised. The
       raw products should be immersed for a minimum of 15 minutes and then thoroughly rinsed
       and drained before use. The preferred steriliser to be used for most salad, fruit and
       vegetable crops is a solution containing an active ingredient of Sodium
       Dichoroisocyanurate at 300 parts per million. The product in tablet form is available from
       the janitorial contractor.

1.19   Crops which carry a heavy bacterial loading may need a higher concentration of Sodium
       Dichoroisocyanurate and should be rinsed after process with fresh potable water before
       use.     Products containing Sodium Dichoroisocyanurate must only be used under
       supervision. In all instances the manufacturer‟s instructions must be followed. The product
       is classified under COSHH Regulations as harmful.

Sandwich-Like Products – Manufacture and Issue

1.20   The term sandwich refers to any filled bread or like product, including rolls, baps,
       baguettes, french sticks, pitta, and naan. Any such product must not be prepared more
       than 24 hours prior to consumption.

1.21   The manufacture, production and storage of sandwich type products is a high risk process
       and must take place in a designated area, maintained to the highest standards of
       cleanliness and sanitation. All practices, including personnel, ingredients, materials,
       equipment and environment must be strictly controlled in order to minimise product
       contamination.




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1.22   It is essential that only chilled, products are used in the sandwich manufacture process. All
       necessary steps for continued food safety, as identified in this PSO must be taken. Small
       batch process is the preferred method of manufacture. In addition:

               Extreme care is necessary with regard to storage of all food packaging. Incorrect
                storage could lead to contamination of the food product;

               On completion of the manufacturing process and prior to issue, all items must be
                returned to refrigerated storage (0C to +5C) with the minimum delay;

               Upon removal from refrigerated storage, the food items must be served with the
                minimum delay. Where the products are to be transported to a serving point, the
                use of refrigerated or insulated boxes are recommended;

               The product should be consumed within 4 hours of issue. If consumption has not
                taken place, it can be assumed that the product is not required and can be removed.

Dog Searches in Food Areas

1.23   In the event that a food area has been searched by dogs or contaminated following a
       search, the following actions must take place:

          Open food which may have been contaminated must be removed and discarded.

          All food production surfaces and equipment that have been contaminated by the
           search dog must be thoroughly cleaned and sanitised.

          Any food room that has been searched must be thoroughly cleaned.

How to Maintain HACCP

1.24   Targets and critical limits for each CP must be firmly established by the Catering Manager
       and reflect current legislation e.g. for fridge temperatures or handling practices. The target
       set will define the control required. All CPs must be monitored routinely dependent on risk
       and to ensure the targets are being met. When monitoring shows a variation from the
       target level corrective action must be taken.

1.25   If there is a major change with regard to ingredients used or style of operation, the process
       must be reviewed to see whether the change introduces new hazards which might require
       revised or new controls.

1.26   Catering Managers must ensure that monitoring is routinely tested to ensure continued
       accuracy. Thermometers, for example, will be routinely validated or tested against a
       calibrated reference thermometer (boiling water = 100C, melting ice = 0C). The outcome
       of such tests should be recorded.

1.27   It is essential to ensure staff education or instruction includes information on the food safety
       management system in place and the role of any individual in the system particularly
       his/her role in monitoring and/or controlling any critical control points.

Risk Assessment

1.28   Risk assessments should take account that:

               food in establishment kitchens is produced mainly on the day of consumption; and
                that the majority is cooked just prior to the actual meal service;


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               the regulations require assessment to identify the control points (CP) which all have
                equal importance. Staff must ensure that in all circumstances, all areas and
                procedures are assessed;

               individual establishment circumstances;

               that the system must be reviewed whenever conditions and practices change.

1.29   Critical Control Point: A critical control point is a step in the process where a control
       measure must be used to prevent, eliminate or reduce a hazard to an acceptable level, e.g.
       prevent the multiplication of pathogenic organisms. It is likely no other controls will follow to
       rectify any potential hazard.

1.30   Risk: A risk can be defined as the likelihood of a hazard occurring.

1.31   Risk Assessment Method: Using the hazard assessment matrix in Annex 2, Catering
       Managers must identify and decide on the hazard, its potential harm and the likelihood of the
       hazard occurring. In making the assessment, the Catering Manager must take into
       consideration existing control measures and implement any identified corrective action
       required. A typical example of a food flow chart is given in Annex 3. Examples of risk
       assessments are given in Annex 9.

Food Safety Management: Policy Arrangements

1.32   Supply of Commodities: All suppliers must comply with agreed contractual and legal
       specifications. Specifications include a quality/quantity standard and a requirement to meet
       specified microbiological criteria (where necessary) together with product testing, where
       appropriate. These actions will ensure that establishments receive assured products at
       value for money for the establishment and the Prison Service overall. Centrally contracted
       suppliers are routinely audited to ensure provenance of product and compliance with food
       safety regulations.

1.33   Food Commodity Recall: Establishments may be required to remove certain food
       commodities from circulation, especially where there is a potential risk to consumers‟
       health. Catering Services will, either directly or through RPUs, advise Catering Managers
       of the affected item(s) and procedures to adopt.

1.34   Personnel Health Screening: The following apply:

               All prisoners may participate in catering or other food handling activities unless
                otherwise directed by the Governor or a Healthcare professional;

               All personnel must be screened prior to employment on catering or food handling
                duties. It is essential that a „Food Safety Health Questionnaire‟ (Annex 10) is
                completed prior to any food related activity being undertaken for the first time;

               All visitors and maintenance personnel who enter the catering facility are required to
                complete a Food Safety Health Questionnaire (Annex 10);

               Where the Catering Manager considers that an individual‟s health may have an
                adverse effect on the provision of safe food, the individual should be removed from
                the food area and referred, with a report, to a Healthcare professional;

               Further guidance, if required, can be found in the „Food Handlers Fitness to Work‟
                publication which can be obtained from the Food Standards Agency or from
                Catering Services.

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Personal Hygiene

1.35   Personal hygiene is vital in ensuring food is not contaminated. The following steps must be
       taken:

               To ensure continued good hygiene practice, all staff, prisoners and visitors, on
                entering the kitchen, must wear the clean protective clothing, including headwear
                provided by the establishment;

               Hygienic hand washing and drying facilities must be provided and used by all food
                handlers and visitors, including maintenance personnel. [Catering Standard 4;
                Baseline 7];

               All food handlers must practise good personal hygiene whilst undertaking food
                handling duties. This means:

                a)    Washing and drying hands before and after handling food and after going to
                      the toilet;
                b)    Reporting any illness to management;
                c)    Not working if suffering from diarrhoea and/or vomiting;
                d)    Not handling food with scaly or infected skin lesions which cannot be totally
                      covered during food handling;
                e)    Not spitting in food handling areas;
                f)    Not smoking in food handling areas;
                g)    Not eating or chewing gum in food handling areas;
                h)    Ensuring work surfaces and utensils are clean;
                i)    All food handlers are required, where necessary, to change out of their
                      outdoor clothing and wear the appropriate protective clothing as directed
                      (paragraph 1.45);
                j)    Jewellery must not be worn whilst in the kitchen or in food handling areas
                      with the exception of plain wedding bands and sleeper earrings;
                k)    Nail varnish must not be worn by food handlers whilst on food handling
                      duties;
                l)    All hair must be covered by appropriate headwear;
                m)    All establishment staff and visitors must be provided with appropriate
                      protective clothing and headwear;
                n)    Where showers are available at the place of work, food handlers shall be
                      encouraged to make use of them on a daily basis before commencing work;
                o)    All cuts and abrasions must be covered with a blue waterproof dressing and
                      finger stall where necessary. All other dressings and medications on
                      exposed skin must be covered with a distinctive waterproof dressing;
                p)    All food handlers must report to their supervisor if they have, or suspect they
                      have, any septic sores, bowel/stomach disorders, diarrhoea or disease likely
                      to be transmitted through food. Any food handler with any of these must be
                      removed from food handling duties until such time as the problem is cleared
                      by a Healthcare professional.

Training Requirements

1.36   Annex II (General Hygiene Requirements) Chapter XII (Training) Regulation (EC) No
       852/2004 applies. A food handler or operator is any person in a food business who handles
       or prepares food whether open (unwrapped) or packaged. Food business operators must
       ensure that food operators/handlers are:

               Supervised and instructed and/or trained in food hygiene matters commensurate
                with their work activities; and

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                Those responsible for the development and maintenance of the HACCP system or
                 operation of relevant guidelines have received adequate training in the application of
                 the HACCP principles.

1.37   The “Food Law Code of Practice” states that the level of training, instruction or supervision of
       food handlers is the responsibility of the food business to determine, having regard to the
       nature of the business and the role played by food handlers within it, and should be assessed
       as part of a hazard analysis system. Authorised officers should take into account any relevant
       UK or EC industry guides to good practice when assessing training levels, but it is expected
       that persons preparing high risk open food will require the level of training equivalent to that
       contained in the foundation courses accredited by the Royal Institute of Public Health, the
       Chartered Institute of Environmental Health, the Royal Society for the Promotion of Health, the
       Society of Food Hygiene Technology and other similar training organisations.

1.38   In order to prove due diligence staff must be properly trained and adequate records of training
       are to be kept. A record of training undertaken by food handlers must be kept (Annex 11).
       The training must be in line with the following:

               All prospective food handlers must be provided with an induction education pack prior
                to being assigned food handling duties. The induction pack (Annex 12) contains
                information on the following elements:

                a)      Induction Form;
                b)      Common Reasons for Food Poisoning;
                c)      Personal Hygiene;
                d)      Food Hygiene;
                e)      A Safe Working Environment;
                f)      Personal Clothing;
                g)      'Clean As You Go' Policy;
                h)      Future Education Requirements;
                i)      Work Compact and Job Description.

1.39   The output of providing this training will be that food handlers are trained to be competent and
       are supervised and instructed in food hygiene matters commensurate with their work activities.
       [Catering Standard 4; Baseline 2].

Impact Assessment

1.40   Foundation level education courses must be delivered under the overall supervision of a
       tutor who has attained Intermediate („Supervising Food Safety Level 3‟) / Diploma („Award
       in Food Safety Level 4‟) with support tutors drawn from those with appropriate teaching
       skills and hygiene qualifications. Failure to ensure compliance with the regulations could
       result in serious consequences for the food business operator and the Prison Service.
       Consequently the following must occur:

                A documented training programme must be undertaken to ensure that all food
                 handlers throughout the establishment receive the necessary training before
                 commencing food handling duties;

                To operate and ensure an effective system of training, all documentary evidence
                 must be maintained as proof that the necessary criteria have been met.

1.41   Training programmes on food safety must include as a minimum:

                Category A. Hygiene Awareness Instruction: given at induction stage to anyone
                 who provides on-site support not directly involved in the handling of high risk food

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                and all potential food handlers. Training must be carried out before they undertake
                any food related operation.

               Category B. Essential Hygiene Education (Level 1): given to anyone whose duties
                bring them into direct contact with food, e.g. servery worker.

               Category C. Foundation Certificate in Food Hygiene (Level 2): must be attained by
                anyone involved in the handling of high risk food, e.g. kitchen worker.

1.42     For ease of reference these have been listed as follows:


 Category       Responsibilities                                   Training level required

 A              Anyone who would provide on-site support           Hygiene Awareness Instruction:
 (Low Risk)     not directly involved in the preparation and       to include Essentials of Food
                personal handling of high risk open                Hygiene and Start Right video.
                (unwrapped) food, such as: Store and RID           Training should be carried out as
                clerks, Works Department, Board of Visitors        part of induction.
                or any person who would need to enter the
                kitchen or store premises on a regular basis.
 B              Anyone who would provide on-site support           Essential Hygiene Education
 (Medium        not directly involved in the preparation and       (Level 1): to undertake self study
 Risk)          personal handling of high risk open                of „Hygiene Sense‟ in addition to
                (unwrapped) food but may undertake such            above training and undergo further
                duties as supervision of cleaning food areas,      written test within 3 weeks.
                delivery or service of food, e.g. counter staff;
                food delivery staff; wing servery staff and
                prisoners; canteen and mess staff.
 C              Anyone who prepares and/or processes high          Certificate in Food Safety (Level
 (High          risk (including wrapped) food, such as:            2): to be achieved within 8 weeks,
 Risk)          kitchen assistants; cooks; chefs; craftsmen;       comprising of a minimum 6 hour
                prisoners undertaking kitchen work.                education programme culminating
                                                                   in an examination and certificate
                                                                   when a pass criteria is achieved.
 For further details see Annex 13.

1.43     The Food Hygiene Education Package previously issued to all establishments from central
         Catering Services should be used as a replacement for any existing education packages
         currently in use. It contains the following materials:

               The Level 2 Tutor Pack, such as the Highfield training package;
               The Essentials of Food Hygiene Booklet and Test Paper;
               Hygiene Sense Booklet and Test Paper;
               Competency Awareness Questionnaires;
               The Food Hygiene Handbook;
               A Question of Hygiene;
               Food Safety Strikes Back Video;
               Start Right Video.

Learning and Skills for Prisoners Employed in Food Areas

1.44     Establishment kitchens are real production areas and as such offer the opportunity to give
         prisoners realistic and sector specific skills in an area where there are significant
         resettlement opportunities. Prisoners employed within food areas must be offered the


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       opportunity and be supported in attaining accredited qualifications within the catering,
       hospitality and leisure sector. [Catering Standard 4; Baseline 21].

Dress Standards - Catering Staff and Prisoners

1.45   Clean protective clothing must be worn by all food handlers at all times whilst on duty.
       [Catering Standard 4; Baseline 6]. The minimum dress standard for food handlers
       employed in main production areas is:

               Clean, sturdy, safety footwear;

               Clean and pressed trousers (plain white are acceptable for prisoners);

               Clean and pressed chefs jacket;

               Clean and pressed cooks apron;

               Clean headwear (disposable paper forage caps);

1.46   Prisoners on domestic cleaning duties in the utensil or dishwash areas may wear a T-shirt,
       trousers together with clean sturdy footwear and clean headwear with further protective
       clothing as required, e.g. rubber apron, wellington boots.

1.47   The minimum dress standard for food handlers at the point of service is:

               Clean sturdy safety footwear;
               Clean and pressed long coat;
               Clean headwear (disposable paper forage cap)




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CHAPTER 2:            MEAL PROVISION

Introduction

2.1    Prisoners must be provided with 3 meals per day – breakfast, lunch and evening or
       equivalent, e.g. at weekends where it is acceptable to provide a combined breakfast/lunch
       (brunch) and a separate meal later in the day.

2.2    In addition to daily meals a supper snack item for consumption after the evening meal must
       be provided.

2.3    This chapter also enables Catering Managers and their staff to clearly identify the
       techniques and rules to be observed when compiling menus to produce reasonable meals
       for prisoners and to plan by using a multi-choice, pre-select menu.

2.4    The menu is a way of communicating and planning by informing the consumer and allowing
       caterers to plan ahead. Menus should allow prisoners to be given a choice to eat not only
       in the style they are accustomed to but also include ethnic/cultural dishes and encourage
       healthy foods.

2.5    The type of menu best suited for Prison Service needs is a multi-choice, pre-select, cyclical
       menu. This is a menu which is compiled to cover a given period of time e.g. 3/4/6 months,
       which takes account of seasonal variation together with consumer preferences. There
       must be a multi-choice, pre-select menu system in operation that provides for both the
       lunchtime and evening meal.

2.6    A 3 or 4 week cycle is the most popular which may be changed to accommodate the
       seasons of the year. There must be a minimum of a 3 week menu cycle in operation. At
       the end of each period the menus can be used again, thus overcoming the need to keep
       compiling new ones. The length of the menu is determined by management policy. Menus
       need to be monitored carefully to take account of changes in consumer requirements and
       any variations in weather conditions which are likely to affect demand for certain products
       and dishes. Menus should be flexible enough to allow for the inclusion of seasonal or
       special offers which may become available from suppliers. There are many things to
       consider when compiling a cyclical menu.

Conducting a Market Survey

2.7    A properly constructed market survey makes sure that not only are preferences provided
       where possible but also that the diverse needs of the prisoner population can be met.
       Recorded surveys of prisoners‟ views concerning food preferences must be carried out
       regularly and the results published at least every 6 months. [Catering Standard 4; Baseline
       17].

2.8    The sample survey pro-forma at Annex 14 is a good example of a questionnaire. Before
       undertaking a survey it is important that the process is planned and those expectations are
       not over-raised. Establishments should gather and analyse the information from the
       returned questionnaires, not forgetting that it is the consumer, not the caterer, who selects
       his or her menu, so analysis of dish popularity is necessary and those dishes which are not
       popular may not stay on the menu. Consumer demand, balanced against other resource
       implications, is to be considered and traditional dishes, modern trends in food fashions and
       healthy eating choices will be taken into account.

2.9    Caterers locally need to establish whether a full questionnaire of the population is required
       every 6 months when other methods, such as consumer meetings and attendance by the
       Catering Manager at other regular meetings such as those arranged to discuss matters

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       relating to Foreign Nationals, mini surveys etc may equally yield valuable information.
       Catering Managers are required to submit copy questionnaires and survey analysis to
       Catering Services once per year.

Pre-Select Menus

2.10   There are many variations on a theme for pre-select systems. It is the responsibility of
       Catering Managers to decide what is best for their establishment. Pre-select lends itself to
       being managed by a database programme. Annexes 15-19 provide a paper copy example
       typical of that used in many establishments today. It may be utilised as a skeleton model,
       and adapted to fit into local regimes.

2.11   The format of this system is:

               The multi-choice weekly menu and meal specifications are published in advance
                (Annex 15);

               Choice slips to be issued to prisoners by wing staff (Annex 16);

               Prisoner returns completed choice slip to wing office, or:

               Alternatively, makes a verbal choice, but in any event signs for his/her selections;

               Information is collated and retained on the wing and total requirements arrived at
                (Annex 17);

               Totals for the order are sent to the kitchen to enable production plans to be put in
                operation (Annex 18);

               The wing staff will confirm requirements at the earliest opportunity (e.g. daily at
                breakfast). This will take into account wing movements;

               Where food is served at residential unit level, all food transport will have a contents
                slip signed on collection by both the wing representative and the duty caterer to
                confirm the trolley contents before it leaves the kitchen (Annex 19);

               When prisoners have a location change wing staff will need to take into
                consideration their meal choices.

Menu Structure

2.12   As the menu is the principle way of communicating with consumers it is important that it
       clearly indicates what is available and what the options are. Large numbers of choices are
       not, in themselves an indication of good food.

2.13   It is important that the menu should make sense, be clear, be easy to read and be capable
       of being understood by the consumer. Even more importantly the consumer must
       understand what is on offer. An inadequate presentation can be off-putting and can lower
       expectations of the meal. Each dish offered must carry a symbol identifying individual diet
       suitability, e.g. healthy eating (), vegetarian (v), Halal (H). Additionally, pictorial symbols
       should be used – particularly when meals are being offered to non-English speakers. A
       brief accurate description must be published for each main course menu. A typical
       example can be found at Annex 20.




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Planning the Menu

2.14   Catering Managers must take account of the following when compiling their menus:

               type of establishment;

               age and sex of consumers;

               religious cultural and ethnic background of prisoners;

               diets recommended by Healthcare professionals;

               time of year: Spring, Summer, Autumn, Winter, Easter, Christmas;

               time of day: breakfast, lunch, dinner, evening meal;

               cost of commodities: is the budget available;

               repetition of commodities and issues: cauliflower cheese, lasagne, welsh rarebit (all
                cheese);

               texture of dishes: mashed potatoes, creamed swede, rice pudding (all soft);

               repetition of flavours: chilli con carne, chicken curry, and lamb samosas (all spicy);

               colour: macaroni cheese, creamed potatoes, buttered cauliflower (all white);

               nutritional value: an assortment of dishes will be offered with varying nutritional
                content, thereby promoting a balanced healthy diet by choice;

               to ensure a varied diet is available, the following must be offered at the stated
                minimum frequencies:

                 Food Group                     Minimum Frequency
                 Meat                           Daily
                 Fruit and Vegetables           5 portions per day
                 Poultry                        Twice per week
                 Fish                           Twice per week (One of which should be oily)
                 Supplementary Snack            Per evening


Menu Suitability Chart

2.15   By referring to menu suitability chart (Annex 21), a handy checklist of main course and
       accompanying vegetables can be made. The discipline will ensure concentration is centred
       on the suitability chart and will reflect the relationship of vegetables to main course.

2.16   The same technique can be used to expose the relationship of other menu items such as
       main course to dessert.

Genetically Modified Food

2.17   The Genetically Modified & Novel Foods (Labelling) (England) Regulations 2000 (SI No.
       768) require businesses to provide advice to consumers regarding the presence of
       genetically modified ingredients. Failure to comply can lead to prosecution and a fine of up

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       to £5,000. Genetically modified food is defined in the EC Novel Foods Regulations as a
       “food which is, or made from, a genetically modified organism” and which contains genetic
       material or protein resulting from the modification.

2.18   The Food Standards Agency advises that genetically modified foods permitted in the EU do
       not contain animal or human genes. The Chief Medical Officer has stated that all
       genetically modified food for sale in this country has undergone rigorous tests and as there
       is no evidence to suggest they are unsafe to eat, there are no health grounds for banning
       them. However all establishment menus must contain the following statement: “Items on
       this menu marked with an asterisk (*) contain ingredients produced from genetically
       modified maize or soya.”

Continuous Improvement

2.19   Catering is not a static business and requires regular reviews to ensure targets and
       objectives are being met. This includes:

               completion of quality monitoring forms;

               having a healthy eating policy in place;

               ensuring the catering budget is on target;

               continuously developing skills in correcting:

                a.     over-portioning;
                b.     over-production waste;
                c.     theft;
                d.     correct purchasing procedures;
                e.     sufficient yield from that purchased;

               reviewing consumer dissatisfaction or comments from other sources such as staff,
                managers, IMB or HMCIP.

Meal Times

2.20   Meal times must reflect those within the community. All meals must be specified and the
       timings agreed with the Area Manager and published locally. A period of 14 hours is the
       maximum any prisoner should go without food. In addition to the evening meal prisoners
       must be provided with a supper snack and the means to make a hot beverage. [Catering
       Standard 4; Baseline 14].

2.21   There must be a minimum of 4½ hours between the beginning of one meal and the next
       and meals are available to be consumed within the following guidance times: [Catering
       Standard 4; Baseline 13].

       Breakfast       07.30 – 09.00
       Lunch           12.00 – 14.00
       Evening         17.00 – 19.00

2.22   In establishments holding young people under 18s and/or serving a Detention and Training
       Order there is a minimum of 4½ and a maximum of 5½ hours between breakfast and lunch
       and between lunch and evening meal. [Catering Standard 4; Baseline 15].

