Optimalittstheorie am Phonologie Morphologie Syntax Interface

Document Sample
Optimalittstheorie am Phonologie Morphologie Syntax Interface Powered By Docstoc
					Optimalitätstheorie am Phonologie-
/Morphologie-/Syntax-Interface der
            slavischen
             Sprachen


 Modul: MSW_1 (Russische/polnische Sprache in Struktur, Funktion
                           und Gebrauch),
  MA Fremdsprachenlinguistik/MA Kommunikationslinguistik: SL 1
 Phonetik / Phonologie, 3 LP, 2 SWS oder SL 2 Morphologie, 3 LP, 2
                                SWS
                          Seminar, 2 SWS
                        Prof. Dr. Peter Kosta
 Mo 11.15-12.45                                   1.11.227 20.10.



                                                                     1
Optimalitätstheorie am Phonologie-/Morphologie-
        /Syntax-Interface der slavischen
                    Sprachen
Im Anschluss an die bekannte Theorie von Prince und
Smolensky werden die Sprachebenen Phonologie,
Morphologie und Syntax in den einzelnen slavischen
Sprachen analysiert.
Im Vordergrund werden natürlich die Phonologie
(Silbenphonologie) und Morphonologie stehen.

Wichtigste Arbeitsgrundlage:
Rutgers Optimality Archive
http://roa.rutgers.edu/index.php3




                                                      2
(1) Alan Prince, Rutgers University <prince@ruccs.rutgers.edu>
Paul Smolensky, John Hopkins University <smolensky@jhu.edu>

        537- Optimality Theory: Constraint
       0802 Interaction in Generative
             Grammar //
             http://roa.rutgers.edu/view.php
             3?id=845




                                                                 3
                           Optimalitätstheorie

   Abstract ROA Version, 8/2002: essentially the same as the Tech Report,
    with occasional small-scale clarificatory rewordings. Various typos,
    oversights, and outright errors have been corrected. Pagination has
    changed, but the original footnote and example numbering is retained.
    Future citations should include reference to this version.
    //
    This work develops a conception of grammar in which optimality with
    respect to a set of constraints defines well-formedness. The argument
    begins with a brief assessment of the promise of optimization-based
    approaches, focusing on issues of explanation from principle. The general
    lay-out of Optimality Theory is sketched, including the core notions of
    ranking & violability and the emphasis on universality in the constraint set.
    //




                                                                                4
                       Optimalitätstheorie


   Part I shows how the ideas play out over a variety of
    phenomena and generalization patterns. The key distinction
    between Markedness and Faithfulness constraints is
    introduced. The analytical focus is on empirical phenomena
    ranging from epenthesis to infixation to a variety of
    sometimes-complex interactions between prominence,
    syllabification, stress, and word form. Part I concludes with a
    formal presentation of the theory.




                                                                      5
                       Optimalitätstheorie


   Part II investigates the theory of syllable structure. It begins
    with a study of the basic Jakobson typology and moves on to
    present an analysis of aspects of the Lardil phonological
    system which incorporates the results of the basic theory. The
    section concludes with a detailed exploration of a generalized
    theory based on multipolar scales of sonority-to-syllable-
    position affinity.
    //
    Part III examines the derivation of universal and language
    particular inventories, provides discussion of foundational
    issues, and concludes with analysis of the relation between
    Optimality Theory and theories using a notion of repair.


