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					                       Department of English and American Studies
                         Courses Available to Exchange Students

LITERATURE
LINGUISTICS
CULTURE STUDIES
PRACTICAL EXERCISES
TRANSLATION


LITERATURE

Course:     Introduction to Literature                     Code: UL00 or Credits:        4
                                                           1A08
Teacher:     Mgr. Jiří Flajšar, Ph.D., Mgr. Ema Jelínková, Ph.D., Pavlína Flajšarová
E-mail:
Credit requirements:       Regular seminar attendance (no more than two absences), assigned
readings, participation in class discussions.
Credit-Exam Test based on the topics and exercises covered over the semester in the seminar and
lecture - exact test dates will be announced early in the semester, a total of three dates will be
given throughout the examination period.
Annotation:        A compulsory seminar for 1st year students of English Philology. It focuses on
the basics of literary scholarship including the terminology of poetics, narratology, and drama as
well as practical poetry analysis. Along with the compulsory lecture (taught by doc. Marcel
Arbeit), the seminar provides an essential background for all later English and American literature
courses.
Syllabus:     1/ Course Introduction
2/ Literary genres
3/ Versification + 1 page of exercises
4/ Repetition of Sound /Patterns of Sound
5/Stanza, Stanza forms, Rhymed Poem Forms + poem by Hopkins
6/ Figures of Speech, Tropes
7/ Development of Drama
8/ Comedy and Tragedy
9/ Novel
10/ Narrative situations and points of view
11/ Irony and Satire
12/ Allegory, symbol, myth, stream of consciousness
The course reader is available for xeroxing at the copy center of the Palacký University Press
(details will be provided by the instructor).
Literature: Abrams, M.H.. The Norton Anthology of English Literature. Vol. 2. 6th ed. New
York: Norton, 1993.
Cuddon, J. A. The Penguin Dictionary of Literary Terms and Theory. 1976. London: Penguin,
1991.
Fowler, Roger. A dictionary of modern critical terms. London, 1993.
Gibaldi, Joseph. MLA Handbook for Writers of Research Papers. 6th ed. New York: MLA, 2003.
Gray, Martin. Dictionary of Literary Terms. London: Longman, 1992.
Kennedy, X.J. Literature: An Introduction to Fiction, Poetry, and Drama. New York:
HarperCollins, 1991.
Shipley, Joseph T. Dictionary of world literary terms: criticism, forms, technique. London, 1955.
Vlašín, Štěpán, ed. Slovník literární teorie. Praha: Československý spisovatel, 1984.
Wellek, René, and Austin Warren. Theory of Literature. New York: Harcourt, 1984.

Course:   British Literature I (19th century)                 Code: BL01 or       Credits:     3
                                                              2A12
Teacher:      PhDr. Libor Práger,
E-mail:     libor.prager@email.cz
Credit requirements: c l a s s a t t e n d a n c e , c r e d i t t e s t , a n a l y t i c a l e s s a y
Annotation: T h e c o u r s e ' s p u r p o s e i s t o p r o v i d e s t u d e n t s w i t h a n
overview of major literary movements and leading representa
tives of British literature in the 19th century.
Compulsory course for the 2nd block students.
Literary history material is covered mostly by lectures acco
mpanied by class discussions which focus on detailed analysi
s of representative texts assigned as "in-class reading".
Syllabus:

Literature: S u g g e s t e d l i t e r a r y h i s t o r y t e x t b o o k :
 Carter, Ronald: The Routledge History of Literature in Engl
ish, Routledge, 2001
In-class reading:
 Each week the students read the assigned reading for the cla
ss (a few poems, a short story or even a short novel)



Course: British Literature I                                  Code: BL01 or       Credits: 3
                                                              2A12
Teacher: Mgr.Ema Jelínková, Ph.D., Pavlína Flajšarová
E-mail: ema.jelinkova@upol.cz
Credit requirements:
presence (3 absences)
an essay ( 5-6 pages)
thorough knowledge of all items on the reading list
credit test
Annotation: The course gives an introduction into nineteenth-century British poetry and prose; it
covers the Pre-Romantic (Burns, Blake) and Romantic period (Lake School, Satanic School,
Cockney School) and the highlights of Victorian literature (the Brontes, Dickens, the
Preraphaelites, Hardy, Wilde).
Syllabus:
The Romantic Period: Introduction*
R. Burns: „To a Mouse―
W. Blake: „The Lamb―, „The Tyger―, „London―, „The Chimney Sweeper I,II―
W.Wordsworth: „Preface to Lyrical Ballads―, „The Solitary Reaper―, „Lines Composed a Few
Miles Above Tintern Abbey―
S.T.Coleridge: „Frost at Midnight―, „Kubla Khan―
G.G. Byron: „She Walks in Beauty―
P.B. Shelley: „Ode to the West Wind―
J. Keats: „La Belle Dame Sans Merci―, „Ode on a Grecian Urn―
M. Shelley: Frankenstein
J. Austen: Pride and Prejudice
The Victorian Age: Introduction
A. Tennyson: „Lady of Shalott―, „The Lotos -Eaters―
R. Browning: „My Last Duchess―, „Porphyria´s Lover―
E. Barrett: Sonnets from the Portuguese (Sonnet nr.43)
Emily Bronte: Wuthering Heights
C. Dickens: „A Christmas Carol―
D.G. Rossetti: „The Blessed Damozel―
C. Rossetti: Song (When I Am Dead…)
A.C. Swinburne: „The Garden of Proserpine―
T. Hardy: Tess of d´Urbervilles
G.M. Hopkins: „Spring and Fall―
M. Arnold: „Dover Beach―
The Nineties: Introduction
O.Wilde: The Importance of Being Earnest

Literature:
* all prefaces and poems are in the Norton Anthology of English Literature, Vol.2

Course:     British Literature II (20th century)              Code:   2A13 or Credits:    3
                                                              BL02
Teacher:      PhDr. Libor Práger, Ema Jelínková
E-mail:     libor.prager@email.cz
Credit requirements:      class attendance, credit test, analytical essay
Annotation: C o m p u l s o r y c o u r s e f o r t h e 2 n d b l o c k s t u d e n t s .
    The course's purpose is to provide students with an overvi
ew of major literary movements and leading representatives
of British prose, poetry and drama in the 20th century.
  Literary history material is covered mostly by lectures acco
mpanied by class discussions which focus on detailed analysi
s of representative texts assigned as "in-class reading".
Syllabus:
Literature: S u g g e s t e d l i t e r a r y h i s t o r y t e x t b o o k :
 Carter, Ronald: The Routledge History of Literature in Engl
ish, Routledge, 2001
 In-class reading
 Each week the students read the assigned reading for the cla
ss (a few poems, a short story or even a short novel)


Course:     British Literature 1660 – 1789                    Code:   3L03     Credits:       3

Teacher:     Mgr.Ema Jelínková, Ph.D.
E-mail:     ema.jelinkova@upol.cz
Credit requirements:      presence (3 absences)
an essay ( 5-6 pages) or a presentation (15-20 mins)
4 items* on the reading list
(*1 item = 1 novel / play, or 5 short stories, or 10 poems)
Annotation:       The course deals with British literature of Restoration and Augustan age. It
focuses on development of novel and new trends in poetry.
Syllabus:    1.Farquhar, G.: The Beaux´s Stratagem
2.Defoe, D.: Moll Flanders
3.A.Pope: The Rape of the Lock
4.J.Swift: Gulliver´s Travels
5.S.Richardson: Pamela
6.H.Fielding: Joseph Andrews
7.L.Sterne: Tristram Shandy (Vol.1-3)
8.O.Goldsmith: The Vicar of Wakefield
9.S.Johnson: Rassellas, Prince of Abyssinia
10.F.Burney: Evelina
11.M.G.Lewis: The Monk
12.J.Austen: Juvenilia (tba)
Literature:




Course:     Contemporary British Fiction                  Code: 7B18        Credits:     3
Teacher:      PhDr. Libor Práger
E-mail:     libor.prager@email.cz
Credit requirements:     class attendance, panel presentation, 3-4 pag
e essay (3rd credit)
Annotation: T h e p u r p o s e o f t h e c o u r s e i s t o e x p a n d t h e r a n g e o f e
ach student's understanding of the contemporary literary sce
ne in Britain, apply relevant approaches to knowledge and sc
holarly inquiry and explore the ways in British literature has
developed over the last 50 years.

Syllabus: C o u r s e p r o g r a m m e : G . G r e e n e : T h e Q u i e t A m e r i c a n ,
M. Spark: The Prime of Miss Jean Brodie, J. Fowles: The Col
ector, D. Lessing: The Fifth Child, A. Carter: The Bloody Ch
amber
Literature:

Course:     British Satire                                   Code:    7B33       Credits:     3

Teacher:       Mgr.Ema Jelínková, Ph.D.,
E-mail:       ema.jelinkova@upol.cz
Consultations: Th 9-12
Credit requirements:       presence (3 absences)
an essay ( 5-6 pages) or a presentation (15-20 mins)
4 items* on the reading list
(*1 item = 1 novel / play, or 5 short stories, or 10 poems)
Annotation:        The course gives a historical overview of British satire since the Middle Ages
till the present day. The changing role of satire as „the policeman of literature― is to be discussed,
supported by major satirical works of individual periods.
Syllabus:      1.G.Chaucer: General Prologue, Friar´s Tale (Canterbury Tales)*
2.B.Jonson: Volpone or the Fox
3.A.Pope: To a Lady (Moral Essays)*
4.J.Swift: A Modest Proposal*
5.J.Gay: The Beggar´s Opera
6.H.Fielding: Shamela
7.R.B.Sheridan: The School for Scandals
8.J.Austen: Northanger Abbey
9.W.M.Thackeray: The Book of Snobs
10.S.Butler: Erewhon
11.G.B.Shaw: Mrs.Warren´s Profession
12.A Huxley: Brave New World
13.G.Orwell: Animal Farm*
14.D.Lodge: Changing Places
Literature:


Course:     Contemporary Scottish Literature               Code:              Credits:       3
                                                           kaa/3B08

Teacher:      Mgr.Ema Jelínková, Ph.D.
E-mail:      ema.jelinkova@upol.cz
Credit requirements:       presence (3 absences)
an essay ( 5-6 pages) or a presentation (15-20 mins)
4 items* on the reading list
(*1 item = 1 novel / play, or 5 short stories, or 10 poems)
Annotation:       The course is aimed at providing an introduction into Scottish literature of 1970s
– 1990s. Major attention is paid to the uneasy heritage of the past – Calvinism and its view of
predestination, failure of Scotland in historical perspective and the present-day ―resurrection‖ of
its culture.
Syllabus:     1.M.Spark: *The Prime of Miss Jean Brodie
             The Driver´s Seat
2.J.Galloway: Valentine, Not Flu, Someone Had to, The Bridge (in: Where You Find It)
*J.Galloway: The Trick Is to Keep Breathing
3.L.Lochhead: Mary Queen of Scots Got Her Head Chopped Off
4.*A.Gray: Lanark
5.A.L.Kennedy: A Perfect Possession, Failing to Fall, The Mousebock Family Dictionary (in:
Now That You Are Back)
6.*I.Welsh: Trainspotting
7.*I.Banks: The Wasp Factory
8.E.Morgan: Selected Poems
9.L.Lochhead: Dreaming Frankenstein (tba)
10.*J.Kelman: How Late It Was, How Late
11.K.Atkinson: Charlene and Trudi Go Shopping, The Cat Lover (in: Not the End of the World)
12.R.Butlin: Vivaldi Learns a New Skill (in: Vivaldi and the Number 3)
Literature:



                                                           Code: kaa/7B05     Credits:   3
Course:     Irish Literature I
Teacher:     PhDr. Matthew Sweney
E-mail:      msweney @ seznam.cz
Credit requirements:
attendance: 2 absences maximum
an essay (5-6 pages)
thorough knowledge of all items on the reading list
credit test
Annotation:       The course introduces students to 20th century Anglo-Irish literature, including
poetry, plays and short stories.
Syllabus:
Literature:

                                                           Code: kaa/7B06     Credits: 3

Course:     Irish Literature II
Teacher: PhDr. Matthew Sweney
E-mail:     msweney @ seznam.cz
Credit requirements:
attendance: 2 absences maximum
thorough knowledge of all items on the reading list
credit test
Annotation:      an essay (5-6 pages) is required for the third credit
The course introduces students to 20th century Anglo-Irish literature, with emphasis on Irish drama.
Syllabus:
Literature:


                                                           Code: kaa/7B34     Credits: 3

Course:     Samuel Beckett
Teacher: PhDr. Matthew Sweney
E-mail:     msweney @ seznam.cz
Credit requirements:
attendance: 2 absences maximum
thorough knowledge of all items on the reading list
credit test
Annotation:        an essay (5-6 pages) is required for the third credit
The course will acquaint students with the works of Samuel Beckett, including poetry, short stories,
plays, novels, film and translations.
Syllabus:
Literature:


Course:     American Literature 1                           Code: AL01 or Credits:          3
                                                            2A14
Teacher:    Doc. PhDr. Michal Peprník, Dr.
E-mail:     Michal.Peprnik(et)upol.cz
Credit requirements:
- "impression" - relate the world of a literary work (from the program of the course) to your own
world - (1-2 pages type-written).
essay on a selected topic (see the notice board), 4-5 pages type-written, MLA format - you have to
use at least three sources of academic
attendance and participation in the class work (maximum two absences)
a good knowledge of the texts
a written test - the terminology used in the class and knowledge of the texts (there is only one
repeat)
Annotation: The seminar will discuss novels, short stories and poems of major American writers.
The selected works represent various stages of development of American literature and cover the
major literary trends.
Syllabus:
Hector St.John de Crévecoeur: "What is an American?" (HAL)
Benjamin Franklin: The Autobiography, Part I, II (HAL), "Information to Those Who Would
Remove to America" (HAL), "Remarks Concerning the Savages of North America" (Heath)
BACKGROUND READING: "The Literature of Colonial America 1620-1776." HAL 1-9, 41-49.
2. J.F.Cooper: The Last of the Mohicans
    Preface to The Leather-Stocking Tales
 BACKGROUND READING: see M.H. Abrams, J.D. Hart for ROMANTICISM;
3. E.A.Poe: "The Philosophy of Composition" (HAL)
 "The Raven", "Annabel Lee" (HAL)
 "The Fall of the House of Usher" (HAL)
4. R.W.Emerson: "Nature" (The Introduction, Part I) HAL
 "The American Scholar" (HAL)
5. Nathaniel Hawthorne: The Scarlet Letter
 Preface to The House of Seven Gables (HAL)
6. Herman Melville: Bartleby, the Scrivener (HAL)
7. Walt Whitman: Song of Myself (focus on parts 1,2,6,11,21,24,51,52;
"There Was a Child Went Forth" (HAL)
8. H.W. Longfellow: "A Psalm of Life"
Emily Dickinson: poems no.254,258,341,441,465,712,1732,1755 (HA), no. 328 - "A Bird Came
Down the Walk" (Heath) - special focus
9. Mark Twain: The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn
"The Celebrated Jumping Frog of Calaveras County" (HA)
BACKGROUND READING: Tall-Tale, Hoax, American folklore, "REALISM,
REGIONALISM, LOCAL COLOR" - see J.D. Hart
10. Frederick Douglass: Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave
11. Bret Harte: "The Outcasts of Poker Flat" (NA), "Tennessee's Partner" (AAL)
BACKGROUND READING: "The Literature of an Expanding Nation 1865-1912." HAL 1143-
1169.
    Jack London: "To Build a Fire" (HA), "The Law of Life" (NA)
BACKGROUND READING: American naturalism (see J.D. Hart, Harper, Ruland and
Bradbury)
Literature:
McQuade, Donald, gen.ed. The Harper American Literature. The Compact Edition. 1987.
(HAL).
Abrams, M.H. A Glossary of Literary Terms. 5th ed. (1985).
Hart, James D. The Concise Oxford Companion to American Literature (1986).
Procházka, Martin at al. Lectures on American Literature. Praha: Karolinum, 2002.
Course:     American Literature II                          Code: AL02 or Credits: 3
                                                            2A15
Teacher:       Mgr. Jiří Flajšar, Ph.D., Matthew Sweney
E-mail:
Credit requirements:        For the basic 2 credits:
-attendance (maximum of two absences), a good knowledge of the texts (will be tested
throughout), active participation in class work
-credit test (written at the end of the semester)
-an essay (4-5 pages type-written), MLA format (parenthetic referencing only!)—either compare
two works by two authors or analyze one work by one author, other formats possible upon
request/consultation with the instructor
WARNING: In the essay, at least two secondary sources (books, scholarly magazines, NOT
internet sites like Sparknotes, Bookrags, etc.) MUST be quoted alongside the primary text being
analysed, otherwise the essay will not be accepted.
Essay deadline, test dates and other current course information will be specified in the beginning
of the semester.
For the third credit:
the basic 2 credits obtained first, then a comprehensive exam covering Am Lit I and II will be
worth the third credit. The study guide is available online at the English Dept. website. For details
and current dates, see the Literature Section noticeboard. Exam questions are also posted on our
department website at:
http://www.anglistika.upol.cz/AMLITEXAMQUESTIONS.rtf
Exam dates will be posted in the STAG university computer system and will be distributed evenly
throughout the examination period.
Annotation:         A compulsory seminar for 2nd block students who major in English philology. It
focuses on the main developments and major authors in the field of American literature including
fiction, poetry, and drama of the late 19th and early 20th centuries (ie in the period from 1880 to
1945). The seminar is followed up with a comprehensive oral examination in American Literature
I and II, that is, based on the courses 2A14 (American Literature 1) and 2A15 (American
Literature II).
Syllabus:      1/ Introduction to the course mechanics. The MLA style format.
2/ Realism
Henry James: ‖Daisy Miller‖ (HA, NA)
3/ Naturalism
Fiction:         Stephen Crane: Maggie, A Girl of the Streets (Zbroj./free
                  online download)
Poetry:          Stephen Crane: ‖A man said to the universe‖, ‖Do not weep, maiden, for war is
kind‖, ‖I walked in a desert‖, (HA+NA)
4/ Women Writers
Kate Chopin: The Awakening (NA)
5/ Regionalism
Poetry: Edwin Arlington Robinson: ‖Miniver Cheevy‖, ‖Richard Cory‖, ‖Mr. Flood‘s Party‖ (NA,
HA) Edgar Lee Masters: ‖Lucinda Matlock‖, ‖Petit, the Poet‖, ‖Seth Compton‖ (HA)
Fiction:         Sherwood Anderson: selections from Winesburg, Ohio:
‖Introduction‖, ‖Hands‖, ‖Adventure‖, ‖Tandy‖, ‖The Strength of God‖, ‖The Teacher‖, ‖The
Untold Lie‖ (Zbroj., CCCS).
6/ Modernism
Expatriates. Imagism, Vorticism.
Gertrude Stein: ‖A Valentine‖ (x), Ezra Pound: ‖In a Station of the Metro‖, ‖The River-
Merchant‘s Wife: A Letter‖ (NA), Marianne Moore: ‖Poetry‖, E. E. Cummings: ‖since feeling is
first‖ (NA)
Modernist Poets in the American Grain.
Robert Frost: ‖Mending Wall‖, ‖Stopping by Woods on a Snowy
Evening‖ (NA), Carl Sandburg: ‖Chicago‖ (NA), Robinson Jeffers:
‖Shine, Perishing Republic‖, ‖Carmel Point‖ (NA)
William Carlos Williams: ‖The Young Housewife‖, ‖The Red
Wheelbarrow‖ (NA), Wallace Stevens: ‖Anecdote of the Jar‖ (NA)
7/ Women Writers II
Willa Cather: My Ántonia (MC)
8/ Harlem Renaissance
Langston Hughes: ‖The Negro Speaks of Rivers‖, ‖Morning After‖
(NA)
Countee Cullen: ‖Yet Do I Marvel‖ (NA) (HA). Claude McKay: ‖If
We Must Die‖, ‖America‖ (HA). Hurston, Zora Neale: ‖How It Feels To Be Colored Me‖ (NA)
9/ The Jazz Age
        Francis Scott Fitzgerald: The Great Gatsby (Zbrojnice)
10/ Southern Literature
William Faulkner: ‖Barn Burning‖ (NA, HA), ‖Ambuscade‖ (this is the first chapter from The
Unvanquished (x/Zbroj/CCCS)
11/ Modern American Drama
Eugene O‘Neill: Long Day’s Journey Into Night (NA)
12/ Credit Test (date and place TBA)

Primary Readings:
Available at either the Zbrojnice University Information Center (university library), the public
libraries of Olomouc, the Statni vedecka knihovna (SVKOL) or at the Center for Comparative and
Cultural Studies (CCCS) at the English Dept (mainly anthologies and other works).
Abbreviations:
HA=The Heath Anthology of American Literature, Volume Two.
MC=Multiple copies available of My Ántonia, see the instructor for details.
NA=The Norton Anthology of American Literature, VolumeTwo.
x=xeroxed copy, available at the xerox copying service at the Palacký University Press (details
will be provided by the instructor).
Literature: Abrams, M. H. A Glossary of Literary Terms. 5th ed. (1985).
Gray, Richard. A History of American Literature. (2004).
Hilský, Martin, ed. Od Poea k postmodernismu (1993).
Jařab, Josef. American Poetry and Poets of Four Centuries. (1976, 1982).
Ruland, Richard and Bradbury, Malcolm. From Puritanism to Postmodernism. (1991).

                                                          Code: kaa/7B08    Credits: 3
Course:     Modern American Literature 1
Teacher:     Prof. PhDr. Josef Jařab, CSc.
E-mail:
Credit requirements:

Annotation: The course will deal with American writing and culture from the decades following
the Civil War up to World War II. The changing and complicating relationship between modernity
(the state of civilization) and modernism (the developments in the arts) will be one of the major
focuses of the debates.



 For the seminar-like discussions mostly short-fiction texts have been chosen, and students are
expected to read the assigned titles continuously through the time of the course, and take active part
in the discussions. For the final colloquy a reading list should be presented which will include
besides the short texts discussed in the classes at least three titles from the General Reading List.
For the three credits that the course will provide students are expected to be present in 75 % of the
classes and write an essay which should be submitted by mid-January 2010 - a critical essay for
which the text can be chosen from the General Reading List, the essay should be five typed pages
plus bibliographical notes. No dictionary or bio/bibliographical information is expected, mostly a
critical examination and assessment of some characteristic feature of the chosen book. One title
should not be chosen for essay writing by more than two students, so that there should be at most
two signatures next to any one book.


Syllabus:   .
LiteratureGENERAL READING LIST:

Theodore Dreiser - Sister Carrie

Sinclair Lewis – Mainstreet

Sherwood Anderson - Winesburg, Ohio

Ernest Hemingway - The Sun Also Rises

Francis Scott Fitzgerald - The Great Gatsby

William Faulkner – The Sound and the Fury

William Faulkner – Light in August

William Faulkner – The Bear

John Steinbeck – The Grapes of Wrath

Erskine Caldwell – God´s Little Acre

Henry Miller – Tropic of Cancer

Edward Dahlberg – Bottom Dogs

Henry Roth – Call it Sleep

Michael Gold – Jews Without Money

Leo Rosten – The Education of HYMAN KAPLAN
Nathanael West – The Day of the Locust

Richard Wright – Native Son

Nelson Algren – Never Come Morning

James T. Farrell – The Young Manhood of Studs Lonigan

William Saroyan – The Human Comedy

Ayn Rand – The Fountainhead

Pearl Buck – Good Earth

Carson Mc Cullers – The Heart Is a Lonely Hunter

Dashiell Hammett – The Maltese Falcon

James M. Cain – The Postman Always Rings Twice

John Dos Passos –Manhattan Transfer




Course: American Short Story                  Code: 7B04  Credits: 3
Teacher:      PhDr. Libor Práger
E-mail:     libor.prager@email.cz
Credit requirements:     class attendance, panel presentation, 3-4 pag
e essay (3rd credit)
Annotation:
 This optional course focuses on major 20th century America
n short-story writers. The objective of the course is close re
ading of assigned texts and exploration of their various elem
ents (such as themes, plots, characters, point of view, image
ry, style, and symbolism) in order to arrive at a comprehensi
ve understanding, appreciation, and enjoyment of the art of
modern American short story.
Syllabus:     Course reading list (subject to changes)
Sherwood Anderson: I Want to Know Why,
Ring Lardner: Haircut,
Willa Cather: Paul's Case,
Carson McCullers: A Tree, A Rock, A Cloud,
Francis Scott Fitzgerald: The Sensible Thing,
Richard Wright: The Man Who Was Almost a Man,
Ralph Ellison: King of the Bingo Game,
Vladimir Nabokov: First Love,
Eudora Welty: Petrified Man,
Ernest Hemingway:The Killers,
Shirley Jackson: The Lottery,
J.D.Salinger: A Perfect Day for Bananafish,
Peter Taylor: What You Hear From 'Em,
Truman Capote: Miriam,
F l a n n e r y O´ C o n n o r : G o o d C o u n t r y P e o p l e ,
John Updike: A & P,
Joyce Carol Oates: The Girl,
B o b b i e A n n M a s o n: S h i l o h ,
Tim O Brien: The Things They Carried
Literature:


                                                          Code: kaa/7L18   Credits: 3
Course:     Hemingway’s Short Fiction
Teacher:     PhDr. Matthew Sweney
E-mail:      msweney @ seznam.cz
Credit requirements:
attendance: 2 absences maximum
thorough knowledge of all items on the reading list
credit test
Annotation: an essay (5-6 pages) is required for the third credit
Syllabus:    Students will read almost all of Hemingway‘s short fiction.
Literature: Ernest Hemingway, The Short Stories of Ernest Hemingway
              Carlos Baker, Ernest Hemingway: A Life Story

Course:      North American Poetry I                         Code: 7B40         Credits:    3
Teacher:      Mgr. Jiří Flajšar, Ph.D.
E-mail:
Credit requirements:       For the basic two credits: Attendance and participation in class
discussions (30%), a 15-minute-long presentation (on any poem from the syllabus, 40%), and an
essay (minimum 2 pages) which may be 1/ based upon your presentation or 2/ on a new topic—
comparing two poems by two different poets or analyzing one other poem in depth.
For the third, additional credit: Exam will be in the written form: you will analyze an unknown
poem from the period covered by the course (at least 1 page), the other question will be
theoretical—discuss two (or more) of a list of poetry schools covered throughout the semester.
Exact test dates will be anounced early in the semester.
Annotation:
Syllabus:     1/ Course Introduction.
2/ Tradition Which Got Rebelled Against: The Academic School
William Meredith: ‖The Illiterate‖ (44)
Howard Nemerov: ‖The Goose Fish‖ (47)
Richard Wilbur: ‖The Pardon‖ (48), ‖The Writer‖ (50) John Hollander: ‖Swan and Shadow‖
(123), ‖Variations...‖ (123)
3/ Beats / San Francisco Renaissance
Kenneth Rexroth: ‖Vitamins and Roughage‖ (7), ‖Proust‘s Madeleine‖ (8), ‖The Wheel
Revolves‖ (9)
Charles Bukowski: ‖vegas‖ (44)
Gary Snyder: ‖Riprap‖ (135), ‖Mid-August at Sourdough Mountain Lookout‖ (136), ‖Above Pate
Valley‖ (136)
4/ From Traditional to Free Verse
James Wright: ‖Complaint‖, ‖A Blessing‖, ‖Honey‖
Philip Levine: ‖On the Edge‖, ‖Animals Are Passing From Our Lives‖, ‖They Feed They Lion‖,
‖The Simple Truth‖
Adrienne Rich: ‖Aunt Jennifer‘s Tigers‖ ‖Diving Into the Wreck‖
5/ Confessional Poetry I
Theodore Roethke: ‖Open House‖
Robert Lowell: ‖Skunk Hour‖
Randall Jarrell: ‖The Death of the Ball Turret Gunner‖
John Berryman: ‖The Ball Poem‖, ‖Dream Song no. 14‖, ‖my heavy daughter‖
6/ Confessional Poetry II
Richard Hugo: ‖White Center‖
Anne Sexton: ‖The Truth the Dead Know‖, ‖You All Know the Story of the
Other Woman‖ Elizabeth Bishop: ‖One Art‖
7/ New York School:
Ashbery: ‖The Instruction Manual‖, ‖The Painter‖, ‖The One Thing That Will Save America‖
Koch: ‖Girl and Baby Florist Sidewalk Pram Nineteen Seventy Something‖
        ‖Variations on a Theme by William Carlos Williams‖
O‘Hara: ‖The Day Lady Died‖, ‖A Step Away from Them‖
8/ Deep Image School
Robert Bly: ‖The Great Society‖
Charles Simic: ‖Return To A Place Lit By A Glass Of Milk‖
James Wright: ‖The Jewel‖
9/ Feminist Poetry
Lorine Niedecker: ‖I Married‖
Anne Sexton: ‖Housewife‖, ‖The Abortion‖
Muriel Rukeyser: ‖More Of a Corpse Than A Woman‖
June Jordan: ‖If You Saw a Negro Lady‖, ‖Case In Point‖
Maxine Kumin: ‖After Love‖
Molly Peacock: ‖So, When I Swim To The Shore‖, ‖Say You Love Me‖
Ellen Bass: ‖In Celebration‖
Ai: ‖Woman to Man‖
Margaret Atwood: ‖You Fit Into Me‖
10/ The New Romantics: Successors of Confessional and Deep-Image Schools
Stanley Kunitz: ‖Touch Me‖
Campbell McGrath: ‖A Dove‖
Robert Hass: ‖Privilege of Being‖
Alice Fulton: ‖ A Little Heart-to-Heart With the Horizon‖ at
http://www.pshares.org/issues/article.cfm?prmArticleID=3093
Graham, Jorie: ‖The Way Things Work‖ at
http://www.harpercollins.com/catalog/excerpt_xml.asp?isbn=0880014768
‖San Sepolcro‖ at http://www.poets.org/poems/poems.cfm?prmID=1293
Tony Hoagland: ‖Poem for Men Only‖ ‖Lucky‖ at
http://www.poets.org/poems/poems.cfm?prmID=1353

The course reader, edited by the instructor, with all the assigned poems is available for xeroxing
at the copy center of the Palacký University Press (details will be provided by the instructor early
in the semester).
Other Primary Sources:
Codrescu, Andrei, ed. American Poetry Since 1970: Up Late. New York: Four Walls Eight
Windows, 1989.
Howe, Florence, ed. No More Masks! An Anthology of Twentieth-Century American Women
Poets. New York: Harper, 1992.
Vendler, Helen, ed. The Harvard Book of Contemporary American Poetry. Cambridge: Belknap,
1985.
Waldman, Anne, ed. The Beat Book: Writings from the Beat Generation. Boston: Shambhala,
1999.
Weinberger, Eliot. American Poetry Since 1950: Innovators and Outsiders. New York: Marsilio,
1993.
Literature: Flajšar, Jiří. Dějiny americké poezie. Ústí nad Orlicí: Oftis, 2006.
Gray, Richard. A History of American Literature. Malden: Blackwell, 2003.
Jařab, Josef. American Poetry and Poets of Four Centuries. Olomouc: Palacký UP, 1982.
Rasula, Jed. The American Poetry Wax Museum. Urbana, IL: National Council of Teachers of
English, 1996.
Rosenthal, M. L. The New Poets. New York: Oxford UP, 1967.
Ruland, Richard, and Malcolm Bradbury. From Puritanism to Postmodernism. New York:
Penguin, 1991.