2.23   Prisoners must be provided with the facilities and commodities to enable them to prepare a
       minimum of 4 hot drinks a day.


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2.24   Potable cold water must be made available to all prisoners at each meal time.

Breakfast

2.25   As a minimum, the following must be provided:

           A portion of breakfast cereal;

           200 ml of milk (semi skimmed recommended);

           4 gms of sugar;

           2 x bread rolls / sliced bread / toast;

           2 x jam or marmalade sachets;

           2 x margarine portions;

           Access to hot beverage;

2.26   Balanced against the rest of the day‟s menu, it is recommended that the breakfast meal is
       complemented with one of the following: a piece of fresh fruit, yoghurt, a slice of cheese, a
       boiled egg or whole fruit juice.

Product Quality Monitoring

2.27   Quality systems are important to ensure that the consumer knows they will receive the
       same product every time they order it. Management monitoring must ensure that the
       quality of the food environment, food service and end product is maintained and reviewed
       on a regular basis. A member of the establishment management team at the time of
       service makes a daily recorded survey and comments on food quality. [Catering Standard
       4; Baseline 18]. These checks are to be recorded in the kitchen journal (Annex 22). A
       selection of the criteria to be used includes factors such as quantity, appearance, colour,
       temperature, texture and presentation/garnishing.

2.28   There must be a system in place to monitor all prisoners‟ comments and feedback
       concerning food (Annex 6).

2.29   Food waste from the point of service must be monitored, recorded, costed and analysed in
       order to improve efficiency (Annex 23).

Budgetary Controls - Catering

2.30   The Catering Manager is accountable and responsible for the satisfactory provision of food
       for prisoners from within a disclosed catering budget. The establishment food budget
       enables flexibility for caterers to provide a varied, healthy, multi-choice menu. The Catering
       Manager, via line management, controls the operation within the establishment structure.

2.31   As part of this process Catering Managers compile, cost and operate standardised recipes
       that reflect prisoners‟ preferences and a pre-determined budget. [Catering Standard 4;
       Baseline 13]. Responsibility for determining the establishment food budget lies with the
       governing Governor who will set aside a realistic sum that will meet the dietary needs of the
       population of the establishment.




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2.32   The Catering Manager must implement and maintain an effective menu management
       system to ensure full control of the catering cycle, from purchase of commodities through to
       the disposal of waste from point of service. The following should be considered:

               Fully costed recipes;

               Pre-determined portion sizes;

               Regular reviews of commodity costs;

               Fluctuations in production and food served (which must be recorded and
                maintained).

Procurement

2.33   The Prison Service has adopted a central policy on food procurement. Advice on all aspects
       of procurement must be sought initially from local Regional Procurement Units, the National
       Procurement Unit or Area Catering Managers.

Late Receptions

2.34   Late receptions (prisoners arriving at an establishment after the normal serving time for
       meals) must have food provided by the use of regenerated frozen meals, except at times
       when the kitchen is serving meals. The principles of HACCP will be adopted, and control
       mechanisms as identified for the safe production and regeneration of such meals will be
       adhered to. It is a requirement to monitor and record all such processes.

Prisoners Attending/Returning from Court

2.35   Prisoners attending court shall receive adequate meal provision as required by the terms of
       the contract held by Court Escort Contractors. Prisoners must receive an adequate
       breakfast before they leave the establishment.

Variations in Diet

2.36   It is vital that all prisoners, including those from minority groups believe that their food is
       stored, prepared and served in the appropriate way.

2.37   All religious, cultural and medical dietary needs must be met. The menu choices and meal
       provision must reflect the religious and cultural needs of the establishment. [Catering
       Standard 4; Baseline 20].

2.38   Medical Diets: Prisoners who require a particular diet as part of a medical condition, such
       as coeliacs or diabetics must consult the establishment Healthcare professional who will
       prescribe treatment and authorise any need. The catering department must be notified of
       any medical diets along with advice on how to meet the medical condition.

2.39   Food Allergy and Food Intolerance: Food allergy and food intolerance are both types of
       food sensitivity. When someone has a food allergy, their immune system reacts to a
       particular food as if it is not safe. If someone has a severe food allergy, this can cause a
       life threatening reaction.

               Food intolerance does not involve the immune system and is generally not life
                threatening, but if someone eats a food they are intolerant to, this could make them
                feel ill or affect their long term health;


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               The substance in a food that causes an allergic reaction in certain people is called
                an allergen. Allergens are normally proteins and there is usually more than one kind
                of allergen in each food;

               Most allergic reactions to food are mild, but sometimes they can be very serious. If
                someone has a food allergy they can react to just a tiny amount of the food they are
                sensitive to;

2.40   Symptoms of an Allergic Reaction: The symptoms of an allergic reaction can vary and the
       reactions can be more or less severe on different occasions. Symptoms can appear within
       minutes, or up to several hours after someone has eaten the food they are allergic to.
       Generally, the consumer will not experience all of these symptoms at the same time. In the
       event, Healthcare advice should be undertaken without delay. Some of the symptoms of
       an allergic reaction can also be symptoms of other illnesses. The most common symptoms
       of an allergic reaction include:

               Coughing;

               Dry, itchy throat and tongue;

               Itchy skin or rash;

               Nausea and feeling bloated;

               Diarrhoea and/or vomiting;

               Wheezing and shortness of breath;

               Swelling of the lips and throat;

               Runny or blocked nose;

               Sore, red and itchy eyes.

2.41   Anaphylaxis: People with severe allergies can have a reaction called anaphylaxis
       (pronounced anna-fill-axis), sometimes called anaphylactic shock. When someone has an
       anaphylactic reaction, they can have symptoms in different parts of the body at the same
       time, including rashes, swelling of the lips and throat, difficulty breathing and a rapid fall in
       blood pressure and loss of consciousness.

               Anaphylaxis can be fatal if it is not treated immediately, usually with an injection of
                adrenaline (epinephrine). This is why it is extremely important for someone with a
                severe allergy to take their medication with them wherever they go;

               The first symptoms of anaphylaxis can develop within minutes of eating the food, but
                symptoms can develop up to several hours later. Severe symptoms can appear
                within minutes of ingestion. Many anaphylactic reactions can be misleadingly mild
                at first, so it is better to be cautious and not underestimate the danger. People with
                severe allergies who also have asthma are more likely to have a severe reaction
                affecting the lungs;

               Anaphylaxis can also be caused by other things, such as bee and wasp stings and
                drug allergy, but food allergy is one of the most common causes. In the UK and
                Europe peanuts, milk, eggs and fish are the most common foods to cause
                anaphylaxis, although any food including nuts, sesame seeds and shellfish can also
                cause it.

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2.42   Women Prisoners: Women prisoners in the later stages of pregnancy and lactating
       mothers may require extra calories per day. Any additional requirements should be met
       following advice from a Healthcare professional. Annex 25 provides supplementary
       guidance from the Food Standards Agency.

2.43   Vegetarian Diet: A vegetarian is a person who does not eat fish, flesh, fowl, sea creatures
       or invertebrates and also avoids animal by-products such as gelatine and animal rennet
       which is found in some cheeses. Eggs and dairy products are not consumed by all
       vegetarians. Vegetable oil margarine/frying oil must be used in the preparation and
       cooking of all food for prisoners on a vegetarian diet.

2.44   Vegan Diet: A vegan diet is based on fruits, vegetables, nuts, seeds, beans, pulses and
       cereals. The diet omits all animal products including meat, poultry, fish, sea creatures,
       invertebrates, eggs, animal milks, honey and royal jelly. Vegan prisoners should not be
       required to handle such foodstuffs. Food or drinks containing or made with any of the
       above or their derivatives should not be served. Yeast extract and fortified soya milk must
       be provided for vegans in order to provide vitamin B12 Vegetable oil margarine/frying oil
       must be used in the preparation and cooking of all food for prisoners on a vegan diet.

Religious Diets

2.45   Religious Festivals: Food for religious festivals should always be provided in consultation
       with the relevant faith chaplain. Where food is brought in it must come from a regulated
       source. Such food must be provided in containers that can be x-rayed, if x-ray facilities are
       in place at the establishment. The Governor must be satisfied that the necessary security
       and food safety issues are adequately covered. In making arrangements, Chaplains and
       others must ensure they always meet the requirements and needs of local policies. The
       main religious festivals are set out annually in a PSI issued by Chaplaincy HQ. It is
       important, as far as practicable, to ensure fair provision across the different faith groups.
       Further information on special food for religious festivals can be sought from HM Prison
       Service Chaplaincy HQ, Abell House.

2.46   Buddhist: Many Buddhist prisoners will require a full vegetarian diet i.e. no fish. Some may
       request a vegan diet and this must be allowed. Fasting is sometimes practised, and
       especially on the Observance Days some devotees will observe the Eight Precepts, one of
       which prohibits any food between noon and the following dawn. Asian Buddhists may eat
       meat but will decline pig meat and pork and bacon products.

2.47   Christians, including Roman Catholics may require a non meat option on Good Friday,
       which should be accommodated as a requirement in establishment menus.

2.48   Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints („Mormons‟): No dietary restriction, save for
       provision of beverages. Members will receive Drinking Chocolate or Cocoa or Caro, Barley
       Cup, Horlicks or Ovaltine as an acceptable substitute in lieu of the normal tea and coffee
       which are both forbidden.

       Members of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints traditionally undertake a 24-
       hour fast on one day per month. This normally commences on the first Saturday of the
       month and is completed on the first Sunday. Members should be given access to sufficient
       and appropriate food and beverages upon completion of the Fast.

2.49   Ethiopian Orthodox: The vegetarian diet is acceptable though a fish dish may also be
       taken if required.

2.50   Greek Orthodox: The ordinary diet is acceptable, except at Easter when a vegetarian diet
       may be taken.

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2.51   Hindu (Strict): A vegetarian diet but without fish and egg is acceptable. Cheese, dairy
       products, garlic and onion may also be included provided there is the option to refuse these
       items.

2.52   Hindu (Others): Beef, pork and any by-products derived from beef and pork are
       unacceptable to Hindus. No special cooking facilities or arrangements are necessary to
       provide the necessary variations in the dietary requirements.

2.53   Jain: A vegetarian diet is acceptable. A true Jain diet might be nutritionally inadequate
       since fasting is part of their religion. Due to the medical implications, the Healthcare
       professional may consider it necessary to seek further guidance from the Jain Society. A
       true Jain would require separate cooking utensils, storage and washing-up facilities.

2.54   Jew: In accordance with agreement reached between the Prison Service and the Visitation
       Committee at the Office of the Chief Rabbi, any Jewish prisoner who satisfies the Jewish
       Chaplain appointed to the establishment (or obtains such confirmation from their “home
       Rabbi”) that they have a sincere desire to adhere to the Jewish faith and to follow Jewish
       dietary laws, will be entitled to one Kedassia supervised Kosher main meal per day whilst in
       prison. Any such prisoner who satisfies the Jewish Chaplain and Governor that they
       cannot partake of vegetarian food may receive a second pre-packed Kedassia supervised
       Kosher main meal.

               Jews who wish to observe the fast on the Day of Atonement must be given a
                Kedassia supervised Kosher meal not later than 18.00 hrs on the eve of the fast and
                a further Kedassia supervised Kosher meal after the fast (at nightfall on the following
                day). Some part of breakfast and dinner so saved may go towards substantial
                supper meals. During the Feast of Passover, all Jewish prisoners, so requesting,
                must be issued with Kedassia supervised Kosher for Passover meals.

               Jewish prisoners at Passover receive supplementary foods to be supplied by
                arrangement with the Jewish Chaplain. A list of foods (Kosher, where relevant)
                which must be supplied to Jewish prisoners during Passover has been agreed with
                the Jewish Visitation Committee. This comprises:

                      Matzos                 -       5 cartons

                      Soft margarine         -       500 grams

                      Soup in a cup          -       8

                      Cheese portions        -       300 grams

                      Jam                    -       1 large jar (250 grams)

                      Fresh fruit            -       x 2

                      Salad

                      Tea, coffee, sugar etc.

                Eggs, fresh fruit and salad must be provided daily by the prison kitchen.




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2.55   Muslim: Muslim prisoners must be provided with a Halal diet. (“Halal” means permitted
       according to Islamic law). The following points need to be noted:

               The Halal diet can be:

                (a)    An ordinary diet utilising Halal meat and poultry products in place of Haram
                       (forbidden) products;

                (b)    A vegetarian diet;

                (c)    A vegan diet;

                (d)    A seafood diet, e.g. fish, prawn and seafood products.

               Establishment menus must include, as a minimum, a main meal daily choice
                suitable for Muslims. The choice will be indicated as such;

               Where the Halal meat or poultry option is declined a vegetarian or vegan choice
                should be offered;

               All Halal meat and poultry products must be purchased from the agreed national
                contracts;

               The diet must not consist or contain anything which is considered to be unlawful
                (Haram) according to Islamic law, such as non-Halal meat and their by-products,
                e.g. gelatine;

               The Halal diet must be free from any product or by-product derived from pigs, e.g.
                pork, bacon, ham. It must also be free from all alcohol, wines and spirits;


               Vegetable based oils/fats/margarines must be used for frying and other cooking.

2.56   Delivery/Reception: Halal products must be clearly labelled and delivered separately from
       non-Halal, and sited separately on chilled vehicles. Halal products must be off-loaded first
       and decanted onto a trolley designated Halal, by persons free from Haram products.
       Clean, disposable gloves must be used.

2.57   Storage: Halal products must be stored in separate conditions where facility allows. If this
       is not possible then products may be stored within the same facility in an isolated
       designated area on a higher, separate shelf clearly labelled for Halal products. Designated
       containers must be used.

2.58   Issuing of Commodities: Products will only be issued by and to persons who are free from
       handling Haram products.

2.59   Production: There must be no cross handling of Halal and non-Halal items. Separate
       preparation of Halal meat is a key requirement, using separate cutting board and knives
       designated for use, and marked as such, with Halal products only. It is essential that
       separate pots, pans and utensils, designated for use with Halal products only, are used and
       marked as such.

2.60   Serving: Distinctly separate utensils must be identified and used for the serving of Muslim
       meals. [Catering Standard 4; Baseline 21]. Utensils must not travel across from Halal to


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       Haram trays and vice-versa. It is desirable that Muslim prisoners are employed to serve
       the Halal meat dishes.

2.61   Cooking: It is desirable that when space is available, taken together with prisoner numbers,
       separate storage, preparation, processing and food service provision is made. A suitable
       diet stove may be set aside for the preparation of Halal dishes. It is best practice to have
       Muslims involved in the cooking of Halal dishes.

2.62   Holding: When using hot cupboards and hot trolleys Halal dishes should be placed in a
       separate compartment wherever possible, and in any event must be covered and marked
       Halal at all times. Separate utensils are to be used in the decanting process.

2.63   Frozen/Chilled Oven Ready Meals: In instances where establishments are unable to
       comply with these requirements, it may be necessary to purchase oven ready, prepared,
       frozen or chilled Halal meals. These are available nationally from a Prison Catering
       Services approved supplier.       Regeneration must be carried out according to the
       manufacturer‟s instructions and followed according to the meal type.

2.64   In order to ensure adequate establishment provision for Muslim prisoners, the catering staff
       must develop and maintain close liaison with the Race Relations Management Team,
       Security Department, Chaplaincy and the visiting Muslim Chaplain.

2.65   Paganism: Many Pagans will require a vegetarian diet. Some may request a vegan diet.

2.66   Roman Catholic: On two days of the year, Ash Wednesday and Good Friday, Roman
       Catholics are required to fast (eat little) and abstain from meat. A vegetarian or fish dish
       would be required.

       On Wednesdays and Fridays in Lent, Roman Catholics will often fast and may abstain from
       meat so a vegetarian or fish dish may be appropriate on these days.

2.67   Sikh: Beef, pork and their products (except dairy milk) are unacceptable to many Sikhs.
       „Halal‟ or „Kosher‟ meat is forbidden to all Sikhs.

               Sikhism teaches that the eating of meat more generally is a matter of individual
                conscience and this must be respected. Some Sikhs will accept an ordinary diet
                with the above proviso in mind; others may require a vegetarian or vegan diet.

2.68   Some good practice relating to catering for prisoners from minority religious groups include:

               Appropriate labelling of equipment;

               Inviting relevant faith chaplains into kitchens;

               Enabling food provision for religious festivals;

               Involving prisoners from different religions and ethnic minority prisoners in cooking
                and other kitchen work.

2.69   Further Advice and Guidance: Advisory guidance will at all times, be issued to all
       establishments by the centre. Catering Managers can seek advice/information about
       religious diets from their Area Catering Manager, Catering Services and/or the appropriate
       HQ faith adviser.

2.70   Certain food products can be hazardous and/or present a security risk if used incorrectly or
       inappropriately. Some herbs, spices, yeast, food colourings and flavouring agents in particular
       can pose a risk to health and security. For example nutmeg can be used as a hallucinatory

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       drug and yeast is a key brewing ingredient. These products must be used in full
       accordance with the manufacturer‟s instructions under the direct supervision of staff. They
       must also be secured appropriately (e.g. locked cupboard) at all times when not in use and
       proper account must be kept of consumption and resulting stock levels.




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CHAPTER 3            HEALTHY CATERING FOR A DIVERSE PRISONER POPULATION

3.1    Providing acceptable meals for a diverse prisoner population is a skilled job. The Prison
       Service has a responsibility to meet cultural and diversity needs whilst providing reasonable
       food. In addition the Service has a responsibility to educate and give prisoners the
       opportunity to eat healthily if they choose to do so. Balancing these elements is not always
       easy and all those involved in catering must be aware of the sensitivities in these areas. All
       food must be of an acceptable taste, texture, appearance and presentation at the point of
       service and on the plate. (Annex 24).

Implementing, Maintaining and Developing a Well Balanced Diet

3.2    Establishment catering departments should promote the concept of healthy eating by
       ensuring that a choice of balanced, nutritious meals is made available.

3.3    A well balanced diet is based on starchy foods (pasta and rice), contains at least 5 portions
       of a variety of fruit and vegetables, some milk and dairy foods, some protein-rich foods
       (meat, fish and pulses), and is low in fat especially saturated fat, salt and sugar. A healthy
       lifestyle would include a well balanced diet, plenty of exercise, drinking plenty of water and
       not missing meals especially breakfast.

3.4    To assist caterers and consumers, the Food Standards Agency has issued nutrient and
       food–based guidelines for eating well. Full guidance can be found at Annex 25. These are:

               Bread, other cereals and potatoes

                a)     Starchy foods should make up about a third of the daily diet;
                b)     Offer a variety of breakfast cereals, porridge and/or bread at breakfast;
                c)     Offer a variety of starchy foods with main meals including potatoes, rice,
                       pasta, noodles and other grains;
                d)     A variety of breads should be available daily as starters and meal
                       accompaniments;
                e)     Offer wholegrain cereals where possible, which are often higher in fibre and
                       other nutrients.

               Fruit and vegetables

                a)     Fruit and vegetables should make up around a third of the daily diet;
                b)     Offer at least 5 different fruits and vegetables every day;
                c)     Aim for 1 or 2 portions with each meal and offer fruit as a snack item;
                d)     A portion of fresh or cooked fruit or vegetables should be approximately 80g.

               Milk and dairy products

                a)     Milk and dairy foods should be served every day;
                b)     Moderate amounts should be offered each day as milk in drinks, cheese,
                       yoghurt or milk based puddings and sauces;
                c)     Where appropriate choose lower fat and salt options or use higher fat/salt
                       options in smaller amounts or less frequently.




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               Meat, fish and meat alternatives

                a)     A meat or meat alternative should be offered at all main meals;
                b)     Fish should be offered at least twice a week one of which should be oily (a
                       typical portion is 140g);
                c)     Meat alternatives for vegetarians should be varied and use a variety of foods
                       from this group. Cheese may be used as a substitute; however dairy foods
                       should not be used too often as the protein source for vegetarians.

               Food containing fat, salt and food/drinks containing sugar

                a)     Use just a small amount of these foods
                b)     Use lower fat alternatives or use these foods in smaller amounts. Where
                       possible saturated fat should be replaced with unsaturated fat;
                c)     Snacking on sugary foods and drinks throughout the day can cause tooth
                       decay;
                d)     If using convenience foods, check the label and choose those foods with
                       lower levels of salt;
                e)     Avoid adding salt to food during preparation, cooking or at the table.

3.5    Whilst caterers should ensure a balanced diet is available, healthy eating is not assessed
       dish by dish. A healthy intake of food is assessed over a period of time. Achieving an
       appropriate intake of food from a wide variety of foods with the emphasis on starches
       (particularly fibre rich starches) fruits and vegetables along with less total fat is the
       individual aim. The provision of such items on menus is essential to achieving a healthy
       diet. Caterers must be aware of current nutritional guidelines and recommendations. They
       must use up-to-date information and advice from reliable sources such as HMP Catering
       Services, Food Standards Agency (see Annex 25), Dieticians, and Health Education
       Officers.

3.6    As part of this process caterers should look objectively at menu selection and modify their
       recipes, cooking methods and service towards more healthy guidelines. Particular attention
       should be paid to recipe modification and attractive presentation. All the products used in
       the kitchen should be reviewed with the aim of introducing healthy cooking ingredients and
       products such as wholemeal bread, flour and pasta, brown rice, low fat milk, unsaturated
       cooking fats and lean meats, fish and poultry.

3.7    Kitchen staff and consumers should be regularly surveyed. Ask for ideas and suggestions
       about food served, atmosphere in the dining area and use these suggestions as a valuable
       resource. Consumers will appreciate being involved. The results of the surveys and
       suggestions should be used to review the menu. Make simple gradual changes to start
       with and continue to be flexible with new items. Keep a suggestion box available to
       consumers and encourage them to be involved in the service. A food comments book
       should be available to all prisoners and views expressed should be regularly reviewed.




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3.8    A balanced approach to diet should be considered over a period of time (a day or week for
       example) and should include plenty of meals and not be restricted to a single dish.
       Recommended nutritional based guidance should be considered by Catering Managers as
       part of menu planning (Annex 25). Dietary guidelines for adults in the United Kingdom
       include the following recommendations:

                No more than 35% of energy provided by total fat;
                No more than 11% of our food energy by saturated fat;
                50% of energy provided by carbohydrates;
                UK adults should consume 18g fibre per day;
                Non-milk extrinsic sugars or added sugars should provide no more than 11% of food
                 energy intake;
                15% of energy provided by protein;
                Adults should consume no more than 6g of salt per day.

