Marketing Strategies of Planet Health

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					Rev. 7/07                                      UWW DEGREE PLAN INSTRUCTIONS
   INSTRUCTIONS FOR USING THIS FORM

   Using the form: This form consists of four pages beyond this instruction page. Each page has a tab at the bottom of the screen. The
   form will allow you to enter data only in the fields open to you. With the possible exception of the course listings, you should have
   enough space available to meet the requirements of the fields. Because these workbook sheets are protected, you will be able to
   make only those changes allowed. If you have lists of courses in any of the four sections that exceed twenty lines for the completed
   sections and fifteen for the proposed sections, then follow the instructions in the comments on the right hand side.

   PAGE 1: Selected area of concentration, definition, and individualized focus: Select your general topic area from the dropdown
   list of concentration topics. If you select Other--see below, a line will open up for you to enter your individualized concentration title. If
   you have selected one of the UWW titles, click on the Definitions button to find the definition goes with the selected title, then copy and
   paste it back in the page 1 definition box. If you had selected Other--see below in the title box, you will have to write your own
   definition of the new field. You may have a particular focus for a UWW field. If so, describe it briefly in the designated box. Having a
   special focus is neither required nor expected, but it may help clarify why certain courses are selected over others in your degree.

   PAGE 1: Comments field Use this field to give the reviewers information that may be helpful in evaluating the plan. For instance, if
   some of your previous community college courses were transferred to UMass as upper division course equivalents or if some will need
   department approval for transfer, then you will want to note that.

   PAGE 2: Credits currently on your SPIRE transcript: This page should identify every course or credited learning experience
   already on your transcript. Use the original course number, department, and title from the institution in which you took the course, but
   put the UMass equivalent in parentheses if it is transferred in as a 300+ course equivalent.. List only those credits in the top grid that
   are directly related to your concentration. Put all remaining credits in the grid below until all credits on the transcript are accounted for.
   Don't forget the transfer/UMA field. It identifies whether the credits represent transfer or residency (UMass Amherst) credit. The
   credits will be added automatically, so you can check the totals on this page against your transcript total. Note that only 75 transfer
   credits will be included in the tally, though you may have actually transferred in more credits.

   Extra page: Use this extra sheet for any courses that do not fit into the grids. Though the total credits are visible on this extra page,
   this calculation does not carry over to the original numbered pages. These credits will be included in the final tally only if the totals
   for UMA and transfer credits are entered as the last line or two (with the UMA/TR column filled) of the category where they
   belong on the 2-DONE or 3-TO DO page.

   PAGE 3: Credits remaining to be earned: This page breaks the credits you have yet to earn into
   UWW core courses, upper division and other courses rounding out the concentration, other unrelated courses (usually remaining gen
   eds to be done), special transcript credits, and finally, the portfolio credits. The portfolio comes last, because the number of credits
   sought for prior learning is often determined by the number of credits remaining after all the other requirements have been identified.
   The portfolio credit numbered entered here is a target; approval of the degree plan does not indicate any assurance the target will be
   met.

   Page 3: Credit tallies: At the bottom of the page, you will see tallies that automatically track the number of completed and proposed
   credits, of residency and transfer credits, and of total and concentration credits. A red cell indicates the credits fall short of
   requirements, so your degree plan will need readjustment. Only 75 transfer credits will be counted toward the 120 needed for
   graduation. (Concentration totals may include the related extra transfer credits, however.)

   PAGES 4: Portfolio assessment: The number of credits you have identified for your portfolio on page 3 is transferred automatically
   to this portfolio page. You will decide if your portfolio credits are all related to the concentration, elective credits unrelated to the
   concentration, or a combination of the two.

   PAGES 4: Portfolio experiences: This list of experiences should be limited, both in the information about individual items and in the
   total number included. Usually no more than four or five central jobs or experiences should be identified here. This is not a short
   resume, but a succinct statement of those experiences which you will be writing about in some depth to demonstrate your learning in
   the designated topics. Follow closely the format of the example given, adapting the content you put in the fields when necessary.

   PAGE 4: Portfolio learning areas: The portfolio learning areas identify college-level topics for which you will be seeking credit
   through your prior learning portfolio. Include no more than five or six; the portfolio will gain more from a rich discussion of fewer areas
   than from a cursory examination of many. These learning areas are topics, not jobs or activities. For instance, rather than landscape
   contractor, you would write something like landscape design and construction.
3/22/2011                                            UWW Degree Plan                                             1-statement




Student: LAST name, first name, middle initial                       Student Number

                                     <-- Use mouse to click in degree box
                    B.A. or B.S.