Course:      North American Poetry II                        Code: 7B44         Credits: 3
Teacher:      Mgr. Jiří Flajšar, Ph.D.
E-mail:
Credit requirements:       For the basic two credits: Attendance and participation in class
discussions (30%), a 15-minute-long presentation (on any poem from the syllabus, 40%), and an
essay (minimum 2 pages) which may be 1/ based upon your presentation or 2/ on a new topic—
comparing two poems by two different poets or analyzing one other poem in depth.
For the third, additional credit: Exam will be in the written form: you will analyze an unknown
poem from the period covered by the course (at least 1 page), the other question will be
theoretical—discuss two (or more) of a list of poetry schools covered throughout the semester.
Exact test dates will be anounced early in the semester.
Annotation:        The seminar provides an overview of the important poetic trends in American
poetry from roughly 1970 up to the present so as to give as much as possible of a comprehensive
picture of the enormously diversified American poetry map. This course is always taught in the
spring semester as the second part of a two-semester option seminar sequence covering American
poetry from 1945 to the present. Attendance of the earlier (7B40) seminar which covers American
poetry from 1945 to 1970 is welcome, but not necessary. Combined, the two courses (ie North
American Poetry I and II, taught in the Fall and Spring Semesters, respectively) provide the most
comprehensive coverage of American poetry from 1945 to the present ever taught anywhere.
Syllabus:     1/ Introduction.
Entering The seventies: The situation of American Poetry.
2/ Experimental and Language Poetry:
Introductory Essay: at http://www.poetrypreviews.com/poets/language.html
Charles Bernstein: ‖Thinking I Think I Think‖ at
http://www.fencemag.com/v1n2/work/charlesbernstein.html
Michael Palmer: ‖Dearest Reader‖ at http://www.poets.org/poems/poems.cfm?prmID=2206
Bernadette Mayer: ‖Skylands‖ at http://www.bigbridge.org/Site/Text/Good_&_Mayer.html
Richard Jackson: ‖Sonata‖ at
http://www.utc.edu/~engldept/pm/richard.html
3/ The New Formalists: Form and Narrative Revived
Annie Finch: ‖A Reply From His Coy Mistress‖, ‖Dickinson‖
Gjertrud Schnackenberg: ‖Supernatural Love‖
Dana Gioia:‖Money‖, ‖Planting a Sequoia‖, ‖Unsaid‖
Mark Jarman: ‖Unholy Sonnets‖
Richard Katrovas: ‖Elegy for My Mother‖
4 / Ethnic Poetry: African-American
Gwendolyn Brooks: ‖We Real Cool‖
Dudley Randall: ‖A Poet Is Not a Jukebox‖
Etheridge Knight: ‖A Poem for Myself‖
Yusef Komunyakaa: ‖Tu Do Street‖, ‖Facing It‖, ‖My Father‘s Loveletters‖
Michael Harper: ‖American History‖, ‖‖
Lucille Clifton: ‖What the Mirror Said‖
5/ Ethnic Poetry: Asian American
Li-Young Lee: ‖I Ask My Mother To Sing‖
Garrett Hongo: ‖Something Whispered at the Shakuhachi‖
Cathy Song: ‖Lost Sister‖, ‖Heaven‖
Agha Shahid Ali: ‖Even the Rain‖, ‖I See Chile in My Rearview Mirror‖
6/ Native American Poetry:
Sherman Alexie: ‖Defending Walt Whitman‖, ‖Evolution‖, ‖On the Amtrak from Boston to New
York City‖
Leslie Marmon Silko: ‖Long Time Ago‖
Joy Harjo: ‖Deer Dancer‖, ‖Equinox‖
Ray A. Young Bear: ‖A Season of Provocations‖
7/ Latino Poetry
Rafael Campo: :‖Phone Messages on Call‖, ‖The Lost Plaza Is Everywhere‖, ‖Belonging‖, ‖What
the Body Told‖
Lorna Dee Cervantes: ‖Freeway 280‖
Gary Soto: ‖Oranges‖
8/ Poetry as Testimony: Living on the Margin
C. K. Williams: ‖The Dress‖
Charles Reznikoff: ‖Massacres‖
Gerald Stern: ‖Behaving Like a Jew‖, ‖Lucky Life‖, ‖Underground Dancing‖
Marvin Bell: ‖To Dorothy‖, ‖The Self and the Mulberry‖ :‖About the Dead Man and His Masks
#23‖
Rachel Wetzteon: ‖Urban Gallery‖, ‖Surgical Moves‖
9/ New Trends: Cyberpoetry/Machinemade poetry/Multimedia Poetry/Hypertext Poetry.
10/ Poetry after 9/11. The Political Lyric.

The course reader, edited by the instructor, with all the assigned poems is available for xeroxing
at the copy center of the Palacký University Press (details will be provided by the instructor early
in the semester).

Other Primary Sources:
Codrescu, Andrei, ed. American Poetry Since 1970: Up Late. New York: Four Walls Eight
Windows, 1989.
Howe, Florence, ed. No More Masks! An Anthology of Twentieth-Century American Women
Poets. New York: Harper, 1992.
Vendler, Helen, ed. The Harvard Book of Contemporary American Poetry. Cambridge: Belknap,
1985.
Waldman, Anne, ed. The Beat Book: Writings from the Beat Generation. Boston: Shambhala,
1999.
Weinberger, Eliot. American Poetry Since 1950: Innovators and Outsiders. New York: Marsilio,
1993.
Literature: Flajšar, Jiří. Dějiny americké poezie. Ústí nad Orlicí: Oftis, 2006.
Gray, Richard. A History of American Literature. Malden: Blackwell, 2003.
Jařab, Josef. American Poetry and Poets of Four Centuries. Olomouc: Palacký UP, 1982.
Rasula, Jed. The American Poetry Wax Museum. Urbana, IL: National Council of Teachers of
English, 1996.
Rosenthal, M. L. The New Poets. New York: Oxford UP, 1967.
Ruland, Richard, and Malcolm Bradbury. From Puritanism to Postmodernism. New York:
Penguin, 1991.


Course: History of American Literature                      Code:    7B11      Credits:    3
Teacher:     Josef Jařab
E-mail:
Credit requirements:
Annotation:

Syllabus:
Literature:


Course:       American Literature 3                         Code:    AL03 or Credits:      4
                                                            3A08
Teacher:      Marcel Arbeit
E-mail:
Credit requirements:
Annotation:
The course will deal with American writing and culture from the decades following the Civil War
up to World War II. The changing and complicating relationship between modernity (the state of
civilization) and modernism (the developments in the arts) will be one of the major focuses of the
debates.

 For the seminar-like discussions mostly short-fiction texts have been chosen, and students are
expected to read the assigned titles continuously through the time of the course, and take active
part in the discussions. For the final colloquy a reading list should be presented which will include
besides the short texts discussed in the classes at least three titles from the General Reading List.
For the three credits that the course will provide students are expected to be present in 75 % of the
classes and write an essay which should be submitted by mid-January 2010 - a critical essay for
which the text can be chosen from the General Reading List, the essay should be five typed pages
plus bibliographical notes. No dictionary or bio/bibliographical information is expected, mostly a
critical examination and assessment of some characteristic feature of the chosen book. One title
should not be chosen for essay writing by more than two students, so that there should be at most
two signatures next to any one book.
Syllabus:
Literature: GENERAL READING LIST:
Theodore Dreiser - Sister Carrie
Sinclair Lewis – Mainstreet
Sherwood Anderson - Winesburg, Ohio
Ernest Hemingway - The Sun Also Rises
Francis Scott Fitzgerald - The Great Gatsby
William Faulkner – The Sound and the Fury
William Faulkner – Light in August
William Faulkner – The Bear
John Steinbeck – The Grapes of Wrath
Erskine Caldwell – God´s Little Acre
Henry Miller – Tropic of Cancer
Edward Dahlberg – Bottom Dogs
Henry Roth – Call it Sleep
Michael Gold – Jews Without Money
Leo Rosten – The Education of HYMAN KAPLAN
Nathanael West – The Day of the Locust
Richard Wright – Native Son
Nelson Algren – Never Come Morning
James T. Farrell – The Young Manhood of Studs Lonigan
William Saroyan – The Human Comedy
Ayn Rand – The Fountainhead
Pearl Buck – Good Earth
Carson Mc Cullers – The Heart Is a Lonely Hunter
Dashiell Hammett – The Maltese Falcon
James M. Cain – The Postman Always Rings Twice
John Dos Passos –Manhattan Transfer



Course:      SLAM POETRY                                     Code: 7L21         Credits:    3
Teacher: Mgr. Robert Hýsek
E-mail:      bobhysek@hotmail.com
Credit requirements:
3 to 5 texts should be presented in front of the audience (depending on their length and the number
of students participating in the course)
participation (3 absences)
Annotation: This course focuses, from practical point of view, on the genre of performative poetry
called Slam Poetry. The students are taught how to write their own poems or interpret someone
else's, how to articulate and present them, how to contact the audience and choose the proper
means of dramatization of the text. The poems or texts selected for the obligatory final public
performance can be their own works and/or both classic and experimental poems written mainly
by English and American authors. The course takes place in summer semester only.
Syllabus:     none
Literature:
Eleveld, Mark, and Smith, Marc Smith, and Collins, Billy. The Spoken Word Revolution: Slam,
Hip Hop & the Poetry of a New Generation. Sourcebooks, Inc., 2003.
Glazner, Gary. Poetry Slam: The Competitive Art of Performance Poetry. San Francisco: Manic D
Press, 2000.
Hewitt, Geof. Hewitt's Guide to Slam Poetry and Poetry Slam with DVD. Shoreham: Discover
Writing Press, 2005.
Holbrook, Sara, and Salinger, Michael. Outspoken!: How to Improve Writing and Speaking Skills
Through Poetry Performance.Portsmouth:Heinemann,2006.
Holbrook, Sara, and Yolen, Jane. Wham! It's a Poetry Jam: Discovering Performance Poetry.
Wordsong, 2002.
Smith, Marc Kelly, and Kraynak, Joe. The Complete Idiot's Guide to Slam Poetry. Indianapolis:
Alpha Books, 2004.



Course:     Literature in Film                              Code: 7B28        Credits: 3
Teacher:      PhDr. Libor Práger
E-mail:     libor.prager@email.cz
Credit requirements:     class attendance, presentation, comparative e
ssay (3rd credit)
Annotation: I n t r o d u c t i o n t o a n d c l o s e s t u d y o f n o v e l s b y s e l e c t e
d British and American writers and comparing the texts with
their representation in film.
  The purpose of the course is to expand the range of student
s' understanding of the literature and film genres, narratives
, characters and themes representation, and explore the ways
in which literature has been transformed to another media.
Syllabus: C o u r s e p r o g r a m m e ( s u b j e c t t o c h a n g e ) :

1. Washington Square (Henry James) 2. Enduring Love (Ian
McEwan) 3. The Hours (Michael Cunnigham) 4. The Talented
Mr. Ripley (Patricia Highsmith) 5. Sweet Hereafter (Russell
Banks), 6. A Clockwork Orange (A. Burgess)
Literature:



                                                             Code:kaa/7L27      Credits: 3

Course:     Detective Story
Teacher: PhDr. Matthew Sweney
E-mail:      msweney @ seznam.cz
Credit requirements:
attendance: 2 absences maximum
thorough knowledge of all items on the reading list
credit test
Annotation: an essay (5-6 pages) is required for the third credit
Students will be given a historical survey of the detective story, from the 19th to the 21st century,
with emphasis on American writers.
Syllabus:
Literature:
Course:      Poetry in Time                                 Code:           Credits: 3
Teacher:       Mgr. Tereza Chocholová
E-mail:      chocholovat@seznam.cz
Credit requirements:
- presence (3 absences)
- active home work,
- active cooperation in class,
- final essay (4-5 pages)
Annotation: The goal of the seminar is to give students a sense of continuity in English and
American poetry. The seminar is based on close reading of the texts; moreover, a wider context
within the cultural/historical background will be provided.
Syllabus:     to be specified later
Literature: to be specified later
LINGUISTICS


Course:     Introduction into Language Study               Code: UJ00 or       Credits:   4
                                                           1A07
Teacher:     PhDr.Bronislava Grygová, Ph.D.
E-mail:      grygov@upol.cz
Credit requirements:     - presence (max. 3 absences)
                           - two tests passed
                           - oral exam
Annotation:     The course gives an introduction into the study of English; it covers all language
plans, whenever possible a comparison between Czech and English is made.
Syllabus:    1. Phonetics and phonology. Sources of foreign accent.
              2. Morphology
              3. Morphological typology
              4. Word-formation
              5. Nouns. Pronouns.
              6. Verbs
              7. Syntax. Traditional and generative approach.
              8. Semantics and lexicology.
Literature: Yule.G.: The Study of Language.3rd edition. CUP.

*Note: The subject is taught in English, however, whenever appropriate or necessary Czech
is used to explain more complex issues.


Course:     Morphology I                                   Code: 1A09 or       Credits:       3
                                                           MOSX
Teacher:      Václav Řeřicha
E-mail:      vrericha@yahoo.co.uk
Credit requirements:       written tests, translation of English texts into Czech,
Annotation:       Introduction to morphological analysis, description of grammatical categories,
detailed analysis of the English verb, comparison with Czech.
Syllabus:     Structural functionalism. Basic terminology. Simple Present and its uses. Simple Past
and its uses. Present Perfect and its uses.
Literature:
Alexander, L. G. Longman English Grammar Practice.
Leech, G. Meaning and the English Verb. London: Pearson Education Limited, 2004.
Matthews, P. H. Morphology. Cambridge University Press 1991.
Svoboda, Aleš. A Brief Survey Of The English Morphology. Skripta Universitas Ostraviensis
1998.
Veselovská, L. English Morphology And Morphosyntax: Syllabi, Examples, Exercises.
Vydavatelství UP Olomouc 2005.
Dušková, L. Mluvnice současné angličtiny na pozadí češtiny. Academia Praha 1988.
Mathesius,V. Obsahový rozbor současné angličtiny. Academia Praha, 1988.
Quirk, R. et al. A Comprehensive Grammar of the English Language. Longman, 1994.
kaa/1A09 or MOSX              MORPHOLOGY I                                              3 credits
Teacher:                       Doc. PhDr. Ludmila Veselovská, M.A., Dr.
Assigned to:                  obligatory course (A credit) for the students of English
                               philology in the 1st block.
Working language:              English
Preliminary condition:        none
Form:                          2 hour (1+1) lecture during one semester
Assessment:                            credit
The course in morphology within the BA in English philology consists of two one-semester
courses: (i) Morphology 1 (kaa/1A09) and (ii) Morphology 2 (kaa/2A08).
In the first part (Morphology 1) students acquire knowledge of some basic topics in theoretical
morphology: classification of morphemes and their characteristics (in English contrasted with
Czech) and they will learn to recognise and comment on examples of derivational and inflectional
morphemes in English. Other topics discussed in the course are word-formation (concentrating on
derivation and compounding). Special attention is given to the structure of English verbs and
modals. The course also provides English terminology and skills needed for the basic theoretical
analysis of grammatical structures in English. The working language in the seminar is English and
the students are expected to master practical English grammar.
Credit assessment: presence and work in the seminars, passing two tests (each part of the course
is assessed separately, student must pass both parts).
Literature:
 Akmajian & Demers & Harnish: Morphology (1990) The Study Of The Structure Of Words.
    In: Linguistics. MIT Press, Mass.
 Alexander, L. G. (1992) Longman English Grammar Practice . Longman.
 Dušková, Libuše (1988) Mluvnice současné angličtiny na pozadí češtiny. Academia Praha.
 Finegan & Besnier (1990) Structured Meaning In Words. In: Language: Its Structure and Use.
    HBJ.
 Fromkin & Rodman (1990) Morphology: The Words Of Language. In: An Introduction to
    Language. HBJ.
 Katamba, Francis (1993) Morphology. Macmillan.
 Leech, Geoffrey (2004). Meaning and the English Verb. London: Pearson Education Limited.
 Quirk, R. et al (1994) A Comprehensive Grammar of the English Language. Longman.
 Spencer, Andrew (1991) Morphological Theory. Blackwell.
 Svoboda, Aleš (1998) A Brief Survey Of The English Morphology. Skripta Universitas
    Ostraviensis.
 Veselovská, Ludmila (2005) English Morphology and Morphosyntax: Syllabi, Examples,
    Exercises. Vydavatelství UP Olomouc 2005.