Five Portions per Day

3.9    Fruit and vegetables are fundamental to a balanced diet. They are generally low fat, low
       calorie foods high in vitamins, minerals and a good source of fibre. Consumption of more
       fruit and vegetables may help reduce the risk of heart disease and some cancers. The „5 a
       day‟ programme is a Government initiative aimed at improving the nation‟s health. The aim
       is for individuals to eat at least 5 portions of a variety of fruit and vegetables per day.
       Variety is the key – 5 glasses of fruit juice would only count as one portion. Fresh, frozen,
       chilled, canned, 100% juice, dried fruit and vegetables all count. Fruit and vegetables
       contained in convenience foods can contribute. It is worth noting that potatoes do not
       count, neither do vitamin pills nor dietary supplements.

3.10   Per adult, a portion can be identified as follows: see www.5aday.nhs.uk for more
       information.

           Food type                                Example
           Fruit (80gms or 3oz) per portion         1 medium apple/orange/banana
                                                    Fruit salad – fresh or canned (in juice) –
                                                    3 heaped tablespoons
                                                    1 tablespoon of raisins, 3 whole dried
                                                    apricots
           Fruit Juice                              One 5fl oz/150ml glass of 100% juice,
                                                    (not to be confused with „juice„ drinks)
           Vegetables (80gms or 3oz) per portion    3 heaped tablespoons of carrots, peas,
                                                    sweetcorn, beans and other pulses (can
                                                    count if not being used as the protein
                                                    source in a meal – so for vegetarians
                                                    beans and pulses can‟t count towards
                                                    protein foods and the fruit and vegetable
                                                    count at the same time), broccoli, okra,
                                                    courgettes, cereal bowl of salad.




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Portion Specifications

3.11   Portion control is necessary to maintain consistency in quantity without prejudice to any
       individual, to maintain budgetary control and to provide the minimum provision. As such,
       Catering Managers should implement a portion control system which should be decided
       locally based on the following guidelines:

       Milk ......................... Semi skimmed ...................................... 200ml
       Cheese ................... Cheddar ............................................... 60g
       Chicken .................. Medium portion ..................................... 250g
       Pork Chop .............. Medium with bone ................................ 150g
       Minced Beef ........... Medium portion cooked ........................ 140g
       Bacon ..................... Rasher grilled ....................................... 50g
       Sausage ................. Grilled ................................................... 60g
       Meat Pie ................. Individual .............................................. 175g
       Beefburger .............. Grilled ................................................... 50g
       Fish Finger ............. 3 Fish fingers, grilled ............................ 75g
       Egg ......................... Size 3 ................................................... 57g
       Margarine ............... Portion .................................................. 7-10g
       Jam or Marmalade .. Average on one slice ............................ 15g
       Lettuce ................... Average serving .................................... 30g
       Tomato ................... Tinned .................................................... 17g
                                      Fresh………………………………………. 50g
       Potatoes ................. Boiled ................................................... 175g
                                     Mashed 1 scoop .................................... 60g
       Chips ...................... Medium portion ..................................... 165g
       Peas ....................... Medium portion ..................................... 70g
       Orange ................... Medium sized ....................................... 160g
       Apple ...................... Medium sized ....................................... 112g
       Banana ................... Medium ................................................ 100g
       Porridge .................. Medium portion ..................................... 160g
       Breakfast Cereal ..... Flake type (medium serving) ................ 35g approx
       Rice ........................ Medium portion, boiled ......................... 180g
       Pasta ...................... Medium portion, boiled ......................... 180g
       Coffee ..................... Instant .................................................. 2g
       Sugar ...................... Per serving ........................................... 4g

Healthy Recipes

3.12   Catering Managers should develop and implement standard recipes as a means of
       maintaining a quality provision. They should constantly review their practices in order to
       provide increasingly healthy meals. Ways of doing this include:

               Checking recipes and, wherever possible, reduce fat, sugar and salt levels. Sugar
                substitutes or salt alternatives should not be used in food preparation. A minimal
                use of salt in cooking is acceptable;

               Replacing more saturated fats (lard, suet, butter and pastry margarines) with
                unsaturated fats such as unsaturated block or soft margarines and white fats; oils
                such as rape seed, sunflower, safflower, olive or nut oils;

               Using a variety of fish, white or oily. The latter is thought to provide some protection
                against heart disease;

               Using the leanest possible cuts of meat - remove skin from poultry before cooking if
                it is to be casseroled because this is where poultry fat occurs;

Issue No. 294                                                                               issue date 09/04/08
PSO 5000                                                                                     Page 37


               Making use of reduced fat products wherever possible, particularly the dairy
                products such as semi or fully skimmed milk, low fat yoghurt less than 10% fat,
                varieties of fromage frais, Greek yoghurt, quark, soft cheese and similar products.
                Use reduced fat cheeses or smaller quantities of stronger flavoured cheeses such
                as parmesan or very mature cheddar. Reduce the number of roux or cream sauces
                used - look for alternative sauce methods which use less fat;

               Increasing the fibre content of flour-based dishes by including from 25% to 50%
                wholemeal flour in all flour-based recipes other than white sauces;

               Using pulses to thicken soups and casseroles;

               Using the minimum amount of sweeteners such as sugar (brown or white) honey,
                syrup, treacle. Serving more fruit-based desserts helps to reduce sugar levels;

               Using the minimum amount of salt, salted bouillon and packet soup mixes, the latter
                two contain high levels of salt;

               Using one layer of pastry rather than two;

               Using oatmeal for coatings or add to crumbles and other suitable dishes.

Cooking Methods

3.13   How food is cooked has implications on how healthy the final meal is. Caterers should:

               Minimise the use of deep fat frying. When frying, always ensure the thermostat on
                the fryer is working and that the vegetable oil is at the correct temperature, clean,
                and is kept covered when not in use. This will help to minimise the uptake of fat by
                the food. Product overloading will drastically reduce cooking efficiency. Stir frying
                uses less oil;

               Bake, grill, poach, roast or steam. When grilling, ensure the food is on a rack and
                not on a flat oven tray; roast should also be on racks or use diced vegetables.
                There is no need to brown meat in fat to seal – it is equally effective to dry fry or add
                boiling stock. Use the leanest possible cuts of meat and trim any visible fat either
                prior to cooking (casseroles) or prior to serving (roast). To retain as wide a range of
                vitamins and minerals as possible it is preferable to steam vegetables rather than
                boil;

               Decorate a third to a half of all cold desserts with fresh or dried fruits rather than
                over-relying on piped cream.




Issue No. 294                                                                     issue date 09/04/08
PSO 5000                                                                                    Page 38


Food Service/Counter Presentations

3.14   How food is offered or presented can help consumers eat more healthily. Some ways of
       doing this include offering:

               alternatives next to each other e.g. butter, unsaturated margarines and reduced fat
                spreads together;

               vegetables without fat or cream sauces (which can be offered separately). Serve
                poultry with the skin removed;

               some reduced fat salad dressings at the side of salads served without dressings;

               fresh meats and fish on salad bars as alternatives to tinned varieties and pastry
                items;

               lower fat alternatives to pour-on cream for desserts e.g. yoghurt and similar reduced
                fat products;

               a variety of breads and/or rolls which include whole grain varieties. Ensure
                sandwiches reflect this variety. Offer a selection of high fibre biscuits and crisp
                bread;

               a wide variety of interesting fresh fruits, vegetables and salads.




Issue No. 294                                                                    issue date 09/04/08
PSO 5000                                                                                   Page 39


CHAPTER 4:       FOOD SAFETY AND MANAGEMENT OF FOOD AT POINT OF SERVICE

Introduction

4.1    Food service is a high priority task which, if carried out correctly, makes a contribution to an
       establishment‟s security and good order. The effective management of serveries in
       residential areas is highly important. Food service areas will differ in size, shape and
       layout, but the aim for a high standard of food service is the same. The chapter that follows
       is designed as the basic minimum to be implemented and adapted locally.

Servery Officer Duties

4.2    It is the responsibility of the Catering Manager to ensure that servery supervisors are aware
       of these instructions.

               All personnel who work in the food business must be trained in food handling to the
                appropriate level. This requirement is previously explained in detail at paragraph
                1.41;

               It is the responsibility of the food business proprietor (the Governor) to ensure that
                all persons in the food chain are trained to the appropriate level for the task to be
                performed. The Catering Manager must be informed of individual food handler
                training requirements. Training must then be programmed accordingly;

               Up-to-date records must be maintained of all persons completing food handling
                training. Records should be kept in the wing/houseblock office and copies held on
                the staff personal file and by the Catering Manager;

               All prisoners must receive training on all equipment that they are going to operate in
                the course of their duties;

               Where possible, each prisoner should have a folder which holds records of all the
                food handling training they have received within the establishment;

               Prisoners working on serveries must understand what is required of them and have
                a job description – a compact may be used;

               To ensure that all prisoners are fit to work in food service areas, they must first be
                passed as medically fit by the establishment‟s Healthcare professionals.

Risk Assessments

4.3    A risk assessment of the work area must be completed. This must be carried out by a
       suitably trained and qualified person and must cover all areas/items involved in food
       service.

4.4    Safe Systems of Work: Once risk assessments have been completed, safe systems of
       work must be produced that will ensure that all work can be carried out in a manner that
       reduces the risk to acceptable levels.




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PSO 5000                                                                                  Page 40


4.5    Cleaning: The highest standards of hygiene and cleanliness must be maintained at all
       times. Cleaning schedules, monitoring systems, cleaning equipment and agents must be
       linked to effective prisoner training. To allow this:

               All cleaning equipment that is to be used in the food service area must be kept in a
                designated area (NOT IN THE SERVERY) and must be marked with the correct
                colour code;

               It is essential that a colour code system for cleaning equipment operates in
                accordance with Prison Service policy as set out in PSI 19/2007 (a revision to
                Section 3 of PSO 3801, Health and Safety Policy Statement);

               Cleaning/servery personnel must ensure that all completed cleaning is done to the
                highest standard. Completion of cleaning routines must be monitored and the
                findings accurately recorded after each cleaning period by servery supervisors.
                (These are to be kept for audit purposes – a minimum of 6 months completed
                records are to be maintained.)

Control of Substances Hazardous to Health

4.6    Control of Substances Hazardous to Health (COSHH) is the name given to the series of
       regulations aimed at protecting people against risks which may occur from exposure to
       substances or processes hazardous to health in the work place. Under COSHH
       Regulations 2002 (as amended) all persons at work need to know the safety precautions to
       take so as not to endanger themselves or others through exposure to substances
       hazardous to health. All persons that are required to use chemicals in the course of their
       work must be trained in their safe use and training entered on 2055C. The chemicals must
       not be kept in the servery area but in a designated chemical storeroom. This room must be
       kept locked.

Food Collection and Transportation

4.7    It is the responsibility of staff collecting a food trolley from the kitchen that the contents
       correspond with the items required/ordered. It is also the responsibility of staff collecting
       food to ensure that the food trolley is at the correct temperature.

Food Service

4.8    Cold Serving Counters - Temperatures and Food Service: It is essential that the hotplates
       and cold service counters are in good working order and are at the correct temperatures
       before food is placed inside. Equipment must be switched on in plenty of time for it to attain
       the correct temperature.

4.9    Food Temperatures at Point of Service: It is a requirement that food temperatures are
       taken and recorded at the point of service. When food arrives at the servery it must be
       decanted into the hotplate leaving lids on gastronorm trays until food service commences.
       Just before the start of serving food, the temperature of each dish must be taken and the
       findings recorded. If the food service takes over 30 minutes then a second check must be
       made. If food is not at the correct temperature, guidance should be sought from the
       Catering Manager.

4.10   Hot Holding and Food Service: It is essential that all hot food is transported at the correct
       temperature. Hot food must be served hot. Food cabinets must be able to maintain a core
       temperature of a minimum +63°C or above. Cabinets must be operating at a minimum of
       +75°C or above. All hot food must be served at a temperature above +63°C.


Issue No. 294                                                                 issue date 09/04/08
PSO 5000                                                                                  Page 41

4.11   Cold Holding and Service: As with hot food, cold food must be covered at all times except
       when food is to be served. Cold food must be either stored/transported at +5°C or less OR
       it must be consumed within 4 hours of leaving refrigerated storage after which it must be
       disposed of and a record of events kept.

4.12   Food Presentation: It is important that all food that has been prepared by the catering
       department should be presented in the best possible way within the restrictions and
       constraints of the food service area. This entails keeping main dishes separate from
       vegetables and the dessert.

4.13   Contamination of Special Diets: It is essential that special diets are not contaminated, even
       briefly, by other menu items. For example a vegan or vegetarian meal should not come
       into contact with meat; Halal meals should not come into contact with non-Halal (Haram)
       menu items. The servery layout must be carefully considered to avoid contamination and
       separate identifiable serving utensils must be used for special diets. Instructions for laying
       up the servery and using identifiable serving utensils issued by Catering Managers must be
       carefully followed.

4.14   Food Service Routines: Catering staff are to visit each servery, at least weekly, to observe
       food service routines.

Wing Refrigerators

4.15   All fridges in residential areas must be operated and maintained to the highest standards.
       Records of operating temperatures must be kept. Refrigerators must be kept clean and
       free from out of date produce. Food must be stored in the correct manner. In order to
       achieve the above requirements, inspection of fridges should be part of the wing servery
       supervisor‟s duties.

Use of Sterile Wipes

4.16   Before taking the temperature of food a sterile wipe must be used in the prescribed manner
       to ensure that the probe is sterile. A fresh wipe must be used to clean the probe for each
       different food item. Sterile wipes will not make the probe acceptable for use with Halal
       meat, therefore either two probes are kept, one for Halal and vegetables and one for non
       Halal foods or a non-contact infra red thermometer is used.

Dress Standards

4.17   Both staff and prisoners must wear clean protective clothing whilst serving food. Some
       prisoners may be both cleaners and food handlers. Staff must ensure that prisoners do not
       wear the same protective clothing for both cleaning and serving food. Prisoners must not
       be allowed to leave the servery area and move around the establishment in the protective
       clothing that is worn to serve food. Prisoners must not change into protective clothing in
       cells. Hats must be worn. It is good practice to wear disposable gloves, but hands must be
       thoroughly washed prior to donning gloves.

Waste Food Management

4.18   To assist in reducing food waste, it is essential that all food waste from the servery is
       recorded. This information should be passed, at least weekly, to the Catering Manager for
       costing and analysis.




Issue No. 294                                                                 issue date 09/04/08
PSO 5000                                                                                       Page 42



Portion Control

4.19   Unless prisoners are allowed to serve themselves, the portion control system identified by
       the Catering Manager must be operated. This will assist the catering team in ensuring that
       the correct amount of food is available at the point of service for the number of prisoners.

Food Comments

4.20   Prisoners have a right to pass comments about the food served and related issues. A food
       comments book must be available at the point of service. The comments book must be
       seen and signed by the Catering Manager on a regular basis (at least weekly) and actioned
       as required. Prisoner request and complaints forms may also be used.

Dirty Protest Guidance

4.21   To ensure all current food safety regulations are met with regard to safe handling of food
       during a dirty protest, the following guidelines should be met:

               All prisoners will be catered for according to their cultural, racial or religious beliefs,
                or under the advice from a Healthcare professional;

               All food should be issued to prisoners on disposable plates/polystyrene containers;

               All drinks should be issued to prisoners in disposable cups/polystyrene cups.
                Where appropriate, disposable lids should be used to cover the cups. If the prisoner
                is allowed the use of his/her own flask, hot or cold water should be provided and
                issued at the cell door;

               All food waste and cutlery items should be disposed of in sealed polythene waste
                bags and sent for incineration;

               Refused food should be disposed of immediately in sealable polythene waste bags
                and a record of the food refused should be made by the unit/wing manager;

               If the prisoner gives up the protest after refusing his meal and requires food, a
                requisition should be made to the Catering Manager during normal kitchen
                operational hours. If outside normal operational hours, provision of a sandwich meal
                should be offered;

               All staff involved in the direct issue of food and collection of food waste and cutlery
                items are advised to wear the special protective clothing and certainly a minimum of
                plastic disposable gloves. Where more than one prisoner is involved in the protest,
                gloves should be changed for each individual issue and collection. The clothing
                should be disposed of in sealed polythene waste bags and sent for incineration;

               Food should be plated just prior to issue to ensure food temperatures for service are
                adhered to;

               Where more than one prisoner is involved in a dirty protest, bulk food items should
                be stored at temperatures of above +63C;

               The kitchen should record all temperatures of food prior to issue to serving staff and
                ensure that a minimum temperature of +75C has been maintained;



Issue No. 294                                                                      issue date 09/04/08
PSO 5000                                                                                     Page 43

               Separate samples of food issued to prisoners on dirty protest should be kept for a
                72 hour period;

               A log of all food and drinks issued should be kept for the duration of the protest;

               A supply of anti-bacterial soap at the wash facilities should be made available.




Issue No. 294                                                                    issue date 09/04/08
PSO 5000                                      ANNEXES                                    Page 1


                                                                                              ANNEX 1

                                       Food Safety Policy Statement

The catering department at HMP/YOI ____________________ and all those responsible for food
provision have a duty to comply with all food safety legislation and adopt good practice. This
includes:

               A commitment to producing safe food for prisoners, staff and visitors.

               Implementing effective control measures to ensure hazards to food safety are
                identified and monitored.

               Ensuring all food handlers/supervisors are competent in food safety according to
                their need and that all training is documented.

               The provision of cleaning schedules and records of cleaning for all food areas
                including food service points.

               High levels of hygiene for all food preparation areas, equipment, facilities and
                personnel.

               Monitoring and recording all temperature control points during delivery, storage,
                preparation, cooking, cooling, reheating, holding and distribution.

               Procedures for dealing with the following: health screening and reporting of prisoner
                and staff illness, visitors, contractors, enforcement officers, food poisoning incidents,
                complaints and waste management.

               Effective quality control systems including stock rotation, foreign body control, self
                audits and correct food labelling.




Issue No. 294                                                                     issue date 09/04/08
PSO 5000               ANNEXES                   Page 2

                                                      ANNEX 2

                Hazard Assessment Matrix




Issue No. 294                              issue date 09/04/08
PSO 5000                                            ANNEXES                                        Page 3

                                                                                                         ANNEX 3

                                                Food Flow Chart2

                                      Supplier Appraisal -
                                              CP

                                Hygiene of Environment -                  Premises
                                           CP

                                Receipt of Commodities -
                                           CP

             Fresh                             Frozen                     Ambient


        Chilled Storage                  Frozen Storage
      Temp. Record - CP                 Temp. Record - CP
                                                                       Thawing - CP


                                     Preparation for Cooking - CP

        Cooking Core - CP                                         Cooking Core –
                                                                       CP

         Serving Hot - CP                                         Hot Holding - CP


                                                                 Serving Hot – CP

                                                  Holding at Room Temp. After
                                                   Cooking 1½ hr Limit – CP

                                   Accelerated Cooling & Refrigerated
                                             Storage - CP

                         Serving Cold - CP                         Preparation
                                                                    of Dishes

                                                                    Reheating
                                                                    Core - CP

                                                                   Hot Holding
                                                                    Core - CP

                                                                   Serving Hot -
                                                                        CP




2
    This flow chart excludes critical control points – these are to be identified locally by Catering Managers.

Issue No. 294                                                                              issue date 09/04/08
PSO 5000                                  ANNEXES                                 Page 4

                                                                                       ANNEX 4
                            Hygiene of Environment Inspection Form

1. Receipt of Commodities                                                    x
Delivery vehicle checks
Storage (Chilled)
Storage (Ambient)
Stock Rotation
Returns
2. Temperature Control                                                       x
Temperatures Taken
Records Being Kept
Digital Probes Working
Prime Cooking Equipment
3. Cross Contamination                                                       x
Storage
Preparation
Service and Display
4. Kitchen Fabric                                                            x
Walls
Floors
Ceilings
Doors and Windows
Lighting
Ventilation
Drainage
COSHH Records Kept
Staff Training Records
5. Cleaning                                                                  x
Schedules/Records
Chemicals
Cleaning Equipment
Surfaces
Equipment
Structure
Wash Up
6. Personal Hygiene                                                          x
Cleanliness
Clean Clothing
Habits
First Aid Kit
Wash Hand Basins
Staff Facilities
7. Pest Control                                                              x
Signs of Infestation
Control Measures Kept
8. Waste Disposal                                                            x
Internal
External
9. Serveries                                                                 x
Cleanliness
Serving Staff
Visitors WC
Inspection Completed By:                                      All ‘x’ require action
Date:




Issue No. 294                                                            issue date 09/04/08
 PSO 5000                         ANNEXES                          Page 5


                                                                        ANNEX 5

                              Pest Control Record

                        REPORT TO PEST CONTROL OFFICER
Date Reported:                          Time Reported:
Problem:




Location:




Reported By:                            Department:
ACTION BY PEST CONTROL OFFICER
Date Investigated:                      Time Investigated:
Pests Identified:




Comments:




                                         Date:



Signed By (Operator):




 Issue No. 294                                               issue date 09/04/08
PSO 5000                                    ANNEXES                                  Page 6

                                                                                          ANNEX 6

                            Establishment Food Comments Record

Date:                                              Time:
Received By:
Name:

Location:

Telephone:

Personal Officer:

Subject:

Nature of Comment:



Product Brought In: YES / NO                       Made on Site: YES / NO
Supplier:                                          Ingredients:


Manufacturer:


Attach copies of all records relating to product or ingredients (delivery note, temperature records,
coding checks, production times etc).
ACTION REQUIRED:



Copy Sent to Local RPU: YES / NO
ACTION COMPLETED:


Signed:                                            Date:




Issue No. 294                                                                 issue date 09/04/08
PSO 5000                                    ANNEXES                             Page 7

                                                                                     ANNEX 7

                                     Illness Incident Record

Date:                                              Time:
Received By:
Location:

Telephone:

NB: For group incidents, list others involved on separate sheet
Date and time of food consumption:
Where was food consumed:



Details of food consumed (include all food and drink as part of meal):




NB: Attach copies of all records relating to meal or ingredients
Details of alleged illness:




Symptoms               Date of Onset               Time of Onset         Duration
Nausea
Vomiting
Diarrhoea
Abdominal Pain
Other Symptoms (give details):




Healthcare Informed: YES / NO




Issue No. 294                                                             issue date 09/04/08
PSO 5000                                    ANNEXES                                 Page 8

                                                                                        ANNEX 8

                          Kitchen Temperature Control Flow Chart


                            Chilled                   Frozen                       Dry
                Includes raw meat and            Includes      all        Includes flour, pastry,
                poultry, cooked meat and         frozen products.         custard and gravy mix,
                meat       products,    fish,                             cold    sweet     mix,
                shellfish,          prepared                              canned products and
                vegetables, dairy products                                raw vegetables.
                and milk.


