'official companion' pamphlet - The Exeter College RFC Dinner for

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					The Exeter College RFC Dinner
              for
  Past and Present Members



 Friday, 16th February, 2007




  Exon Rugby 1948-49 (F_Bailey)
                     Programme for the Evening

This evening is to bring together past and present members of the Exeter
College Rugby Football Club. We welcome Old Members from 1948
through to 2000, as well as members of the current men’s and women’s
teams.

7.00pm
Pre-dinner drinks in the bar from 7:00pm

7.30pm
Dinner in College Hall
Mr Charlie Morris (2005, PPE) and Ms Beth Hunt (2005, History), Captains
of the men and women’s current teams (respectively) will give a speech
and present awards during dinner.

The Sub-Rector and Junior Dean have requested that Old Members ahere to College
rules during the evening.


    Rugby Club 1958-59
    (J_Badcock)




Ken Waller, 1957

Dear Exeter Rugby Players, especially those of 1957/58

I wish I could be with you for the celebrations, but it is not possible. I was
in Oxford recently for my son Douglas’ MBA Graduation and my wife
Janet and I had the great pleasure of meeting up with Rosemary and
Dick Penn in London during our time in the UK. Fortunately we’ve seen a
fair bit of them, either in the UK or Australia, over the last 25 years or so.

May I wish you all the very best for a happy evening and a great reunion!
The College these days is a highly placed and regarded Rugby College
(dare I say that my son Douglas, playing for St Peter’s late last year,
helped eliminate Exeter from Cuppers, in the semi final, before going on
to win the final?)

May I wish to current players all the best in the future and to my
contemporaries may I say – put those aching limbs to good use. Do as I
do – predict weather changes. Now all together please “I was walking
down the street – I saw a house on fire,”
                From those who couldn’t be here
John White, 1951

Hello Exeter Rugby people. I’m John White, Club Captain 1953-54 .I
was elated to read that you were inviting people of my vintage to
your dinner tonight and I am sure you will have a memorable evening.
Had I been living in England I would have moved mountains to be with
you, but I have been living in New Zealand these past 40 years and
Auckland seems 40,000 miles away tonight, and I shall feel privileged if
you allow me these few minutes.

Exeter of course is a very different college from the Exeter of 50
years ago. You now have a female Rector, female students, and to
my great surprise, women rugby players who I understand are to be
congratulated for their success on the field. The women have been
a civilising influence in many respects, including their effect on the
plumbing. In the men-only days the only running water on the staircases
was in the scout’s den. All the toilets and baths were concentrated
in the fourth quad basement which is now I believe a lecture room.
After a muddy game, we had to cart our everyday clothes from the
staircase to the 4th quad bath house even when it was raining cats
and dogs. Pity the chap who needed the potty in the middle of the
night. One must thank the arrival of the fair sex for the modernisation
which ended this irksome inconvenience.

Well, your invitation to we old fellers evoked many happy memories of
rugby at Exeter, memories which even today give me much satisfaction
and enjoyment. Although you current players may not be particularly
aware of it, you are now building up memories which will yield you a
rich return further down the track.

I do not have records, but Exeter was in the first division of the league
throughout my three years, and I am sure we played in the quarter
finals of cuppers under the captaincy of my predecessor, Scottish
international half back Pat McLachlan. I’m confident however that
during my three years we won quite a few more games than we lost.

During my first game for the college I recall Bill Joss breaking from the
line out, and I went with him. I was the only one in a position to take
the ball from Bill when he was checked. I made a few yards until I was
held when Bill took the ball from me again. We each handled three
or four times in this manner. We two made 25 or 30 yards. This may
seem an insignificant memory to you, but it was darned good rugby by
anyone’s standard, and recalling it gives me great pleasure.
                    [continued from previous page]

I was delighted to see that you are still playing the very dangerous
Stow on the Wold. Yes, “dangerous” because of the cider (snake
bite) served in the local pub. Stow on the Wold was my first away from
Oxford game for the college and I entirely ignored the warning about
snake bite. After a short time I felt decidedly woozy and decided to
get out of the pub and seek the sanctuary of the team bus. But the
bus was locked and no sign of the driver. So I lay down on the very
wide stone wall immediately opposite the door of the bus where I went
to sleep and apparently rolled off the wall into the adjacent garden
- without waking up I might add! Neither did I wake up when the rest
of the team emerged from the pub. I understand they were looking
for me and calling out when some bright spark fortunately decided to
look over the wall.

As Captain I disapproved of pointless kicking duels chiefly between
opposing full backs. We managed to instil that this kicking merely gave
the recipient and attacking opportunity. The team accepted the
idea that if the ball was kicked to a player behind them, they would
make that extra effort to run back to an onside position where they
could take an attacking pass. This extra effort was so often painful to
produce. However, people responded very well to this stratagem and
on the odd occasion we even scored from it, virtually from our own
goal line. We kicked to touch only as a last resort.