                                                                       6
                   Optimalitätstheorie


   Keywords optimality, markedness, faithfulness,
    ranking, violable, universalArea Phonology, UG,
    Formal Analysis
   Type Manuscript




                                                      7
                          Optimalitätstheorie


   Table of Contents
   1. Preliminaries . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
    .......................................1
   1.1 Background and Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
    ................................1
   1.2 Optimality . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
    .................................4
   1.3 Overall Structure of the Argument . . . . . . . . . . . . .
    ................................7




                                                                               8
                           Optimalitätstheorie


   Part I Optimality and Constraint Interaction
   Overview of Part I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
    . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
   2. Optimality in Grammar: Core Syllabification in
    Imdlawn Tashlhiyt Berber . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
   2.1 The Heart of Dell & Elmedlaoui . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
    . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
   2.2 Optimality Theory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
    . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
   2.3 Summary of discussion to date . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
    . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22


                                                                                 9
                      Optimalitätstheorie


   3. Generalization-Forms in Domination
    Hierarchies I
   Blocking and Triggering: Profuseness and
    Economy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
    . . . . . . . 23
   3.1 Epenthetic Structure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
    ...................................
    . . . 24
   3.2 Do Something Only When:
   The Failure of Bottom-up Constructionism . . . . .
    . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28

                                                                  10
                                 Optimalitätstheorie

   5. The Construction of Grammar in Optimality Theory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
    . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73
   5.1 Construction of Harmonic Orderings
   from Phonetic and Structural Scales . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73
   5.2 The Theory of Constraint Interaction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
    . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 74
   5.2.1 Comparison of Entire Candidates by a Single Constraint . . . . . . . . . .
    . . . . . . . . 74
   5.2.1.1 ONS: Binary constraints . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
    . . . . 75
   5.2.1.2 HNUC: Non-binary constraints . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
    . . . . 78
   5.2.2 Comparison of Entire Candidates by an Entire Constraint Hierarchy . .
    . . . . . . . 79
   5.2.3 Discussion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
    . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83



                                                                                                      11
                     Optimalitätstheorie


   5.2.3.1 Non-locality of interaction . . . . . . . . . . .
    . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83
   5.2.3.2 Strictness of domination . . . . . . . . . . . .
    . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 85
   5.2.3.3 Serial vs. Parallel Harmony Evaluation
    and Gen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86
   5.2.3.4 Binary vs. Non-binary constraints . . . . .
    . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 88
   5.3 P~Ãini.s Theorem on Constraint Ranking . . .
    ...................................
    . 88

                                                            12
                     Optimalitätstheorie


   5.2.3.1 Non-locality of interaction . . . . . . . . . . .
    . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83
   5.2.3.2 Strictness of domination . . . . . . . . . . . .
    . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 85
   5.2.3.3 Serial vs. Parallel Harmony Evaluation
    and Gen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86
   5.2.3.4 Binary vs. Non-binary constraints . . . . .
    . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 88
   5.3 P~Ãini.s Theorem on Constraint Ranking . . .
    ...................................
    . 88

                                                            13
                        Optimalitätstheorie

   Optimalitätstheorie
   aus Wikipedia, der freien Enzyklopädie

   Die Optimalitätstheorie (auch: Optimality Theory, im weiteren
    OT) ist ein Modell der theoretischen Linguistik. Ziel der Theorie ist
    es zu beschreiben, welche sprachlichen Ausdrücke in einer
    Einzelsprache grammatisch sind und welche nicht.
   Die Theorie geht davon aus, dass es für jeden sprachlichen
    Ausdruck viele verschiedene Möglichkeiten gibt, diesen zu
    realisieren. Dazu treten alle diese Realisierungen in einen
    Wettbewerb und anhand der Grammatik einer Sprache werden nach
    und nach alle Möglichkeiten ausgeschlossen, die nicht zu dieser
    Grammatik passen. Die Realisierung, welche am Ende übrig bleibt,
    erfüllt die Grammatik am besten im Vergleich zu allen anderen
    Möglichkeiten.