DELIVERY             +5C (max 8C)               -18C (max -                   Ambient
                                                     12C)


STORAGE               +5C or below                -18C/-22C               Ambient or +15C



                                                      Defrost to



  PREP
                        +10C max                       +5C                    Cool +5C



COOKING
                      At least +82C



COOLING
                    +5C in 1½ hours




                 Reheat to core temp of                               Reheat to core temp of
                         +82C                                                +82C

SERVICE
HOT                     +63C min

SERVICE
COLD                                                               +5C (max 7C)




Issue No. 294                                                                issue date 09/04/08
PSO 5000                                    ANNEXES                                  Page 9


                                                                                          ANNEX 9
                                 Examples of Risk Assessment


Control Point 1 (Supplier Appraisal)

Process:               Central Contract Commodities               Non Contract
Hazard:                Micro-organism, chemical and foreign       Micro-organism, chemical and
                       body contamination.                        foreign body contamination.
Control Measures:      Purchase from approved suppliers           Purchase from approved suppliers
                       against HMP specification.         Check   against local specification. Check
                       goods on receipt.                          goods on receipt.
Monitoring:            Evaluation by procurement and food         Evaluation by procurement and
                       specialist (then at least annually).       food specialist then at least
                                                                  annually by Catering Manager.
Recording:             Supplier appraisal record.                 Supplier appraisal record.
Action Required /      Procurement (RPU/NPU).                     Catering Manager and Stores
Responsibility:                                                   Clerk.

Control Point 2

Process:               Hygiene of Environment
Hazard:                Micro-organism, chemical and foreign
                       body contamination.
Control Measures:      Adequate staff training.     Effective
                       cleaning schedules.
Monitoring:            Regular visual and physical checks by
                       staff.
Recording:             Hygiene Managers inspection.
                       Operational reports.
Action Required /      Catering Manager.
Responsibility:

Control Point 3

Process:               Premises
Hazard:                Chemical       and       foreign    body
                       contamination.
Control Measures:      Implement        effective,      planned
                       maintenance programme.
Monitoring:            Daily by catering staff.
Recording:             Hygiene Managers inspection.
                       Small repairs programme.
Action Required /      Catering and Works Services staff.
Responsibility:




Issue No. 294                                                                  issue date 09/04/08
PSO 5000                                    ANNEXES                                  Page 10

Control Point 4

Process:              Delivery of Commodities
Hazard:               Micro-organism            multiplication,
                      chemical      and      foreign      body
                      contamination.
Control Measures:     Visual check of vehicle and driver.         Visual and physical check of date
                      Check condition of commodities on           marks.      Temperatures etc to
                      vehicle for damage/dents and split          comply with specifications and
                      containers. Temperature control.            temperature regulations.
Monitoring:           Check every delivery and include            Check delivery vehicle, date
                      findings in supplier appraisal record.      marks, temperatures and condition
                                                                  of food for every delivery.
Recording:            Delivery monitoring form (GIS).
                      Supplier appraisal record.
Action Required /     Delegated catering staff.
Responsibility:

Control Point 5 (Storage)

Process:              Storage of Commodities
                      (Fresh and/or Frozen)
Hazard:               Micro-organism multiplication       and Cross contamination by food
                      foreign body contamination.             handlers      and     foreign  body
                                                              contamination.
Control Measures:     Visual check of all stores.             Instruction,       training     and
                      Temperature check of storage units: supervision by catering staff.
                      refrigerators (<+5°C); deep freeze
                      units (<-18°C).      Place into correct
                      storage within specified timescale.
Monitoring:           Daily by built in temperature gauge or Ongoing          observation     and
                      probe.                                  training/re-training as necessary.
                                                              Good personal hygiene.
Recording:            Enter temperatures in kitchen journal.  Training entered on training record
Action Required /     Delegated catering staff.               Delegated catering staff.
Responsibility:


Process:              Storage of Commodities
                      (Fresh and/or Frozen)
Hazard:               Cross contamination between raw and
                      cooked commodities.
Control Measures:     Maintain separate areas/facilities for
                      raw    and    cooked      commodities.
                      Implementation of cleaning schedules.
Monitoring:           Constant monitoring by catering staff
                      and, where necessary, re-training.
                      Cleaning schedules.
Recording:            Hygiene Managers inspection of
                      records.
Action Required /     Delegated catering staff.
Responsibility:




Issue No. 294                                                                 issue date 09/04/08
PSO 5000                                    ANNEXES                               Page 11


Process:              Storage of Commodities
                      (High Risk/Ready to Eat)
Hazard:               Micro-organism multiplication and
                      foreign body contamination.
Control Measures:     Store at < +5°C or > + 63°C.
Monitoring:           Daily by supervision. Temperature
                      probe.
Recording:            Hygiene Managers inspection of
                      records.
Action Required /     Delegated catering staff.
Responsibility:

Control Point 6

Process:              Thawing (Frozen Commodities)
Hazard:               Multiplication of micro-organisms.
                      Insufficient    defrosting.      Cross
                      contamination.
Control Measures:     Using controlled thaw cabinet, defrost
                      in lidded containers until correctly
                      thawed. Store away from other foods.
Monitoring:           Visual and physical checks by staff as
                      necessary.         Implementation   of
                      cleaning schedules.
Recording:            Hygiene Managers inspection.
Action Required /     Delegated catering staff.
Responsibility:

Control Point 7 (Preparation for Cooking)

Process:              Raw Meat                                 Raw Vegetables
Hazard:               Multiplication of micro-organisms.       Micro-organism, chemical and
                      Cross contamination.                     foreign body contamination.
Control Measures:     Carry out processing in designated       Check each bag/crate before use.
                      area. Reduce handling time. Reduce       Carry     out    preparation  in
                      time product held at ambient             designated area.
                      temperature.
Monitoring:           Visual and physical checks by staff.     Visual and physical checks by
                      Cleaning schedules.                      prisoners and staff.      Cleaning
                                                               schedules.
Recording:            Hygiene Managers inspection.             Nil.
Action Required /     Delegated catering staff.                Delegated catering staff.
Responsibility:

Process:              Raw Salad                                Home Made Mayonnaise / Salad
                                                               Cream
Hazard:               Micro-organism, chemical and foreign     Multiplication of micro-organisms.
                      body contamination.                      Cross contamination.
Control Measures:     Reduce time „high risk‟ commodities      Use pasteurised egg product or
                      are held at ambient temperature.         egg-free recipe. Keep refrigerated
                      Prepare in designated area.        The   and use within 24 hours.
                      addition of any „dressing‟ should take
                      place just prior to service.
Monitoring:           Visual and physical checks by staff.   Compliance with standard recipe.
Recording:            Nil.                                   Disposal after 24 hours.

Issue No. 294                                                               issue date 09/04/08
PSO 5000                                   ANNEXES                                   Page 12

Action Required /     Delegated catering staff.                  Delegated catering staff.
Responsibility:

Process:              Bakery                                     Bread and Rolls
Hazard:               Multiplication of micro-organisms,         Foreign body contamination.
                      cross contamination and foreign body
                      contamination.
Control Measures:     Prepare in designated area. Thorough       Limit handling.
                      cooking. Supervision and training.
Monitoring:           Visual check of food handler,              Visual check of food handler,
                      operation and food.                        operation and food.
Recording:            Nil.                                       Nil.
Action Required /     Delegated catering staff.                  Delegated catering staff.
Responsibility:

Process:              Cakes and Biscuits                         Meat Pies and Pasties
Hazard:               Multiplication of micro-organisms.         Multiplication of micro-organisms.
                      Cross contamination and foreign body       Cross contamination.
                      contamination.
Control Measures:     Limit handling and store appropriately. Limit    handling    and  store
                                                              appropriately.
Monitoring:           Visual check of food           handler, Visual check of food handler,
                      operation and food.                     operation and food.
Recording:            Nil.                                    Nil.
Action Required /     Delegated catering staff.               Delegated catering staff.
Responsibility:

Control Point 8 (Cooking)

Process:              Stews and Casseroles                       Joints of Meat
Hazard:               Multiplication of micro-organisms.         Survival of micro-organisms.

Control Measures:     Adequate cooking and agitation. Avoid      Ensure adequate cooking        and
                      cold    spots.       Minimum        core   core temperature of +82°C.
                      temperature of +82°C.
Monitoring:           Physical checks by staff. Boiling in the   By temperature probe.
                      middle. Use of temperature probe.
Recording:            On temperature record form.                On temperature record form.
Action Required /     Delegated catering staff.                  Delegated catering staff.
Responsibility:

Process:              Meat Cuts                                  Egg Dishes
Hazard:               Survival of micro-organisms.               Survival of micro-organisms.

Control Measures:     Ensure adequate cooking and core Serve hard boiled or fully fried.
                      temperature of +82°C.
Monitoring:           By temperature probe.            Visual check by staff.
Recording:            On temperature record form.      Nil.
Action Required /     Delegated catering staff.        Delegated catering staff.
Responsibility:




Issue No. 294                                                                 issue date 09/04/08
PSO 5000                                   ANNEXES                               Page 13


Process:              Bakery Products (Pies & Pasties)        Reheating (Rechauffé) Home
                                                              Made ‘High Risk’ Foods
Hazard:               Survival of micro-organisms.            Survival of micro-organisms.

Control Measures:     Ensure thorough cooking with a core Reheat to +82°C.
                      temperature of +82°C.
Monitoring:           By temperature probe.               By temperature probe.
Recording:            On temperature record form.         On temperature record form.
Action Required /     Delegated catering staff.           Delegated catering staff.
Responsibility:

Process:              Purchased Pre-Prepared Foods            Use of Leftovers
Hazard:               Survival of micro-organisms.            Micro-organism,    chemical       or
                                                              foreign body contamination.

Control Measures:     Reheat to manufacturers‟ specification DO NOT USE.
                      or reheat to +82°C.
Monitoring:           By temperature probe.
Recording:            On temperature record form.
Action Required /     Delegated catering staff.              Catering Manager.
Responsibility:

Control Point 9 (Cooling)

Process:              All
Hazard:               Multiplication of micro-organisms.

Control Measures:     Reduce temperature to +5°C within 90
                      minutes by use of a blast chiller.
Monitoring:           Visual and by in-built probe.
Recording:            On temperature record form.
Action Required /     Delegated catering staff.
Responsibility:

Control Point 10

Process:              Hot Holding
Hazard:               Multiplication of micro-organisms.

Control Measures:     Visual and physical check of
                      appliance.      Effective maintenance
                      plan.
Monitoring:           Weekly, by use of temperature probe
                      or in-built temperature gauge.
Recording:            On temperature record form.
Action Required /     Delegated catering staff.
Responsibility:




Issue No. 294                                                             issue date 09/04/08
PSO 5000                                   ANNEXES                             Page 14


Control Point 11 (Food Service)

Process:              Hot                                  Cold
Hazard:               Multiplication of micro-organisms.   Multiplication of micro-organisms.

Control Measures:     Serve above +63°C.                   Serve below +5°C.
Monitoring:           Supervision and use of temperature   Supervision     and       use      of
                      probe.                               temperature probe.
Recording:            On temperature record form.          On temperature record form.
Action Required /     Delegated catering staff.            Delegated catering staff.
Responsibility:




Issue No. 294                                                           issue date 09/04/08
PSO 5000                                    ANNEXES                                   Page 15

                                                                                          ANNEX 10

                        Staff/Visitors' Food Safety Health Questionnaire

Name:                 _________________________

Address:              _________________________

                      _________________________

                      _________________________

Occupation:           _________________________

Department:           _________________________

1. Have you suffered from sickness, diarrhoea or any stomach disorders within the last 7 days?
                                                                                          YES/NO

2. Have you suffered from any 'flu-like' symptoms during the last 48 hour period?

                                                                                               YES/NO

3. Have you recently been in contact with anyone suffering from any of the following –
   cholera, dysentery, gastro-enteritis, typhoid paratyphoid, or salmonella infection?
                                                                                       YES/NO

4. Are you suffering from any infectious conditions of the skin, nose, throat, eyes or ears?
                                                                                               YES/NO

5. Have you been abroad within the last 3 months?
                                                                                               YES/NO

If yes, please state where:   ________________________________

6. Have you suffered from any of the above conditions during or since your return from leave?
                                                                                          YES/NO

I agree that the above-mentioned statement is true to the best of my knowledge.

Signature:
(Officer/Visitor)

Date:

Signature:
(Duty Catering Manager)

Date:




Issue No. 294                                                                  issue date 09/04/08
 PSO 5000                                                  ANNEXES                                                       Page 16

                                                                                                                        ANNEX 11

                                                Hygiene and Health & Safety Training Record

 Name:           _____________________________

 Location:       _____________________________




Induction/   Basic Food     Intermediate Food    Advanced Food       Health &     Staff Equipment    Cleaning    Job Description

 Level 1         Hygiene        Hygiene             Hygiene           Safety          Cleaning      Techniques




 Issue No. 294                                                         issue date 09/04/08
PSO 5000                       ANNEXES                      Page 17


                                                                 ANNEX 12


                                 INDUCTION PROGRAMME


           1. INDUCTION FORM

           2. COMMON REASONS FOR FOOD POISONING

           3. PERSONAL HYGIENE

           4. FOOD HYGIENE

           5. A SAFE WORKING ENVIRONMENT

           6. PERSONAL CLOTHING

           7. „CLEAN AS YOU GO‟ POLICY

           8. FUTURE TRAINING REQUIREMENTS

           9. WORK COMPACT & JOB DESCRIPTION




Issue No. 294                                          issue date 09/04/08
PSO 5000                                   ANNEXES                                                      Page 18

                           HER MAJESTY’S PRISON:                  _____________________

                    PRISON CATERING SERVICES - INDUCTION FORM
This form is to be completed by both parties prior to the commencement of work within the
Catering Department and is to be kept on record.

Supervisor Name: ___________________________________

Prisoner’s Name: ____________________ Task: ______________________

Allocation: _______________________________

Location: ________________                    Date Commenced: _________________

                                                                                   MANAGER            PRISONER
                                                                                                    (Food Handler)

                                                                         Initial                   Initial

       1. MEDICAL COMPLETED....... DATE......

       2. DECLARATION OF INFECTIOUS DISEASES

       3. PROCEDURE FOR REPORTING SICKNESS

       4. PROCEDURE FOR REPORTING ACCIDENTS

       5. COSHH REGS EXPLAINED

       6. „EVENT OF FIRE‟ PROCEDURES

       7. JOB DESCRIPTION

       8. SAFE FOOD POLICY

       9. SAFE ENVIRONMENT POLICY

       10. TRAINING POLICY



       a. HOURS OF ATTENDANCE

       b. DRESS STANDARD REQUIRED

       c. MEAL TIMES

       d. EQUIPMENT USE AND AUTHORISATION

       e. REPORTING OF DEFECTS

       f. RATE OF PAY AND PAY DAY

       g. EXTRA CURRICULA ACTIVITIES

       h. FAMILIARISATION TOUR OF KITCHEN

       i. INTRODUCTION TO STAFF

       j. SAFE KNIFE DRILL & TALLY SYSTEM

I have had explained to me the above, either verbally or by written means. I have received the appropriate initial training
to enable me to commence work in a safe and hygienic manner. Further, I fully understand what is required of me.

Prisoners Signature: _____________________ Date: ___ / ____ / _______




Issue No. 294                                                                                   issue date 09/04/08
PSO 5000                            ANNEXES                                         Page 19


COMMON REASONS FOR FOOD POISONING


               Food prepared too far in advance.

               Food stored at room (ambient) temperatures (not refrigerated or kept hot).

               Cooling food too slowly before refrigerating.

               Not re-heating food to a high enough temperature.

               Using cooked food contaminated with food poisoning bacteria.

               Under-cooking meat and meat products.

               Not thawing frozen meat and poultry for sufficient time.

               Cross contamination from raw to cooked products.

               Infected food handlers.

               Poor hygiene practice.


PERSONAL HYGIENE

YOU AND GOOD HYGIENE



Everyone who works in the food industry can make a big difference to hygiene. YOU play an
important part in achieving good hygiene by:

       Keeping yourself clean and wearing clean clothing.
       Keeping your living quarters clean.
       Keeping your workplace clean.
       Following the displayed rules for keeping food safe.
       Doing what you are asked to do at work.
       Adopting good habits, such as washing your hands before working with food, and avoiding
       what you know to be bad habits.




Issue No. 294                                                                  issue date 09/04/08
PSO 5000                           ANNEXES                                        Page 20


FOOD HYGIENE


       Protecting food from harm.
       Informing your supervisor of anything that you see which could be harmful to food.
       Keeping food covered.
       Keeping the preparation of raw and cooked food strictly separate.
       Not preparing food too far in advance.
       Keeping food that is meant to be kept hot, HOT.
       Keeping food that is meant to be kept cold, COLD.
       Ensuring that all cuts and sores are covered with a blue waterproof dressing.

A SAFE WORKING ENVIRONMENT & PERSONAL SAFETY

YOU HAVE A DUTY TO YOURSELF AND OTHERS TO PREVENT ACCIDENTS


REMEMBER—CATERING IS A HIGH RISK INDUSTRY

The 5 main causes of accidents and ill health in catering are:

SLIPS, TRIPS AND FALLS

LIFTING AND MANUAL HANDLING

CONTACT WITH HOT SURFACES OR HARMFUL SUBSTANCES

DERMATITIS

WORK RELATED UPPER LIMB DISORDERS


       Clean as you go ALWAYS.
       If it is not in use put it away.
       Remove obstacles from walkways.
       Avoid carrying hot liquids.
       Carry out instructions regarding safe systems of work.
       Do not operate any machinery you are not trained to use.
       If in doubt, ask your supervisor.
       Use the correct tools for the task at hand.
       Avoid lifting items which you know to be too heavy.
       Avoid the need to stand on objects to reach articles.
       Wear the correct clothing.




Issue No. 294                                                                issue date 09/04/08
PSO 5000                             ANNEXES                                        Page 21


PERSONAL CLOTHING

DRESS STANDARDS FOR FOOD HANDLERS ARE:-

         Clean, sturdy footwear; preferably toe protected.
         Clean and pressed blue/white check trousers.
         Clean and pressed white double breasted chefs jacket.
         Clean and pressed white cooks apron.
         Clean white hat or forage cap.

CATERING STAFF EMPLOYED ON DOMESTIC DUTIES MAY WEAR:-

         Clean white T shirt.
         Clean white hat.
         Clean sturdy footwear.
         Clean trousers appropriate to the duties.
         Further protective clothing as required e.g. rubber apron.

It is a requirement that adequate facilities are provided to accommodate changing from outside
clothing to kitchen protective wear. Kitchen whites should not be worn outside the catering facility.

CLEAN AS YOU GO

THIS MEANS “ALWAYS CLEAN UP AFTER YOU HAVE FINISHED EACH TASK”

DETERGENTS AND SANITISERS FULFIL DIFFERENT ROLES:-

REMEMBER:-              DETERGENT FOR CLEANSING DIRTY SURFACES
                        SANITISER FOR FINAL WIPE DOWN

         Always use the correct detergent for the job at hand.

USE THE FOLLOWING PROCESS WHEN CLEANING

a.       Remove all debris from the surface to be cleaned (place debris in a refuse bin and replace
         the lid).
b.   Dampen the area to be cleaned.
c.   Scour the surface with the correct cloth and a solution of warm water and detergent.
d.   Rinse the area with clean water.
e.   Sanitise if necessary.
f.   Dry with a suitable clean dry cloth or allow to air dry.


DO NOT LEAVE FOOD SPILLS AND SPLASHES FOR OTHERS TO CLEAN UP

Removal of food debris discourages the spread of various forms of vermin. If you see vermin (i.e.
rats, mice, cockroaches) in the workplace, inform your supervisor.
Keep doors and windows shut.
Do not interfere with any apparatus that has been provided to trap or detect vermin.
Keep lids on refuse bins.




Issue No. 294                                                                  issue date 09/04/08
PSO 5000                           ANNEXES                                       Page 22


FUTURE TRAINING REQUIREMENTS

YOU ARE REQUIRED TO UNDERTAKE ON-GOING TRAINING SO THAT:-

You have a better understanding of what is expected of you.
You are able to contribute to the effectiveness of the catering business.
To maintain and improve the standard of hygiene.
You can help prevent the outbreak of food borne illness.
To maintain and improve the quality standard of food service.
You can assist in the prevention of accidents in the workplace.
To comply with legislation.
To achieve academic recognition.




Issue No. 294                                                               issue date 09/04/08
PSO 5000                                      ANNEXES                                                                       Page 23


                                            PRISON CATERING SERVICES

                                              STATEMENT OF PURPOSE

      To lead a useful life whilst in custody by adopting a realistic attitude to meaningful work.

                                                     WORK COMPACT


HMP    ..............................   NAME ........................ LOC             ..............................

JOB TITLE:                              ………………..

HOURS OF ATTENDANCE:                                         am
                                                             pm

PAYMENT:                                         KITCHEN PAYMENT SCHEME

PAY DAY:                                         ...................................................

TIME OFF:                                        BY ARRANGEMENT

GYM/CLASSES/ETC:                                 BY ARRANGEMENT

ACCOUNTABLE TO:                                  SUPERVISING CATERER


OVERALL PURPOSE:
To assist in providing the catering service for the establishment and to carry out all the activities
and duties as directed by the legitimate authority.

KEY RESULT AREAS:
To use as directed stores and provisions in the proper manner.
Provision of wholesome and healthy meals in a hygienic environment.
Take full advantage of training opportunities to develop practical skills, knowledge and personal
qualities.
Exercise those skills, knowledge and qualities to an appropriate and acceptable standard.


PERFORMANCE STANDARD:
You will be performing effectively when:

      Co-operative contributions are given to fulfilling the aims of the catering operation.
      Consumer complaints about meals are at a minimum level.
      Your workplace is kept to the highest hygienic standards at all times.
      Your new skills, knowledge and personal qualities are seen by your peer group as being
      effective.




Issue No. 294                                                                                                          issue date 09/04/08
PSO 5000                       ANNEXES                                      Page 24
                                                                                ANNEX 13


                                  Training Flowchart



         Candidate

Issued with Essentials of                              Before candidate starts work in food
Food Hygiene                                           areas

Issue    test    paper  for                            Test is completed by candidate by
Essentials of Food Hygiene                             reference to booklet - 100% pass
and set return date                                    rate

Watch Start Right video                                Before candidate starts work /
                                                       handles food

Issue Hygiene Sense booklet                            This stage within 3 weeks


Issue Hygiene Sense test                               Test paper is completed by
paper and set return date                              candidate with reference to booklet
                                                       - 100% pass rate


Issue    Food     Hygiene
handbook with Questions of
Hygiene book

Competency to be checked                               To be completed by supervisor as
by supervisor completing the                           preliminary to learning sessions
3 competency sheets

Commence 6 hours of                                    Successful completion of course
learning sessions + video on                           within 8 weeks:      Issue Food
Food Safety leading to                                 Hygiene Foundation Certificate
Foundation Certificate

Refresher / exam test by use                           Stages of results:
of Ivy Primary Food Hygiene                            70% = Pass
disks,    exam   paper    or                           80% = Credit
external paper                                         90% = Distinction




Issue No. 294                                                        issue date 09/04/08
PSO 5000                             ANNEXES                                             Page 25
                                                                                               ANNEX 14

                                              Sample Survey

You are invited to help in a survey, which is being carried out in order to look at the food provided
by HMP/YOI ………………... We are very interested in knowing what you think. Providing us with
the following information about your likes and dislikes could result in changes being made to the
menu.