On the odd occasion we lined up to go right at the kick off, but in fact
we went left. We also at line-outs infrequently stood well back from the
5 metre line and threw to the boot of our number one - we scored the
odd try from this too.

I vividly recall a surprise fixture with Roslyn Park XXX - the Park’s second
XV. It had been discovered quite by chance late in the season that
both sides had no fixture on the same date. They, the second team
of a first ranking London club should have beaten us by 20 points or
so … and I know this was their expectation. Prior to the game none of
us talked about our prospects except in a very positive manner. We
certainly recognised that we were up against it. “We’ll really have to
give it all we’ve got today boys. Pull out all the stops; maximum effort
today.” In the event every member of the team punched well above
his weight as it were. In the ‘50s a try was worth only three points, the
same as a penalty goal. Early in the second half we scored a try far out,
and we were elated. Unluckily it proved a little beyond the capabilities
of our goal kicker, who was very disappointed, as we all were. The
Park who should have steam rolled us, were mortified and did their
darnedest to bring us to heel. But Exeter had decided “They shall
                    [continued from previous page]
not pass” and pass they did not. I recall this as the hardest and most
desperately fought game of my life. Final score 3-3. They eventually
managed a penalty. I felt very proud to be Captain of such men who
showed the determination to keep tackling, running to the breakdown,
and fighting for the ball when lungs burned, and tortured muscles
almost screamed “no more”. I know I was sore for days afterwards. On
reflection it was the most memorable and satisfying game of my life.
Really we did get the better of them. A try always was for better than
a penalty. I am thankful to Exeter, and in particular to that team for this
superlative rugby experience.

A word of warning to you all – please do not succumb to the many
distractions which Oxford has on offer to the extent that at end of
term collections the Rector addresses you as Rector Barber once
admonished me. “Good morning Mr White. Your philosophy tutor is
far from happy with your progress this term. If any one tutor next term
expresses a similar opinion, next term will be your last. Please do enjoy
your holiday Mr White.”

Exeter always was such a friendly college, and the camaraderie
amongst the rugby fraternity was particularly strong. Indications are
that this has not changed. Thank you Exeter rugby folk for indulging
this old boy, and I wish all strength to your arm in all you endeavour.
Especially warm salaams to any of my contemporaries who may be
present tonight – and a very good night to you all.


John Badcock, 1958

The 1960-61 side        (still 2nd
Division) had Steve Richards (3rd
from back left) who hooked for
England, standing beside Stanley
(father of Boris) Johnson. Nigel
Jenney (back/centre) changed,
occassionally, for key fixtures.
Captain, centre front, was John
Badcock.
                From those who couldn’t be here
Royce Bowen, 1941

Thanks for the invitation to the college Rugby Club Dinner. Just too far
I am afraid.

In the loft I have (Gilman & Soames) framed photographs of the
combined Lincoln/Exeter 1940/41 (or 41/42??) Rugby XV, captained by
Keith Scott, later England Captain (E.J.K. Scott, Lincoln). We won Cupper
and League. Additionally I have a similar framed (G & S) photograph
of the highly successful 1946/48 sides – again captained by an England
Captain to be! The Exeter/Lincoln photography was borrowed from me
a year or so ago to be copied for their “archives”.

My school (Monmouth) Captain was the famous John G William,
Cambridge & Wales Captain when Wales ruled the Rugby world! The
survivors of the undefeated 1940 Monmouth School XV meet each year
(and attend Speech Day!) There are now 5 of us left but our Coach
(aged 93) attends the Dinner and will sing if requested!!

The great post-war influx of talented “Colonial” players forced me to
play my out of College Rugby with the Oxford RFC – this at the invitation
of Ralph Westall, then College Bursar. With others “rejected” by the
University XV we made up about 50% of the Oxford RFC side, which
basically was meant to be an amalgam of Oxford Normals, Oxford Exiles
and Pressed Steel XVs. We became quite good, with fixtures which
included Gloucests, Northampton etc. Hope it still exists!

Andrew Peck, 1979

Unfortunately I will be out of the country on a ski-ing holiday with my
family that week, as it will be school half term holiday. I hope it goes well.
Please pass my regards to the teams of 1989-1992.

Brian Moore, 1951

I am very sorry indeed that I cannot be present on the 16th February. I
would have greatly enjoyed the occasion, please convey my apologies
to all present.

I still recall our Cuppers final against BNC at Iffley Road, which we narrowly
lost. Whether the result would have been different if I had managed to
scramble over to score I’ll never know but the memory stays with me.

Subsequently I played with Sale RFC for a few seasons and came across
John White for a short time as well as playing against Eric Thompson
(Liverpool) and Ricki Winn at Northampton. There were two of us on the
Sale 1st XV who were not internationals nor County players so I suppose
               From those who couldn’t be here
I was in illustrious company. I used to get sworn at by Eric Evans in the
front row.