Course:     Morphology II (Morphosyntax)                    Code: 2A8     or   Credits:     3
                                                            MOSX
Teacher:     Václav Řeřicha
E-mail:     vrericha@yahoo.co.uk

Credit requirements:     written tests, translation and morphological analysis of English texts, oral
exam,
Annotation:       System of English tenses, modality, negation, comparison with Czech.
Syllabus:    Past Perfect and its uses. The Future Tense and its uses. Periphrastic constructions.
Modal verbs. Negation.
Literature:
Alexander, L. G. Longman English Grammar Practice.
Leech, G. Meaning and the English Verb. London: Pearson Education Limited, 2004.
Matthews, P. H. Morphology. Cambridge University Press 1991.
Svoboda, Aleš A Brief Survey Of The English Morphology. Skripta Universitas Ostraviensis
1998.
Veselovská, L. English Morphology And Morphosyntax: Syllabi, Examples, Exercises.
Vydavatelství UP Olomouc 2005.
Dušková, L. : Mluvnice současné angličtiny na pozadí češtiny. Academia Praha 1988.
Mathesius,V.: Obsahový rozbor současné angličtiny. Academia Praha, 1988.
Quirk, R. et al: A Comprehensive Grammar of the English Language. Longman, 1994.

kaa/2A08 or MOSX               MORPHOLOGY II (Morphosyntax)                      3 credits
Teacher:
                             Doc. PhDr. Ludmila Veselovská, M.A., Dr.
Assigned to:                 obligatory course (A credit) for the students of English
                             philology in the 2nd block.
Working language:            English
Preliminary condition:       kaa/1A09: Morphologie I
Form:                        2 hour a week during one semester
Assessment:                          credit , oral exam

Seminar in Morphology II (Morpho-syntax) is the second part of the course in English
morphology. The working language in the seminar is English and the students are expected to
master practical English grammar, terminology needed to discuss grammar and theoretical topics
discussed in the course kaa/1A09: Morphology I.
The main topic in the seminar Morphology II is the classification of parts of speech. We will in
detail discuss the morpho-syntactic characteristics of the major lexical categories in English,
starting with the revision of the repertory of inflectional morphemes related to N, A, and V
categories. Grammatical categories of nominal and verbal paradigms will be discussed in more
detail. With Nouns they are above all categories of Countability/Number, Animacy/Gender, Case
and Determination; with Verbs, Tense, Aspect, Voice, Agreement etc. (including the syntactic
characteristics of auxiliaries, modals and lexical verbs). We will also analyse in more detail the
properties of the phrasal projections of N(P), A(P) and V(P) and the clausal functions of the
relevant phrases.
Students are supposed to study real English data, analyse them independently and to be able to
make descriptively adequate generalisations. The general structuralist framework will allow them
to explain the properties of English structures and to contrast them with Czech referring to more
general principles of grammar.
Credit assessment: presence and work in the seminars, homework reading and passing two tests.
Requirement for the exam: students are to acquire theoretical knowledge of the topics discussed
in the courses of Morphology I and Morphology II (including the reading) and to be able to
analyse some example of English text in terms of the theory.
Literature:
 Akmajian & Demers & Harnish: Morphology (1990) The Study Of The Structure Of Words.
    In: Linguistics. MIT Press, Mass.
 Alexander, L. G. (1992) Longman English Grammar Practice . Longman.
 Dušková, Libuše (1988) Mluvnice současné angličtiny na pozadí češtiny. Academia Praha.
 Finegan & Besnier (1990) Structured Meaning In Words. In: Language: Its Structure and Use.
    HBJ.
   Fromkin & Rodman (1990) Morphology: The Words Of Language. In: An Introduction to
    Language. HBJ.
   Katamba, Francis (1993) Morphology. Macmillan.
   Leech, Geoffrey (2004). Meaning and the English Verb. London: Pearson Education Limited.
   Quirk, R. et al (1994) A Comprehensive Grammar of the English Language. Longman.
   Spencer, Andrew (1991) Morphological Theory. Blackwell.
   Svoboda, Aleš (1998) A Brief Survey Of The English Morphology. Skripta Universitas
    Ostraviensis.
   Veselovská, Ludmila (2005) English Morphology and Morphosyntax: Syllabi, Examples,
    Exercises. Vydavatelství UP Olomouc 2005.

kaa/2A09 or SNTX                       SYNTAX I                                             3 credits
Teacher:                       PhDr. Bronislava Grygová, Ph.D.
                               Doc. PhDr. Ludmila Veselovská, M.A., Dr.
Assigned to:                   obligatory course (A credit) for the students of English
                                philology in the 2nd block.
Working language:               English
Preliminary condition:         kaa/2A08: Morphologie II
Form:                          2 hour a week during one semester
Assessment:                             credit
The course in morphology within the BA in English philology consists of two one-semester
courses: (i) Syntax 1 (kaa/1A09) and Syntax 2 (kaa/2A08). The course follows the course of
Morphology I and II and presuppose the knowledge of practical English grammar, terminology
related to grammatical analysis and the theoretical knowledge of English major parts of speech
(their characteristics including phrasal projections).
In the course of Syntax I the students acquire the skills and knowledge related to the analysis of
English clause. We will focus on the main sentence functions discussing the semantic,
morphological and syntactic characteristics of English subject, object and attribute. We will
mention the processes related to question formation, negation and passivisation in more detail too,
to contrast them with the same phenomena in Czech. The course will also provide the overall
(descriptive) analysis of the main sentence patterns in English discussing in detail their formal
properties and mentioning their communicative functions.
Students are supposed to study real English data, analyse them independently and to be able to
make descriptively adequate generalisations. The general structuralist framework will allow them
to explain the properties of English structures and to contrast them with Czech referring to more
general principles of grammar.
Credit assessment: presence and work in the seminars, homework reading and passing two tests.
Literature:
 Akmajian & Demers & Harnish (1990) Linguistics. MIT Press, Mass.
 Alexander, L. G. (1992) Longman English Grammar Practice . Longman.
 Dušková, Libuše (A988) Mluvnice současné angličtiny na pozadí češtiny. Academia Praha.
 Finegan & Besnier (1990) Language: Its Structure and Use. HBJ.
 Fromkin & Rodman (1990) An Introduction to Language. HBJ.
 Quirk, R. et al (1994) A Comprehensive Grammar of the English Language. Longman.
 Veselovská, Ludmila (2006) English Syntax: Syllabi, Examples, Exercises. Vydavatelství UP
    Olomouc.
kaa/2A10 or STX2                       SYNTAX II                                          4 credits
Teacher:                       Prof. PhDr. Jaroslav Macháček, CSc.
                               Doc. PhDr. Ludmila Veselovská, M.A., Dr.
Working language:               English
Preliminary condition:         kaa/2A09: Syntax I (alternatively parallel to Syntax I)
Form:                           2 hour a week during one semester
Assessment:                             credit , oral exam
Seminar in Morphology II (Morpho-syntax) is the second part of the course in English
morphology. The working language in the seminar is English and the students are expected to
master practical English grammar, terminology needed to discuss grammar and theoretical topics
discussed in the courses of Morphology I/II and above all Syntax 1 (kaa/2A08).
The course concentrates on three main topics:
(i) functions of constituent order (the concept of functional sentence perspective and its formal
realisation in English when compared with Czech),
(ii) semiclause structures (English infinitive and –ing forms)
(iii) complex sentences (the classification of subordinate clauses with special attention given to
WH-questions and relative clauses).
Students are supposed to study real English data, analyse them independently and to be able to
make descriptively adequate generalisations. The general structuralist framework will allow them
to explain the properties of English structures and to contrast them with Czech referring to more
general principles of grammar.
Credit assessment: presence and work in the seminars, homework reading and passing two tests.
Requirement for the exam: students are to acquire theoretical knowledge of the topics discussed
in the courses of English grammar (i.e. Morphology I/II and Syntax I/II) including the reading and
to be able to analyse some example of more complex English text in terms of the theory.
Literature:
 Akmajian & Demers & Harnish (1990) Linguistics. MIT Press, Mass.
 Alexander, L. G. (1992) Longman English Grammar Practice . Longman.
 Dušková, Libuše (A988) Mluvnice současné angličtiny na pozadí češtiny. Academia Praha.
 Finegan & Besnier (1990) Language: Its Structure and Use. HBJ.
 Fromkin & Rodman (1990) An Introduction to Language. HBJ.
 Quirk, R. et al (1994) A Comprehensive Grammar of the English Language. Longman.
 Veselovská, Ludmila (2006) English Syntax: Syllabi, Examples, Exercises. Vydavatelství UP
     Olomouc.


Course:     Lexicology I                                  Code:               Credits: 3
                                                          Kaa/2A11 or
                                                          LE01
Teacher: Prof. Jaroslav Peprník, Mgr. Michaela Martinková, Ph.D.
E-mail: michmartin@email.cz
Credit requirements
a) active participation (up to 2 missed attendances)
b) one class presentation
c) written exam
Annotation:
The course introduces basic issues, concepts and terminology essential to the study of word as a
sign and the English vocabulary as a system. The English lexicon will be looked at from both
onomasiological (synonymy) and semasiological approach (polysemy and homonymy), and
componential approaches will be discussed in greater depth. Diachronic view will, too, be taken
into consideration and thus topics covered include also changes of meaning and development of
the English lexicon (differentiation in origin). As the course proceeds, students will be enriching
their own vocabulary with certain lexical fields, they will also learn new collocations and idioms.
Students will be asked to participate in class discussions; each will also have one class
presentation. At the end of the semester there will be a written exam.
Syllabus:    1) Introduction. Language as a sign system.
Basic terminology: word as a sign; icon, symbol, index; semiotic triangle, concept, arbitrariness,
faux amis, iconicity, motivation, onomatopoeia, sound symbolism
Peprník 9-11(Motivation), 14-16 (Word as a sign, Iconicity in Language), Dirven Verspoor 1-13

2) What is in a word? ‗The study of meaning‘. Componential approaches to meaning. Nida. Katz
and Fodor. Wierzbicka.
Basic terminology: word, word form, lexical vs grammatical meaning; lexeme, lexical unit,
paradigm; denotation, connotation, reference, components of meaning, seme, sememe; ambiguity
vs vagueness; lexical subsystems, semantic fields
Peprník 7-8, 11-14, 17-21, Dirven Verspoor 14-20, Nida: Components of meaning.
Cruse chapters 5,13.

3) Between Form and Meaning:
a) From form to meaning: semasiology (polysemy, homonymy).
b) From meaning to form: onomasiology (synonymy, antonymy)
Basic terminology: centre, periphery; onomasiology, semasiology; paradigmatic relations in the
lexicon, polysemy, homonymy (homograph, homophone); synonymy, antonymy, hyponymy,
hyperonymy, meronymy (meronym, holonym)
Peprník 21-39, Dirven Verspoor 25-48

4) Types of dictionaries.

5) Syntagmatic relations in the lexicon: Collocations. What is ‗idiomatic‘?
Basic terminology: idioms of encoding, idioms of decoding, collocations, idioms, clichés.
Cruse ch.4,12.

6-7) Development of the English lexicon (differentiation in origin)
Peprník 81-105, Campbell 254-281, Algeo 271-294

8) Changes of lexical meaning
Basic terminology: widening, narrowing, deterioriation/pejoration, amelioration/elevation,
euphemism; literal and figurative meaning, transfer of meaning, metaphor, metonymy,
synecdoche, folk etymology.
Peprník 39-58, Algeo 227-246
Literature:
Required: Peprník, Jaroslav. 2001. English Lexicology. FFUP Olomouc.
Recommended:
Nida, Eugene. 1975. Components of meaning. In: Componential Analysis of Meaning. The
   Hague: Mouton.
CRYSTAL, David. 2003. The Cambridge Encyclopedia of the English Language. CUP.
   Part II: English Vocabulary.
   Part I Old English: Vocabulary (pp 22-27), Middle English (46-49, 60), Early Modern
    English 72, Modern English 80-82, Learning about English: Dictionaries 442-443
Dirven, René and Marjolijn Verspoor. 1998. Cognitive Exploration of Language and Linguistics.
    Ch. 1 The cognitive basis of language: Language and Thought.
    Ch.2 What‘s in a Word? Lexicology. John Benjamins.
Campbell, Lyle. 2000. Historical linguistics: An Introduction. Ch. 10 Semantic Change and
    Lexical Change. MIT.
Algeo, John, and Thomas Pyles. (2005) ‗Foreign Elements in the English Word Stock‘. ‗Words
    and Meanings. In: The Origins and Development of the English Language. Thomson
    Wadsworth.
Dwight Bolinger. 1975. Meaning. In: Aspects of Language. 2nd edition. Pp 185-224. New York:
    Harcourt Brace Jovanovich, Inc
Lehrer, Adrienne. 1969. Semantic Cuisine. Journal of Linguistics 5:39-55.
Cruse, Alan. 2000. Meaning in Language: An Introduction to Semantics and Pragmatics. OUP.
http://www.sweb.cz/corpus/slovnik.htm
Machek, Václav. 1971. Etymologický slovník jazyka českého. Academia.
Rejzek, Jiří. 2001. Český etymologický slovník. Leda 2001.
McCarthy, Michael, and Felicity O´Dell. English Vocabulary in Use. Upper-intermediate. CUP
2001.
McCarthy, Michael, Felicity O´Dell and Ellen Shaw. Vocabulary in Use Upper intermediate with
    answers. Self-study reference and practice for students of North American English. CUP 1997.
McCarthy, Michael, and Felicity O´Dell. English Idioms in Use. CUP
Learning English with the BBC: Keep your English up-to-date (Professor David Crystal's guide to
new and changing English words and expressions) or Funky Phrasals
http://www.bbc.co.uk/worldservice/learningenglish/
Topics for presentation:
1. False friends between English and a language other than Czech          2 students
2. Introducing Thesaurus and dictionaries of synonyms                     3 students
3. Compare one entry in five different dictionaries                       3 students
4. Famous lexicographers: from Johnson to Murray (OED) and Webster 2 plus 1 students
5. Oxford Collocations Dictionary for Students of English                 2 students
6. Etymology of the days of the week in English and in Czech (OED + Český etymologický
slovník)                                                                2 students
7. Etymology of kinship terms and words denoting social relations         2 students
8. Etymology of words denoting foods and drinks                           2 students
9. Paradigmatic and syntagmatic relations in a vocabulary exercise: multiple choice test
                                                                               3x2 students