                                                                       14
           Optimalitätstheorie




Schematische Darstellung der OT.
Legende: GEN = Generator, CAND = Candidates,
EVAL = Evaluation, C = Constraints

                                               15
                       Optimalitätstheorie

   Einleitung


   In der Grammatiktheorie geht man davon aus, dass alle Sprachen
    der Welt denselben Prinzipien unterliegen. Was die Theorie konkret
    erklären soll, ist, wie die Unterschiede zwischen diesen Sprachen
    zustande kommen und wie die Theorie parametrisiert sein muss,
    dass sie genau die Strukturen ableitet, die in einer Sprache
    grammatisch sind. Der Begriff der Grammatikalität bezieht sich
    dabei auf die Formen, die in einer gesprochenen Sprache wirklich
    vorkommen, ein ungrammatischer Ausdruck wäre im weiteren Sinne
    ein solcher, der entweder in der Sprache nicht vorkommt oder der
    vom Sprecher nicht verstanden würde.
   Die Grammatik einer Sprache wird in der OT definiert als eine
    geordnete Menge von so genannten Beschränkungen (englisch
    Constraints). Das sind Regeln, die genau festlegen, welche
    Eigenschaften ein Ausdruck nicht haben soll. Wenn eine
    Realisierung eine dieser „verbotenen“ Eigenschaften hat, spricht
    man davon, dass sie die entsprechende Beschränkung verletzt

                                                                    16
                  Optimalitätstheorie


   Die Beschränkungen sind universell, das heißt
    sie gelten für alle Sprachen. Eine Einzelsprache
    − genauer ihre Grammatik − unterscheidet sich
    von einer anderen dadurch, dass diese
    Beschränkungen unterschiedlich stark gewichtet
    sind. Die Ordnung vom wichtigsten zum
    unwichtigsten Constraints wird als Ranking
    bezeichnet. In der OT sind die Prinzipien, denen
    alle Sprachen zugrunde liegen, die
    Beschränkungen, die Parameterbelegung wäre
    das Ranking, welches in jeder Einzelsprache
    spezifisch ist.

                                                   17
                Optimalitätstheorie


   Ein Ausdruck wird in der OT als Input
    bezeichnet, die Menge der möglichen
    Realisierungen dieses Ausdruckes heißt
    Output oder Kandidatenmenge. Zu jedem
    Input gibt es also eine Reihe von
    Kandidaten, von denen es denjenigen
    auszuwählen gilt, der den Input in Hinblick
    auf die Grammatik am besten − also
    optimal − erfüllt.
                                              18
                       Optimalitätstheorie

   Die Auswahl des optimalen Kandidaten wird Evaluation oder
    Wettbewerb genannt. Dieser Prozess funktioniert im Wesentlichen
    wie folgt: Am Anfang steht der Input, je nach Auslegung der
    Theorie kann dies eine Tiefenstruktur, ein Wort, die logische Form
    eines Satzes oder Ähnliches sein. Zu diesem Input wird nun die
    Kandidatenmenge generiert, also eine Menge von Möglichkeiten, wie
    der Input realisiert werden könnte, also zum Beispiel
    Oberflächenstrukturen, die phonetische Form eines Wortes, der
    konkrete Satzbau oder Anderes. Jeder dieser Kandidaten zeichnet
    sich dadurch aus, dass er bestimmte Beschränkungen verletzt.
    Zunächst werden alle Kandidaten aus dem Wettbewerb geworfen,
    welche die höchste Beschränkung verletzen. Von den übrig
    gebliebenen Kandidaten werden nun die rausgeworfen, die das
    nächst niedrigere Constraint verletzen und so weiter. Dies geht
    solange, bis nur noch ein Kandidat übrig ist, dieser ist dann der
    optimale Kandidat und repräsentiert einen in einer Sprache
    grammatischen Ausdruck.