1.       What age group are you? (Please circle your answer)


21-25               26-30       31-35           36-40          41-45           over 45


2.       How would you describe yourself / your ethnic origin? (Please tick your answer)


     ASIAN                         BLACK                          WHITE

Indian origin                  African origin                English origin
Pakistani origin               Caribbean origin              Irish origin
Bangladeshi origin             Other (please describe)       Scottish origin
Chinese origin                 ____________________           Welsh origin
East African origin                                           Other (please describe)
Other (please describe)                                       ______________________
______________________


Mixed Race (please describe)
_____________________
Other (please describe)
_____________________

3.       What diet, if any, do you follow?

(please circle your answers)
Vegetarian diet?                                                       Yes                No
Vegan diet?                                                            Yes                No
Religious diet? If yes which one?                                      Yes                No

Muslim       Sikh     Jewish   Buddhist      Hindu   Other (specify)

Medical diet?                                                          Yes                No




Issue No. 294                                                                     issue date 09/04/08
PSO 5000                             ANNEXES                                          Page 26

4.       How many times per week do you take these meals? (Please circle your answer)


      Breakfast                       Lunch                                 Dinner
0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7                 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7                        0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7



5.       Are you content with the amount of healthy options offered to you? (Please circle one)


      Not at all                            Unsure                                      Very much
          1                2                  3                         4                   5

5a.      How content are you with the amount of fresh fruit and vegetables that are available to
         you? (Please circle one)


      Not at all                            Unsure                                      Very much
         1                  2                  3                        4                   5

6.       How content are you with the range/variety of different food available? (Please circle one)

      Not at all                                Unsure                                      Very
          1                     2                 3                     4                    5

7.       For the following question score the particular items of food on the scale of 1-5 for how
         much you like or dislike them.


       Dislike                           Neither like nor dislike                           Like
          1                     2                   3                   4                    5



Chicken                               Sweetcorn                             Fried fish
Lamb                                  Peas                                  Baked fish
Beef                                  Broad beans                           Doughnut
Pork                                  Green beans                           Yoghurt
Bacon                                 Baked beans                           Rice pudding
Sausage                               Tomatoes (tinned)                     Sponge cake
Liver                                 Sprouts                               Custard
Kidney                                Salad                                 Fruit crumble
Smoked fish                                                                 Fruit pie
Grilled fish                                                                Fresh fruit
Poached fish




Issue No. 294                                                                    issue date 09/04/08
PSO 5000                           ANNEXES                                        Page 27



8.      How often are able to find something on the menu that you like? (Please circle one)

       Never                               Sometimes                                  Always
         1                   2                3                     4                    5

9.      What are your top three favourite meals from the lunch menu?

1.
2.
3.

9a.     What are your top three least favourite meals from the lunch menu?

1.
2.
3.


10.     What are your top three favourite meals from the dinner menu?

1.
2.
3.

10a.    What are your top three least favourite meals from the dinner menu?

1.
2.
3.

11.     Do you have any additional comments for practical changes you would like to see on the
        menu?




     THANK YOU FOR TAKING THE TIME TO COMPLETE THIS FORM. PLEASE HAND TO A
                         MEMBER OF THE CATERING TEAM




Issue No. 294                                                                issue date 09/04/08
PSO 5000                       ANNEXES                         Page 28

                                                                    ANNEX 15
                               Multi-Choice Weekly Menu

Weekly Menu for Week Ending: 00 / 00 / 00

 LUNCH SUNDAY
 CHOICE 1
 CHOICE 2
 CHOICE 3
 CHOICE 4
 CHOICE 5
 CHOICE 6


 EVENING SUNDAY
 CHOICE 1
 CHOICE 2
 CHOICE 3
 CHOICE 4
 CHOICE 5
 CHOICE 6


 LUNCH MONDAY
 CHOICE 1
 CHOICE 2
 CHOICE 3
 CHOICE 4
 CHOICE 5
 CHOICE 6


 EVENING MONDAY
 CHOICE 1
 CHOICE 2
 CHOICE 3
 CHOICE 4
 CHOICE 5
 CHOICE 6




Issue No. 294                                             issue date 09/04/08
PSO 5000                            ANNEXES                                       Page 29
                                                                                       ANNEX 16
                            Pre-Select Menu: Prisoners’ Choice Slip

 NAME:

 CHOICE         1   2   3   4   5   6   Return to wing office by 08.30 am.
                                        If you do not make a selection, you will automatically be
                                        allocated choice 1.
 SUN
 MON
 TUES
 WED
 THURS
 FRI
 SAT


 NAME:                                  LOCATION:

 CHOICE         1   2   3   4   5   6   Return to wing office by 08.30 am.
                                        If you do not make a selection, you will automatically be
                                        allocated choice 1.
 SUN
 MON
 TUES
 WED
 THURS
 FRI
 SAT


 NAME:                                  LOCATION:

 CHOICE         1   2   3   4   5   6   Return to wing office by 08.30 am.
                                        If you do not make a selection, you will automatically be
                                        allocated choice 1.
 SUN
 MON
 TUES
 WED
 THURS
 FRI
 SAT




Issue No. 294                                                                issue date 09/04/08
PSO 5000                     ANNEXES                                     Page 30

                                                                             ANNEX 17
                             Wing Requirements Record

                 Meal Choices for Lunch / Evening _______day   /   /

                   LOCATION ________________________________

  CELL          NAME        SUN     MON     TUE    WED     THU     FRI      SAT
  1
  2
  3
  4
  5
  6
  7
  8
  9
  10
  11
  12
  13
  14
  15
  16
  17
  18
  19
  20




Issue No. 294                                                      issue date 09/04/08
PSO 5000                   ANNEXES                                 Page 31

                                                                       ANNEX 18

                            Wing Totals Order Form

 TOTAL NUMBERS REQUIRED:                1     2      3   4     5       6
 SUNDAY
 MONDAY
 TUESDAY
 WEDNESDAY
 THURSDAY
 FRIDAY
 SATURDAY




Issue No. 294                                                issue date 09/04/08
PSO 5000                          ANNEXES                            Page 32

                                                                          ANNEX 19

                                  Trolley Confirmation Slip

Choice           Wing             Menu Item                   Numbers
1
2
3
4
5
6
Medical: 1
2
Potatoes
Rice
Vegetables
Bread Loaves
Butter Portions
Sweet
Fruit
Milk Pudding
Tea Packs
Other
Checked Correct (Wing Officer):

Signed Away Correct (Caterer):




Issue No. 294                                                   issue date 09/04/08
PSO 5000                        ANNEXES                                      Page 33

                                                                                 ANNEX 20
                                Menu Content Descriptions


1. Jerked Chicken                            Chicken leg, marinated in Caribbean
                                             spices, lightly roasted and finished with
                                             yoghurt ().
2. Lamb with Turmeric Rice                   Sautéed minced lamb with fennel, cumin
                                             and served on a bed of savoury yellow
                                             rice (H).
3. Creamy Vegetable Pie                      Selection of vegetables in a creamy
                                             sauce encased in puff pastry (v).
4. Bean Goulash                              A selection of beans (butter, haricot,
                                             kidney, black-eye) poached in a tomato
                                             and paprika sauce.


1. Special Chicken Fried Rice                Pieces of chicken meat marinated in
                                             Chinese five spices, stir-fried with
                                             vegetables and boiled rice ().
2. Cottage Pie                               Minced beef and vegetables topped with
                                             mashed potato baked in the oven.
3. Ocean Surprise                            Tuna flakes and sweetcorn in a light
                                             mustard sauce, topped with creamed
                                             potato and cheese (H).
4. Vegetable Chilli                          A selection of vegetables and red kidney
                                             beans in a spicy chilli sauce (v).


1. Chicken Tandoori                          Oven baked spicy chicken portion served
                                             with basmati rice (H).
2. Grilled Gammon & Pineapple                Gammon steak grilled with a ring of
                                             pineapple ().
3. Vegetable Lasagne                         Mixed vegetables and soya protein
                                             blended together with a rich tomato
                                             sauce in layers of pasta topped with a
                                             cream sauce and grated cheese (v).
4. Vegetarian Sausage Roll                   Vegetarian sausage mix wrapped in a
                                             light golden brown puff pastry (v).


1. Lamb Chilli Pie                           Minced lamb with mushrooms, onions
                                             and baked beans in chilli sauce topped
                                             with cheese and creamed potato (H).
2. Chicken Tandoori                          Oven baked spicy chicken portion served
                                             with basmati rice.
3. Leek & Pepper Flan                        Leeks and mixed peppers with eggs and
                                             milk in a pastry base, baked in the oven
                                             () (v).
4. Plain Omelette                            Pan fried, seasoned whipped eggs.




Issue No. 294                                                          issue date 09/04/08
PSO 5000                     ANNEXES                                        Page 34

                                                                                  ANNEX 21

                                Menu Suitability Chart

                    Baked   Garden     Spaghetti   Sweetcorn   Cabbage    Mixed Veg
                    Beans   Peas       Rings
Beefburger
Ind. Pie
Pizza
Fish (in batter)
Fish (in sauce)
Roast Chicken
Roast Beef
Lasagne
„Brown‟ Casserole
„White‟ Casserole
Stir Fry
Other
Totals



                    Chips   Boiled     Mashed      Roast       Pasta       Rice
                            Potatoes   Potatoes    Potatoes
Beefburger
Ind. Pie
Pizza
Fish (in batter)
Fish (in sauce)
Roast Chicken
Roast Beef
Lasagne
„Brown‟ Casserole
„White‟ Casserole
Stir Fry
Other
Totals




Issue No. 294                                                          issue date 09/04/08
PSO 5000                                                  ANNEXES                                                      Page 35

ANNEX 22

                                                           Kitchen Journal HB003

           Date                      Prison                       Time             Time   Time
                                      Roll                Menu                                   Core          Time                Waste
                                                                  from     Temp     in    from                           Wastage
                                                          Item                                   Temp         Served               Cost
                                                                 storage           oven   oven


 Staff on Duty                                Breakfast
           Time
Name       In            Time Out



                                               Lunch
                                               Brunch


 Kitchen
   Roll
  A.M.            P.M.




                                              Dinner

   Tool
  Check                  Signature
    07:00
    11:30
    14:45
    16:45
                                              Supper
    Cleaning Check       Signature
     11:30
     16:45



Issue No. 294                                                                                           issue date 09/04/08
PSO 5000                                            ANNEXES                                                                    Page 36



Daily Food Quality Check
                                       Hand Washing                    Weekly Food Area
                                       Checks                          Check
                                        Time   Signature               Kitchen
                                                                       Dry Store
Governors Signature                                                    Serveries
                                                                       Governors Signature




                Trolley Temperatures                       Chilling
                                                                                                        Time
                                                                       Time      Time
                                                 Menu      Temp into                         Product     into        Date         Menu    Sign/
                                                                        into      out
                                                 Item       Chiller                           Temp      Cold        Required      Item   Initials
                                                                       Chiller   Chiller
                                                                                                       Storage
Breakfast
Lunch
Dinner
                        Serveries                          Defrost
                                                                                                        Time
                                                                        Time      Time
                                                           Temp into                         Product     into        Date         Menu    Sign/
                                                 Product                 into      out
                                                            Defrost                           Temp      Cold        Required      Item   Initials
                                                                       Defrost   Defrost
                                                                                                       Storage
Breakfast
Lunch
Dinner




Issue No. 294                                                                                                    issue date 09/04/08
PSO 5000                                                    ANNEXES                                                           Page 37



                Servery Hot Cupboard Temperatures                   Receipt

                                                                                 Product    Product   Vehicle       Vehicle      Driver     Sign/
                                                         Supplier     Product
                                                                                  Temp      Quality   Cond.          Temp       Standard   Initials

Breakfast
Lunch
Dinner

    Storage Temperatures

Dairy Fridge
Raw Meat
Cooked Meat
Veg Coldroom
Freezer 3                                            Fabric Check               Signature
Freezer 4                                           Correct/Incorrect A.M.
        Weekly Costed Stock Check                   Correct/Incorrect P.M.
                                                        Special Information
Main Stores
Dairy Fridge
Veg Fridge
Raw Meat Fridge
Supplies
                           Total




Issue No. 294                                                                                                   issue date 09/04/08
PSO 5000                              ANNEXES                                   Page 38


                                                                                       ANNEX 23

                                     Value of Waste Monitoring

MENU/FOOD ITEM               WASTE              TOTAL VALUE OF       IMMEDIATE ACTION
                           RECORDED-                WASTE                 TAKEN
                         WEIGHT/NUMBER
STARTER:

STARTER:

MAIN:

MAIN:

MAIN:

MAIN:

MAIN:

MAIN:

VEGETABLE:

VEGETABLE:

VEGETABLE:

VEGETABLE:

DESSERT:

DESSERT:

DESSERT:

OTHER:
OTHER:
OTHER:

TO BE COMPLETED AFTER EACH MEAL BY THE CATERING MANAGER

Indicate which meal:           Breakfast:
                               Lunch:
                               Evening:

Action Plan to Reduce Waste:




Checked by: ______________            Signed:      _______________      Date: ______________



Issue No. 294                                                    issue date 09/04/08
PSO 5000                              ANNEXES
                                      Page 39

                                                                                  ANNEX 24


                            Food Quality Assessment

Is a full menu displayed including meal specifications?

Are menu items described correctly?

Are ethnic needs met?

Are vegetarian/vegan needs met?

Are medical needs met?

Is the menu the standard menu of the day?

If any menu changes have been made, are they appropriate?


COMMENTS: _______________________________________________________
          _______________________________________________________

SCORING TABLE FOR FOOD QUALITY AND TEMPERATURE

Hot Scoring                     Cold Scoring                           Menu Selection

 0ºC>    62ºC    = -5            at     8ºC             =   +1         Main Meal      +1 - 10
   at    63ºC    = +1           8ºC<    7ºC             =   +1         Vegetables     +1 - 10
63ºC>    70ºC    = +2           6ºC<    5ºC             =   +2         Potatoes       +1 - 10
70ºC>    75ºC    = +3           5ºC<    2ºC             =   +4         Sweet          +1 - 10
75ºC>    82ºC    = +4                                                  Others         +1 - 10

MENU ITEM               1      2       3            4            5     6      7       8      TOTALS
COLOUR

TASTE

TEMPERATURE

TEXTURE

APPEARANCE

ACTUAL SCORE

MAX. SCORE
AVAILABLE

SCORE: 35 > 44 : EXCELLENT         30 > 34 : GOOD                22 > 29 : ADEQUATE       -1 >
21 : POOR




                                           - 39 -
PSO 5000               ANNEXES
                       Page 40




                                               ANNEX 25




www.food.gov.uk




    Guidance on food served to adults in major institutions




                                                Updated April 2008




                          - 40 -
PSO 5000                                      ANNEXES
                                              Page 41

     Introduction

1.   The public sector in England spends around £2 billion a year on providing food and drink to service users,
     staff, the general public, clients and visitors 3. If the public sector can help to change wider eating habits by
     serving healthier food, it can help to reduce future costs to the NHS 4. The Department of health estimates the
     costs to the NHS of treating the effects of poor diets to be around £4 billion per year 5.

2.   The advice contained in this document is for all those providing food to adults in major institutions. The term
     major institution refers to publicly funded institution from the NHS to prisons where food provision may be
     some or all of the day’s consumption. The advice will also be relevant to other instances of food provision to
     adults.

Who is this advice for?

3.   This paper provides specific guidance for those providing food for adults in major institutions. It aims to
     provide the basis for caterers to help consumers achieve a healthy diet and the basis for assessment to those
     responsible for commissioning and monitoring standards. General healthy eating advice for institutions is
     provided in the Food Standards Agency’s nutrient and food based guidelines for UK institutions. 6

4.   The nutrient standards provided in this document are based upon the needs of adults aged 19–74 years.
     Advice is provided below to reflect both single and mixed population groups as may arise in different
     settings. Where example menus are provided these have been chosen to reflect key settings but are
     anticipated will be relevant to wider settings.

Background

5. Data from the National Diet and Nutrition Surveys (NDNS) 7 8 9 show us that while,
   on average, the population consumes about the right amount of total fat, higher
   consumers are eating close to 50% of their energy as fat; far greater than
   recommended amounts. These surveys also tell us that, on average, the
   population consumes too much saturated fat, salt and non-milk extrinsic sugar
   (NMES, some people call this added sugars). We also know that, some sections
   of the population have intakes of vitamins and minerals below recommended
   levels.

6. As such, we would advise those providing food for sections of the population
   where such discrepancies in intake are apparent, to buy and provide foods such
   that they result in lower intakes of fat, salt and NMES. We would also advise that
   foods providing vitamins and minerals should be bought and provided in greater
   amounts where insufficiencies are likely. This is not new advice.

Nutrient Based Guidance

7. When providing food to adults in major institutions the Agency therefore advises
   that provision of food should meet the average population requirement5 as a
   minimum, but provide food to meet target recommendations5 where intake in this

3
  National Audit Office, 2006 Smarter food procurement in the public sector. TSO.
4
  Healthy Futures, Sustainable Development Commission, 2004.
5
  Choosing a Better Diet: a food and health action plan, Department of Health 2005
6
  Food Standard Agency nutrient and food based guidelines for UK institutions (2007) see
http://www.food.gov.uk/multimedia/pdfs/nutguideuk.pdf
7
  Gregory, J (2000) National Diet and Nutrition Survey: young people aged 4 to 18yrs, The Stationary
Office. London
8
  Henderson et al (2002) National Diet and Nutrition Survey: adults aged 19 to 64yrs . The Stationary
Office. London
9
  Finch, S (1998) National Diet and Nutrition Survey: older people aged 74yrs + . The Stationary Office.
London



                                                  - 41 -
PSO 5000                                      ANNEXES
                                              Page 42

     section of the population are known to be either in excess, or in deficit, of
     Government recommendations.

8. The Agency therefore recommends that those providing food to adults in major
   institutions should aim to provide food that meets the target recommendation for
   total and saturated fat, salt and NMES. That is to aim to provide food that provides
   less than 98% of the daily dietary reference value or Scientific Advisory Committee
   on Nutrition (SACN) recommended levels for these nutrients covering all meals
   and snacks.

9. Where vitamin and mineral intakes are below recommended levels, those
   providing food in major institutions should aim to provide food to meet the target
   recommendation for these nutrients. That is at 90-100% of the daily reference
   nutrient intake10 before inclusion of snacks. For adults eating in major institutions
   this would include riboflavin, potassium and iron.

10. Nine percent of women aged 19-64 have insufficient intakes of vitamin A. Younger
    men and women aged 19-24 in particular have intakes below the lower reference
    nutrient intake (16 & 19% respectively). However, recommending target intakes
    above the dietary reference value for the whole population might result in some
    individuals consuming more than the safe level of vitamin A.11 The Agency has not
    therefore included advice for increased consumption of vitamin A containing foods,
    however, we would recommend that those providing food for adults in major
    institutions consider how they may provide awareness to relevant adults about this
    issue.

11. Women who could become pregnant or who are planning a pregnancy are advised
    to take an additional 400 micrograms (mcg) of folic acid per day as a supplement
    from before conception until the 12th week of pregnancy. In addition to this, they
    should also eat folate rich foods such as, green vegetables, brown rice and fortified
    breakfast cereals (making a total of 600 mcg of folate per day from both folate rich
    foods and a supplement).
12. The action of sunlight on the skin is the major source of vitamin D and some adults particularly may not
    receive sufficient sunlight if they spend large periods of time indoors. Adults in these groups may require
    additional vitamin D. Government advice for this population group is that this may be required as a 10
    microgram (µg, mcg) supplement daily. This advice applies to the following groups of people:

                  Women who are pregnant or breastfeeding
                  Older people
                  Those of Asian origin
                  Those who always cover up all of their skin when outside
                  Those who rarely get outdoors
                  And those who eat no meat or oily fish


13. The Agency‟s guidance on nutrient provision in for adults in major institutions,
    based upon recommendations from the Committee on Medical Aspects of Food

10
   The reference nutrient intake is the amount of a nutrient that is enough for almost every individual,
even those with high needs.
11
   Safe Upper Levels for Vitamins and Minerals. Expert Group on Vitamins and Minerals. Food
Standards Agency 2003.



                                                   - 42 -
    PSO 5000                                    ANNEXES
                                                Page 43

         and Nutrition Policy (COMA) and SACN, and taking account of excesses and
         insufficiencies from NDNS data is laid out in Table 1.

         Table 1. Nutrient-based guidance for adults aged 19-74yrs:
         Nutrient                        Average population                Recommended target
                                         requirement                       for areas of excess or
                                         (provided as daily                insufficiency
                                         averages over 7 days              (provided as daily averages
                                                                           over 7 days)
         Energy (kcals)                           2225
         Total fat (g)                           Max 87                            Less than 85
         Saturated fat (g)                       Max 27                           Less than 26.46
         Carbohydrate (g)                       Min 297
         NMES (g)                                Max 65                             Less than 64
         Fibre (as NSP g)                          18
         Protein (g)                             Min 50
         Sodium (mg)                            Max 2400                          Less than 2352
         Salt (equivalent g)                    Max 6.0                            Less than 5.9
         Iron (mg)                                 15                              More than 15
         Potassium (mg)                           3500                            More than 3500
         Riboflavin (mg)                           1.3                            More than 1.3
         Folate (mcg)                           Min 200                                >200
         Vitamin D (mcg)                        Min 10*

    *see paragraph 12


14. Nutrient intake across the day is conventionally divided across four eating occasions,
    namely breakfast, lunch, evening meal and food consumed between meals (snacks).
    Given that a wider range of foods tend to be consumed in lunch and evening meals
    compared to breakfast, these conventionally are assigned a greater proportion of
    intake.

15. The Agency‟s guidance for institutions will assume that, breakfast will contribute 20%
    of daily intake, with lunch and evening meals contributing 30% each. Foods
    consumed between meals (snacks) will contribute 20% of intakes.

    Food Based Guidance
16. Table 2 provides further food-based advice to caterers that would help them to meet the nutrient
    recommendations above.12 The food group advice in table 2 corresponds to that illustrated in the
    eatwell plate. See figure 1. In temperate climates, such as the UK, the UK Government advises that 6 –
    8 glasses (about 1.2 litres) of water, or other fluids, should be consumed every day to prevent
    dehydration. This amount should be increased when the weather is warm or when exercising.




