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					Curriculu m Docu ment
Grade 10
Revision September, 2004

                        MIDDLETOWN PUBLIC SCHOOLS
                         MIDDLETOWN, CONNECTICUT
               English Program - Grade 10 American Literature Curriculum
                                     (Teacher resources in separate binder)
MISS ION STATEMENT:

We believe all students must acquire literacy skills to pursue their goals and to
become informed, p roductive citizens. Among these skills is the ability to listen,
speak, question, write, read, research, reflect, co mp rehend, and evaluate/ Students
become engaged, skillfu l and independent learner through participating in a
balanced, coordinated and flexib le program that emphasizes critical and aesthetic
thinking and expression, chiefly in the context o f literature study. Through such
study, students consider and exp lore our hu man experience, ranging fro m the
immed iate and personal to the timeless and transcendent. Students gain an
appreciation and awareness of the qualities and traditions that unify us as a global
community through exposure and careful consideration of culturally and ethnically
diverse literature.

GOALS:

As a result of K-12 instruction, students will:
1. Read with understanding and respond reflectively and critically, applying a
    variety of strategies to comprehend, interpret, evaluate and appreciate texts
    of different genres.
2. Read and appreciate texts of many periods and cultures to build an
   understanding of the many dimensions of human experience.
3. Write fo r varied audiences and purposes by using writing process elements
    appropriately.
4. Write and speak English clearly, skillfully and confidently.
5. Use a variety of textual, technological and other med ia resources to gather,
   synthesize, evaluate and communicate informat ion.

Course Title: English 10 -- Ame rican Literature
Audience:
All 10th grade students who have passed English 9. Students may also
participate in the Interd isciplinary A merican Studies program.

Course Descripti on:
English 10 is a one-year, one credit, one period course. It will focus on the major periods and themes of American
Literature. The teachers will gu ide students in the study and interpretation of all types of American Literature and
will illustrate important literary trends and how they reflect changes in American culture. Units of study may be
organized by chronology, themes or genres . However, the essential questions for each semester must provide the
structure for all material selection.
Vocabulary, grammar, language study, and study skill instruction must be an ongoing part of the program. Teachers
will provide students with listening, speaking, and viewing experiences during each unit.




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Curriculu m Docu ment
Grade 10
Revision September, 2004

Content Standards (Grade 10)

Exploring and Responding to Texts

Students will read the important classics of their grade level, determine the ways in which
they have shaped Western culture, and analyze the reasons for their being considered "classics."

Students will read, view and listen to key works of contemporary literature and create responses that examine the
works' principal elements.

Students will analyze the appeal of various works and determine their literary value.

Students will determine the various influences on authors and analyze the impact of those influences on the text.

Students will explain how all of the literary conventions and devices in a text or performance are used by an author
to express tone, create mood and establish overall theme.

Students will read, listen to and view literary texts and identify and explain the human experiences they convey.

Students will read classic and contemporary literature to determine polit ical and social ideas which characterize
those works.

Students will examine classical and contemporary literature to consider various cultural and historical influences on
the authors.

Students will read and respond to both classic and contemporary texts to examine themes central to the American
experience and those portrayed in the range of traditional literature.

Producing Texts

Students will select fro m the co mplete variety of text structures (essay, short story, poetry, academic essay, report,
research paper, response to literature, documentary, etc.) the appropriate organizat ional pattern for addressing
audience, purpose and point of view.

Students will identify and use effectively the salient features of all appropriate oral, v isual and written discourse.

Students will determine which primary and secondary sources are appropriate to the task (research paper, fict ion,
school newspaper, video) and will integrate and elaborate upon information effectively in the final product.




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Revision September, 2004
Readi ng and Res ponding

Students will describe the thoughts, opinions and questions that arise as they read, view, or listen to a text,
demonstrate a basic understanding of the text, and identify inconsistencies and ambiguit ies.

Students will examine the fit between the text and prior knowledge by reconciling differences, extracting clues or
evidence, making inferences, drawing conclusions, predicting events, inferring motives and generalizing beyond the
text.

Students will adapt appropriate strategies to deepen initial understanding and go beyond the text to judge its literary
quality.

Students will ask and answer their own and each other's text-related crit ical and analytical questions.

Students will describe theme, sy mbolis m, tone and other complex elements of fiction, and identify point of view,
man ipulative language and other elements of bias in nonfiction materials.

Students will use the literary elements of a text (theme, symbolism, imagery, conflict, etc.) to draw conclusions
about a text.