                                                                    19
                     Optimalitätstheorie

   Woher der Input konkret kommt, hängt in hohem Maße
    von dem betrachteten Problem ab. Im Falle der
    Phonologie, in der es zu einem großen Teil um
    Sprachproduktion geht, kommt der Input beispielsweise
    aus dem mentalen Lexikon, optimiert wird letztlich die
    phonetische Realisierung des Lexems. In anderen
    Ansätzen kann der Input auch der optimale Kandidat
    einer vorangegangen Evaluation sein, man spricht hier
    von der so genannten „lokalen Optimierung“ (siehe auch
    den Abschnitt Weitere Anmerkungen). In der Syntax
    wird auf einen Input meist gänzlich verzichtet, da man
    hier versucht, die Struktur einer Sprache unabhängig
    von ihrem Gebrauch zu beschreiben. Die Entscheidung,
    ob eine Struktur in einer Sprache wohlgeformt ist, ergibt
    sich hier einzig aus dem Ranking der Constraints.

                                                            20
                       Optimalitätstheorie

   Tableaus
   Ein wichtiges Hilfsmittel bei optimalitätstheoretischen
    Analysen sind so genannte Tableaus, das sind Tabellen,
    die den Evaluationsprozess grafisch veranschaulichen
    sollen.
   Dabei steht im oberen linken Feld des Tableaus der
    konkrete Input der Evaluation. Daneben sind die
    Beschränkungen, von links nach rechts entsprechend
    ihres Rankings, aufgelistet. Eine in der Literatur häufig
    verwendete Schreibweise für das Ranking (die
    Reihenfolge) der Beschränkungen ist:
       C1 » C2 » … » Cn,
   wobei Ci » Cj bedeutet, dass Ci höher gerankt ist als Cj.
    In den Tableaus würde also Ci stets links von Cj stehen.

                                                                21
                        Optimalitätstheorie

   In der ersten Spalte des Tableaus stehen die einzelnen Kandidaten,
    welche aus dem Input in GEN generiert wurden. Verletzt ein
    Kandidat eine Beschränkung, wird jede Verletzung im
    entsprechenden Feld einzeln mit jeweils einem Asterisk (*)
    gekennzeichnet. Wird ein Kandidat suboptimal, das heißt, verletzt er
    eine Beschränkung, die ein anderer sich noch im Wettbewerb
    befindlicher Kandidat nicht oder nicht so oft verletzt, so wird sein
    „Ausscheiden“ mit einem Ausrufezeichen (!) hinter dem *
    gekennzeichnet. Die entscheidende Verletzung nennt man „fatal“.
    Wie im folgenden Beispiel zu sehen ist, kann es auch vorkommen,
    dass alle Kandidaten dieselbe Beschränkung verletzen (Das ist der
    Fall in der Beschränkung C2). Da es in diesem Falle keinen
    optimalen Kandidaten gibt, entscheiden die nächst niedrigeren
    Verletzungen. Der optimale Kandidat wird mittels des so genannten
    „Pointing Finger“, einer zeigenden Hand () markiert. Die
    Graufärbung ist ein zusätzliches visuelles Hilfsmittel um die
    suboptimalen Kandidaten hervorzuheben.


                                                                      22
                 Optimalitätstheorie

INPUT       C1        C2         C3    C4

                     *          *
CAND    1
CAND    2             **!        *

CAND    3             *          *     *!

CAND    4   *!        *                ***



                                             23
                 Optimalitätstheorie


INPUT       C3       C2         C1     C4

CAND    1   *!       *

CAND    2   *!       **

CAND    3   *!       *                 *

                    *          *      ***
CAND    4
                                             24
               Optimalitätstheorie


   Was die beiden Tableaus T1 und T2
    unterscheidet, ist allein das Ranking der
    Beschränkungen C1 und C3. Es wird
    deutlich, dass durch das Umordnen dieser
    Beschränkungen der Kandidat CAND4
    optimal wird, obwohl er insgesamt mehr
    Beschränkungen verletzt als die übrigen
    Kandidaten.