UWW advisor                              Entry semester              Expected Grad date:

Select concentration title:

Click on Definitions tab at bottom; then copy and paste selected definition of concentration below:




Identify the special focus, if any, you will give to your degree in this field.




Use space below for additional explanatory notes (optional):




PREVIOUS UMASS AMHERST STUDENTS ONLY:                                Did you file for Fresh Start on entering UWW?
                           YES               NO                Semester Fresh Start began:
If you filed for Fresh Start, you must complete 45 credits at UMass Amherst since that point.

Indicate below how your general education requirements will be fulfilled:
                                                  Use mouse to click on box to select.
General education requirements reflected in CLEP and courses:
I have completed the Mass Transfer Block
I have completed the Commonwealth Transfer Compact:



           Advisor Signature                                                                    Date

           Student Signature                                                                    Date

           UWW Review Date
3/22/2011                                          UWW Degree Plan                                                   2-done


                                  CREDITS ALREADY ON TRANSCRIPT
Enter below all courses currently on your SPIRE transcript, separating out those that are are directly related to your
Area of Concentration (including transfer and UMA courses that meet general education requirements) from those that
are not related.

DIRECTLY RELATED TO CONCENTRATION:
If a course is transferred in as a UMass equivalent numbered 300 or above, put equivalent in parentheses.
   Dept      Number                        Title                     gen ed    type       credits




                         TOTAL PREVIOUS CREDITS IN CONCENTRATION:                                   0

NOT RELATED TO CONCENTRATION

Enter below the courses now on SPIRE not related to your concentration:
   Dept      Number                        Title                     gen ed    type       credits




                         TOTAL PREVIOUS CREDITS NOT IN CONCENTRATION:                               0
            TOTAL TRANSFER CREDITS CURRENTLY ON TRANSCRIPT (maximum 75)                             0
            TOTAL RESIDENCYCREDITS (red = under minimum 45)                                         0
            TOTAL CREDITS CURRENTLY ON SPIRE                                                        0
            When the plan is complete, none of the boxes should be red.
3/22/2011                                             UWW Degree Plan                                                                   3-to do


CREDITS YET TO BE EARNED:

Enter below the UWW core courses for Professional Studies (Frameworks, Writing, 2
Professional Studies courses)
Dept      Number Title                                                                              gen ed      type          credits
UWW       191G   Frameworks of Understanding                                                            I        UMA                4
UWW       370    Writing about Experience                                                           Jr Wrtg      UMA                3
UWW              Integrative Experience                                                                IE        UMA                3
Select from the dropdown box the 2 Experiential Reflection courses you intend to take or are taking:
Reflections courses: Select one from this drop-down list:                                                        UMA               3
Reflections courses: Select one from this drop-down list:                                                        UMA               3
                                                                            TOTAL UWW CORE CREDITS:                               16

Courses in area of concentration yet to be taken:
Dept      Number     Title                                                                           gen ed       type        credits




                                  TOTAL NEW CONCENTRATION CREDITS TO BE EARNED:                                                    0
Additional non-concentration courses to be completed (including gen eds not listed above):
Dept      Number     Title                                                                           gen ed       type        credits




                     TOTAL OTHER GEN EDS AND ELECTIVES NOT IN CONCENTRATION:                                                       0

Special transcript credits sought for trainings, etc. (transfer credit):
Topic of S.T. :                                                                                                  TR


Prior Learning Portfolio credits sought (see portfolio page):
UWW       296Y       Total prior learning portfolio (details on next page)                                      UMA

                                  Total credits to be earned:                                                                     16
                                  Total credits already earned:                                                                    0
                                  Total credits in concentration (red = < minimum 45):                                             0
(Because of transfer limits, the final degree total may be different from adding the totals above. See degree total below.)