Students will entertain, exp lore and defend multip le interpretations of all fiction and nonfiction they read.

Appl ying English Language Conventi ons

Students will understand the forms of the English language as they vary across linguistic commun ities and will use
the accepted features of standard English and other linguistic co mmunities, where appropriate, to create orig inal
written and oral wo rks.

Students will draw conclusions regarding the evolution of language and how it influences and reflects societal
changes.




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Essential Questions:

SEM ESTER 1:

THEM E: What is an A merican? How is our defin ition of ourselves reflected in the literature of our nation?

    1.   How is this definit ion affected by immig ration, mu lticulturalism (race, gender,
            class, and religion, media)?
    2.   How is this definit ion affected by where you live (region of the country, urban, suburban,
            rural)? How does this powerful sense of place or reg ion we live in
            affect our literature?

    3.   How does the conflict between our need to express our individuality v. our need to belong affect our
         literature?

SEM ESTER 2:
THEM E: What is the American dream? How is our defin ition of this dream reflected in the literature of our nation?
       1. Ho w did the notion of this dream develop?
       2. Is it attainable for all people and how do people respond when it is not
          attainable?
       3. Ho w is the American dream influenced by who we are as individuals.?

LEARNER OUTCOMES:

At the end of the academic year all students will:

         1. Experience an extensive selection of readings in A merican Literature
         2. Write creat ively, imag inatively and critically through narrative, persuasive and expository writing
         3. Demonstrate an understanding of four dimensions of responses to literature:
                   a. Init ial understanding
                   b. Crit ical stance
                   c. Develop an interpretation
                   d. Personal connection
         4. Demonstrate critical listening skills
         5. Practice and refine fundamentals of oral co mmun ication
         6. Exp lain and analy ze how A merican culture is revealed through visual media
         7. Continue to enrich one's vocabulary through exposure to American literature selections
         8. Demonstrate terminology associated with A merican literature and culture
            i.e. A merican Dream, A merican Hero and Anti-hero, transcendentalism, Lost generation
         9. Practice and improve personal study skills
         10.Identify and apply literary terminology as analytical tools in their reading and writ ing.
         11.Demonstrate how similar the mes and literary periods are treated in and by genres
         12. Identify major historical and societal changes in American Literature
         13. Explain how A merican Literature demonstrates the enduring and conflicting values of indiv idually and
         cultural assimilation.




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Major Works
Short stories, nonfiction, and poetry continue to be listed by semester and unit. Major works should be matched to
appropriate units and essential questions; however, the follo wing conditions must be met:

        Four major works must be taught each semester in the form of at least two novels and at least one play.
        Women and people of color must author three major works throughout the year.
        Teachers may use films for some of the major works. For example, the use o f the film “The Co lor Pu rple”
         augmented by or instead of the text is an option.

         Semester 1                                            Semester 2

         “The Bean Trees”        Kingsolver                    “The Color Purple”       Alice Walker
         “To Kill A Mockingbird” Harper Lee                    “Their Eyes Were Watching God”
                                                                                        Z.H. Hurston
         “The Catcher in the Rye” J.D. Salinger                “The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn”
                                                                                        Mark Twain
         “Piano Lesson”             August Wilson              “Streetcar Named Desire”
                                                                                        T. Williams
         “The Glass Menagerie”      T.Williams                 “Fences”                 August Wilson
                                                               “Death of a Salesman” Arther Miller


XI. UNITS OF S TUDY:

There is no sequential order or s pecific texts for each essential question. However, by the end of each
semester, designated essential questions must recei ve adequate attention and all the core te xts must be
completed. Below is a suggested program of study that serves as an example of how content and resources are
sequenced and selected in order to address the overarching essential questions this semester.


Semester 1
Each of the three units of study corresponds to the essential questions under the umbrella of the central theme.

THEM E: What is an A merican? How is our defin ition of ourselves reflected in the literature of our nation?

    1.   How is this definit ion affected by immig ration, mu lticulturalism (race, gender,
            class, and religion, media)?
    2.   How is this definit ion affected by where you live (region of the country, urban, suburban,
            rural)? How does this powerful sense of place or reg ion that we live in
            affect our literature?

    3.   How does the conflict between expressing our individuality v. our need to belong affect our literature?




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1. Immigration and multiculturalism
                 Objectives:
                 1. To contrast and compare how the unique experiences which immigrants face in fluence literary
                 styles and purposes.
                 2. To describe how different cultural groups contribute to the development of American
                 Literature.
                 3. To describe how an A merican identity is expressed in literature.