                                            25
                Optimalitätstheorie

   Arten von Beschränkungen
   Eine Beschränkung im Sinne der OT ist eine
    Bedingung, die ein Kandidat entweder erfüllt
    oder nicht. Wenn ein Kandidat eine Bedingung
    nicht erfüllt, gilt die entsprechende
    Beschränkung als verletzt. Es ist dabei nicht
    ausgeschlossen, dass eine Beschränkung von
    einem Kandidaten mehrfach verletzt wird, siehe
    dazu auch das Beispiel aus der Syntax. Es
    werden generell zwei Arten von Beschränkungen
    unterschieden: Treue- und
    Markiertheitsbeschränkungen.

                                                 26
                      Optimalitätstheorie

   Treuebeschränkungen (T) beziehen sich dabei direkt auf die
    Interaktion zwischen Input und Kandidat. Generell lässt sich sagen,
    dass Treuebeschränkungen immer dann verletzt sind, wenn
    Merkmale eines Kandidaten von denen des Input abweichen.
   Markiertheitsbeschränkungen (M) dagegen kennzeichnen
    Besonderheiten, die ein Kandidat haben muss, um in einer Sprache
    optimal sein zu können. Für jede dieser M gibt es dabei
    Treuebeschränkungen, die seine Wirkung aufheben. So lässt sich
    erklären, warum in einer Sprache eine Besonderheit vorherrscht
    (M»T), während diese in anderen Sprachen ungrammatisch ist
    (T»M).
   Eine weitere Art von Beschränkungen wird in der Prosodie oder bei
    den Analyse von Tonsprachen verwendet. Hier legen so genannte
    Alignment-Constraints (wörtlich: „Ausrichtungsbeschränkungen“)
    fest, in welche Richtungen beispielsweise Töne mit ihren
    entsprechenden Segmenten assoziiert werden sollen.



                                                                      27
                   Optimalitätstheorie

   Beispiele
   Ein nicht-linguistisches Beispiel
   Die drei Männer Hans, Karl und Peter wollen sich je ein
    Auto kaufen. Jeder hat dabei genaue Vorstellungen:
    Hans' Auto soll besonders sparsam sein und eine helle
    Farbe haben, sein Budget beläuft sich auf 12.000 €. Karl
    dagegen möchte ein schnelles Auto, wobei ihm die Farbe
    egal ist und er etwa 20.000 € zur Verfügung hat. Peter
    möchte unbedingt ein blaues Fahrzeug erwerben. Für
    ihn ist die Hauptsache, dass es fährt, da er das KFZ
    sowie den Unterhalt dafür von seinem reichen Onkel
    geschenkt bekommt, spielt Geld für ihn keine Rolle.


                                                          28
                Optimalitätstheorie

   Der Autohändler hat jedoch ein nur sehr
    begrenztes Sortiment im Angebot:
   Einen Kleinwagen mit 45 PS in Dunkelblau für
    8.000 €,
   Einen roten Sportwagen 120 PS für 25.000 €
    sowie
   Einen weißen Kombi mit 90 PS für 12.000 €.




                                                   29
                 Optimalitätstheorie

   Der Autohändler erklärt, dass die
    (hypothetische) Faustregel gilt: „Je mehr PS ein
    Auto hat, desto schneller ist es und desto teurer
    ist es im Unterhalt“, demnach wäre der
    Kleinwagen als „sparsam“ anzusehen, der
    Sportwagen als „schnelles“ und damit teures
    Auto. Der Kombi ist konventionell ebenfalls als
    „schnelles“ Auto anzusehen und demnach „nicht
    sparsam“. Darüber hinaus wäre es kein Problem,
    ein Modell nachzubestellen, sollten sich zwei
    oder mehr Kunden für dasselbe Fahrzeug
    entscheiden.