    Figure 1



    12
      Table 2 is modified from Government advice on healthy eating (including that in Catering for Health
    available form the Stationary Office), food allergy, food hygiene and a report to the Food Standards
    Agency from the Caroline Walker Trust which is available at
    www.food.gov.uk/healthiereating/nutritioncommunity/



                                                     - 43 -
PSO 5000   ANNEXES
           Page 44




             - 44 -
    Procurement

17. When buying foods the following table** can be used to help caterers establish whether a food has high, medium
    or low amounts of fat, saturated fat, sugars and salt in 100g of the food. These figures correspond to the Agency’s
    signpost traffic light labelling system.




    **Taken from joint Which? and Food Standards Agency’s shoppers card

18. Caterers are advised to ask suppliers about the levels of salt, fat, saturated fat and sugars in their products and
    choose lower salt, fat, saturated fat and sugars options where appropriate – and where possible check the
    information provided on the packaging label.

19. Try to choose products that meet the Food Standards Agency’s salt targets. These are targets to limit the amount
    of salt in a wide range of foods, which retailers, manufacturers and some caterers (and catering suppliers) are
    working voluntarily to achieve by 2010. It might be difficult initially to find products that meet the targets, but
    over time this should become easier as work progresses.



    Table 2: Food-based guidelines for provision to adults in institutions/public funded premises.

                            Bread, rice, potatoes pasta and other starchy foods
    Guidance                Starchy foods should make up about a third of the daily diet.
                            Offer a variety of breakfast cereals (preferably fortified), porridge and/or
                             bread at breakfast.
                            Offer a variety of starchy foods with main meals including potatoes, rice,
                             pasta, noodles and other grains.


                                                     - 45 -
                   A variety of breads should be available daily as starters or meal
                    accompaniments.
                   Offer wholegrain varieties where possible, which are often higher in fibre
                    and other nutrients.

Why                Foods from this group are a good source of energy and the main source of a
                    range of nutrients in the diet. As well as starch, these foods supply fibre, iron
                    and B vitamins such as folate and riboflavin
                   Wholegrain cereals are higher in fibre.
                   Insoluble fibre in wholegrain bread, brown rice, fruit and vegetables etc helps
                    to keep bowels healthy and help prevent constipation.
                   Soluble fibre, e.g. in oats and pulses, may help reduce cholesterol.
                   Breakfast cereals can be a good source of folate, riboflavin, fibre and iron.

What’s             All breads including wholemeal and granary bread, pitta bread, chapattis,
included            roti, tortillas and bagels.
                   Potatoes, plantain, yam, sweet potato, squash and cassava (where sweet
                    potato or squash are eaten as a vegetable portion to a main meal, they do not
                    count as a starchy food).
                   Breakfast cereals.
                   All rice, couscous, bulgar wheat, semolina, tapioca, maize, cornmeal
                   All noodles, pasta.
                   Beans, peas, lentils and other pulses can be eaten as part of this group.
                   Other grains e.g. oats, millet, barley etc.

Tips on            Ask suppliers about and check the levels of salt, fat, saturated fat and sugars in
choosing            their products.
foods              Try to choose products that meet the Food Standards Agency’s salt targets. It
                    might be difficult initially to find products that meet the targets, but over time
                    this should become easier as work progresses.
                   Look for white bread with added nutrients and fibre if customers don’t like
                    brown or wholemeal bread – choose lower salt bread where possible.
                   Wholemeal bread/flour can be good sources of folate, iron and provide useful
                    amounts of fibre.
                   Choose wholegrain bread, flour, rice and pasta where possible, or consider
                    using a mixture of wholemeal and white if customers are not keen on the
                    wholemeal variety.
                   Choose fortified breakfast cereals but look for those with a lower salt and/or
Tips on             sugar content.
choosing           Fortified breakfast cereals are a good source of vitamin D, folate, and iron .
foods               Some will be good sources of fibre.
                   Potatoes can be a useful source of folate.
                   Beans and pulses such as soya beans, chick peas, lentils and broad beans can
                    be useful sources of iron and fibre.

Tips on            Try different breads such as seeded, wholemeal and granary and use thick cut
cooking and         bread for sandwiches.
serving foods      Try not to add too much fat e.g. butter on bread and potatoes.
                   Use combinations of wholemeal and white bread in sandwiches to encourage
                    consumption of wholemeal varieties.
                   Porridge is a great warming winter breakfast and whole oats with fresh fruit
                    and yoghurt makes a great summer breakfast.
                   Boil potatoes in the minimum amount of water and for the shortest amount of


                                           - 46 -
                   time to retain vitamins, but ensure they are cooked until edible.
                  Use skimmed or semi-skimmed milk rather than butter or margarine to mash
                   potatoes to smoothness.
                  Roast potatoes in small amounts of vegetable oil, brush the oil on to potatoes
                   to use smaller amounts.
                  Try to cut down on the amount of fried foods offered, such as chips and other
                   reconstituted potato dishes.
                  Choose thick cut chips or potatoes wedges instead of thin cut chips – they
                   absorb less oil when cooking or use oven chips.
                  Pre-blanch chips in steamers before frying, this will reduce the amount of oil
                   absorbed.
                  Use unsaturated oils such as sunflower or rapeseed oils instead of saturated
                   fats e.g. lard in cooking.
                  Make sure the oil used for frying is at the correct temperature – this reduces
                   the amount of fat absorbed.
                  Drain/blot fried foods before serving.
                  Use baked products where possible instead of frying as they are likely to
                   contain less fat; compare product labels for more information.
                  Choose tomato and vegetable based sauces in preference to creamy, buttery
                   sauces where appropriate.
                  Use more starchy foods e.g. pasta in relation to meat/rich sauces (e.g. in
                   lasagne, potato to meat in cottage pie, sausages and mash – have more of the
                   mash, some vegetables and one less sausage.
                  Serve plenty of boiled/steamed rice with curries, rather than poppadums or
                   fried rice.

Allergy tips      Be aware of adults who have coeliac disease, also known as gluten intolerance,
                   who need to avoid all cereals containing gluten (wheat, oats, barley or rye).
                   Alternative foods made from maize (i.e. polenta), rice, rice flour, potatoes,
                   potato flour, buckwheat, sago, tapioca, soya and soya flour are available. Seek
                   expert advice from a dietitian where necessary. Some gluten free foods are
                   available on prescription.




                                          - 47 -
Food safety      Starchy foods and particularly foods such as grains and rice can contain spores
tips              of Bacillus cereus, a bacteria that can cause food poisoning. When the food is
                  cooked, the spores can survive. Then, if it is left standing at room temperature,
                  the spores will germinate, multiply and may produce toxins (poisons) that
                  cause either vomiting or diarrhoea. Reheating will not get rid of the toxin.
                 Low numbers of Bacillus cereus won’t make someone ill, but if food contains
                  high numbers of the bacteria, or if a toxin has been produced, it could cause
                  food poisoning. The longer that food is left at room temperature, the more
                  likely it is that bacteria, or the toxins they produce, could make food unsafe.
                  Therefore these types of food should be served directly after cooking, if this is
                  not possible they should be cooled within an hour and kept in the fridge until
                  reheating (for no more than 1 day). Avoid reheating more than once.




                                          - 48 -
                                         Fruit and vegetables
Guidance            Fruit and vegetables should make up about one third of the daily diet.
                    Offer at least 5 different portions of fruits and vegetables every day.
                    Aim for 1 or 2 portions with each meal and offer fruit as a snack.
                    A portion of fresh or cooked fruit or vegetables should be about 80g.

Why                 Fruit and vegetables are good sources of many vitamins (including folate)
                     minerals and fibre.
                    There is increasing evidence that consuming more than 400g of fruit and
                     vegetables every day may reduce the risk of developing chronic diseases
                     such as coronary heart disease and some cancers.
                    Fruit and vegetables are very low in fat.
                    Fruit and vegetables are a good source of potassium, which may help to
                     lower blood pressure.
                    Increasing fruits and vegetables in the diet helps to increase the fibre intake,
                     which can reduce the total amount of calories consumed amongst those who
                     wish to lose weight.

What’s              All types of fresh, frozen, tinned, juiced and dried fruit.
included            All types of fresh, frozen, juiced and tinned vegetables.
                    100% Fruit and vegetable juices count as one portion however much you
                     drink.
                    Some smoothies can count as more than one potion if they contain all the
                     edible pulped fruit/vegetable. The number of portions depends on how many
                     fruits of vegetables are used and how the smoothie was made.
                    Beans and pulses are also included but, again, only count as a maximum of
                     one portion per day.

Tips on             Ask suppliers about and check the levels of salt, fat, saturated fat and sugars in
choosing foods       their products.
                    Try to choose products that meet the Food Standards Agency’s salt targets.
                     It might be difficult initially to find products that meet the targets, but over
                     time this should become easier as work progresses.
                    Buy tinned fruit in natural juice rather than in syrup.
                    Buy tinned vegetables and pulses in water, with no added salt or sugar.
                    Store fresh vegetables in a cool, dark place.
                    Fruit and vegetables which are useful sources of iron include dark green
                     leafy vegetables (but not spinach), broccoli, dried apricots and raisins,
                     blackcurrants and broad beans.
                    Fruit and vegetables which are useful sources of folate include, green leafy
                     vegetables, broccoli, Brussels sprouts, peas, asparagus and oranges.
                    Bananas, raisins, peas and pulses are a particularly good source of potassium.




                                            - 49 -
Tips on            Steaming or cooking vegetables with minimum amounts of water, for as
cooking and         short as time as possible and serving as soon as possible will help retain
serving foods       vitamins.
                   Use fresh fruit and vegetables as soon as possible, rather than storing them,
                    to avoid vitamin loss. Alternatively, use frozen fruit and vegetables.
                   Avoid leaving any cut vegetables exposed to air, light, heat or leaving them
                    to soak. Cover and chill them.
                   Add vegetables and pulses to stews, casseroles or other dishes and offer a
                    variety of vegetables at main meals.
                   Offer a variety of dried fruits to add to cereal options and porridge and
                    include dried fruit in cakes and desserts.
                   Offer colourful and interesting salads (with low fat dressings) and vegetables
                    with main meals.
                   Always have attractive looking fresh fruit on display.
                   Try to offer alternative fruit dishes, and incorporate fruit into other desserts
                    and dishes, including cold starters and savoury dishes (e.g. citrus chicken and
                    pork and apple sauce).
                   Fruit juice is still a healthy choice, and counts as one of the five portions of
                    fruit and vegetables we should be having every day, but it is best to drink
                    fruit juice at mealtimes.

Other tips         Offer fruit and vegetables as a snack.
                   Encourage a glass of 100% fruit juice, e.g. with breakfast or with a main
                    meal, But remember fruit juices only count as one portion of fruit a day, and
                    are high in NMES so if you offer this with breakfast everyday you will need
                    to adjust NMES intake at other eating occasions.
                   Pureed stewed fruit can be offered with custard or yoghurt or ice cream as
                    dessert.
                   Try to avoid adding sugar or syrupy dressings to fruit (such as stewed apple).
                   Try to avoid adding fat or rich sauces to vegetables (such as carrots glazed
                    with butter).
                   Foods and drinks rich in vitamin C, such as citrus fruit, green vegetables,
                    peppers, tomatoes and potatoes, may help the body absorb iron.
                   For more information on guidelines for fruit and vegetables see annex 1.

Tips on food-      Some people, such as Jains, have restrictions on some vegetable foods.
related             Caterers should check with the individual customer about their needs.
customs
Allergy tips       Some people can be allergic to certain fruits, such as apples, peaches, melon,
                    mango, pineapple and kiwi. Allergy to fruits can be linked to pollen allergy
                    and hay fever.




                                          - 50 -
Food safety      Because most fresh fruits and vegetables are grown outdoors in non-sterile
tips              environments, it is possible that they may occasionally harbour potential food
                  poisoning organisms that are present in soil, air and water. The number of
                  potentially harmful micro-organisms on fresh produce intended to be eaten
                  raw can be reduced by using hygienic growing practices and careful washing
                  of fruit and vegetables with potable water before consumption.
                 NEVER use household cleaners/ washing up liquid as these products may not
                  be safe for human consumption, and by using them, harmful residues may be
                  left on the food.




                                        - 51 -
                                         Milk and dairy foods
Guidance            Milk and dairy foods should be served every day.
                    Moderate amounts should be offered each day as milk in drinks, cheese,
                     yoghurt or milk-based puddings and sauces.
                    Where appropriate choose lower fat and salt options or use higher fat/salt
                     options in smaller amounts or less frequently.

Why                 Milk and dairy products are excellent sources of calcium which is needed for
                     optimal bone strength as well as sources of protein, vitamin A and riboflavin
                     (B2).
                    The fat content of different dairy products varies, and much of this is
                     saturated fat.
                    Fortified dried milks are a good source of vitamin D.

What’s              All types of milk, including dried milk, reduced fat milk, goat’s and sheep’s
included             milk.
                    Cheeses e.g. Cheddar, cottage cheese, cheese spreads, Edam, goat’s cheese,
                     stilton.
                    Yoghurt (fruit or plain, whole milk or low-fat), or fromage frais.
                    Milk-based sauces, custard and milk puddings.
                    Fortified Soya drinks.

Tips on             Ask suppliers about and check the levels of salt, fat, saturated fat and sugars in
choosing foods       their products.
                    Try to choose products that meet the Food Standards Agency’s salt targets.
                     It might be difficult initially to find products that meet the targets, but over
                     time this should become easier as work progresses.
                    Consider switching to semi-skimmed or skimmed milk.
                    Milk, cheese and yogurt are useful sources of riboflavin.

Tips on             Use fromage frais, quark or plain yogurt in dishes in place of some of the
cooking and          cream (but be careful not to alter the taste or appearance of the dish).
serving foods       Offer frozen yoghurts as an alternative to ice cream, to reduce fat content.
                    Use milk in sweet and savoury sauces, custard and puddings.
                    Use reduced calorie mayonnaise in dressings or dilute with lower fat yogurt.
                    Use béchamel, instead of cheese, sauce for dishes covered in cheese (e.g.
                     lasagne).
                    Use reduced fat cheese in sandwiches or on cheese boards, or use smaller
                     amounts of full fat cheeses.
                    Use smaller amounts of stronger tasting cheese to provide flavour, this helps
                     lower salt and fat content of dishes.
                    Grate cheese for use in salads, sandwiches and fillings; you will tend to use
                     less.

Other tips          Some flavoured and malted milk products and shakes tend to contain added
                     sugar, which can be bad for teeth.
                    Hard cheeses, such as Cheddar tend to be higher in saturated fat then softer
                     cheese such as edam and brie.
Other tips
                    Use plain yoghurt and fromage frais instead of cream, soured cream or crème
                     fraîche.
                    Pregnant women and older people should avoid unpasteurised and soft-



                                            - 52 -
                    mould-ripened cheese (e.g. Camembert, Brie and all blue-veined cheese).

Tips on food-      People of certain religions, such as Hindus, Sikhs and Muslims may not eat
related             milk products, and Jewish people may require kosher milk products.
customs            Strict Jews who eat kosher foods do not eat milk products at the same time
                    as, or immediately before or after foods/meals containing meat.
                   Vegans, including some Rastafarians, will not eat milk products.
                   Caterers should check with the individual customer about their needs.

Allergy tips       Some people are allergic to milk and will need to avoid all milk products,
                    including yoghurts and cheese.
                   Other people may be intolerant to lactose, the sugar found in milk. Such
                    people may be able to tolerate small amounts of milk in their diets but
                    people’s sensitivities can vary. Lactose intolerance is found in about 5% of
                    the adult population in the UK but is more common in certain ethnic
                    communities where milk is not traditionally part of the adult diet. For
                    example, in South America, Africa and Asia, more than 50% of the
                    population are intolerant to lactose, rising to nearly 100% in some parts of
                    Asia.
                   There are a number of alternative products such as soya or rice drinks.
                    Choose alternatives that are fortified with nutrients such as calcium.

Food safety        Unpasteurised (raw) milk should be avoided as it may contain micro-
tips                organisms harmful to health.
                   Milk and dairy products should always be refrigerated and stored at
                    temperatures below 8oC (ideally at temperatures between 0oC & 4oC).
                   In order to avoid the risk of listeriosis, vulnerable groups, such as pregnant
                    women and older people, are advised to avoid eating ripened soft cheeses of
                    the Brie, Camembert and blue veined types, whether pasteurised or
                    unpasteurised. This is because ripened soft cheeses are less stable than hard
                    cheeses (they are less acidic and contain more moisture) and are therefore
                    more inclined to allow growth of undesirable bacteria such as Listeria.




                                          - 53 -
  Meat, fish, eggs, beans and other non dairy sources of protein
Guidance            A meat or meat alternative should be offered at all main meals.
                    Fish should be offered at least twice a week, one of which should be oily (a
                     typical portion is about 140g).
                    Meat alternatives for vegetarians should be varied and a variety of foods
                     from this group should be used. Cheese may be used as a substitute;
                     however it should not be used too often as the protein source for vegetarians
                     as it can be high in salt and saturated fat.

Why                 Meat and fish are good source of protein and of vitamins and minerals such
                     as iron and all the B vitamins except folate. Meat is a particularly good
                     source of riboflavin.
                    Oily fish provide long chain omega-3 fatty acids which may help to prevent
                     heart disease. Such foods are also a source of vitamins A and D and iron.
                    Beans and pulses are sources of protein, fibre and iron.
                    Eggs are useful sources of protein, vitamins A, vitamin D and Riboflavin
                     (B2).
                    Nuts provide a source of protein, iron, fibre and essential fatty acids.

What’s              Meat, poultry, offal, fish, eggs, nuts, beans, pulses, seeds and other non dairy
included             sources of protein.
                    Meat includes all cuts of beef, lamb and pork and meat and meat products
                     such as ham, bacon, salami, corned beef, beefburgers and sausages.
                    Fish includes any fresh, frozen and tinned fish, such as tuna, sardines,
                     pilchards, and mackerel, and fish products such as fish cakes and fish fingers.
                    Oily fish, such as salmon, sardines, trout and fresh tuna. Canned tuna is not
                     considered an oily fish as the long chain omega-3 fatty acids are lost in the
                     canning process for tuna. Other canned oily fish are not affected in the same
                     way.
                    All eggs e.g. boiled, poached, scrambled, fried, omelettes.
                    Beans and pulses – e.g. baked beans, runner beans, chickpeas, butter beans,
                     kidney beans and lentils are in this group and provide a good source of
                     protein for vegetarians and are low in fat.
                    Other textured protein products suitable for vegetarians, such as tofu, and
                     textured protein products such as soya, quinoa and quorn(R)

Tips on             Ask suppliers about and check the levels of salt, fat, saturated fat and sugars in
choosing foods       their products.
                    Try to choose products that meet the Food Standards Agency’s salt targets.
                     It might be difficult initially to find products that meet the targets, but over
                     time this should become easier as work progresses.
                    Use lean cuts of meat where possible. Some types of meat are high in fat,
                     particularly saturated fat, which can raise cholesterol levels
                    Go for turkey and chicken, without the skin, because these are lower in fat.
                    Look for meat products with higher meat content, look at the label for more
                     information
Tips on
                    White fish are low in fat
choosing foods
                    Chose tinned fish in spring water rather than oil
                    Choose smoked meats and fish less often as they can be high in salt
                    Oily fish, such as herring, mackerel, pilchards, salmon, sardines, trout or roe
                     and egg yolks are rich in vitamin D
                    Look for canned beans and pulses with no added salt and sugar.


                                            - 54 -
                   Nuts and seeds can be a good alternative to snacks high in saturated fat,
                    however avoid salted nuts where possible.

Tips on            Remove visible fat from meat and skin from poultry
cooking and        Stand poultry and joints on racks when cooking to allow the fat to flow away
serving foods
                   Larger pieces of meat will absorb less fat than smaller pieces
                   Boil, bake, grill or poach rather than frying or roasting where possible as this
                    will lower the fat content
                   Reduce the amount of processed meat and fish on offer e.g. coated chicken,
                    burgers, fish fingers.
                   Add pulses to meat dishes to increase the fibre content, reduce the overall fat
                    content and add extra protein.
                   Serve slightly less meat with extra vegetables or starchy foods.
                   Serve foods with tomato or vegetable based sauces rather than creamy,
                    buttery sauces to lower the fat content.
                   If frying, make sure the temperature is correct and change fat./oil regularly
                    and drain well to reduce fat content.
                   Serve oily fish as pâtés and spreads on bread and toast.
                   When baking fish, brush with unsaturated vegetable oil rather than butter.
                   If a dish must be finished with butter, try lightly brushing with melted butter
                    before serving.
                   Boil, poach or scramble eggs rather than frying them.
                   When serving foods with gravy opt for lower salt versions of gravy mixes, or
                    stock/bouillon cubes/granules.
                   Gradually lower the salt content of food you cook yourself to allow
                    customers taste buds to adapt and try using alternative herbs and spices to
                    flavour foods.
                   Season food sparingly with salt or seasonings containing salt, a chef’s palette
                    may be less sensitive to salt than many of the customers.
                   Seeds can be eaten raw, dry fried or dry roasted in a frying pan or in a
                    roasting tin without any oil.

Other tips
                       Liver/pâté is a useful source of nutrients but liver and liver products should
                        not be served more than once a week as it contains a lot of vitamin A.
                       Women who have been through the menopause, and older men, who are
                        more at risk of osteoporosis, should avoid having more than 1.5mg of
                        vitamin A a day. This means:
                               not eating liver or liver products, such as pâté, more than once a
                                week - or having smaller portions of these
                               taking no more than 1.5mg of vitamin A a day in supplements
                                (including fish liver oil), if not eating liver
                               not taking any supplements containing vitamin A (including fish
                                liver oil) if eating liver once a week
Other tips
                               Having a total of 1.5mg or less of vitamin A a day, on average,
                                from diet and supplements combined is unlikely to cause any harm.

                   Women who are pregnant or thinking of having a baby, Agency and Health
                    Department advice is:
                               avoid taking supplements containing vitamin A, including fish
                                liver oil (except on the advice of your GP)



                                           - 55 -
                              avoid eating liver or liver products such as pâté because these are
                               very high in vitamin A
                   Meat products in pastry, such as pies and sausage rolls, are often high in fat.
                   Quiches and flans can be high in fat and salt, so try not to provide these too
                    often.
                   Pulses are a good source of iron, but try to have some food (such as peppers or
                    dark green vegetables) or a drink rich in vitamin C (such as orange juice) with
                    your meal as this may help you absorb the iron.