Resources:       Much of the short selections are fro m the anthology, Language of Literature, A merican Literature,
                 or An Introduction or Read ing Poetry .

                 Other sources are available through Depart ment Head

Novels:          The Bean Trees           Barbara Kingsolver
                 When I was Puerto Rican, Esmerelda Santiago

Non-fiction:     Jonathan Edwards ("Sinners in the Hands of an Angry God")
                  Salem Court Docu ments
                  Ben jamin Fran klin
                  William Least Heat Moon fro m Blue Highways
                  Ch ief Joseph
                  Abigail Smith Adams Letter to Her Husband
                  Gloria Steinem “Sisterhood”
                  Anna Quindlen fro m “Mother’s Choice”
                  Richard Rodriquez fro m “Hunger of Memory”
                  Abraham Lincoln fro m “A House Divided”
                  Olaudah Equiano fro m “The Interesting Narrative of the Life of
                           Olaudah Equiano”
                  Bernard Weisberger fro m A Nation of Immigrants
Short Stories:
                 Baldwin “Sonny's Blues”
                 Porter “Jilting of Granny Wetherall”
                 Chopin “The Storm” “Story of An Hour”
                 Silko “The Man to Send Rain Clouds”
                 Hawthorne “Young Good man Brown”
                 Gilman, “Yellow Wallpaper”

Poetry:
                 Ann Bradstreet
                 Phyllis Wheatley
                 Walt Whit man
                 Emily Dickinson




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2. Identity of Place
                 1. To co mpare/contrast the influences of geography and location on literary content,     style,
                 and intent.
                 2. To exp lain the influences of place on the development of the American
                    identity.
                 3. To examine the develop ment of regional language differences and its impact on literature.

Resources:       Much of the short selections are fro m the anthology, Language of Literature, A merican Literature,
                 or An Introduction or Read ing Poetry .



Novels:
                 The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn
                 selections from Winesburg, Ohio

Nonfiction :
                 William Bradfo rd fro m “Of Ply mouth Plantation”
                 Anne Moody from Co ming of Age in Mississippi
                 Elinore Pru itt Stewart fro m Letters o f a Woman Homesteader
                 Mark Twain fro m The Autobiography of Mark Twain
                 Tru man Capote: “A Christ mas Memory”

Short Stories:
                 William Fau lkner “A Rose for Emily” or “The Bear”
                 Willa Cather “Pau l’s Case” or “A Wagner Matinee”

Poetry:
                 e.e.. cu mmings “anyone lived in a pretty how town”
                 Walt Whitman “I hear A merica Singing”
                 Langston Hughes, “I, too Sing A merica”
                 Dudley Randall “Ballad of Birmingham”
                 Carl Sanburg “Ch icago”
                 Robert Frost selections

Drama:
                 Our Town
                 The Glass Menagerie or A Streetcar Named Desire
Movie:
                 “Grapes of Wrath”
                 Selections fro m “Lonesome Dove”




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Curriculu m Docu ment
Grade 10
Revision September, 2004
3. Individual Identity v. a National Identity
          Objectives:
          1. To co mpare/contrast how different age, racial, and gender groups strive to retain a sense of personal
          identity with in a national identity of conformity and commonality.

          2. To analy ze the conflict that occurs when individual identity is restricted by the
             expectations of a defined group identity.

          3. To evaluate how a national identity(being an A merican) is essential to the wel l-being of all people.

Resources: Much of the short selections are fro m the anthology, Language of Literature, A merican Literature, or An
                Introduction or Reading Poetry .

          Other sources are available through Depart ment Head

Novels:
                   The Catcher in the Rye, J.D. Salinger
                   The Bell Jar

Non fict ion
                   Martin Luther King, Jr. “Letter fro m a Brimingham Jail”
                   Henry Dav id Thoreau “Disobedience”
                   Maya Angelou I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings
                   Ralph Waldo Emerson “Self – reliance”

Short Story
                   Richard Wright “Battle Royal”
                   Amy Tan Two Kinds
                   John Updike A & P
Poetry             Walt Whitman
                   Robert Frost
                   Sylvia Plath
                   Anne Sexton
                   Langston Hughes

Drama              Julius Caesar

Movies:            Cool Hand Luke




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Curriculu m Docu ment
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Exploring and Responding to Text

Students will read the important classics of their grade level, determine the ways in which they have shaped Western
culture, and analyze the reasons for their being considered "classics."

Students will read, view and listen to key works of contemporary literature and create responses that examine the
works' principal elements.