                                                    30
                   Optimalitätstheorie

   Die Entscheidung, wer welches Auto kauft, gleicht einem
    optimalitätstheoretischen Prozess: jeder der drei Männer
    hat genaue Vorstellungen (Input) und drei Modelle zur
    Auswahl (Kandidaten). Aus der gegebenen Situation
    lassen sich für alle drei Kunden geltende
    Beschränkungen postulieren:
   Die Farbe soll mit des Kunden Vorstellung
    übereinstimmen (kurz: Farbe)
   Das Fahrzeug sollte nicht teurer sein, als der Kunde Geld
    hat (Preis)
   Das Fahrzeug entspricht der Vorstellung des Kunden von
    Sparsamkeit und Geschwindigkeit (PS)

                                                            31
                       Optimalitätstheorie

   Je nach Kunde sind diese Beschränkungen unterschiedlich stark
    gewichtet: für Hans ist PS am wichtigsten, gefolgt von einer hellen
    Farbe. Die Geldfrage steht bei ihm zuletzt. Er wird sich für das erste
    Auto entscheiden, auch wenn es nicht seiner Farbvorstellung
    entspricht, da die anderen beiden Modelle nicht sparsam genug
    sind. Karls Prioritäten liegen ähnlich, auch für ihn ist die Eigenschaft
    PS am wichtigsten in Bezug auf Geschwindigkeit. Da sein Budget
    begrenzt ist, kommt diese Beschränkung an zweiter Stelle, die Farbe
    an letzter. Er wird sich für den Kombi entscheiden, da er ebenfalls
    als „schnell“ bezeichnet und der Sportwagen zu teuer ist. Peters
    Anforderungen an sein Auto sind wie folgt gewichtet: Im
    Vordergrund steht die Farbe, der Rest ist ihm egal. Er wird das erste
    Auto kaufen, da es vollständig seinen Vorstellungen entspricht.
   Jeder der drei Käufer hat nun das Auto gekauft, welches er als das
    passendste erachtet, also das, welches ihm unter den gegebenen
    Umständen (Budget, Angebot und Vorstellungen) optimal erscheint.



                                                                          32
                      Optimalitätstheorie

   Beispiele aus der Linguistik
   Im folgenden sind zwei Beispiele aus den linguistischen
    Teilbereichen Phonologie und Syntax aufgeführt.
   Phonologie
   In der Phonologie des Deutschen existiert ein Phänomen, welches
    Auslautverhärtung genannt wird. So wird das Wort Lied im
    Deutschen [li:t] ausgesprochen. In der OT wird hingegen
    angenommen, dass auch die Aussprache [li:d] eine mögliche
    Aussprache des Deutschen ist, zumal sie mit der zugrundeliegenden
    Form /li:d/ identisch ist. Deutlich wird diese zugrundeliegende Form
    an flektierten Formen des Wortes, beispielsweise im Plural ['li:.dɐ],
    bei denen der Plosiv /d/ nicht mehr am Ende einer Silbe steht und
    deshalb nicht der Auslautverhärtung unterliegt, also stimmhaft
    ausgesprochen wird.




                                                                        33
                   Optimalitätstheorie

   Wichtiger als die Identität zwischen zugrundeliegender
    Form und Aussprache ist aber eine Beschränkung der
    Aussprachemöglichkeiten für Auslautkonsonanten:
    Stimmhafte Obstruenten sind hier zu vermeiden. Da die
    Identitäts- oder Treuebeschränkung im Deutschen
    weniger wichtig ist als die Beschränkung der
    Aussprachemöglichkeiten (Markiertheitsbeschränkung),
    wird die Aussprache [li:t] von Sprechern des Deutschen
    vorgezogen. Im Englischen ist die Treuebeschränkung
    wichtiger als die genannte Markiertheitsbeschränkung.
    Das Verb lead (führen) hat dieselbe zugrundeliegende
    Form wie das deutsche Wort Lied. Da es in dieser
    Sprache aber keine Auslautverhärtung gibt, wird es dort
    als [li:d] mit stimmhaftem [d] ausgesprochen.