          When the plan is complete, none of the boxes below should be red.
          TOTAL TRANSFER CREDITS (maximum 75 count here)                                                                           0
          TOTAL RESIDENCYCREDITS (red = under minimum 45)                                                                         16
          TOTAL DEGREE CREDITS TOWARD GRADUATION (red = less than 120)                                                           16
3/22/2011                                 UWW Degree Plan                                          4-prior learning


                                      PRIOR LEARNING PORTFOLIO



Number of prior learning credits from page 3:                       0

Select the way your portfolio credits will apply:
                     area of concentration only




Below give information about only those positions or roles that you plan to discuss in depth in your
portfolio. Use only as many lines as you need, abbreviating when necessary. See the sample in the
line below:
1996-2006      Little Kids Day Care         West Springfield, MA        Head Teacher (2001-2006)


  dates held               organization                city/state             most recent position title




Identify the 2-6 portfolio areas for which you will be seeking credit in your portfolio. These should be
topics of study, not job titles. (Example: Marketing Strategies , not Marketing Strategist)
                       ADDITIONAL COURSES

This page is to be used to list courses that do not fit in the grids on the other pages.
Check the box above each grid to indicate how the courses in that grid apply.
  COURSES BELOW ARE:
     Done-Concntrn     Done-Not concntrn        To Do-Concntrn         To Do-Not Concntrn

  Dept      Number                      Title                      gen ed        type       credits




                       Total "runover credits" in this category:                                      0

 COURSES BELOW ARE:
      Done-Concntrn        Done-Not concntrn         To Do-Concntrn         To Do-Not Concntrn
  Dept      Number                      Title                      gen ed        type       credits




                       Total "runover credits" in this category:                                      0

 COURSES BELOW ARE:
       Done-Concntrn      Done-Not concntrn          To Do-Concntrn         To Do-Not Concntrn
  Dept      Number                      Title                      gen ed        type       credits




                       Total "runover credits" in this category:                                      0

 COURSES BELOW ARE:
       Done-Concntrn       Done-Not concntrn         To Do-Concntrn         To Do-Not Concntrn
  Dept      Number                      Title                      gen ed        type       credits




                       Total "runover credits" in this category:                                      0
Common UWW Focuses and Areas of Concentration
Arts Areas of Concentration
Arts Administration—The study of how the principles of management and leadership may be applied
to arts organizations and arts programming and events. In addition to the study of these principles,
this concentration usually requires an understanding of the creative process, program development in
the arts, fundraising, financial management, and arts education.
                                                                                                       DEFINITIONS PAG
Business Areas of Concentration
Business Studies—The study of the generic processes that support for profit and non-profit
organizations in the attempt to move products, resources and services to the marketplace.
The understanding of basic management, leadership, economic, organizational,
administrative, customer, employee, ethics, policy, and technological elements are of
concern. This concentration includes a variety of components in psychology, business,
economics and human resources.
Accounting and Finance—The study of the financial and accounting systems employed by
profit and non-profit organizations and businesses and the relationship of those systems to
organizational structures and managerial decision making processes. Coursework is
generally drawn from Information technology, accounting, management and mathematics.

Business Operations—Often referred to as Supply Chain Management today, this
concentration is the study of designing new and improving existing production processes to
utilize both material and human resources efficiently. This concentration usually includes an
understanding of production and inventory control, material requirement planning, and the
fundamental principles of management and leadership.
Hospitality Administration—The study of the application of management and leadership
principles to the special environments and conditions of the hospitality field. In addition to an
understanding of basic management and leadership principles, this concentration requires
exposure to and experience in specific areas of hospitality (e.g. travel and tourism, food
service, hotel administration).
Human Resource Development—The study of how to utilize the human resources of an
organization effectively and efficiently. Within this concentration are the traditional HR areas
(e.g. compensation administration, personnel management) and emerging fields, such as
employee assistance and counseling, career counseling, and workforce education and
training, may also be included.
Information Systems Administration—The study of the role of information technology in an
organization and the development and administration of information systems. This
concentration usually includes the study of information technology, the fundamental principles
of management and leadership, and issues of employee training and organizational change
that often accompany the introduction of new technology in an organization.
Labor and Employee Relations—The study of the relationships between management and
employees in both unionized and non-unionized organizations. The areas of collective
bargaining, employee empowerment, conflict resolution, and organizational communication
are usually included in this concentration.
Marketing and Sales—The study of communicating information about an organization,
products, services, or ideas to targeted customers and/or the public at large. This area of
study can include courses in marketing research, sales, advertising, psychology, sociology,
and the media.
Non-Profit Administration—The study of the special conditions that characterize management
and leadership in non-profit organizations. This concentration adds to a broad overview of
management and leadership theory an investigation of the public policy, human resources,
legal, and community relations issues that are commonly encountered in non-profit
organizations.
Organizational Studies—The exploration of the structures, behaviors, and interactions that
exist within and between organizations. This concentration includes the study of management
and leadership theory, issues of authority and power, and organizational behavior. This
concentration may include courses in culture, management, communication, media,
psychology, sociology, and information technology.
Public Relations—The study of how to communicate with various sectors of the public (e.g.
customers, potential customers, prospects, voters, fans, etc.) in order to influence their
attitudes and opinions in the interest of promoting a person, product, organization, or idea.
This concentration may include courses in journalism, psychology, marketing, sociology,
communication and media studies.
Sustainable Entrepreneurship-- the study of businesses that are consistent with the principles
of sustainable living including: (1) How profitable the business is (2) How it treats its
employees and interacts with the community, and (3) How it affects the natural environment.
Areas of interest include green building, sustainable agriculture, holistic health, and
sustainable energy. This concentration includes courses related to ecology and business
including accounting, marketing, management, agriculture, biology, and climate.