Students will analyze the appeal of various works and determine their literary value.

Students will determine the various influences on authors and analyze the impact of those influences on the text.

Students will explain how all of the literary conventions and devices in a text or performance are used by an author
to express tone, create mood and establish overall theme.

Students will read, listen to and view literary texts and identify and explain the human experiences they convey.

Students will read classic and contemporary literature to determine polit ical and social ideas which characterize
those works.

Students will examine classical and contemporary literature to consider various cultural and historical influences on
the authors.

Students will read and respond to both classic and contemporary texts to examine themes central to the American
experience and those portrayed in the range of traditional literature.

Producing Texts

Students will select fro m the co mplete variety of text structures (essay, short story, poetry, academic essay, report,
research paper, response to literature, documentary, etc.) the appropriate organizat ional pattern for addressing
audience, purpose and point of view.

Students will identify and use effectively the salient features of all appropriate oral, v isual and written discourse.

Students will determine which primary and secondary sources are appropriate to the task (research paper, fict ion,
school newspaper, video) and will integrate and elaborate upon information effectively in the final product.

Readi ng and Res ponding

Students will describe the thoughts, opinions and questions that arise as they read, view, or listen to a text,
demonstrate a basic understanding of the text, and identify inconsistencies and ambiguit ies.

Students will examine the fit between the text and prior knowledge by reconciling differences, extracting clues or
evidence, making inferences, drawing conclusions, predicting events, inferring motives and generalizing beyond the
text.

Students will ask and answer their own and each other's text-related crit ical and analytical questions.

Students will describe theme, sy mbolis m, tone and other complex elements of fiction, and identify point of view,
man ipulative language and other elements of bias in nonfiction materials.




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Curriculu m Docu ment
Grade 10
Revision September, 2004



Semester 2:

There is no sequential order or s pecific texts for each essential question. However, by the end of this
semester, each essential question must recei ve adequate attention and all the core texts must be completed.
Below is a suggested program of study as an example of how content and resources are sequenced and
selected in order to address the overarching essential questions for this semester.




THEM E: What is the American dream? How is our defin ition of this dream reflected in the literature of our nation?
       1. Ho w did the notion of this dream develop?
       2. Is it attainable for all people and how do people respond when it is not
          attainable?
       3. Ho w is the American dream influenced by personal identity?

 Each of the three units of study corresponds to the essential questions under the umbrella of the central theme.


1. The development of the concept of the American Dream

          Objectives:

          1. To define the A merican Dream and exp lain its foundations.
          2. To analy ze how the A merican Dream is depicted in literature.
          3. To trace the change of the American Dream fro m its origin to its place in today’s
              society; to examine how literature depicts this evolution.

Novels:

Short Stories: Washington Irving “The Devil and To m Walker”
                 Nathaniel Hawthorne “Dr. Heidegger’s Experiment”
Non-fiction
                 Thomas Jefferson The Declarat ion of Independence
                 Crevecoeur ("What is an American?")
                 Abraham Lincoln “The Gettysburg Address”
Poetry:
                 Walt Whitman
                 James Russell Lowell “Stanza on Freedo m”
Drama:

Movie:
                   Selections fro m “Ragtime”




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2. The American Dream: attainable or elusive?

    Objectives:

    1.   To compare/contrast how fictional and non-fictional characters succeed or fail
         in their pursuit of the A merican Dream.

    2.   To examine how the concept of the American Dream functions as a litera ry archetype.

    3.   To describe how fict ional and non-fict ional characters respond to the opportunities
         and restrictions in American culture.

Resources:

     Novel:
                           To Kill a Mockingbird
                           The Last Picture Show or Ethan Frome
   Short Story:
                           F. Scott Fit zgerald “Winter Dreams”
                           Anzia Yezierska “A merica and I”
                           Gish Jen “In the A merican Society”
                           Lucy Honig “Eng lish as a Second Language”

   Non-fiction             (To be added)

   Poetry                  Paul Laurence Dunbar “We Wear the Mask”
                           Edwin Arlington Robinson “Richard Cory”
                           Edgar Lee Masters “Lucinda Matlock”
                           Carl Sandburg “Chicago”

  Drama:                   Death of a Salesman
                           Piano Lesson or Fences

  Movie:                   Selections fro m Ragtime

3. The individual identity in relationship to the American Dream
    Objectives:

         1.   To examine the impact that the American Dream has on personality and
              the attitude of fictional and non-fict ional characters.