                                                          34
                   Optimalitätstheorie

   Nach diesen Annahmen lassen sich folgende
    Beschränkungen postulieren:
   *[+sth]$ (Markiertheitsbeschränkung)
   ID [±sth] (Identitäts- oder Treuebeschränkung)
   Das erste Constraint symbolisiert dabei die
    Auslautverhärtung. Es bedeutet, dass ein Kandidat die
    Beschränkung verletzt (gekennzeichnet durch den
    Asterisk am Anfang der Beschränkung), wenn am Ende
    einer Silbe (gekennzeichnet durch das Symbol „$“
    rechts) ein stimmhafter Laut auftaucht. Dieser Laut hat
    dann die Eigenschaft, [+sth] zu sein. Das zweite
    Constraint besagt, dass alle Laute bezüglich ihrer
    Stimmhaftigkeit in Input und Output übereinstimmen,
    also IDentisch sein sollten.

                                                              35
               Optimalitätstheorie


   Die folgenden beiden Tableaus stellen die
    Aussprache der Wörter Lied im Deutschen
    (Ranking der Beschränkungen: *[+sth]$ »
    ID [±sth]) und lead im Englischen
    (Ranking: ID [±sth] » *[+sth]$)
    gegenüber.




                                            36
               Optimalitätstheorie
    T4:   Englisch


           Input: /li:d/ ID[±sth]    *[+sth]$



           [li:t]        *!



          [li:d]                    *


                                                37
         Optimalitätstheorie
    T3: Deutsch


      Input: /li:d/ *[+sth]$   ID[±sth]

     [li:t]                   *



      [li:d]       *!



                                          38
                   Optimalitätstheorie

   (Anmerkung: Die Auslautverhärtung betrifft im
    Deutschen nur Plosive und Frikative, diese Tatsache
    wurde der Einfachheit halber bei der Postulierung der
    Constraints ignoriert.)




                                                            39
                     Optimalitätstheorie

   Syntax

   Ein Beispiel aus der Syntax ist die Erklärung verschiedener Wh-
    Bewegungsmuster bei Mehrfachfragesätzen in den Sprachen der
    Welt. Dabei geht es um die Position von Wh-Phrasen (z. B.
    Interrogativpronomen wie wer, warum, wessen im Deutschen oder
    why und what im Englischen; oder komplexere Phrasen, denen ein
    solches Interrogativpronomen vorangeht, wie Wessen Mutter oder
    Welches von den vielen Kindern, die du meinst). Im Deutschen
    beispielsweise steht immer nur eine Wh-Phrase am Anfang eines
    (Teil-)Satzes:
   (1) a.* (Es) hat Fritz wann1 [welches Buch]2 gelesen?
        b.Wann1 hat Fritz t1 [welches Buch]2 gelesen?
        c.*Wann1 [welches Buch]2 hat Fritz t1 t2 gelesen?




                                                                      40
                 Optimalitätstheorie

   Im Koreanischen dagegen bleiben alle Wh-
    Phrasen in situ, das heißt in der Position, wo in
    einem Aussagesatz die jeweilige Antwort auf die
    Fragewörter stehen würden:
   (2)
   a. Nŏnŭn muŏsŭl1 wae2 sassni?
      du    was      warum kaufen
   b.*Muŏsŭl1 nŏnŭn t1 wae2 sassni?
      was      du         warum kaufen
   c.*Muŏsŭl1 wae2 nŏnŭn t1 t2 sassni?
      was       warum du               kaufen

                                                    41
                  Optimalitätstheorie

   Das Bulgarische dagegen ist eine Sprache, in der alle
    Wh-Elemente an den Anfang des Satzes bewegt werden:
   (3) a.*Koj1 vižda kogo2 ?
          wer sieht wen
       b. Koj1 kogo2 t1 vižda t2?
          Wer wen         sieht
   (Anmerkungen: Der Asterisk (*) steht hier für
    Ungrammatikalität; t kennzeichnet eine Spur, also die
    Position, von der aus das koindizierte Element
    herausbewegt wurde. Der Index verdeutlicht dabei,
    welches Element zu welcher Spur gehört. Die strukturelle
    Darstellung der Ausdrücke ist hier sehr stark
    vereinfacht.)