Team and Project Development—The study of organizing and managing projects within an
organization. Because projects in large organizations today often cut across several
departments and organizational cultures, this concentration often includes an understanding
of organizational communication, organizational cultures, diversity in the workplace, and
conflict resolution, in addition to the fundamental principles of management and leadership.
This concentration may also have an Information Technology component.

Sustainability Studies Concentrations
Sustainability Studies—The study of practical solutions for creating a sustainable future in
specific regions and on the planet. Sustainability Studies integrates knowledge and
methodologies from the Sciences, Humanities, and Arts to provide a roadmap that can be
applied to the design, selection, and implementation of policies, practices, technologies, and
strategies. Courses are typically drawn from agriculture, chemistry, biology, public health,
nutrition, communication, political science and business.
Sustainable Entrepreneurship-- the study of businesses that are consistent with the
principles of sustainable living including: (1) How profitable the business is (2) How it treats
its employees and interacts with the community, and (3) How it affects the natural
environment. Areas of interest include green building, sustainable agriculture, holistic health,
and sustainable energy. This concentration includes courses related to ecology and business
including accounting, marketing, management, agriculture, biology, and climate.

Green Building and Design—The study of designing, building and retrofitting structures to
utilize environmentally sustainable materials and alternative sources of energy. This
concentration includes courses in the Building Materials and Wood Technology green building
certificate program, design, sustainable entrepreneurship, and business (e.g. marketing,
accounting, management).
Sustainable Food Systems—The study of sustainable agriculture, food production, and food
distribution systems. This concentration examines the impact of large-scale industrial food
systems on the environment, on the treatment of animals, and on public health and explores
alternative, sustainable approaches to food production and distribution. Components of this
concentration include courses in agriculture, food systems, nutrition, and business.

Holistic Health and Small Business Development—The study of how to create and
maintain a sustainable business in the holistic health field. Students explore the possibilities
and pitfalls of small business development in this growing area of health and wellness.
Components of this concentration include courses in holistic health, community health
education, sustainable entrepreneurship, and business.
Children’s Learning and Development Areas of Concentration
Children’s Learning and Development (CLD)—The study of how children learn and develop
and the services and policies needed to facilitate their healthy growth. Students learn about
the needs of children who may have a range of backgrounds and requirements. Knowledge is
attained through coursework in areas such as education, psychology, sociology and public
policy.
Child Advocacy Studies—The study of the theory and practice of providing support to children.
Advocacy may take the form of working directly with children and their families, or working
within the legal, criminal justice, mental health, social service, or political sphere on behalf of
children. Child advocacy studies requires knowledge of issues facing children including
cultural diversity, child abuse, psychopathology, poverty, substance abuse, and cognitive,
emotional, and physical disabilities. Knowledge is attained through coursework in areas such
as sociology, communication, public health, psychology, education, and public policy.