Tips on food-      People of certain religions, such as Hindus and Sikhs, as well as vegetarians
related             and vegans including some Rastafarians, may not eat eggs, meat or fish.
customs            Some Jewish people will require kosher meat and Muslims will require Halal
                    meat. Pork and pork products are not appropriate.
                   Strict Jews who eat kosher foods do not eat meat products at the same time
                    as, or immediately before or after foods/meals containing meat. They may
                    only eat fish with fins and scales and do not eat shellfish. Eggs should not
                    contain blood spots.
                   Hindus who eat fish may only eat fish with fins and scales and may also not
                    eat shellfish.
                   Caterers should check with the individual customer about their needs.

Allergy tips       Some people are allergic to nuts, peanuts, fish, shellfish and eggs. The
                    labelling of bought-in products will need to be checked carefully to see if
                    these allergenic foods are used as ingredients.


Food safety        Always store meat and fish in the fridge, ideally at temperatures between 0oC
tips                and 4oC.
                   Always ensure that uncooked meat and ready to eat foods are stored apart.
                    Ideally raw meat & fish should be covered and stored on the bottom shelf
                    where they can not drip onto other foods. Cooked meat and fish should be
                    covered and stored above raw in the fridge.
                   Eggs are a useful source of nutrients but when served to older people and
                    pregnant women they should always be well cooked, until both the yolk and
                    white are solid. This is to avoid the risk of Salmonella, which causes a type
                    of food poisoning.
                   At risk groups should avoid all types of pâté, including vegetable. This is
                    because pâté can sometimes contain Listeria.
                   Always ensure that meat is well cooked. This is especially important with
Food safety         poultry and products made from minced meat, such as sausages and burgers.
tips                Make sure these are cooked until they are piping hot all the way through any
                    juices run clear and no pink meat is left.
                   Vulnerable groups should avoid raw shellfish. This is because raw shellfish
                    can sometimes contain harmful bacteria and viruses that could cause food
                    poisoning. It is far safer to eat shellfish as part of a hot meal, such as in a
                    curry.




                                           - 56 -
                       Foods and/or drinks high in fat and/or sugar
Guidance            Use foods containing fat sparingly. Look out for lower fat alternatives or eat
                     these foods in smaller amounts. Where possible replace saturated fat with
                     unsaturated fat
                     Snacking on sugary foods and drinks throughout the day is discouraged as
                     this can cause tooth decay.

Why                 Foods from this group principally provide energy in the forms of fats and
                     sugars but may contain other nutrients in much smaller amounts. Some can
                     also be high in salt. These nutrients are consumed in greater amounts than
                     required and are associated with disease progression and/or dental caries.
                    Foods from this group can contribute to excess energy intakes if they are
                     eaten in large amounts.
                    Having too much saturated fat can increase the amount of cholesterol in the
                     blood, which increases the chance of developing heart disease.
                    Often foods high in calories offer few other nutrients, it is important that
                     these foods do not displace more nutrient rich foods.

What’s              Foods containing saturated fat include: butter, margarine, lard, other
included             spreading fats and, cooking oils (e.g. palm oil), oil-based salad dressings,
                     mayonnaise, cream, crème fraiche, chocolate, crisps, biscuits, pastries, cakes,
                     puddings, ice cream, rich sauces, and gravies.
                    Foods containing unsaturated fats include: low-fat spreads, cooking oils (e.g.
                     sunflower, olive), oil-based salad dressings
                    Foods containing sugar include: soft drinks, fruit juice, sweets, jams, honey
                     and sugar, as well as foods such as cakes, puddings, biscuits, pastries and ice
                     cream.

Tips on             Ask suppliers about and check the levels of salt, fat, saturated fat and sugars
choosing foods       in their products.
                    Try to choose products that meet the Food Standards Agency’s salt targets.
                     It might be difficult initially to find products that meet the targets, but over
                     time this should become easier as work progresses.

Tips on             Use mono- and poly- unsaturated fats wherever possible for cooking,
cooking and          spreading and in dressings.
serving foods       Consider using spreads that are soft straight from the fridge, so it is easier to
                     spread thinly.
                    Choose soya, rapeseed and olive oils for cooking and salad dressings
                    Choose sunflower oil, soya oil or olive oil fat spreads.
                    Choose tomato and vegetable based sauces rather than cream based ones.
                    Offer fewer fried foods.
                    Use reduced calorie mayonnaise in dressings or dilute with lower fat yogurt.
                    Serve salad dressings and desert toppings separately so that customers can
                     decide how much they want.
                    Don’t automatically garnish potatoes and vegetables with butter prior to
Tips on              service.
cooking and         Ensure correct temperatures when frying so that foods absorb less fat.
serving foods       Reduce the amount of sugar used in dishes where practical and acceptable.
                    Use dried or fresh fruit to sweeten dishes.
                    Consider using spreads that are soft straight from the fridge, so it is easier to
                     spread thinly.
                    Try halving the sugar you use in your recipes. It works for most things except


                                            - 57 -
                    jam, meringues and ice cream.
                   Choose wholegrain breakfast cereals rather than those coated with sugar or
                    honey.

Other tips         Foods high in fat and sugars can be included in the diet but should be
                    consumed sparingly or in small amounts.
                   Offer chilled water (still, sparkling, with a slice of lemon or lime)
                    unsweetened fruit juices and chilled milk drinks.

Tips on food-      Many religious celebrations may include traditional foods that are high in fat
related             or sugars. Providing these foods occasionally as part of a celebration or
customs             festival is important for many adults.
Allergy tips       Many foods high in fat or sugar, such as cakes and biscuits, can contain eggs,
                    milk or nuts and are not suitable for people allergic to these foods.

Food safety        Eggs are a useful source of nutrients but when served to older people and
tips                pregnant women they should always be well cooked, until both the yolk and
                    white are solid. This is to avoid the risk of Salmonella, which causes a type
                    of food poisoning.




                                          - 58 -
20. All food business operators need to follow food hygiene rules which are set out in EU legislation, including the
    requirement to have in place food safety management procedures based on the HACCP principles. The Agency already
    provides much information and guidance on its web site.

    Background to the food hygiene legislation and pdf copies of the EU rules can be accessed from:
    http://www.food.gov.uk/foodindustry/regulation/europeleg/eufoodhygieneleg

    Guidance to the legislation can be found at: http://www.food.gov.uk/foodindustry/guidancenotes/hygguid/fhlguidance/

    A      Questions  &     Answers     page     on    the    legislation  for   caterers             can     be     found     at:
    http://www.food.gov.uk/foodindustry/regulation/hygleg/hygleginfo/foodhygknow/

21. If you have any questions about how the EU food hygiene legislation applies to your institution, the Agency strongly
    recommends seeking further advice from your local authority Environmental Health Department. Following recent
    changes in food labelling legislation, there is now a requirement for foods sold pre-packed to declare the presence of a
    list of specified allergenic foods. This applies to foods sold retail or to mass caterers. Therefore, if any residents in care
    homes have food allergies or intolerances, it is essential that those catering for them carefully read the labels or
    accompanying information for any products they buy, to check whether such allergenic ingredients are used. The list
    currently consists of cereals containing gluten (wheat, barley, rye, and oats), crustaceans, fish, peanuts, soybeans, milk,
    nuts (such as almond, hazelnut, walnut, cashew, and Brazil nut), celery, mustard, sesame and sulphur dioxide/sulphites.
    This list will be extended in 2007 to include molluscs and lupin.

22. The Food Standards Agency produced guidance for caterers on food allergy in 2004. This is available on our website:
    http://www.food.gov.uk/safereating/allergyintol/caterers/




    Example Menus

23. Menus 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5 are example menus that meet the nutrient and food based guidance in tables 1 and 2. These are
    designed to provide examples based on different settings such as hospitals, work place canteens and prisons.

24. The nutrient analysis of these example menus are provided in Tables 3, 4, 5 and 6. The basis for this analysis is
    provided in separate reports from an independent dietitian. 13 The analysis of the menus is taken as a daily average over
    a 7 day period according to the breakdown for each eating occasion identified at paragraph 15. All five 7-day example
    menus have met all the standards and targets over the average of seven days. The standards and targets have been met
    over each individual eating occasion throughout the day in menus 1-3 with the exception of a few specific nutrients,
    such as salt. These are documented in the accompanying technical reports.


    13
     Daniels, L. Example Menus for adults (2007) see www.food.gov.uk/healthiereating/nutritioncommunity
    Daniels, L. Example Menus for adults in prison (2008) see
    www.food.gov.uk/healthiereating/nutritioncommunity


                                                       - 59 -
25. As the prison service is responsible for the provision of meals the example menus 4 & 5, do not include the contribution
    from snacks, which inmates have the opportunity to purchase. The prison service will need to consider the implications
    where such opportunities may not be available. Targets and analysis of example menus 4 & 5 are shown in table 6 for
    the prison setting and cover breakfast, lunch and evening meal only (excluding snacks).

    Table 3. Nutrient analysis of example menu plan for adults aged 19-74yrs setting.

        Nutrient                           Average                   Recommended                Nutrient
                                          population                     target              Provision from
                                         requirement               for areas of excess       example menu
                                         (provided as               or insufficiency         plan for mixed
                                        daily averages             (provided as daily
                                                                                                 adults
                                          over 7 days               averages over 7
                                                                          days)               (provided as
                                                                                             daily averages
                                                                                              over 7 days)
    Energy (kcals)                          2225                                                   2244.3
    Total fat (g)                          Max 87                    Less than 85.3                 74.5
    Saturated fat (g)                      Max 27                    Less than 26.5                 24.4
    Carbohydrate (g)                      Min 297                                                  311.4
    NMES (g)                               Max 65                    Less than 63.7                 50.3
    Fibre (as NSP g)                         18                                                      28
    Protein (g)                            Min 50                                                  101.2
    Sodium (mg)                           Max 2400                  Less than 2352                 2200.7
    Salt (equivalent g)                   Max 6.0                   Less than 5.88                   5.3
    Iron (mg)                               14.8                    More than 14.8                  16.8
    Potassium (mg)                          3500                    More than 3500                 5288.7
    Riboflavin (mg)                          1.3                    More than 1.3                    2.7




    Table 4. Nutrient analysis of example menu plan for men aged 19-74yrs setting.

        Nutrient                           Average                   Recommended                Nutrient
                                          population                     target              Provision from
                                         requirement               for areas of excess       example menu
                                         (provided as               or insufficiency          plan for men
                                        daily averages             (provided as daily
                                                                                              (provided as
                                          over 7 days               averages over 7
                                                                          days)              daily averages
                                                                                              over 7 days)
    Energy (kcals)                          2515                                                   2506.9
    Total fat (g)                          Max 98                     Less than 96                  87.6
    Saturated fat (g)                      Max 31                    Less than 30.3                 29.5
    Carbohydrate (g)                      Min 335                                                  342.6
    NMES (g)                               Max 74                    Less than 72.5                 53.9
    Fibre (as NSP g)                         18                                                     29.1
    Protein (g)                            Min 55                                                  104.2
    Sodium (mg)                           Max 2800                  Less than 2744                 2563.3
    Salt (equivalent g)                    Max 7                    Less than 6.86                   6.2
    Iron (mg)                                 9                      More than 9                    16.6
    Potassium (mg)                          3500                    More than 3500                 5486.1
    Riboflavin (mg)                          1.3                    More than 1.3                    2.5


    Table 5. Nutrient analysis of example menu plan for women aged 19-74yrs setting.




                                                     - 60 -
    Nutrient             Average              Recommended             Nutrient
                        population                target          Provision from
                       requirement          for areas of excess   example menu
                       (provided as          or insufficiency     plan for women
                      daily averages        (provided as daily
                                                                    (provided as
                        over 7 days          averages over 7
                                                   days)           daily averages
                                                                    over 7 days)
Energy (kcals)            1930                                        1949.1
Total fat (g)            Max 75               Less than 73.5           60.4
Saturated fat (g)        Max 24               Less than 23.5           20.3
Carbohydrate (g)        Min 257                                       275.7
NMES (g)                 Max 57                Less than 56            42.4
Fibre (as NSP g)           18                                          25.2
Protein (g)              Min 45                                        89.9
Sodium (mg)             Max 2000             Less than 1960           1754.3
Salt (equivalent g)      Max 5                Less than 4.9             4.1
Iron (mg)                 14.8               More than 14.8            15.6
Potassium (mg)            3500               More than 3500            4893
Riboflavin (mg)            1.1               More than 1.1              2.5




                                   - 61 -
Table 6. Nutrient analysis of the example menu for [male & female] prisons compared to dietary
recommendations for breakfast, lunch and evening meal excluding snacks.


Nutrient                                Male Prisons                  Female Prisons
                            Standard/             Menu        Standard/          Menu
                            Target                provision   Target             provision

Energy (kcals)              2012                  2043        1544              1574
Total Fat (g)               Less than 76.4        58.3        Less than 58.5    42.1
Saturated fat (g)           Less than 24.2        17.8        Less than 18.7    13.5
Carbohydrate (g)            268                   303.8       206               234.8
Non Milk Extrinsic Sugars   Less than 57.7        44.8        Less than 44.5    34.3
(g)
Fibre (g)                   18                    24.1        18                20.9
Protein (g)                 55                    90.9        45                75.6
Sodium (mg)                 Less than 2184        2160.6      Less than 1560    1619.3
Salt equivalent (g)         Less than 5.46        5.3         Less than 3.9     4.0
Potassium (mg)              More than 3500        3946.5      More than 3500    3520.9
Iron (mg)                   More than 9           16.4        More than 14.8    15.1
Riboflavin (mg)             More than 1.3         2           More than 1.1     2




                                             - 62 -
                                                                1. Example Menu for Adults 19-74

                         Monday                  Tuesday               Wednesday                                          Friday                 Saturday                 Sunday
                                                                                                                                                           1.1.1.1.1.1.1.1.T
                                                                                                                                                                  h
                                                                                                                                                                  u
                                                                                                                                                                  r
                                                                                                                                                                  s
                                                                                                                                                                  d
                                                                                                                                                                  a
                                                                                                                                                                  y
    Early Morning    Tea / Coffee / Water    Tea / Coffee / Water    Tea / Coffee / Water    Tea / Coffee / Water    Tea / Coffee / Water    Tea / Coffee / Water    Tea / Coffee / Water
         Breakfast    Fruit / Fruit Juice     Fruit / Fruit Juice     Fruit / Fruit Juice     Fruit / Fruit Juice     Fruit / Fruit Juice     Fruit / Fruit Juice     Fruit / Fruit Juice
                     Cereals / Porridge      Cereals / Porridge      Cereals / Porridge      Cereals / Porridge      Cereals / Porridge      Cereals / Porrodge      Cereals / Porridge
                     Sausage & Tomato           Poached Egg         Bacon & Mushroom         Cottage Cheese &           Baked Beans           Bacon & Tomato             Boiled Egg
                      Yoghurt / Parfait       Yoghurt / Parfait       Yoghurt / Parfait            Tomato             Yoghurt / Parfait       Yoghurt / Parfait      Yoghurt / Parfaits
                     Toast with butter /     Toast with butter /     Toast with butter /      Yoghurt / Parfait      Toast with butter /     Toast with butter /     Toast with butter /
                            spread                  spread                  spread           Toast with butter /            spread                  spread                  spread
                          Preserves               Preserves               Preserves                 spread                Preserves               Preserves               Preserves
                       Tea or Coffee        Tea or Coffee / Water   Tea or Coffee / Water         Preserves         Tea or Coffee / Water   Tea or Coffee / Water   Tea or Coffee / Water
                            Water                                                           Tea or Coffee / Water
Mid Morning Snack    Tea / Coffee / Water    Tea / Coffee / Water    Tea / Coffee / Water    Tea / Coffee / Water    Tea / Coffee / Water    Tea / Coffee / Water    Tea / Coffee / Water




                                                - 63 -
         Lunch     Carrot & coriander        Mushroom Soup            Vegetable Soup            Tomato Soup           Leek & Potato Soup        Minestrone Soup               Pea Soup
                           Soup               Grilled Salmon            Cottage Pie             Roast Turkey             Fried Haddock        Chicken Tikka Masala          Roast Lamb
                      Beef Goulash         Vegetable Moussaka      Tofu/Cashew StirFry        Cheese & Tomato        Pasta & Tomato Sauce            & Rice              Vegetable Curry &
                   Vegeburger & gravy      Jacket Potato & Beef         &Noodles                     Pizza           Jacket Potato &Baked       Chicken Liver &                 Rice
                     Jacket Potato &               Chilli          Jacket Potato & Tuna    JacketPotato,Ratatouill           Beans                   Onions            Jacket Potato&Cottage
                          Cheese               Turkey Salad           Pate & Tomato                e,Cheese             Cheese & Pickle        Vegetarian Quiche               Cheese
                     Egg Mayonnaise             Sandwich                 Sandwich           Beef Salad Sandwich            Sandwich                   Jacket               Ham & Cheese
                        Sandwich           Vegetable Samosa &        Egg & Bean Salad           Sardine Salad          Corned Beef Salad       Potato&Vegetable              Sandwich
                       Ham Salad                   Salad                                    Roast Potato/Mashed      Chips / Mashed Potato            Chilli               Chicken Salad
                  Boiled New Potatoes /   RoastPotato/ Smashed      Peas / Leeks / Salad            Potato             Peas / Sweetcorn /        Sardine & Salad        Roast Potato/Mashed
                           Rice                    Potato             Plum Sponge &        Spinach /Broad Beans/              Salad                 Sandwich                   Potato
                      Carrots/Green       Broccoli/MixedVegeta             Custard                   Salad              Banana Custard        Mozzarella & Tomato        Broccoli / Parsnip
                       Beans/Salad              bles/Salad           Fruit/Yoghurt/Ice-      Fruit Pie & Custard       Fruit/Yoghurt/Ice-             Salad            Rhubarb Pie & Custard
                    Apple Crumble &          Chocolate Gateau              Cream             Fruit/Yoghurt/Ice-              Cream                Smashed New            Fruit/Yoghurt/Ice-
                          Custard           Fruit/Yoghurt/Ice-                                      Cream                                            Potatoes                  Cream
                    Fruit/Yoghurt/Ice-            Cream                                                                                       GreenBeans/Courgette
                          Cream                                                                                                                      s/Salad
                                                                                                                                                 Rice Pudding &
                                                                                                                                                  DriedApricots
                                                                                                                                               Fruit/Yoghurt/Ice-
                                                                                                                                                      Cream
Afternoon Tea &    Tea / Coffee / Water     Tea / Coffee / Water    Tea / Coffee / Water     Tea / Coffee / Water      Tea / Coffee / Water     Tea / Coffee / Water     Tea / Coffee / Water
                         & snack                  & snack                 & snack                  & snack                   & snack                  & snack                  & snack
Nightime Snack*
   Evening Meal          Fish Pie            Lamb Casserole         Sausage & Tomato       Spaghetti Bolognaise       Stir Fry Pork & Rice        Braised Steak        Grilled Chicken Breast
                   Vegetable Lasagne        Mushroom Risotto             Nut Roast         Vegetarian Sausages       Vegetarian Shepherds      Vegetarian Ravioli        Cauliflower Cheese
                  Jacket Potato & Tuna    JacketPotato&Cottage        Jacket Potato &      Jacket Potato &Beef                 Pie            Jacket Potato & Tuna      Jacket Potato&Baked
                     Beef Sandwich               Cheese                   Cheese                  Chilli             Jacket Potato&Cottage      Turkey Sandwich                 Beans
                      Pate & Salad           Prawn Sandwich         Chicken Cranberry        Egg Mayonnaise                  Cheese                Ham Salad               Beef Sandwich
                                          Ham & Cheese Salad             Sandwich               Sandwich              Humus & Pitta Bread         Roast Potatoes             Prawn Salad
                     Peas / Spinach          Boiled Potatoes        Smoked Mackerel           Chicken Salad                Tuna Salad         Broad Beans/ Carrots /        Smashed New
                  ChocGinger&Apricot          Broad Beans /                 Salad          Boiled New Potatoes                                        Salad                    Potatoes
                         Mousse                 Ratatouille         Smashed Potatoes       Sweetcorn / Swede /        Broccoli / Spinach /    Black Forest Gateaux     Sweetcorn/Spinach/Sal
                   Fruit/Yoghurt/Ice-       Prune & Hazelnut       Carrots /Baked Beans/          Salad                      Salad              Fruit/Yoghurt/Ice-                ad
                         Cream                   Cream                      Salad            Fruit Mousse &            Banana Bread &                 Cream                     Trifle
                                          Fruit/Yoghurt/Cheese         Fruit & Cereal            Flapjack                  Apricots                                       Fruit/Yoghurt/Ice-
                                                &Biscuits                 Yoghurt           Fruit/Yoghurt/Ice-        Fruit/Yoghurt/Ice-                                        Cream
                                                                    Fruit/Yoghurt/Ice-            Cream                     Cream
                                                                           Cream




                                              - 64 -
Daily Snacks         Currant Bun              Scone & Jam           Chocolate Swiss Roll            Malt Loaf            Toasted Tea Cake              Carrot Cake           Chocolate Krispie
               Fruit/Nuts/Biscuits/Cer   Fruit/Nuts/Biscuits/Cer   Fruit/Nuts/Biscuits/Cer   Fruit/Nuts/Biscuits/Cer   Fruit/Nuts/Biscuits/Cer   Fruit/Nuts/Biscuits/Cer           Cakes
                       eal Bar                   eal Bar                   eal Bar                   eal Bar                   eal Bar                   eal Bar           Fruit/Nuts/Biscuits/Cer
               Cheese&Crackers/Yog       Cheese&Crackers/Yog       Cheese&Crackers/Yog       Cheese&Crackers/Yog       Cheese&Crackers/Yog       Cheese&Crackers/Yog               eal Bar
                         hurt                     hurt                      hurt                      hurt                      hurt                       hurt            Cheese&Crackers/Yog
                  Chocolate/Crisps          Chocolate/Crisps          Chocolate/Crisps          Chocolate/Crisps          Chocolate/Crisps          Chocolate/Crisps                hurt
                      Beverages                Beverages                 Beverages                 Beverages                  Beverages                 Beverages             Chocolate/Crisps
                                                                                                                                                                                 Beverages