Course:          English Grammar I                     Code: 1H05        Credits: 3
                                                       or AGR1
Teacher: Mgr. Michaela Martinková, Ph.D., Mgr. Markéta Janebová, Ph.D.,
E-mail: michmartin@email.cz, m_janebova@post.cz
Credit requirements:    attendance (3 absences maximum), active participation in class, home
study, final test.
Annotation:         First part of a two-semester course in modern English grammar, obligatory for APLEKO students in the first block. We
will concentrate on tricky points of English morphology such as noun determination, countability, modality and modern English temporal
system. These and others will be discussed, analyzed and practised in the context of English grammatical system, with a view to
extralinguistic factors and in comparison with Czech. Basic linguistic terminology related to morphological categories and their semantics
will be introduced as well.
Syllabus:
Topics covered:
1. Nouns: countability, number, subject-verb agreement.
2. Nouns: determination – the usage of articles.
3. Nouns: gender.
4. Pronouns.
5. Verbs I. Types of verbs, modal verbs, modality.
6. Verbs II. Temporal system – simple present and simple past.
7. Verbs III. Perfect tenses, irregular verbs.
8. Verbs IV. Progressive aspect.
9. Verbs V. ‗Simple future‘?, expressing future time
Literature: Hewings, Martin. Advanced Grammar in Use with answers and CD ROM. 2nd ed. CUP
2005.
Jones, Leo. New Cambridge Advanced English. CUP 1998.
Murphy, Raymond. English Grammar in Use With Answers and CD ROM : A Self-Study Reference and
 Practice Book for Intermediate Students of English. 3rd ed. CUP 2004.
Quirk, Randolph, and Sidney Greenbaum. A Student’s Grammar of the English language. Longman
1991.
Alexander, L.G. Longman English Grammar Practice. Longman 1990.
Alexander, L.G. Longman Advanced Grammar. Reference and Practice. Longman 1993.
Gude, Kathy, and Michael Duckworth. Proficiency Masterclass. Oxford UP 1994.
Peprník, Jaroslav. Angličtina pro pokročilé. FIN 1995.
Poldauf, Ivan. Mluvnice současné angličtiny I. SNU 1951.
McCarthy, Michael, and Felicity O‘Dell. English Vocabulary in Use. Upper-intermediate. CUP 2001.
McCarthy, Michael, Felicity O‘Dell and Ellen Shaw. Vocabulary in Use. Upper intermediate with
answers. Self-study reference and practice for students of North American English. CUP 1997.
McCarthy, Michael, and Felicity O‘Dell. English Vocabulary in Use. Advanced. CUP 2002.
Swan, Michael. Practical English Usage. Oxford: Oxford UP, 1995.
COBUILD: http://www.collins.co.uk/Corpus/CorpusSearch.aspx
BRITISH NATIONAL CORPUS: http://sara.natcorp.ox.ac.uk/lookup.html
CAMBRIDGE ADVANCED LEARNER‘S DICTIONARY: http://dictionary.cambridge.org


Course:      English Grammar 2                               Code:KAA            Credits:     3
                                                             2H09 or AGR2
Teacher: Mgr. Michaela Martinková, Ph.D., Mgr. Markéta Janebová, Ph.D.,
E-mail: michmartin@email.cz, m_janebova@post.cz
Credit requirements:
Requirements for ‗zápočet‘: home study, active participation in class, final test. Students are also
asked to have one class presentation – a linguistic analysis of an article selected by themselves.

Annotation:         The second part of the English grammar course is sentence oriented. It is
English Syntax in use, viewed in comparison with Czech. We will focus on modification of
nouns, on verb complementation; discuss and practise non-finite verb forms (-ing forms and
infinitives), passivisation, negation, and (especially as compared to Czech) word order
(inversion). Discourse functions of various sentence types will be mentioned as well. In the
context of sentence complexes we will focus on if- clauses and reported speech.
Syllabus:
Topics covered:
1. Adjectives and adverbs. Noun phrase, premodification and postmodification. Comparison of
adjectives and adverbs. Adjectives and adverbs identical in form. Intensifiers.
2. Genitives.
3. Modal verbs.
4. Complementation of verbs. Non-finite verb forms: -ing form, or the infinitive?
5. Passives.
6. Negation, inversion.
7. The function of word order in English and Czech. Functional Sentence Perspective,
constructions for highlighting.
8. Composite sentence. Compound, complex sentence: if-clauses, time clauses, relative clauses.
Reported speech.
9. Sentence types and discourse functions - questions (wh-questions, Yes/No questions, question
tags, reported questions), imperatives, exclamations (wish clauses)

Literature: Quirk, Randolph, Sidney Greenbaum. A Student’s Grammar of the English
language. Longman 1991.
Hewings, Martin. Advanced Grammar in Use with answers and CD ROM. 2nd edition CUP
2005.
Alexander, L.G. Longman English Grammar Practice. Longman 1990.
Alexander, L.G. Longman Advanced Grammar. Reference and Practice. Longman 1993.
Murphy, Raymond. English Grammar in Use. With Answers and CD ROM : A Self-Study
Reference and Practice Book for Intermediate Students of English. 3rd edition. CUP 2004.
Jones, Leo. New Cambridge Advanced English. Cambridge UP 1998.
Gude, Kathy, and Michael Duckworth. Proficiency Masterclass. Oxford UP1994.
Peprník, Jaroslav. Angličtina pro pokročilé. FIN 1995.
Poldauf, Ivan. Mluvnice současné angličtiny I. SNU 1951.



Course: Historical Development of the English               Code:              Credits: 4
Language                                                    Kaa 3A05 or
                                                            HIAN
Teacher: Prof. Jaroslav Macháček, Mgr. Michaela Martinková, Ph.D.
E-mail: michmartin@email.cz
Credit requirements: written test, oral exam
Annotation:
Where do discrepancies between English spelling and pronunciation come from? And how do we
account for asymmetries in the other language levels? Explaining present-day English by looking
at its earlier stages – past as a way to Modern English.
Syllabus:
Introduction: Milestones in the story of English: Video: The Story of English (2): Mother Tongue.
2.- 8. Back to Caxton‘s times. Sources of Modern English vowels and consonants. Changes in the
systems of English vowels and consonants over time.
9.-12. ‗Irregularities / asymmetries‘ in the morphological system of Modern English seen in a
diachronic perspective: Nouns (irregular plurals, possessive case) and verbs (strong and weak
verbs vs irregular and regular verbs, modal verbs, -ing forms, present perfect). Pronouns
(personal, possessive, demonstrative, reflexive pronouns). The story of articles. Adjectives and
adverbs (periphrastic versus inflectional comparison of adjectives and adverbs, suppletive forms;
adjectives and adverbs identical in form, adjectives and adverbs ending in -ly).
Syntax: Negation. Questions.
Literature:
Required:
VACHEK, Josef. 1978. A Brief Survey of the Historical Development of English. SPN, Praha.
VACHEK, Josef. 1972. Historický vývoj angličtiny. SPN, Praha.
MACHÁČEK, Jaroslav. 1963. Stručný přehled historického vývoje angličtiny s příklady a texty.
  SPN, Praha.
VACHEK, Josef. 1962. Historický pohled na dnešní angličtinu. SPN, Praha.
CRYSTAL, David. 2003. The Cambridge Encyclopedia of the English Language. CUP. Part I:
  The History of English 2-5 (pp.5-75).
BARNETT, Lincoln. The English Language. Where it began and how it became a great tongue.

Textbooks on phonetics:
GIMSON, A.C. 1970. An Introduction to the Pronunciation of English. Edward Arnold, London.
LADEFOGED, Peter. A Course in Phonetics. Hartcourt Brace College Publisher. 3rd edition.

Phonetic Dictionaries:
Wells, J.C. 2000. Longman Pronunciation Dictionary.
Cambridge English Pronouncing Dictionary. CUP.

For etymology, see Oxford English Dictionary. http://dictionary.oed.com (Palacky University
subscribes to the online version).
Onions, C.T. 1966. The Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology. OUP.

Recommended:
Algeo, John, and Thomas Pyles. 2005. The Origins and Development of the English Language.
   Thomson Wadsworth.
Lass, Roger. (ed.) 2001. The Cambridge history of the English language. Vol. 3, 1476-1776. CUP.
Strang, Barbara. 1970. A History of English. Routledge.
Baugh, Albert C, and Thomas Cable. 2002. A History of the English Language. Routledge.
Cable, Thomas. 2002. A Companion to Baugh and Cable‘s A History of the English Language.
   Routledge.
Wright, Joseph, and Elisabeth M. Wright. 1924. An Elementary Historical New English
   Grammar. OUP.
McCRUM, Robert, CRAN, William, and Robert MACNEIL. 1986. The Story of English. Viking
   Penguin Inc. Ch. 2: The Mother Tongue, ch. 3: A Muse of Fire.
Lass, Roger. 1976. English Phonology and Phonological Theory: Synchronic and Diachronic
   Studies. CUP.
http://www.courses.fas.harvard.edu/~chaucer/vowels.html
http://alpha.furman.edu/~mmenzer/gvs/
http://www.anglistika.upol.cz/

Course:    Stylistics (Functional Styles in English)     Code:   3A04 or Credits:     4
                                                         ST02
Teacher:      Václav Řeřicha
E-mail:     vrericha@yahoo.co.uk
Credit requirements: comprehensive presentation of a functional style, oral exam
Annotation: The seminar provides a theoretical background and practical description of specific
functional styles.
Syllabus:
Administrative, business, legal, scientific, popular and scientific, publicistic, newspaper and
headlines, colloquial, literary styles.
Literature:
 Knittlová, D. Funkční styly v angličtině a češtině. Olomouc 1990
Vachek ,J. Chapters from modern English lexicology and stylistics. Praha: UK. 1991.
Hoffmannová, J. Stylistika a současná situace stylistiky. Trizonia 1997
Knittlová, D. Rozvrstvení současné angličtiny. Olomouc 1986
Individual presentations

Course:     Text Linguistics (VÝSTAVBA TEXTU)                Code: 3A06         Credits: 4
                                                             or VTEX
Teacher: Prof. Jarmila Tárnyiková, Mgr. Markéta Janebová, Ph.D.
E-mail:      m_janebova@post.cz
Office hours: Wednesday/Thursday 14.30-15.30 (room 3.39)
Credit requirements:         Students will be graded on participation and attendance (3 absences
maximum),
a presentation, a test, and an oral exam.

Annotation:         So far, you have progressed from phonemes to sentences. What is ‗beyond the
sentence‘?
Is a text a sequence of sentences?
This course focuses on ‗language in use‘ and ‗language as action‘. In order to complement the
compulsory courses dealing with language as a code, it introduces basic terminology and concepts
related to inferential processes involved in human communication. After discussing what makes a text a
text, we will also have a look at speech acts and the Cooperative Principle. Students will be asked to
read the relevant chapters of the literature given below and to make use of the concepts and approaches
discussed in the seminar in their in-class analyses of texts.

Syllabus:     Week 1: Language in use. Text and sentence. Text and discourse. Text linguistics. Seven
standards of textuality. Discourse analysis.
Week 2: Language as action. Speech acts. Intentionality.
Week 3: Context. Cooperative Principle. Intentionality and Acceptability.
Week 4: Cohesion and coherence.
Week 5: Anaphora and Deixis. Situationality. Text Strategies. Intertextuality.
Week 6: Information structure. Functional Sentence Perspective. Informativity.
Week 7: Constructions for highlighting.
Weeks 8 - 11: Text analysis.
Literature: Tárnyiková, J. 2002. From Text to Texture. Olomouc: Univerzita Palackého.
de Beaugrande, R., and W. Dresler. 1981. Introduction to Text Linguistics. London: Longman.

Course: Points of Modern English Grammar                     Code: 2C01       Credits: 3
Teacher: Professor PhDr. Jaroslav Macháček, CSc.
E-mail: machacek@ffnw.upol.cz
Credit requirements:
    - presence (3 accounted for absences)
    - active participation in class
    - oral presentation
Annotation: Analysis of selected problems from Modern English usage focused on what the
students are taught in their Bc. programme, i.e. the sound system (phonetics and phonemics) and
writing, morphology, syntax and lexis compared with Czech usage.
Syllabus: 1. Introduction on a sample text presented by the teacher.
           2. Individual presentations on selected points of Modern English usage followed by
discussion.
Course: Contemporary English                                Code: 3C01           Credits: 3
Teacher: Professor PhDr. Jaroslav Macháček, CSc.
E-mail: machacek@ffnw.upol.cz
Credit requirements:
    - presence (3 accounted for absences)
    - active participation in class
    - oral presentation
Annotation: Analysis of a Modern English written or spoken text from all aspects of language
structure including the sound system (phonetics and phonemics) and writing, morphology,syntax,
textual analysis, semantics, lexis, pragmatic and sociolinguistic features, all of them seen on the
background of Czech language as the mother tongue though contrasted with other languages, and
in historical perspective.
Syllabus: 1. Introduction on a sample text presented by the teacher.
           2. Individual presentations using texts chosen by the students followed by discussion.
Literature: All relevant publications on English language structure.
Literature: All publications on English language structure required and recommended for
language classes of the Bc. programme.



Course: Introduction into Corpus Based Research              Code:              Credits: 3
                                                             Kaa 7C29
Teacher: Mgr. Michaela Martinková, Ph.D.
E-mail: michmartin@email.cz
Credit requirements:
► home readings and one in-class presentation
► Students are expected to select a specific linguistic topic of their interest and carry out a corpus
based analysis of their own. Everybody must present their findings in class and submit them in a
written form.
Annotation:
After a short theoretical introduction (planning, collecting, comuterizing and annotating data;
survey of existing English corpora, and samples of corpus–based studies) students are learning
how to use two multi-purpose corpora (the British Component of the International Corpus of
English ICE-GB, and the British National Corpus BNC) for linguistic research. In a step by step
procedure, they will be getting acquainted with the software for retrieving data from those
corpora.
Syllabus:
1. Introduction
2-3. Types of corpora, survey of existing corpora. Starting ICE-GB.
Readings: Mathesius, Vilém. 1944. O pokoře tvořivého ducha. In: Možnosti, které čekají. Jan
Laichter.
Readings: Meyer ch. 2 (Planning the construction of a corpus)
Presentations: Meyer ch. 3 (Collecting and computerizing data), American National Corpus
4. Annotation, tagging and parsing. Working with ICE-GB
(Supplementary readings: Kennedy ch.4 and 2.6.5. Markup., Meyer ch. 4 (Annotating a corpus))
5. ICE-GB
Readings: Fillmore: “Corpus linguistics” vs. “computer-aided armchair linguistics”.
6. ICE-GB. Start BNC?
Presentation: Kennedy ch.3 Corpus-based descriptions of English 3.1 Lexical description
7. BNC. Students‘ research proposals
Presentation: Kennedy ch.3 Corpus-based descriptions of English 3.2 Grammatical studies
centred on morphemes or words
8. BNC
9-10. Workshop
L:iterature:
Mark Davies‗ web page: http://davies-linguistics.byu.edu/personal/

Textbooks:
Kennedy, Graeme. 1998. An Introduction to Corpus Linguistics. Longman.
Meyer, Charles F. 2002. English Corpus Linguistics: An Introduction. CUP
class reader

Manuals
Guy Aston and Lou Burnard. 1998. The BNC Handbook. Edinburgh University Press.
Nelson, Gerald, Sean Wallis, and Bas Aarts. 2002. Exploring Natural Language. Working
  with the British Component of the International Corpus of English. John Benjamins.

Corpus-based Grammar book: Biber, Douglas. 1999. Longman Grammar of Spoken and
                             Written English.