Child and Youth Services—The study of the theoretical and practical aspects of social
supports provided to children and adolescents with social, emotional, and behavioral
problems. Supports and interventions in this area may occur through the schools, the criminal
justice system, health and mental health providers, social services, and often through a
combination of these. Coursework in areas such as sociology, education, psychology, and
legal studies provides knowledge relevant to this field.
Early Care and Education – The study of the developmental stages – including the cognitive,
emotional, social, and physical domains - that children proceed through from birth to age five,
and of the best approaches to teaching and caring for these children. The early care and
education curriculum needs to address, at a minimum, the following skills in a
developmentally appropriate way: self-help, social, literacy and numeracy. In addition,
educators must have a background in individual and classroom behavior management
strategies, multicultural education and differentiated instruction.
Early Care and Education Administration includes study of both the cognitive, psychological,
and physical development of young children, and also the areas of business and supervision
necessary to administer an early childcare center. This area includes coursework relevant to
engaging diverse children and families in education. Coursework is drawn from education,
psychology, business, public policy, and sociology.

Education Studies in (Subject Area)
(Students insert the word of the subject area of interest into this description, such as English, History,
Mathematics, Biology, Health, and so on. This is not an educator licensure program).
Education Studies in (Subject Area) focuses on learning about (subject area) and acquiring the skills
needed to successfully convey this information in the classroom to diverse students. Coursework is
drawn from (departments pertinent to students’ area of interest) and relevant courses in psychology
and education.
Criminal Justice Areas of Concentration
Criminal Justice--The study of the legal and judicial system, and how it operates though the
fields of law enforcement, the courts, and the corrections system. Studies in this area focus
on the social and legal context within which crimes are committed, criminals are adjudicated,
and incarceration and prisoner rehabilitation occur. Learning in the theoretical and practical
aspects of this area is achieved through coursework in areas such as legal studies, sociology,
and psychology.
Health Studies Areas of Concentration
Health Studies—The study of health and illness and those services and policies aimed at
improving health. Interventions may occur at the level of individual patients, families,
institutions, communities, or public policies. Coursework is drawn from areas such as biology,
public health, nursing, sociology, public policy, and psychology.
Alternative/Complementary/Holistic Health—The study of cultural and societal health
practices other than the Western, biomedical model of healthcare. Coursework may be drawn
from psychology, sociology, anthropology, nursing, education, history, sociology, and public
health.
Health Advocacy/Education/Promotion—The study of principles, strategies and
frameworks to improve the health of individuals and communities. Academic components can
include coursework in political science, public health, nursing, communication, sociology,
psychology, intercultural studies, public policy, gender studies, anthropology, education, and
management.
Health Administration—Study of the application of management and administrative skills in
healthcare organizations and communities. Academic components can include coursework in
management, business, health, legal studies and public policy.
Human Services Areas of Concentration
Human Services Studies—The study of the ways to provide personal and social support to
individuals and families who need temporary or long-term assistance due to disability and
short and long-term circumstances. Learning in this area is concerned with the causes and
interventions for human service needs, the social context within which supports are provided,
and management of the non-profit agencies that typically provide human services.
Coursework is drawn from areas such as psychology, sociology, education, public health,
women’s studies, legal studies, and management.
Child Advocacy Studies—The study of the theory and practice of providing support to
children. Advocacy may take the form of working directly with children and their families, or
working within the legal, criminal justice, mental health, social service, or political sphere on
behalf of children. Child advocacy studies requires knowledge of issues facing children
including cultural diversity, child abuse, psychopathology, poverty, substance abuse, and
cognitive, emotional, and physical disabilities. Knowledge is attained through coursework in
areas such as sociology, communication, public health, psychology, education, and public
policy.
Child and Youth Services—The study of the theoretical and practical aspects of social
supports provided to children and adolescents with social, emotional, and behavioral
problems. Supports and interventions in this area may occur through the schools, the criminal
justice system, health and mental health providers, social services, and often through a
combination of these. Coursework in areas such as sociology, education, psychology, and
legal studies provides knowledge relevant to this field.
Developmental Disabilities--The study of the psychological and social causes of
developmental disabilities, and of the various ways in which individuals with developmental
disabilities are educated, rehabilitated, and supported in our society. This study may consider
the social and political context within which developmentally disabled persons are supported,
as well as policy or management issues related to the funding for and delivery of supports.
Components of study may include psychology, sociology, education, management, and public
policy.
Elder Care—The study of the broad range of medical, social and spiritual needs of persons in
old age, and how individual and social supports can address these needs. This area includes
studies in human development, the sociology of aging, family and community dynamics, and
public policy related to geriatric populations. Coursework in areas such as sociology, human
development, psychology, public health, and public policy provides theoretical and practical
knowledge in this area of concentration.
Human Services Advocacy—The study of the theory and practice of providing advice and
counseling to various populations that are the recipients of human services, to insure that
they are aware of and enabled to receive those social benefits that they are afforded.
Advocacy effort may take the form of working directly with individuals or working within the
political and social community on behalf of large groups. Human service advocacy requires
knowledge about the social and personal causes that create the need for social supports,
knowledge about organizational dynamics and effective communication, political systems,
and the regulatory context of human services. Knowledge in this area is provided through
coursework in areas such as sociology, communication, media studies, psychology, public
health, and public policy.
Human Services Administration—The study of the theoretical and practical aspects of
managing an organization that provides human services supports. Areas of learning include
the management of finance, human resources, operations, and facility management. Study
in these areas takes into account the nonprofit, state-funded, and highly regulated
environment within which human services organizations typically operate. Coursework
relevant to this area may draw from areas such as management, organizational dynamics,
public policy, legal studies, and leadership studies.
Mental Health Studies—The study of the causes, prevention, and treatment of various forms
of mental illness. Learning in this area explores the issues involved in creating integrated
systems to provide the needed services, supports and safeguards to individuals with
psychiatric disabilities, their families, and the broader community. Course work is primarily
drawn from psychology, public health and sociology.
Public Policy Issues in Human Services—The study of the broad range of public policy that
affects the provision of human services. Public Policy includes the statutory and regulatory
context within which public funding and supports are provided to such human services
recipients. Knowledge relevant to this area is gained from the study of policy formed at all
levels of government, whether through legislative or judicial actions, and is achieved through
coursework in areas such as sociology, political science, legal studies, and public policy.