The game is very different now. My son-in-law has taken me recently to
see Saracens play at Watford F.C. and later this month I hope to be at
Twickenham for the England v Italy match.

My very best wishes and good health to everyone from a rugby bore.

Canon Geoffrey Hart, 1948

Canon Hart’s wife phoned to say that he is seriously ill in hospital and so
will not be attending the Rugby Dinner. He passes on his good wishes.

Budleigh Salterton, 1943

Thank you for the invitation. I would have enjoyed the occasion, and
regret that I must decline.

However, if the “past players” find themselves in great need of an 82-
year-old scrum-half, I am prepared to reconsider my decision!

John Tomlinson, 1944

Too decrepit – but am pleased to have been remembered and am
happy to make a contribution. Our Full Back was Newman; may he
R.I.P.

John Moat , 1956

Thank you for asking me, but representation (one 2nd XV appearance
against Keble in 1959 – though I did score the winning try) hardly warrants
it.

I’m sorrowful to think you’re wasting champagne on Rugby players.

Christopher Hawker, 1967

Don’t know whether there will be any 1967-70 members there, but if
there are, please say “greetings” from me and give them my e-mail
address.

Frank Ashby, 1943

Thank you for the invitation. I would have enjoyed the occasion, and
regret that I must decline.
               From those who couldn’t be here
Royce Bowen, 1941

Thanks for the invitation to the college Rugby Club Dinner. Just too far
I am afraid.

In the loft I have (Gilman & Soames) framed photographs of the
combined Lincoln/Exeter 1940/41 (or 41/42??) Rugby XV captained by
Keith Scott, later England captain (E.J.K. Scott, Lincoln). We won Cupper
and League. Additionally I have a similar framed (G & S) photograph
of the highly successful 1946/48 sides – again captained by an England
captain to be! The Exeter/Lincoln photography was borrowed from me
a year or so ago to be copied for their “archives”.

My school (Monmouth) Captain was the famous John G William,
Cambridge & Wales Captain when Wales ruled the Rugby world! The
survivors of the undefeated 1940 Monmouth School XV meet each year
(???attend Speech Day!) There are now 5 of us left but our Coach
(aged 93) attends the Dinner and will sing if requested!!

The great post-war influx of talented “Colonial” players forced me to
play my out of College Rugby with the Oxford RFC – this at the invitation
of Ralph Westall, then College Bursar. With others “rejected” by the
University XV we made up about 50% of the Oxford RFC side, which
basically was meant to be an amalgam of Oxford Normals, Oxford Exiles
and Pressed Steel XV’s. We became quite good, with fixtures which
included Gloucests, Northampton etc. Hope it still exists!

I will contact you when in the city – usually there May, June & July, and
what I have is available for copying if required

John White, 1953

Hello Exeter Rugby folk. This is John White, Captain of Rugby at Exeter
1953-54 speaking to you from New Zealand where I’ve lived the last 40
years of so. I do apologise for not being at this celebration tonight.

I was delighted to receive your invitation to players from the 1950s
because it demonstrated that the very strong camaraderie which
existed with Exeter rugby in my day is still alive and well today.

I’d love to meet the new generation of Exeter rugby folk, especially the
women who have so changed life in the college.

May I extend especial salaams to any of my contemporaries who may
be present tonight. Good health and good luck to all of you. God
bless!
                     Confirmed attendance list

Old Members


Mr Chris Winn           1948
Mr James Collis         1948
Mr Robert Lowndes       1948
Mr Alan Russett         1949
Mr Dennis Holman        1949
Mr Jim Barker           1949
Dr Colin Richards       1951
Mr John Horn            1952
Mr Keith Holloway       1952
Mr Tony Moreton         1952
Mr Eric Wilkinson       1954
                                   Winners of League 1948-9
Mr William Horrell      1955       (J_Collis)
Mr David Culver         1956
Mr Colin Harrison       1957
Mr Jeffery Wear         1957
Mr Anthony Green        1959
Mr Richard Dobby        1992
Mr William Yarker       1992
Mr Edward Coulson       1998
Mr Henry Whittaker      1998
Mr Peter Rushton        1998
Mr George Heywood       1999
Mr Jonathan Dean        2000      Rugby Club tour Dec1950
Mr Paul Coles           2000      (R_Lowndes)


Students

William Bernsen         Charlotte Kestner
Dereck Betts            Katherine Kirkbride
Kate Bugler             Edward Moores
Jennifer Bushell        Charles Morris
Kevin Dickens           Matthew Peters
Caroline Duff           James Robinson
Oliver Gordon           Rupert Robinson
Joseph Haley            Jennifer Rossdale
Patrick Howard          George Tobutt
Bethany Hunt            Andrew Williamson
David Jenkins
Gregory Johnson
James Johnson

				
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