         2.   To describe how individuals have revised and redefined the American Dream
              to respond to personal needs and changes in our society.

         3.   To recognize how broader interpretations of the American Dream and corresponding
              life choices enhance our understanding of humanity.

Resources:

  Novel:
                           The Old Man and the Sea
                           The Color Purple or Their Eyes Were Watching God



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Short Story:
                           Audrey M. Lee “Wait ing for Her Train”
                           Amy Tan “A Pair of Tic kets”

Non-fiction:
                           Zora Neale Hurston “How it Feels to be Co lored Me”
                           James Bald win “My Dungeon Shook: Letter to My Nephew on the One Hundredth
                           Anniversary of the Emancipation”
                           Toni Morrison “Thoughts on the African-American Novel”
                           S.I. Hayakawa “The Case for Official Eng lish”
                           Carlos Alberto Montaner “Why Fear Spanish?”
                           John F. Kennedy “Inaugural Address
                           Henry Dav id Thoreau fro m Walden

  Poetry:
                           Langston Hughes “I, Too”
                           Robert Frost: “The Road Less Traveled”

  Drama:                   To be determined




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Writing

The writing program co mb ines a variety of writing techniques. Students will demonstrate their proficiency in
thoughtful, crit ical responses to their reading. Many of their reader responses will prepare them for the writing on
the Connecticut Academic Performance Tests (CAPT). Students will also develop their skills in mo re fo rmal literary
analysis by using many different topics and approaches listed below. Many writing exercises will incorporate the
Performance Task approach which helps to unify and clarify the purpose of their wo rk. Each task is designed with a
particular background, purpose, audience, task, procedure and guideline for assessment. Students are able to
examine an assessment list that clearly delineates the expectations and the evaluative criteria for the task. In
addition, the task provides students with models that can guide them in the co mpletion of their work. Models of
teacher-designed performance tasks relating to the course literature with s amples of student work will be included in
a separate imp lementation guide.

   Journal writ ing
   Reader response essays
   Critical analysis of literature ( formal essay format)
    1. Co mpare/contrast
    2. Character sketch
    3. Critique of literature
    4. Analysis of style
    5. Defend/refute
    6. Thematic connection to personal experience
    7. Personal narrative

   Research with emphasis on:

        Paraphrasing and generally avoiding plagiaris m;
        Including paper and electronic resources, evaluating validity of sources;
        Including journals and literary crit icis m;
        Including interviews, volunteer work, and other possible outside research;
        Using correct M LA format, including electronic resources.

Students will demonstrate proficiency in the following:

    All Students (English 10)                    English 10C                          English 10A

   Journal Writ ing                  Add:                                Add:
   Reader response essays             A. Co mpare/contrast
   Personal Narrative                    Character sketch               A.   Critique of literature
   Research Activity                     Defend/refute
                                          Thematic connection
                                                                          B.   Literary analysis (x2)
                                                                              Research paper
                                          Research paper



Vocabulary Program
Emphasis on the following skills utilizing Shostak and other resources:

   Sentence completions
   Analogies (SAT prep)
   Word bank – working vocabulary
   Knowledge of prefixes, suffixes, and roots

Vocabulary in context fro m all literature



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Grading Policy
Expectations
Written expression and writing skills are of prime importance in all English courses offered at Middletown High
School. Consequently, a student’s mark is based upon the effectiveness of her/his written work or upon the degree
of imp rovement in that written work. Since imp roved oral co mmunicat ion is also a conce rn and since some of the
most important learn ing takes place in the daily class discussion, a student’s grade in this class is also based upon
class participation and attitude.

Course Specifications
Information will be provided by teacher in individual course

Grading Criteria
Based on specific course requirements and activities, these percentages may vary within 10% for any
given term. Teacher will provide more specific information for each course .

A. Major writing assignments (50%)
        Performance tasks
        Projects
        Papers
        Tests
        Journals

B. Other written work (B and C = 50%)
        Homework (including vocabulary)
        In- class assignments
        Quizzes

C.   Class Activities
          Participation
          Cooperative learning activities
          Oral presentations
          Peer assessment

Late Work
Late work (daily or homework) is not accepted excepted in the case of an excused absence. Papers or
major assignments may be accepted, but penalized for being late. Specific penalties will be at the
discretion of the teacher.

Excused Absences
It is the student’s responsibility to make arrangements for make-up work immediately upon her/his return
to school and to complete the work within one week of returning. In the case
of an extended absence, s/he must make arrangements with the teacher for submitting missed
assignments.




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