Paper on corpus linguistics:
Fillmore, Charles. 1992. ―Corpus linguistics‖ vs. ‖computer-aided armchair linguistics‖.
    Directions in Corpus Linguistics: Proceedings from a 1991 Nobel Symposium on Corpus
    Linguistics, 35-66. Stockholm: Mouton de Gruyter.

Presentations:
Ide, N., Reppen, R., Suderman, K. (2002). The American National Corpus: More Than the Web
Can Provide . Proceedings of the Third Language Resources and Evaluation Conference (LREC),
Las Palmas, Canary Islands, Spain, 839-44. http://americannationalcorpus.org/bib.html

Ide, N., Macleod, C. (2001). The American National Corpus: A Standardized Resource of
American English. Proceedings of Corpus Linguistics 2001, Lancaster UK.
http://americannationalcorpus.org/bib.html

Fillmore, Charles, Ide, Nancy, Macleod, Catherine, and Daniel Jurafsky. 1998. An American
National Corpus: A Proposal. Proceedings of the First International Language Resources and
Evaluation Conference,Granada, Spain. http://www.cs.vassar.edu/~ide/papers/anc.final.pdf

Meyer, Charles F. 2002. Collecting and computerizing data. In: English Corpus Linguistics: An
Introduction. CUP

Kennedy ch.3 Corpus-based descriptions of English. 3.1 Lexical description
3.2 Grammatical studies centred on morphemes or words

(Kyto, Merja, and Susan Romaine. Competing forms of adjective comparison in modern English:
What could be more quicker and easier and more effective?)
 http://163.1.0.36/archive/papers/kytorom.html


Course: Language variation in time: From synchronic Code:                    Credits: 3
variation to diachronic change across language levels Kaa 7C12
Teacher: Mgr. Michaela Martinková, Ph.D.
E-mail: michmartin@email.cz
Credit requirements:
2 credits - active participation, home readings, one class presentation, 3rd credit – final test
Annotation:
‗Every alteration that eventually establishes itself had to exist formerly as a choice‘ (Bolinger).
Shifts of meaning. Errors, mispronunciations, slips of tongue, confusion of sound and sense which
did not remain unnoticed. Prescriptivists‘ pressures. Synchronic approach as something that
‗commands the sun to stand still‘ and the ‗stirrings‘ that will remain.
Syllabus:
1. Introduction. Historical linguistics. Language and change. When evaluating comes in…
Campbell ch.1 (Introduction).Aitchison ch. 1 pp. 3-19: The ever-whirling wheel (the inevitability
of change), ch. 17 pp. 249-260: Progress or Decay?
The Story of English (Next Year´s Words).
2. From synchronic variation to diachronic change.
Bolinger: Flux.
Students´ presentation: Mathesius, Vilém. O potenciálnosti jevů jazykových.
3-8. Classification of changes across language levels. When language ´forms´ change, or/and
change their meanings. External vs internal factors. Therapeutic changes: Great vowel shift.
Reading Chaucer and Shakespeare. Analogies. Errors that caught on.
Campbell ch.2 Sound change, ch.3 Borrowing, ch.4 Analogical change, ch.10 Semantic change
and lexical change. Aitchison ch. 10 pp 133-153 (The reasons why), ch. 11 pp 153-169 (Doing
what comes naturally), ch. 12 pp 169-183 (Repairing the patterns), ch. 13 pp 183-200 (The Mad
Hatter´s Tea Party), ch. 6 pp 84-98 (Catching on and taking off), ch. 9. Change of meaning
(Spinning away),
Students´ presentations(7):
1. Vachek, Josef. Foném h/ ve vývoji angličtiny.
2. Analogies in the development of English verbs (strong vs weak, regular vs irregular)
3. Stern, Gustav. Meaning and change of meaning. Ch. 7: General Theory of Sense Change (pp
162-191).
4. Bréal, Michel. Semantics: Studies in the science of meaning. Ch. 2 The law of differenciation,
Justice, David. Travels with the demiurge: Bréal´s repartition.
5. Sweetser, Eve. Semantic Structure and Semantic Change: English Perception Verbs in an Indo-
European Context. In: From etymology to pragmatics. CUP
9. Lexicon and grammar: how far apart?
Campbell 9.5 Grammaticalization. Aitchison ch. 7 pp 98-112 (Caught in the web), ch. 8 pp 112-
120 (The wheels of language).
Hopper and Traugott ch. 1 (Some preliminaries, pp 1-14). Hopper and Traugott ch. 2 (The history
of grammaticalization, pp. 18-32).
Students´ presentations (3):
1. Elizabeth Closs Traugott and Ekkehard Konig. The Semantics-Pragmatics of
Grammaticalization Revisited.
2. Carey, Kathleen. The Grammaticalization of the Perfect in Old English.
3. Slobin, Dan I. Talking Perfectly. Discourse origin of the Present Perfect.
10. Case study: Epistemic meanings.
Students´ presentations (2):
1. Traugott, Elizabeth. On the rise of epistemic meanings in English: an Example of
Subjectification in Semantic Change. Language 65.
Literature:
Audio: Geoffrey Nunberg´s FreshAir pieces http://freshair.npr.org/
Articles to be presented in class:
Mathesius, Vilém. On the Potentiality of the Phenomena of Language. In: Prague School Reader
   In Linguistics. Indiana University Press, 1964.
Vachek, Josef. 1952. Foném h/ ve vývoji angličtiny. SPFFBUA1.
Labov, William. 1972. On the Mechanism of Linguistic Change. Sociolinguistic Patterns, 160-82.
   University of Pelsynvania Press.
Stern, Gustav. 1931. Meaning and Change of Meaning. 2nd printing 1965. Indiana University
   Press.
Bréal, Michel. Semantics: Studies in the Science of Meaning. Appeared originally as Essai de
   Sémantique (1897). Dover translation by Nina Crust, 1964.
Justice, David. 1979. Travels with the demiurge: Bréal´s repartition. Ling. 231 term paper.
Carey, Kathleen. 1994. The Grammaticalization of the Perfect in Old English. In: Perspectives on
    Grammaticalization. Ed. William Pagliuca. John Benjamins.
Slobin, Dan I. 1994. Talking Perfectly. Discourse origin of the Present Perfect. In: Perspectives on
   Grammaticalization. Ed. William Pagliuca. John Benjamins.
Sweetser, Eve. 1990. Modality. In: From etymology to pragmatics. CUP
Sweetser, Eve. 1990. Semantic structure and semantic change: English perception-verbs in an
   Indo-European context. In: From etymology to pragmatics. CUP.
Traugott, Elizabeth Closs. 1989. On the rise of epistemic meanings in English: an Example of
   Subjectification in Semantic Change. Language 65.
Traugott, Elizabeth Closs, and Ekkehard Konig. 1991. The Semantics-Pragmatics of
   Grammaticalization Revisited. In: Approaches to Grammaticalization. Vol.I. John Benjamins.

Home readings:
Required: Bolinger, Dwight. 1989. Flux. BLS 15.

Recommended:
Campbell, Lyle. 2000. Historical Linguistics. An Introduction. MIT Press. Selected chapters: 1.
    Introduction, 2. Sound change, 3. Borrowing, 4. Analogical change, 9. Syntactic change, 10.
    Semantic change and lexical change, 11. Explaining Linguistic change
Bolinger, Dwight. 1975. Aspects of Language. Harcourt Brace Janowich, Inc. Selected chapters:
12.
    Variation in Time: Sources of Variation, 13. Variation in Time: The Outcome of Variation.
McCrum, Robert, William Cram, and Robert Mac Neil. 1986. The Story of English.
Aitchison, Jean. 1991. Language change: progress, or decay? CUP.
Croft, William. 2000. Explaining Language Change. An Evolutionary Approoach. Pearson
Education
     Limited.
Lass, Roger. Phonology and Morphology. In: The Cambridge History of the English Language.
    1476-1776. Vol.3. CUP.
Barnett, Lincoln. The English Language. Where it began and how it became a great tongue.




Course:      REMEDIAL ENGLISH GRAMMAR                      Code: KAA          Credits:    3
                                                           1P05
Teacher:    Mgr. Markéta Janebová, Ph.D.
E-mail:     m_janebova@post.cz
            Office hours: Wednesday/Thursday 14.30-15.30 (room 3.39)
            Credit requirements:     Students will be graded on participation and attendance
            (3 absences maximum), a presentation on a given grammatical problem, and a written test.

             Annotation:       The course is concerned with the sources of grammatical mistakes Czech
            speakers tend to make in English and is aimed at exposing and removing the mistakes by means
            of contrastive analysis and
practice.

            Syllabus:
            Week 1: How to use corpora and other databases
                 English system of dependent clauses I
            Week 2: English system of dependent clauses II
            Presentation: Prepositions (with noun phrases, verbs and adjectives)
            Week 3: Adverbs and adjectives
            Presentation: Comparison (adjectives, adverbs, comparative clauses)
            Presentation: Sequence of adjectives in a noun phrase
            Week 4: Word order
            Presentation: Word order – position of adverbials in the sentence
            Presentation: Indirect questions
            Week 5: Negation
            Presentation: Inversion
            Week 6: Passive voice
            Presentation: Two objects (sequence of direct/indirect/prepositional objects)
            Week 7: False friends, easily confused words
            Presentation: Determiners and quantifiers (the use of each, every, both, half, few, little, much,
            many etc.)
            Week 8: English system of tenses
            Presentation: Interference of articles and prepositions (by car X in the car, in the hospital X
            in hospital etc.)
            Week 9: Revision

            Literature: Alexander, L.G. Longman Advanced Grammar. Reference and Practice. Longman 1993.
            Hewings, M. Advanced Grammar in Use. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 2005.
            Jones, L. New Cambridge Advanced English. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 1998.
            McCarthy, Michael, and Felicity O‘Dell. English Vocabulary in Use. Advanced. CUP 2002.
            Murphy, R. English Grammar in Use. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 2004.
            Quirk, R., and S. Greenbaum. A Student’s Grammar of the English Language. London: Longman,
            1990.
            Sparling, Don. English or Czenglish? Praha: SPN, 1990.
            Swan, Michael. Practical English Usage. Oxford: Oxford UP, 1995.
            http://www.collins.co.uk/Corpus/CorpusSearch.aspx
            http://sara.natcorp.ox.ac.uk/lookup.html
            http://www.edict.com.hk/quizMaker/quiz.htm
            http://www.attotron.com/pub/Quizmake.htm
CULTURE STUDIES


Course:     BRITISH STUDIES                                 Code:   BS01      Credits:   4
Teacher:
E-mail:
Credit requirements:
Annotation:

Syllabus:
Literature:

Course:     BRITISH CULTURAL STUDIES                        Code:   BRCS      Credits:   4
Teacher:
E-mail:
Credit requirements:
Annotation:

Syllabus:
Literature:


Course:       BRITISH/ CULTURAL STUDIES II                  Code:             Credits:
                                                            (KAA/2A04 or
                                                            2H05/6)
Teacher:   Ema Jelínková, Ph.D.
E-mail:   ema.jelinkova@centrum.cz, phone 58/563 3135
   - Credit requirements:        presence (3 absences)
   - an essay ( 5-6 pages) or a presentation (15-20 mins)
   - reading (see British Studies 2 dossier)

Annotation:
The course provides in-depth study of issues relevant to the contemporary British culture, such as
political life, media, art, religion and education.

Syllabus:
1. EDUCATION
   Reading: Coxall and Robins - Education - p. 370-376
          „Immigrants should learn our language―
          „University Challenge―
     Universities in Britain - their enrollment, diversification
     University graduates - finding a job, career future
     Immigrants in British school system
2. IMMIGRATION
Reading: „My Britain―
     Ethnic minorities, immigration laws
3. MASSMEDIA
Reading: Karel Kyncl „Potíţe s netelevizí― in V Buckinghamu mají otevřeno
     British newspaper industry - newspaper tycoons, ownership, categories, readership
     Advertising - history, posters, newspapers
     Advertising - television, strategies
     Book industry - literary prizes and awards, festivals
     Book readership, British Library
     British publishing houses - their history, history of printing, representatives
     British film - its history, national archives, Film institute, DVD and video culture
     BBC - history, its role, current development and changes
4. POLITICAL LIFE AND PARTIES IN GREAT BRITAIN
Reading: Coxall and Robins - Political Parties p. 228 - 256
     Political campaigns, elections
     Political parties - history
     British parliament, royal family
     Local government - system, functions, staff
     Scottish question - brief overview of history and culture
5. WOMEN IN BRITAIN
     distinguished women, their movements
6. RELIGION IN UNITED KINGDOM
     Various denominations and their origin
   7. NATIONAL HEALTH SERVICE
Reading: „Anger at major NHS overhaul―
         „Fear grips old as care home closures rise―
        „NHS reform: Hospital response―
     history and current changes
8. BRITISH NATIONAL SPORTS AND LEISURE
     history and current situation
9. ENVIROMENTAL PROTECTION IN BRITAIN
   Reading: Zero Waste Charter
     British environmental protection - laws and regulations, zero waste charter
     British national parks
10. BRITISH ART
     Architecture
     Painting
     Sculpture

Literature:




                                                          Code: kaa/2A05 Credits:        2+1
Course:    American Studies I                             or AS01
Teacher:    PhDr. Matthew Sweney
E-mail:     msweney @ seznam.cz
Credit requirements:
attendance: 2 absences maximum
brief essays (5-6 pages)
thorough knowledge of all items on the reading list
credit test
Annotation:      excellence on the exam will earn the third credit
The course is a brief history of the United States from the 16th through the 19th century.
Syllabus:
Literature:


Course:     American Studies I                              Code: 2A05 or      Credits: 3
                                                            AS01
Teacher: Jaroslav Peprnik, prof., PhDr., CSc.
E-mail:     peprnik@ffnw.upol.cz
Credit requirements: course attendance (3 absences permitted), end-of-term credit test
Annotation:
Syllabus: geographical-historical-cultural survey of the 50 states of the U.S.A.
Literature: J.Peprnik: A Guide to American Studies I




Course:     American Studies II                            Code: 2A06 or Credits:            2(+1)
                                                           AMCS
Teacher: Mgr. Robert Hýsek
E-mail:      bobhysek@hotmail.com
Credit requirements:
4 approx. one-page essays (one every two weeks)
a test on American states (filling in a blind map)
attendance (2 absences) and active participance (reading and discussion)
Annotation: Discussion-oriented seminar with emphasis on written and oral formulation of
students' opinions. The key themes for discussion and reading are democracy, human rights, civic
society, American dream, American philosophies, racism, sexism, ethnic plurality, feminisms,
McDonaldization, globalization and other cultural phenomena whose analysis helps better
understanding of American society from both historical and present point of view.
Syllabus:
1. The Myth of Democracy and Human Rights
   text: The Declaration of Independence
2. American Philosophies (transcendentalism, pragmatism, objectivism)
   text: Ayn Rand: How Does One Lead a Rational Life in an Irrational Society?
3. American Myths and Dreams – Synchronic and Diachronic Perspective
   text: Andrew Carnegie: The Gospel of Wealth
4. – 5. Ethnic America – Melting Pot, Fruit Salad, or Mosaic? (Americans from America, Asia,
and Africa)
   texts: Benjamin Franklin: Remarks Concerning the Savages of Northern America;
   Maxine Hong Kingston: The Woman Warrior - Chapter 4;
   Alex Haley: The Autobiography of Malcolm X - Chapter I
6. Multiculturalism and Cultural Pluralism Today
movie: Do the Right Thing (Spike Lee, 1989) or Crash (Paul Haggis, 2005)
7. Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action and -isms of the Era of Political Correctness
   text: Defining Racism and Sexism
8. Women Studies and American Feminisms
   text: Suzanne Gordon: Women at Risk
9. The Americanization of the World – McDonald's and the Others
   text: George Ritzer: McDonaldization of Society (An Introduction)

Literature:
Chafe, William H. The Unfinished Journey (America since WW II). NY: Oxford University Press,
1995.
Colombo, Gary, and Robert Cullen, and Bonnie Lisle, eds. Rereading America. New York: St.
Martin's Press, 1991.
Nathan, and Daniel P. Moynihan. Ethnicity: Theory and Experience. Cambridge, Mass: Harvard
Univ. Press, 1975.
Rand, Ayn. The Virtue of Selfishness. New York: Penguin Books, 1961.
Rothenberg, Paula S., ed. Race, Class & Gender in the U.S. New York: St. Martin's Press, 1992.
Sowell, Thomas. Ethnic America: A History. New York: Basic Books, 1981.