                                                          42
                 Optimalitätstheorie

   Für die Analyse sind die folgenden drei
    Beschränkungen ausreichend:
   W-Krit: Eine W-Phrase muss im Satz am Anfang
    stehen.
   Pur-EP: Dies ist ein Constraint, welches das
    Auftauchen von mehr als einem Element
    zwischen Satzanfang und linker Satzklammer
    bestraft. (Die genaue Definition lautet: in der CP
    sind keine Mehrfachspezifizierer erlaubt.)
   Ökon: Verbietet Bewegung (genauer: Spuren –
    t) allgemein.

                                                     43
                 Optimalitätstheorie

   Die Constraints sind folgendermaßen gerankt:
   Deutsch: Pur-EP » W-Krit » Ökon
   Koreanisch: Pur-EP » Ökon » W-Krit
   Bulgarisch: W-Krit » Pur-EP » Ökon
   Da es sich bei allen Beschränkungen um
    Markiertheitsbeschränkungen handelt, ist ein
    Input nicht nötig. Wie die Kandidaten generiert
    werden, kann dabei außer Acht gelassen
    werden.

                                                      44
                     Optimalitätstheorie

   1. Hausaufgabe zum nächsten Mal (03.11.08):

   Wie berechnet sich die Auswahl der optimalen Kandidaten
    optimaltheoretisch?
   Zeichnen Sie Tableaus, in denen Mehrfachfragen im Deutschen,
    Koreanischen und Bulgarischen nach den genannten Constraints
    und nach der Rangfolge den optimalen Output garantieren.
   Beachten Sie dabei die Rangfolge der Beschränkungen in den
    einzelnen Sprachen, z. B. Dt.

   Pur-EP » W-Krit » Ökon


                                                                   45
              Optimalitätstheorie

 2. Hausaufgabe:
 Lesen Sie
• Lesen Sie in: Optimalitätstheorie_PartII:
  Folien 8-37
   CLITICS, VERB (NON)-MOVEMENT, AND
    OPTIMALITY IN BULGARIAN*
   Géraldine Legendre
   Johns Hopkins University
   November 1996

                                              46
Optimalitätstheorie




                      47
Optimalitätstheorie




                      48
Optimalitätstheorie




                      49
Optimalitätstheorie




                      50
Optimalitätstheorie




                      51
Optimalitätstheorie




                      52
Optimalitätstheorie




                      53
Optimalitätstheorie




                      54
Optimalitätstheorie




                      55
Optimalitätstheorie




                      56
Optimalitätstheorie




                      57
Optimalitätstheorie




                      58
Optimalitätstheorie




                      59
Optimalitätstheorie




                      60
Optimalitätstheorie




                      61
Optimalitätstheorie




                      62
Optimalitätstheorie




                      63
Optimalitätstheorie




                      64
Optimalitätstheorie




                      65
Optimalitätstheorie




                      66
Optimalitätstheorie




                      67
Optimalitätstheorie




                      68
Optimalitätstheorie




                      69
Optimalitätstheorie




                      70
Optimalitätstheorie




                      71
Optimalitätstheorie




                      72
Optimalitätstheorie




                      73
Optimalitätstheorie




                      74
Optimalitätstheorie




                      75
76
77
78
79
(2) Gereon Müller, Universität Leipzig
Syncretism without Underspecification in
Optimality Theory: The Role of Leading
Forms // ROA 994-1008
http://roa.rutgers.edu/files/quicklist.html




                                              80
81
82
83
84
85
86
87
88
89
90
91
92
93
94
95
96
97
98
99
100
101
102
103
104
105
106

				
DOCUMENT INFO
Shared By:
Categories:
Tags:
Stats:
views:5
posted:3/22/2011
language:German
pages:106