                                              2. Example Menu for Adult Men 19-74 years




                                             - 65 -
                            Monday                       Tuesday                    Wednesday                                                    Friday                     Saturday                      Sunday
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    Early Morning      Tea / Coffee / Water         Tea / Coffee / Water         Tea / Coffee / Water         Tea / Coffee / Water         Tea / Coffee / Water         Tea / Coffee / Water         Tea / Coffee / Water
         Breakfast      Fruit / Fruit Juice          Fruit / Fruit Juice          Fruit / Fruit Juice          Fruit / Fruit Juice          Fruit / Fruit Juice          Fruit / Fruit Juice          Fruit / Fruit Juice
                              Cereals                      Cereals                      Cereals                      Cereals                     Cereals                       Cereals                      Cereals
                         Scrambled Egg             BakedBeans &M’room            Poached Egg&Tom               Sausage Sandwich              Cheese on Toast             Bacon Sandwich                   Boiled Egg
                        Yoghurt / Parfait            Yoghurt / Parfait            Yoghurt / Parfait             Yoghurt / Parfait           Yoghurt / Parfait            Yoghurt / Parfait            Yoghurt / Parfaits
                     Toast with butter / spread   Toast with butter / spread   Toast with butter / spread   Toast with butter / spread   Toast with butter / spread   Toast with butter / spread   Toast with butter / spread
                            Preserves                    Preserves                    Preserves                    Preserves                    Preserves                    Preserves                     Preserves
                      Tea or Coffee / Water         Tea or Coffee Water          Tea or Coffee Water          Tea or Coffee Water         Tea or Coffee /Water         Tea or Coffee /Water         Tea or Coffee /Water
Mid Morning Snack      Tea / Coffee / Water         Tea / Coffee / Water         Tea / Coffee / Water         Tea / Coffee / Water         Tea / Coffee / Water         Tea / Coffee / Water         Tea / Coffee / Water


           Lunch         Vegetable Soup                Tomato Soup                 Minestrone Soup            Leek & Potato Soup          Chicken Noodle Soup         Carrot & Coriander Soup         Mushroom Soup
                           Chicken Pie                 Beef Goulash                 Roast Chicken                   Pork Chop                   Fried Cod                 Lamb Casserole            Roast Beef & Y Pudd
                        Tuna Pasta Bake            Quorn Curry & Rice               Meat Moussaka              Vegetable Quiche          Broccoli & Cheese Sauce         Vegeburger in Bun           Vege Curry & Rice
                      Jacket Potato & Vege         Jacket Potato & Tuna        Jacket Potato & Cheese &      Jacket Potato & Baked       Jacket Potato & Chicken       Jacket Potato & Chilli          Jacket Potato &
                              Chilli                                                Fromage Frais              Beans & Coleslaw                   Salad                      Con carne              Ratatouille & Cheese
                       Boiled New Potatoes            Mashed Potato              Roast / Mashed Potato       Smashed New Potatoes         Chips /Mashed Potato          Boiled New Potatoes         Roast / Mashed Potato
                      Carrots/Broccoli/Salad        Cabbage/Peas/Salad           Spinach/Leeks/Salad        Cauliflower/Carrots/Salad       Peas/ Corn /Salad         Leeks/Green Beans/Salad       Sprouts /Carrots/Salad
                           Cheesecake               Fruit Pie & Custard            Apple Crumble &            Rice Pudding & Fruit       Bread Pudding & Custard       Fruit Pie & Ice-Cream       Plum Sponge & Custard
                                                                                       Ice-Cream                     Compote
                     Fruit/Yoghurt/Ice-Cream      Fruit/Yoghurt/Ice-Cream            Fruit/Yoghurt          Fruit/Yoghurt/Ice-Cream      Fruit/Yoghurt/Ice-Cream           Fruit / Yoghurt         Fruit/Yoghurt/Ice-Cream



    Afternoon Tea      Tea / Coffee / Water         Tea / Coffee / Water         Tea / Coffee / Water         Tea / Coffee / Water         Tea / Coffee / Water         Tea / Coffee / Water         Tea / Coffee / Water
                             & snack                      & snack                      & snack                      & snack                      & snack                      & snack                      & snack
               &
  Nightime Snack*
     Evening Meal       Lancashire Hot Pot            Grilled Salmon              Beefburger in Bun          Spaghetti Bolognaise        Stir Fry Turkey&Noodles         Chicken Tandoori          Grilled Sausage & Onions
                        Mushroom Risotto            Cheese & Tom Pizza           Vege Shepherds Pie         Vegetable Pakora & Rice            Vege Lasagne                 Cottage Pie             Pasta & Tomato Sauce
                      Egg&CottageCh Salad             Ham Sandwich                   Prawn Salad             Tuna Salad Sandwich              Egg Sandwiches            Cheese Ploughmans              Prawn Sandwiches
                           Roast Potato            Smashed New Potatoes             Jacket Potato                                                                      Rice / Mashed Potato         Smashed New Potatoes
                     Green Beans/Leeks/Salad       Ratatouille/Corn/Salad         Peas/Swede/Salad             Ratatouille / Salad       Mixed Vegetables/Salad        Broccoli/ Leeks/Salad       Tomato/Mushroom/Salad
                       Chocolate Ginger &                  Trifle                 Tinned Peaches &            Black Forest Gateaux       Fruit Mousse & Flapjack         Banana Custard              Lemon Meringue Pie
                         Apricot Mousse                                               IceCream
                          Fruit/Yoghurt                Fruit/Yoghurt                Fruit /Yoghurt               Fruit / Yoghurt               FruitYoghurt           Fruit/Yoghurt/Ice-Cream      Fruit/Yoghurt/Ice-Cream




                                                       - 66 -
Daily Snacks      Carrot Cake        Chocolate Muffin         Currant Bun        Toasted Tea Cake         Sponge Cake           Scone & Jam         Chocolate Eclair
               Fruit/Nuts/Biscuits   Fruit/Nuts/Biscuits   Fruit/Nuts/Biscuits   Fruit/Nuts/Biscuits   Fruit/Nuts/Biscuits   Fruit/Nuts/Biscuits   Fruit/Nuts/Biscuits
               Yoghurt/Cereal bar    Yoghurt/Cereal bar    Yoghurt/Cereal bar    Yoghurt/Cereal bar    Yoghurt/Cereal bar    Yoghurt/Cereal bar    Yoghurt/Cereal bar
               Cheese & Crackers     Cheese & Crackers     Cheese & Crackers     Cheese & Crackers     Cheese & Crackers     Cheese & Crackers     Cheese & Crackers
                Chocolate/Crisps      Chocolate/Crisps      Chocolate/Crisps      Chocolate/Crisps      Chocolate/Crisps      Chocolate/Crisps      Chocolate/Crisps
                   Beverages             Beverages             Beverages             Beverages             Beverages             Beverages             Beverages




                                       - 67 -
                                              3. Example Menu for Adult Women 19-74
                       Monday                    Tuesday                 Wednesday                                              Friday                   Saturday                      Sunday
                                                                                                                                                                     1.1.1.1.1.1.1.3.T
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Early Morning     Tea / Coffee / Water      Tea / Coffee / Water       Tea / Coffee / Water     Tea / Coffee / Water       Tea / Coffee / Water      Tea / Coffee / Water         Tea / Coffee / Water
     Breakfast    Fruit / Fruit Juice       Fruit / Fruit Juice       Fruit / Fruit Juice       Fruit / Fruit Juice        Fruit / Fruit Juice      Fruit / Fruit Juice           Fruit / Fruit Juice
                  Cereals / Porridge        Cereals / Porridge        Cereals /Porridge         Cereals /Porrodge          Cereals / Porridge       Cereals / Porridge            Cereals / Porridge
                  Yoghurt / Parfait         Yoghurt / Parfait         Yoghurt / Parfait         Yoghurt / Parfait          Yoghurt / Parfait        Yoghurt / Parfait             Yoghurt / Parfaits
                  Toast with butter /       Toast with butter /       Toast with butter /       Toast with butter /        Toast with butter /      Toast with butter /           Toast with butter /
                  spread / preserves        spread / preserves        spread / preserves        spread / preserves         spread / preserves       spread / preserves            spread / preserves
                    Tea or Coffee             Tea or Coffee             Tea or Coffee             Tea or Coffee              Tea or Coffee            Tea or Coffee                 Tea or Coffee
                        Water                     Water                     Water                     Water                      Water                    Water                         Water
 Mid Morning      Tea / Coffee / Water      Tea / Coffee / Water       Tea / Coffee / Water     Tea / Coffee / Water       Tea / Coffee / Water      Tea / Coffee / Water         Tea / Coffee / Water

       Lunch          Roast Chicken             Lamb Chop               Beef Goulash         Chicken liver & onions           Fried cod             Chicken curry & rice             Roast Beef
                 Vegetable Curry & Rice             Pizza                                      Vegetarian Sausages         Vegetarian lasagne          Grilled salmon           Vegetable Shepherds Pie
                 Jacket Potato & Smoked     Jacket Potato & Tuna      Tuna Pasta Bake        Jacket potato & cottage     Jacket potato & beef     Jacket potato, ratatouille   Jacket Potato, cheese &
                         Mackerel           Smashed Potato/Rice        Jacket Potato &               cheese                      chilli                   & cheese                 Fromage frais
                  Roast Potatoes/ Boiled      Peas/Cauli/Salad            Baked Beans          Rice/ Mashed potato        Chips/mashed potato         Smashed potatoes           Roast potatoes/Mash
                          potato                                                               Green beans/Cabbage          Peas/Sweetcorn            Mixed vegetables             Parsnips/Broccoli
                  Carrots/Spinach/Salad       Chocolate Gateau
                                                                           Boiled
                                           Fruit/Yoghurt/Ice cream        Potatoes/Rice       Banana & apricot custard   Prune & Hazelnut Cream    Fruit Mousse & Flapjack      Apple crumble & custard
                  Fruit & cereal yoghurt                              Courgette/Broad        Fruit/Yoghurt/Ice-cream    Fruit/Yoghurt/Ice-cream   Fruit/Yoghurt/Ice cream      Fruit/Yoghurt/Ice cream
                 Fruit/Yoghurt/Ice-cream                                      beans
                                                                             
                                                                         Fruit pie &
                                                                             custard
                                                                      Fruit/Yoghurt/Ic
                                                                        e-cream

                                               - 68 -
Afternoon Tea &   Tea / Coffee / Water    Tea / Coffee / Water       Tea / Coffee / Water       Tea / Coffee / Water      Tea / Coffee / Water      Tea / Coffee / Water       Tea / Coffee / Water
                        & snack                 & snack                    & snack                    & snack                   & snack                   & snack                    & snack
Nightime Snack*
  Evening Meal    Leek & potato soup       Tomato & rice soup      Carrot & coriander soup           Pea soup                Vegetable soup        Butterbean/ tomato soup        Spinach soup
                      Cottage pie          Stir fry pork & rice         Grilled trout           Spaghetti bolognaise          Beef grillsteak          Lamb Casserole              Shish Kebab
                   Vegetarian quiche        Hummus & salad         Spaghetti & tomato sauce   Broccoli & cheese sauce   Stir Fry Tofu, Cashew &     Vegetarian Moussaka       Vegetable Chilli & Rice
                    Ham sandwich              Egg sandwich             Beef sandwich              Prawn sandwich                 Noodles               Pate Sandwiches          Salmon sandwich
                     Boiled potato                                    Smashed potatoes             Mashed potato          Cheese Ploughman’s            Jacket Potato                 Chips
                   Leeks/Sweetcorn                                   Spinach/Ratatouille               Salad                 Boiled potatoes      Broad beans/carrots/Salad       Tomato/Salad
                        Trifle           Banana bread & apricots                              Chocolate Krsipie cakes     Courgettes/Cabbage      Chocolate Ginger &           Peaches & ice-cream
                    Fruit/Yoghurt            Fruit/Yoghurt                Malt loaf                Fruit/yoghurt        Rice Pudding & Compote    apricot dessert                 Fruit/Yoghurt
                                                                        Fruit/Yoghurt                                         Fruit/Yoghurt
                                                                                                                                                       Fruit/Yoghurt
   Daily Snacks   Fruit/Nuts/Biscuits      Fruit/Nuts/Biscuits       Fruit/Nuts/Biscuits        Fruit/Nuts/Biscuits       Fruit/Nuts/Biscuits        Fruit/Nuts/Biscuits        Fruit/Nuts/Biscuits
                  Yoghurt/Cereal bar       Yoghurt/Cereal bar        Yoghurt/Cereal bar         Yoghurt/Cereal bar        Yoghurt/Cereal bar         Yoghurt/Cereal bar         Yoghurt/Cereal bar
                  Cheese & Crackers        Cheese & Crackers         Cheese & Crackers          Cheese & Crackers         Cheese & Crackers          Cheese & Crackers          Cheese & Crackers
                   Chocolate/Crisps         Chocolate/Crisps          Chocolate/Crisps           Chocolate/Crisps          Chocolate/Crisps           Chocolate/Crisps           Chocolate/Crisps
                      Beverages                Beverages                 Beverages                  Beverages                 Beverages                  Beverages                  Beverages


* Hot drink for nightime snack is choice of tea, coffee, hot chocolate




                                             - 69 -
                                        4. Example Menu for Adult Men in Prison
                  Monday                  Tuesday            Wednesday                                    Friday             Saturday               Sunday
                                                                                                                                      1.1.1.1.1.1.1.4.T
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Breakfast          Fruit                     Fruit               Fruit                Fruit                 Fruit               Fruit                 Fruit
              Cereal & milk             Cereal & milk       Cereal & milk        Cereal & milk         Cereal & milk       Cereal & milk         Cereal & milk
             Bread with spread         Bread with spread   Bread with spread    Bread with spread     Bread with spread   Bread with spread     Bread with spread
                 Preserves                 Preserves           Preserves            Preserves             Preserves           Preserves             Preserves
                    Tea                       Tea                 Tea                  Tea                   Tea                 Tea                   Tea
                  Water                     Water               Water                Water                 Water               Water                 Water



  Lunch     Shish kebab, pitta and   Spicy chicken with    Lamb chop & mint    Spaghetti Bolognaise     Fish & chips       Jerk Chicken        Roast beef & Y Pudd
                   hummus            fruit                       gravy           Roast Turkey &       Beef & onion pie      Beef Hotpot        Gammon & p’apple
                  Pork chop                                   Cottage Pie            stuffing         Vegeburger & bun    Tuna Pasta bake     Roast chicken+stuffing
              Vegetarian Chilli           Fish Pie         Vegetarian Quiche    Mushroom risotto       Ham and salad      Dahl curry & rice   Jacket Potato & baked
            Tuna fish sandwiches      Vegetarian lasagne   Sardine Sandwich    Cheese Pickle S’wich       sandwich          Rice & peas          beans & cheese
                     Rice            Egg & tomato s’wich     Roast Potatoes      Mashed Potatoes            Chips             Broccoli           Roast Potatoes
                     Peas              Boiled potatoes        Sweetcorn            Green beans        Mixed Vegetables      Fresh Fruit              Cabbage
                 Fresh Fruit               Carrots            Fresh Fruit          Fresh Fruit           Fresh Fruit         Fruit Cake             Fresh fruit
                  Fruit Bun              Fresh Fruit             Cake                Flapjack               Cake             Tea/Water        Applecrumble+custard
                 Tea/Water            Choc Chip Muffin        Tea/Water             Tea/Water            Tea/Water                                  Tea/Water
                                         Tea/Water




                                         - 70 -
Evening Meal    BBQ Chicken Legs        Beefburger in bun          Grilled Salmon         Moroccan Lamb         Pack Up Baguettes   Pack Up Baguettes   Pack Up Baguettes
                  Chilli con Carne     Turkey stir fry & rice     Sausage & Onion       Ham/ Pineapple Pizza         Cheese                Egg                 Tuna
                  Liver & Onions            Moussaka                Beef Goulash        ChickenMushroom Pie          Sardine             Turkey                Ham
                Vegetarian Sausages     Falafel & Hummus        Pasta & Tomato Sauce    Cheese/Tomato Pizza            Beef            Corned Beef           Hummus
               Beef Baguette Pack Up   Ham Baguette Pack up     Egg Baguette Pack up      Chicken Pack Up           Rice Salad          Coleslaw           Potato Salad
                    Jacket Potato         Potato Wedges            Boiled Potatoes               Rice              Mixed Salad         Mixed Salad         Mixed Salad
                       Leeks               Diced Salad          Carrot & Parsnip Mash    Ratatouille/Coleslaw      Fresh Fruit         Fresh Fruit          Fresh Fruit
                     Fresh fruit            Fresh Fruit               Fresh Fruit             Fresh Fruit            Yoghurt             Yoghurt             Yoghurt
               Crunchy Fruit Dessert       Carrot Cake               Cheesecake             Banana Bread           Biscuit Pack        Biscuit Pack        Biscuit Pack
                     Tea/Water              Tea/Water                 Tea/Water               Tea/Water             Tea/Water           Tea/Water           Tea/Water




                                           - 71 -
                                    5. Example Menu for Adult Women in Prison
                  Monday                 Tuesday                Wednesday                                         Friday                Saturday                  Sunday
                                                                                                                                                  1.1.1.1.1.1.1.5.T
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Breakfast           Fruit                  Fruit                    Fruit                   Fruit                  Fruit                   Fruit                   Fruit
               Cereal & milk          Cereal & milk            Cereal & milk           Cereal & milk          Cereals & milk          Cereal & milk           Cereal & milk
              Bread with spread      Bread with spread        Bread with spread       Bread with spread      Bread with spread       Bread with spread       Bread with spread
                  Preserves              Preserves                Preserves               Preserves              Preserves               Preserves               Preserves
                     Tea                    Tea                      Tea                     Tea                    Tea                     Tea                     Tea
                   Water                  Water                    Water                   Water                  Water                   Water                   Water




  Lunch         Beef Goulash         Shish kebab & pitta    Bolognaise Bruschetta    Jacket potato & beef   Chicken & lentil soup     Moroccan lamb              Roast beef
                Pork Sausage           Chicken nuggets            Fish pie                   chilli          Beefburger in bun         Pork Chop                 Grilled fish
            Cheese & onion s’wich    Tuna salad sandwich       Humus & salad               Meat Pie         Egg & cress sandwich    BBQ Chicken Wings      Chicken Curry and rice
             Salmon & cucumber         Corned beef and           sandwich            Sardine salad s’wich      Tuna sandwich           Vegeburger          Tofu stir fry & rice
                  sandwich             tomato sandwich       Ham & salad s’wich      Beef coleslaw s’wich     Jacket potato &
             Bean/VegetableBake     Jacket potato & baked    Vegetarian sausages    Cheese & tomato pizza     vegetarian chilli       Boiled potatoes       Roast potatoes/Rice
                     Rice                    beans                                     Boiled potatoes                                   Broccoli            Mixed vegetables
                   Carrots                Oven Chips           Potato wedges          Cabbage/Coleslaw         Potato wedges
                Potato crisps         Green beans/Salad             Peas                 Potato crisps          Sweetcorn           Rice Pudding & fruit     Fruit Pie & custard
                Fruit/Yoghurt            Fruit/Yoghurt         Fruit/Yoghurt            Fruit/Yoghurt          Fruit/Yoghurt               puree                 Tea/Water
                 Tea/Water                Tea/Water             Tea/Water                 Tea/Water             Tea/Water                Tea/Water




                                        - 72 -
Evening Meal        Roast Turkey            Tandoori Chicken      Lamb Kheema & rice    Spaghetti bolognaise        Breaded fish       Pack Up Sandwiches   Pack Up Sandwiches
                   Grilled Salmon             Liver & onion         Chicken chasseur      Gammon Steak              Cottage Pie              Salmon/              Turkey
               Coronation chickensalad   Smoked mackerel salad     Tuna & pasta salad    Cottage cheese &      Humus & tahina salad            Beef                Tuna
                  Mixed Bean salad           Egg mayo salad        Ploughman’s salad      pineapple salad        Ham & egg salad           Soft Cheese              Egg
                 Vegetarian lasagne      Stir Fry Veg & noodles     Dahl curry & rice        Beef salad        Pasta & Tomato sauce       Mixed Salad          Mixed Salad
                    Boiled potato                  Rice              Mashed potato      Cheese & Onion Flan            Chips                Rice salad          Bean Salad
                     Ratatouille            Mixed Vegetables            Carrots            Boiled Potato               Peas                Fresh Fruit          Fresh Fruit
                        Fruit                      Fruit                  Fruit               Spinach                  Fruit                 Yoghurt              Yoghurt
                   Krispie Cakes               Currant Bun              Flapjack               Fruit           Chocolate Chip Muffin       Biscuit Pack         Biscuit Pack
                     Tea/Water                  Tea/Water              Tea/Water            Fruit Cake               Tea/Water              Tea/Water            Tea/Water
                                                                                            Tea/Water




                                             - 73 -
PSO 5000                                      ANNEXES                                                Page 74




26. The above nutrient and food based advice do not represent new guidance. Rather, this advice provides a summary of current
    Government recommendations for adults. The guidance is not intended for those who may have different nutritional
    requirements due to illness or disease and are undernourished or at risk of under nutrition (e.g. because of a poor appetite).
    Hospital inpatients need appropriate assessment and monitoring of their food intakes and nutritional status. If patients are
    unable to meet their requirements for energy and other nutrients or have other specific medical dietary needs, then these must
    be appropriately provided for outside the scope of this guidance.

27. The menus provided in this report represent examples. There are other menu options including different hot and cold main
    meals, snacks and drinks which will provide the nutrient intake outlined in Table 1. Acceptability of the options and sufficient
    variety are important aspects of food and need to be built into menu planning.

28. Many caterers employ registered nutritionists or dietitians who are able to assess menus against Government
    recommendations. The Food Standard Agency recommends that assessment against the guidance in this document will ensure
    that those, without specific medical dietary need, consuming food provided by institutions will be met. In undertaking any
    such assessment it is important that the analysis uses appropriate software with up-to-date information (as a minimum the
    most recent edition of McCance & Widdowson 14) and takes accounts of cooking losses and waste. We also recommend that
    those responsible for commissioning food provision in institutions request such information and check this with actual
    provision to ensure the needs of clients are met.




Annex 1

What is a portion of fruit and veg?
                                             ONE portion = 80g = any of these

1 apple, banana, pear, orange or other similar sized fruit

2 plums or similar sized fruit

½ a grapefruit or avocado

1 slice of large fruit, such as melon or pineapple

3 heaped tablespoons of vegetables (raw, cooked, frozen or tinned)

3 heaped tablespoons of beans and pulses (however much you eat, beans and pulses count as a maximum of one portion
a day)

3 heaped tablespoons of fruit salad (fresh or tinned in fruit juice) or stewed fruit



14
  Food Standards Agency (2002) McCance and Widdowson‟s The Composition of Foods, Sixth summary
edition. Cambridge: Royal Society Chemistry.

Issue No. 294                                                                                   issue date 09/04/08
PSO 5000                                     ANNEXES                                                Page 75

1 heaped tablespoon of dried fruit (such as raisins and apricots)

1 handful of grapes, cherries or berries

a dessert bowl of salad

a glass (150ml) of fruit juice (however much you drink, fruit juice counts as a maximum of one portion a day)


Further information on fruit and vegetables can be found on the following websites:
http://www.eatwell.gov.uk/healthydiet/nutritionessentials/fruitandveg/ or at
http://www.dh.gov.uk/PolicyAndGuidance/HealthAndSocialCareTopics/FiveADay/fs/en or
http://www.5aday.nhs.uk/WhatCounts/PortionSizes.aspx for information on portion sizes




Issue No. 294                                                                                  issue date 09/04/08

								
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