Course:     AMERICAN CULTURAL STUDIES                      Code: AMCS         Credits: 4
Teacher:
E-mail:
Credit requirements:
Annotation:

Syllabus:
Literature:


Course:       Cultural Studies 3                              Code: 2H06         Credits:
Teacher:       Mgr. Jiří Flajšar, Ph.D.
E-mail:
Credit requirements:          For the basic 2 course credits:
-read the assigned readings and be ready to discuss them
-have a 15-minute oral presentation on a topic from the syllabus, you first have the topic okayed
by the instructor. As part of your presentation, you also must supply a one-page written outline
(bring enough copies for everyone in class!)—presentation dates are assigned early in the
semester
-attend every class and participate in class work, more than two absences shall not be excused and
will in having to retake the class or in the extra requirement of a 3-5 page essay
The third credit for the exam is optional: You must take it in either Cultural Studies II (American
Studies) or Cultural Studies III (British Studies). The choice is yours, but you must take the exam
in one of these courses.
For the third credit in this course, you must:
-have obtained the two credits for the same course first
-pass a written exam (to be specified before the end of the semester)

Annotation:       The seminar provides an overview of American culture topics ranging from
American history to politics and pop culture. It is designed for 2nd block (2nd and 3rd year)
students of English and Applied Economics.

Syllabus:
One
Introduction: Course Program, requirements for credits, student presentation sign-up.
Two
What Is American? The National Identity. Stereotypes.
Three
The U.S. System of Government. Basic concepts. An overview of U.S. history. Immigration.
Four
American Myths and Dreams. Work ethics. Attitude to money, success.
Five
Ethnic America: Minorities and Mainstream. Historical Development. Ethnocentrism vs
Multiculturalism.
Six
Mobility: The Sense of Space, Place and Frontier.
Seven
Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action, Political Correctness, Feminism.
Eight
Social Problems: Racism, Violence, Drugs.
Nine
Popular and High Culture in America. The Mass Media, Advertizing, Internet.
Ten
The Global Cop: Americanization of the World. The American Dream in the 21th Century: A
Thing of the Past? Predictions for the Future.

The course reader, edited by the instructor, with all the assigned texts is available for xeroxing at
the copy center of the Palacký University Press (details will be provided by the instructor early in
the semester).

Literature: Beaty, Jerome, and J. Paul Hunter, eds. New Worlds of Literature: Writings
from America’s Many Cultures.
Colombo, Cullen, Lisle, eds. Rereading America.
Luedtke, Luther S., ed. Making America: the Society and Culture of the United States.
Nash, Gary B. and Julie Roy Jeffrey, eds. The American People: Creating a
Nation and a Society.
An Outline of American Government.
An Outline of American History.
Peprník, Jaroslav. A Guide to the U.S.A. I, II.
Maasi, Sonja and Jack Solomon. Signs of Life in the USA: Readings On Popular Culture for
Writers.
(All available at the Palacký University Library or at the English Department Library)
PRACTICAL EXERCISES

Course:     Practical English Grammar (Praktická          Code: KAA          Credits: 3
Gramatika)                                                1A03 or PGR1
Teacher: Mgr. Markéta Janebová, Ph.D.
E-mail:     m_janebova@post.cz
Office hours: Wednesday/Thursday 14.30-15.30 (room 3.39)
Credit requirements:    Students will be graded on participation and attendance (3 absences
maximum), a presentation on a given grammatical problem, and a written test.

Annotation:      The aim of the course is to discuss in greater detail grammar topics presented in
Angličtina pro pokročilé 1 and to practise them. Students will be using English language corpora
and other databases to compare easily confused structures and expressions.

Syllabus:
Week 1: Introduction: How to use corpora and other databases
Week 2: Past tenses I.
Presentation: Articles with proper nouns
Week 3: Past tenses II.
Presentation: Punctuation — how to read punctuation marks, commas in sentence complexes,
commas and connectors
Week 4: Non-past tenses
Presentation: Pronouns, determiners and quantifiers — they vs. he or she, we/us/our in Cze and
En, reflexivity in Cze and En; some and any, each and every, all and whole
Week 5: Revision: English system of tenses
Presentation: Countability
Presentation: Number and agreement — singularia and pluralia tantum (news, cattle)
Week 6: Modal verbs I
Presentation: Notional concord (singular subjects with plural verbs and vice versa); partitive
constructions (a piece of news)
Week 7: Modal verbs II
Presentation: Numerals — how to read and write dates, mathematical operations, how to give
weight/price/temperature etc., numerals in premodifiers (a two-year-old child)
Week 8: Reported speech I
Presentation: Dependent clauses I: relative clauses; adverbial clauses of concession, reason,
purpose etc.
Week 9: Reported speech II
Presentation: Indirect questions
Week 10: Infinitives and –ing forms
Presentation: Dependent clauses II: Conditional clauses

Literature: Alexander, L.G. Longman Advanced Grammar. Reference and Practice. Longman
1993.
Hewings, M. Advanced Grammar in Use. Cambridge UP 2005.
Jones, L. New Cambridge Advanced English. Cambridge UP 1998.
McCarthy, Michael, and Felicity O‘Dell. English Vocabulary in Use. Advanced. CUP 2002.
Murphy, R. English Grammar in Use. Cambridge UP 2004.
Peprník, J. Angličtina pro pokročilé 1. FIN 1995.
Quirk, R., and S. Greenbaum. A Student’s Grammar of the English Language. Longman 1990.
Sparling, Don. English or Czenglish? SPN, 1990.
Swan, Michael. Practical English Usage. Oxford UP, 1995.
http://www.collins.co.uk/Corpus/CorpusSearch.aspx
http://sara.natcorp.ox.ac.uk/lookup.html
http://www.edict.com.hk/quizMaker/quiz.htm
http://www.attotron.com/pub/Quizmake.htm



Course:     Freshman Composition                           Code:    JC01      Credits: 2

Teacher:      Matthew Sweney/Ph.D. students
E-mail:
Credit requirements: zápočet
80% attendance, active participation in class, completion of reading and writing assignments
Annotation:       90-minute seminar once a week
This course provides instruction in writing a range of texts such as essays, summaries or reviews.
It focuses especially on academic writing – effective structuring and logical organization. It
explores the strategies of producing coherent and effective texts. It should also deal with
summarizing, editing, paraphrasing, referencing, quoting, writing a bibliography or plagiarism.
 Syllabus:

   Literature: Jordan, R. R.: Academic Writing Course. London: Collins, E.L.T., 1990.
   Mounsey, Ch.: Essays and Dissertations. Oxford: OUP, 2002.
   Savage & Mayer: Effective Academic Writing. Oxford: OUP, 2005
   Zemach & Rumisek: Academic Writing. Oxford: Macmillan, 2005.
   www.anglistika.cz


Course:     JC02 Speaking and Listening Skills Code: JC02                     Credits:    2
Teacher:     Alena Kolářová/Jan Burda

E-mail:
Credit requirements: zápočet
80% attendance, active participation in classroom activities [discussions, argumentations, games,
listening tests], presentation on assigned topic [compulsory attendance on date of presentation].
Annotation:        90-minute seminar once a week
 The course aims to improve students’ presentation and speaking skills. It aims to help
     students to communicate effectively to a group of audience using a rich mix of language, body
     language, voice projection and audio-visual aids. Listening skills will be practised on a range
     of listening materials.

Syllabus:
   Literature: Komfort, J.: Effective Presentations. Oxford University Press. 2000
   Emden, J.: Presentation Skills for Students. Palgrave Macmillan. 2004
   Jones, L.: Let‘s Talk 3. Cambridge University Press. 2002
   Ur, P.: Discussions that Work. Cambridge University Press. 1981
   Sampedro & Hillyard: Global Issues. Oxford University Press. 2004
   www.anglistika.cz




Course:     JC03 – CAE Result [C1 level]                   Code:    JC03      Credits:     2

Teacher:      PhDr. Sabina Pazderová/Ph.D. students
E-mail:
Credit requirements: 80% attendance of the lessons, active participation, completion of all
classroom tasks and assignments [continuous assessment], passing the final credit test. Speaking,
listening and writing will be part of continuous assessment.
Annotation:       90-minute seminar once a week
 This course aims to upgrade students‘ command of the English language. Students should
     broaden their vocabulary, improve their grammatical accuracy and all skills, with the
     emphasis on communication.
 Materials: Gude, K. Stephens, M. 2008. CAE Result. OUP Student Book Units 1 – 4

Syllabus:
   Literature: Gude & Stephens: CAE Result. Oxford University Press, 2008
   Swan & Baker: Grammar Scan. Oxford University Press, 2008
   Carter & McCarthy: Cambridge Grammar of English, Cambridge University Press, 2006
   Certificate in Advanced English - Official Examination Papers. Cambridge University Press,
    2008
   Cambridge Advanced Learner‘s Dictionary – 3rd edition. Cambridge University Press. 2008
   Oxford Advanced Learner‘s Dictionary - 7th edition. Oxford University Press. 2007
   Oxford Collocations Dictionary for Students of English. Oxford University Press. 2009
   www.anglistika.cz
   http://www.macmillan.cz/
   http://www.cambridge.org/elt/cz/
   http://www.oup.com/elt/


Course:     JC04 – CAE Result [C1 level]                   Code:    JC04      Credits: 2

Teacher:      PhDr. Sabina Pazderová/Ph.D. students
E-mail:
Credit requirements: zápočet
80% attendance of the lessons, active participation, completion of all classroom tasks and
assignments [continuous assessment], passing the final credit test. Speaking, listening and writing
will be part of continuous assessment.
Annotation:       90-minute seminar once a week
 This course aims to upgrade students‘ command of the English language. Students should
    broaden their vocabulary, improve their grammatical accuracy and all skills, with the
    emphasis on communication.
 Materials: Gude, K. Stephens, M. 2008. CAE Result. OUP Student Book Units 5 - 8

Syllabus:
   Literature: Gude & Stephens: CAE Result. Oxford University Press, 2008
   Swan & Baker: Grammar Scan. Oxford University Press, 2008
   Carter & McCarthy: Cambridge Grammar of English, Cambridge University Press, 2006
   Certificate in Advanced English - Official Examination Papers. Cambridge University Press,
    2008
   Cambridge Advanced Learner‘s Dictionary – 3rd edition. Cambridge University Press. 2008
   Oxford Advanced Learner‘s Dictionary - 7th edition. Oxford University Press. 2007
   Oxford Collocations Dictionary for Students of English. Oxford University Press. 2009
   www.anglistika.cz
   http://www.macmillan.cz/
   http://www.cambridge.org/elt/cz/
   http://www.oup.com/elt/



Course:     JC05 – CAE Result [C1 level]                   Code: JC05         Credits:   2

Teacher:      PhDr. Sabina Pazderová/Ph.D. students
E-mail:
Credit requirements: zápočet
80% attendance of the lessons, active participation, completion of all classroom tasks and
assignments [continuous assessment], passing the final credit test. Speaking, listening and writing
will be part of continuous assessment.
Annotation:       90-minute seminar once a week
 This course aims to upgrade students‘ command of the English language. Students should
    broaden their vocabulary, improve their grammatical accuracy and all skills, with the
    emphasis on communication.
 Materials: Gude, K. Stephens, M. 2008. CAE Result. OUP Student Book Units 9 - 12

Syllabus:
   Literature: Gude & Stephens: CAE Result. Oxford University Press, 2008
   Swan & Baker: Grammar Scan. Oxford University Press, 2008
   Carter & McCarthy: Cambridge Grammar of English, Cambridge University Press, 2006
   Certificate in Advanced English - Official Examination Papers. Cambridge University Press,
    2008
   Cambridge Advanced Learner‘s Dictionary – 3rd edition. Cambridge University Press. 2008
   Oxford Advanced Learner‘s Dictionary - 7th edition. Oxford University Press. 2007
   Oxford Collocations Dictionary for Students of English. Oxford University Press. 2009
   www.anglistika.cz
   http://www.macmillan.cz/
   http://www.cambridge.org/elt/cz/
   http://www.oup.com/elt/
Course:     JCB2 Test B2 – receptive skills + Use of     Code:   JCB2       Credits:   2
English

Teacher:
E-mail:
Credit requirements: written test B2 level
Annotation:
Written paper testing Use of English, Reading and Listening- B2 level
Syllabus:
   Literature: Davies & Falla: FCE Result. Oxford University Press. 2008
   Swan, M.: Practical English Usage. Oxford University Press. 2005
   Harrison, M.: FCE Practice Tests. Oxford University Press. 2008
   Cambridge Advanced Learner‘s Dictionary – 3rd edition. Cambridge University Press. 2008
   McCarthy & O‘Dell: English Vocabulary in Use: Upper-intermediate – 2nd edition.
    Cambridge University Press. 2001
   Prodromou, L.: Grammar and Vocabulary for First Certificate, Longman. 2004
   www.anglistika.cz
   http://www.macmillan.cz/
   http://www.cambridge.org/elt/cz/
   http://www.oup.com/elt/



Course:     JCC1 Test C1 - Use of English, Reading       Code:   JCC1       Credits:   2

Teacher:
E-mail:
Credit requirements: Written paper testing Use of English and Reading, C1 level
Annotation:     Written paper testing Use of English and Reading

Syllabus:
   Literature: Gude & Stephens: CAE Result. Oxford University Press, 2008
   Swan & Baker: Grammar Scan. Oxford University Press, 2008
   Carter & McCarthy: Cambridge Grammar of English, Cambridge University Press, 2006
   Certificate in Advanced English - Official Examination Papers. Cambridge University Press,
    2008
   McCarthy & O‘Dell: Test your English Vocabulary in Use - Advanced. Cambridge University
    Press, 2005
   Cambridge Advanced Learner‘s Dictionary – 3rd edition. Cambridge University Press. 2008
   Oxford Advanced Learner‘s Dictionary - 7th edition. Oxford University Press. 2007
   Oxford Collocations Dictionary for Students of English. Oxford University Press. 2009
   http://www.macmillan.cz/
   http://www.cambridge.org/elt/cz/
   http://www.oup.com/elt/
Course:      JC06 – Proficiency Masterclass [C2 Code: JC06                Credits:   2
level]

Teacher:     Steve Schwartzhoff
E-mail:
Credit requirements: zápočet
80% attendance of the lessons, active participation, completion of all classroom tasks and
assignments [continuous assessment], passing the final credit test.
Annotation:      90-minute seminar once a week
 This course focuses on the development of English language competence. They focus on
    advanced lexis and syntax, idiomatic language and formal/informal writing styles.
 Materials: Gude, K. Duckworth, M. 2002. Proficiency Masterclass, New Edition, OUP
    Student Book units 1 - 4