Substance Abuse Rehabilitation—The study of the personal, social and biological causes
of substance abuse and addiction, its effects on the lives of individuals and their communities,
and the various treatments and interventions that can be provided. Coursework is drawn
from areas such as psychology, sociology, biology, public health, nursing, and legal studies.

Integrative Liberal Arts Areas of Concentration
American Studies: The study of United States life and culture in historical and modern times.
Students examine dominant cultural patterns as well as the diversity of cultures in the United
States through the social sciences and the humanities. Courses are drawn from African
American studies, comparative literature, English, history, journalism, political science,
sociology, and women’s studies.
Global Studies: The study of the causes and effects of globalization and responses to it from
a multidisciplinary perspective. Areas of interest may include political and social changes,
resource use, global health concerns, human rights, global safety issues, and others.
Courses are drawn from anthropology, communications, economics, geography, political
science, sociology and women’s studies.
Urban Studies: Social science principles are applied to the study of urban institutions and the
forces influencing urban social, cultural, and political life. Includes instruction in urban theory,
the development and evolution of urban areas, urban sociology, principles of urban and social
planning, and the politics and economics of urban government and services. Courses are
drawn from architecture and regional planning, economics, education, geography, history,
political science, public health and sociology.
Social Justice Studies: This area of concentration focuses on the study of social change,
justice, and the organizing of social movements. Students may elect to focus on social justice
issues in general or on a particular social problem or rights movement such as poverty,
women’s rights, anti-racism, immigrant rights, labor, GLBT rights, environmental justice, or
others. Courses are drawn from a range of fields including gender studies, legal studies,
political science, public health, and sociology.
Journalism Areas of Concentration
Journalism Studies—The study of the theory and practice of various kinds of journalism and
the impact of journalism on public opinion and policy. This concentration generally includes
courses in journalism and writing, but may also include study in a wide range of areas such as
history, sociology, communication, and political science.

Journalism in the Digital Age
The study of the theory and practice of various kinds of journalism with a concentration on
digital media such as websites, blogs, digital photography and videography. Learning includes
examining the impact of journalism on public opinion and policy. This concentration generally
includes courses in journalism and writing, but may also include study in a wide range of
areas such as digital arts, history, sociology, communication, political science.

Writing for the Media--The study of the theory and practices of writing for various print,
broadcast, and electronic media. This concentration would have a strong focus in developing
writing skills and achieving an understanding of the demands of the different media, such as
the web, television, film, theater.
DEFINITIONS PAGE

				
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Description: Marketing Strategies of Planet Health document sample