Syllabus:
   Literature: Gude & Duckworth: Proficiency Masterclass. Oxford University Press, 2002
   Vince, M.: Macmillan English Grammar in Context. Macmillan, 2008
   Hewings, M.: Advanced Grammar in Use. Cambridge University Press, 2005
   Cambridge Advanced Learner‘s Dictionary – 3rd edition. Cambridge University Press. 2008
   Oxford Advanced Learner‘s Dictionary - 7th edition. Oxford University Press. 2007
   Oxford Collocations Dictionary for Students of English. Oxford University Press. 2009
   Mc.Carthy & O‘Dell: English Collocations in Use – Advanced. Cambridge University Press,
    2008
   Mc.Carthy & O‘Dell: English Vocabulary in Use – Advanced. Cambridge University Press,
    2006
   www.anglistika.cz
   http://www.macmillan.cz/
   http://www.cambridge.org/elt/cz/
   http://www.oup.com/elt/




Course:      JC 07 – Proficiency Masterclass            Code:   JC 07     Credits:   2
[C2 level]
Teacher:     Steve Schwartzhoff
E-mail:
Credit requirements: zápočet
80% attendance of the lessons, active participation, completion of all classroom tasks and
assignments [continuous assessment], passing the final credit test.
Annotation:      90-minute seminar once a week
 This course focuses on the development of English language competence. They focus on
    advanced lexis and syntax, idiomatic language and formal/informal writing styles.
 Materials: Gude, K. Duckworth, M. 2002. Proficiency Masterclass, New Edition, OUP
    Student Book units 5 - 8
Syllabus:
   Literature: Gude & Duckworth: Proficiency Masterclass. Oxford University Press, 2002
   Vince, M.: Macmillan English Grammar in Context. Macmillan, 2008
   Hewings, M.: Advanced Grammar in Use. Cambridge University Press, 2005
   Cambridge Advanced Learner‘s Dictionary – 3rd edition. Cambridge University Press. 2008
   Oxford Advanced Learner‘s Dictionary - 7th edition. Oxford University Press. 2007
   Oxford Collocations Dictionary for Students of English. Oxford University Press. 2009
   Mc.Carthy & O‘Dell: English Collocations in Use – Advanced. Cambridge University Press,
    2008
   Mc.Carthy & O‘Dell: English Vocabulary in Use – Advanced. Cambridge University Press,
    2006
   www.anglistika.cz
   http://www.macmillan.cz/
   http://www.cambridge.org/elt/cz/
   http://www.oup.com/elt/


Course:     JCC2 test                                    Code:   JCC2      Credits:2

Teacher:     Steve Schwartzhoff
E-mail:
Credit requirements: exam, written test - C2 level
Annotation:      Written papers testing Vocabulary, Grammar, Reading and Writing skills.

Syllabus:
   Literature: Gude & Duckworth: Proficiency Masterclass. Oxford University Press, 2002
   Vince, M.: Macmillan English Grammar in Context. Macmillan, 2008
   Hewings, M.: Advanced Grammar in Use. Cambridge University Press, 2005
   Cambridge Advanced Learner‘s Dictionary – 3rd edition. Cambridge University Press. 2008
   Oxford Advanced Learner‘s Dictionary - 7th edition. Oxford University Press. 2007
   Oxford Collocations Dictionary for Students of English. Oxford University Press. 2009
   Mc.Carthy & O‘Dell: English Collocations in Use – Advanced. Cambridge University Press,
    2008
   Mc.Carthy & O‘Dell: English Vocabulary in Use – Advanced. Cambridge University Press,
    2006
   http://www.macmillan.cz/
   http://www.cambridge.org/elt/cz/
   http://www.oup.com/elt/
TRANSLATION

Course:      Czech-English Translation Exercises             Code: 2C50           Credits: 2/3
Teacher:      Václav Řeřicha
E-mail:      vrericha@yahoo.co.uk
Credit requirements: active participation in lessons, well-prepared translated texts, a Czech-
English translation with a commentary
Annotation:       Translation exercises with a focus on a stylistically differentiated scale of texts
(e.g. travelogues, regional promotion booklets etc.)

Syllabus: A diversity of functional styles in Czech and their English equivalents, based on
texts provided by both seminar participants and teachers.
Literature: comprehensive Czech – English dictionaries


Course:       Czech-English Translation Exercises            Code: 2C51           Credits:    2/3
Teacher:       Václav Řeřicha
E-mail:       vrericha@yahoo.co.uk
Credit requirements: active participation in lessons, well-prepared translated texts, a Czech-
English translation with a commentary
Annotation: :         Translation exercises with a focus on a stylistically differentiated scale of
texts (incl. e.g. movie subtitles)
Syllabus:      A diversity of functional styles in Czech and their English equivalents, based on
texts provided by both seminar participants and teachers
Literature: comprehensive Czech – English dictionaries



Course:                               Language of Instr.           Code: TRM1 Credits: 3
Teorie a metodika překladu 1          Czech                      or 1T05
Teacher: Mgr. Jitka Zehnalová, PhD.
E-mail:     zehnalova@volny.cz
Credit requirements:
a) zadané úkoly
b) docházka (max. 2 absence)
c) aktivní účast
Annotation: Kurz je realizován jako přednáška s praktickými ukázkami. Cílem je poskytnout
posluchačům základní teoretické a metodologické znalosti pro praktickou překladatelskou práci,
seznámit je se strukturou oboru a jeho vývojem, se základními pojmy, přístupy a terminologií, s
nejvýznamnějšími autory a odbornou literaturou.
Kurs je realizován jako dvousemestrální.
Syllabus:
okruh 1: Translatologie jako obor
historie oboru, nejvýznamnější představitelé
okruh 2: Translatologie jako obor
struktura oboru, současné přístupy, multidisciplinární charakter
okruh 3: Překlad
překlad, druhy překladu, překlad jako produkt, překlad jako proces
okruh 4: Překlad jako proces
komunikační model překladatelského procesu
okruh 5: Funkční přístup
funkce jazyka, funkce textu, textové typologie
okruh 6: Lingvistika a překlad
jazykové roviny a jejich souhra, ekvivalence, funkční ekvivalence, typologické rozdíly mezi
angličtinou a češtinou
okruh 7: Lingvistika a překlad
význam (denotace, konotace)
 okruh 8: Lingvistika a překlad
ekvivalence na rovině slova a nad rovinou slova (kolokace, frazeologie), slovníkové a kontextové
protějšky
okruh 9: Lingvistika a překlad
gramatická ekvivalence (morfologie, syntax)
okruh 10: Lingvistika a překlad
textová rovina (text, parametry textovosti, textové segmenty)
okruh 11: Lingvistika a překlad
překladatelské postupy, přeloţitelnost, idiomatičnost překladu
okruh 12: Opakování
Literature:
Baker, Mona.1992. In Other Words. A coursebook on translation. London and New York:
Routledge.
Knittlová, Dagmar. 2000. K teorii i praxi překladu. Olomouc: UP.
Munday, Jeremy. 2001. Introducing Translation Studies. Theories and Applications. London and
New York: Routledge.
Newmark, Peter.1982. Approaches to Translation. Oxford: Pergamon.
Newmark, Peter. 1998. A Textbook of Translation. Prentice Hall Europe.



Course:                                 Language of Instr.          Code: 3C51       Credits: 3
Kritika překladu                        Czech
Teacher: Mgr. Jitka Zehnalová, PhD.
E-mail:     zehnalova@volny.cz
Credit requirements:
a) zadané úkoly
b) docházka (max. 2 absence)
c) aktivní účast
d) referát
Annotation:
Seminář posluchače seznamuje se základy kritiky překladu a hodnocení kvality překladu,
s modely kritiky překladu, s poţadavky kladenými na kritika překladu a s kritérii hodnocení
překladatelské práce. Důraz je kladen na funkční přístup a na komplexní analýzu textů.
Teoretickou část práce v semináři doplňuje část praktická, která spočívá ve vypracování zadaných
překladů, rozborů textů a jedné recenze a jejich následném rozboru v semináři.
Syllabus:
okruh 1: Úvod do kritiky překladu
translatologie a kritika překladu, struktura oboru definice, hodnocení kvality překladu, kritika
překladu, kritika na základě CT
okruh 2: Úvod do kritiky překladu
ţánry KP, významní teoretici, obecný model KP, obsah kritického textu, poţadavky na kritika
překladu formulování kritiky
okruh 3: Pojmosloví kritiky překladu
překlad, komunikační model překladatelského procesu, kontext, funkce jazyka, funkce textu
okruh 4: Posuny
posuny nutné a volitelné, invariant, interference, negativní posun, ztráta, pozitivní posun
překladatelské operace, provázanost všech rovin textu, překlad jako rozhodovací proces
okruh 5: Rovina gramatická a textová
posuny v rovině gramatické (morfologie a syntax) a textové
okruh 6: Rovina lexikální
rovina lexikální (slovníkové a kontextové protějšky, kolokace, idiomy, obrazná pojmenování),
kompenzace
okruh 7: Funkce překladu
funkce překladu, zjevný a skrytý překlad, teorie skoposu kulturní filtr, kulturní kontext, zaměření
textu na čtenáře, presupozice, způsoby odkazování na socio-kulturně-časový kontext, aluze,
intertextualita, textové a komunikační normy
okruh 8: Modely kritiky překladu
Juliane House - model kritiky překladu rejstřík, expresivita, způsoby převodu z angličtiny do
češtiny překladatelská koncepce
okruh 9: Rovina stylová
stylový faktor v rovině gramatické, idiomatičnost překladu styl, funkční styl, styl textu
okruh 10: Komplexní analýza textu, kriteria hodnocení
analýza textu pro potřeby kritiky překladu, subjektivita kritického hodnocení
kriteria hodnocení
okruh 11: Kritika literárního překladu
literární texty a jejich specifičnostkritika literárního překladu, přeloţitelnost, jazyková tvořivost
okruh 12: Kritika literárního překladu
ukázky studentských prací
Literature:
Baker, Mona. 1992. In Other Words. A coursebook on translation. London and New York:
Routledge.
Newmark, Peter. 1998. A Textbook of Translation. Prentice Hall Europe.
Nord, Christine.1991. Text Analysis in Translation. Amsterdam/Atlanta: Rodopi.
Nord, Christiane.1997. Translating as a Purposeful Activity. Manchester, UK/Northampton MA:
St. Jerome.
Knittlová, Dagmar. 2000. K teorii i praxi překladu. Olomouc: UP.
Kufnerová, Zlata, Vlasta Straková (ed.). 1994. Překládání a čeština. Jinočany: H+H.
Vízdalová, Ivana. 1997. Na stezkách kritického žánru. Příloha obtýdeníku TVAR, edice Tvary,
svazek 17. Praha: Klub přátel Tvaru.
Weigand, Edda (ed.). 2004. Emotion in Dialogic Interaction. Advances in the Complex.
Amsterdam/Philadelphia: John Benjamins.
Hrdlička, Milan, Edita Gromová (ed.). 2004. Antologie teorie uměleckého překladu. Ostrava:
Filozofická fakulta Ostravské univerzity.


Course:                                Language of Instr.           Code: TRM2        Credits:   3
Teorie a metodika překladu 2           Czech                       2T04
Credit requirements:
a) zadané úkoly
b) docházka (max. 2 absence)
c) aktivní účast
d) referát
Teacher: Mgr. Jitka Zehnalová, PhD.
E-mail: zehnalova@volny.cz
Annotation: Kurz je realizován jako přednáška s praktickými ukázkami. Cílem je poskytnout
posluchačům základní teoretické a metodologické znalosti pro praktickou překladatelskou práci,
seznámit je se strukturou oboru a jeho vývojem, se základními pojmy, přístupy a terminologií, s
nejvýznamnějšími autory a odbornou literaturou.
Kurs je realizován jako dvousemestrální.
Syllabus:
okruh 1: Opakování
opakování Teorie a metodiky 1
okruh 2: Stylistika a překlad
styl, stylotvorní činitelé, příznakovost, expresivita
okruh 3: Stylistika a překlad
expresivita, vrstvy slovní zásoby
okruh 4: Stylistika a překlad
základy teorie funkčních stylů
okruh 5: Pojmosloví teorie překladu
překladatelské postupy
okruh 6: Kulturní kontext
kulturní kontext, strategie pro překonání kulturních rozdílů
okruh 7: Kulturní kontext
kulturní kontext, textové a stylové normy
okruh 8: Přeloţitelnost
přeloţitelnost na rovině gramatické, na rovině slova, na rovině textové a pragmatické
okruh 9: Typ textu, textové typologie
typ textu, textové typologie, překladatelská strategie, metody překladu
okruh 10: Překladatelská analýza textu
jazykové a mimojazykové parametry překladatelské analýzy textu
okruh 11: Opakování, referáty
opakování probraná teorie a terminologei, referáty
okruh 12: Opakování, referáty
opakování probraná teorie a terminologie, referáty
Literature: Doporučená literatura:
Urbanová, Ludmila, Oakland, Andrew. 2002. Úvod do anglické stylistiky. Brno:
Barrister&Principal.
Levý, Jiří. 1998. Umění překladu. Praha: Ivo Ţelezný,.
Jettmarová, Zuzana. 1995. „Volba strategie a rozhodování na základě teorie skoposu: komplexní
kritéria překladatelské analýzy textu,― in: A. Rády (ed.), 9 x o překladu, Praha: JTP, 25 – 31.
Hickey, Leo. (ed.). 1998. The Pragmatics of Translation. Clevendon: Multilingual Matters.


Course:   Grammar for Translators                        Code: KAA          Credits: 3
                                                         3C62
Language of Instruction: Czech and English
Teacher: Mgr. Markéta Janebová, Ph.D.
E-mail:    m_janebova@post.cz
Office hours: Wednesday/Thursday 14.30-15.30 (room 3.39)
Credit requirements:
Students will be graded on participation and attendance (3 absences maximum), regular
homework
(translation into English/Czech), and a written test.

Annotation:

Syllabus:
Week 1        How to use corpora.
Week 2        Punctuation.
                     Past tenses.
Week 3        Dependent clauses.
              Constraints on the use of will / would.
Week 4        Verb complementation.
Week 5        Pronouns and gender. Expressions of time and quantity.
Week 6        Modal verbs.
Week 7        Indirect speech.
                     The usage of would.
Week 8        Countability, number, agreement, notional concord.
Week 9        Word order.
Week 10       Functional sentence perspective in translation.
Week 11       Easily confused words.

Literature:
Alexander, L.G. Longman Advanced Grammar. Reference and Practice. Longman 1993.
Alexander, L.G. Longman English Grammar Practice. Longman 1990.
Gude, Kathy, and Michael Duckworth. Proficiency Masterclass. Oxford UP 1994.
Hewings, Martin. Advanced Grammar in Use with answers and CD ROM. 2nd ed. CUP 2005.
Jones, Leo. New Cambridge Advanced English. CUP 1998.
McCarthy, Michael, and Felicity O‘Dell. English Vocabulary in Use. Upper-intermediate. CUP
2001.
McCarthy, Michael, and Felicity O‘Dell. English Vocabulary in Use. Advanced. CUP 2002.
McCarthy, Michael, Felicity O‘Dell and Ellen Shaw. Vocabulary in Use. Upper intermediate with
answers.
  Self-study reference and practice for students of North American English. CUP 1997.
Murphy, Raymond. English Grammar in Use With Answers and CD ROM : A Self-Study
Reference and
  Practice Book for Intermediate Students of English. 3rd ed. CUP 2004.
Poldauf, Ivan. Mluvnice současné angličtiny I. SNU 1951.
Quirk, Randolph, and Sidney Greenbaum. A Student’s Grammar of the English language.
Longman 1991.
   Sparling, Don. English or Czenglish? Praha: SPN, 1990.
Swan, Michael. Practical English Usage. Oxford: Oxford UP, 1995.

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