Docstoc

Figurative Language - PowerPoint

Document Sample
Figurative Language - PowerPoint Powered By Docstoc
					Figurative Language

         Vocabulary
POINT OF VIEW IN POETRY

        POET               SPEAKER

   The poet is the      The speaker of
    author of the         the poem is the
    poem.                 “narrator” of the
                          poem.
    POETRY FORM

   FORM - the appearance
    of the words on the     A word is dead
    page
                            When it is said,
                              Some say.
   LINE - a group of words
    together on one line of
    the poem                  I say it just
                             Begins to live
   STANZA - a group of        That day.
    lines arranged together
  KINDS OF STANZAS

Couplet            =   a two line stanza
Triplet (Tercet)   =   a three line stanza
Quatrain           =   a four line stanza
Quintet            =   a five line stanza
Sestet (Sextet)    =   a six line stanza
Septet             =   a seven line stanza
Octave             =   an eight line stanza
Alliteration
   The repetition of consonants at
    the beginning of words.
   Often used in commercials,
    poetry, or music.
     Example: Peter Piper picked a
      peck of pickled peppers.
     Example: The sneaky snake had
      one more snack.
Allusion
   A reference to something from
    history of literature.

   Often references to the Bible or
    Greek myths.
     Example: He was as strong as
      Hercules.
     Example: The ball game was a
      David and Goliath struggle.
Metaphor
   A comparison between two
    different things without using like
    or as.
   The comparison is clear and
    definite

   Direct Example: My mother IS a
    Bear
   Subtle Example: The criminal
    cried a waterfall of tears for his
    mama.
Repetition
   Repeated words or phrases,
    duh.
   Often used in commercials,
    poetry, or music.

       Example: Head On, apply it
        directly to the forehead. Head On,
        apply it directly to the forehead.
        Head On, apply it directly to the
        forehead. Head On, apply it
        directly to the forehead.
Simile

   A comparison between two
    different things using like or as.

   Example: Her hair was as
    golden as the sun.
   Example: His attitude, like sour
    milk, made me sick.
Symbol

   One thing that stands for itself
    and some other idea.

   Example: The flag symbolizes
    our country and the brave men
    and women who fight for it.
   Example: The Mechanical
    Hound symbolizes death.
Tone
   The emotional attitude toward
    the reader or toward the subject
    implied by a literary work.

   Different tones include angry,
    playful, sarcastic, serious, and
    sincere.

   Also includes tone of voice
Personification

   Giving human characteristics to
    inhuman objects or animals.

   Example 1: The sky cried, giving
    joy to the new born flowers.
   Example 2: The dog seemed to
    laugh as I chased it around the
    yard.
Imagery
   Creating pictures for the senses
     Sight, sound, touch, taste, and
      smell
     Visual imagery is the most common
      kind of imagery in poetry.

   Example 1: The smoke rose
    sweet and thick from the Bar-B-
    Que. (smell)
   Example 2: The deafening crash
    outside woke the baby. (auditory)
    END RHYME
   A word at the end of one line
    rhymes with a word at the end of
    another line

           Hector the Collector
         Collected bits of string.
    Collected dolls with broken heads
     And rusty bells that would not
                   ring.
INTERNAL RHYME

   A word inside a line rhymes with
    another word on the same line.

     Once upon a midnight dreary,
      while I pondered weak and
                weary.

              From “The Raven”
              by Edgar Allan Poe
     NEAR RHYME

   a.k.a imperfect
                           ROSE
    rhyme, close
    rhyme                  LOSE

                        Different vowel
   The words share     sounds (long “o”
    EITHER the          and “oo” sound)
    same vowel or
                       Share the same
    consonant sound
                       consonant sound
    BUT NOT BOTH
RHYME SCHEME

   A rhyme scheme is a pattern of
    rhyme (usually end rhyme, but not
    always).



   Use the letters of the alphabet to
    represent sounds to be able to
    visually “see” the pattern. (See next
    slide for an example.)
SAMPLE RHYME SCHEME

    The Germ by Ogden Nash

   A mighty creature is the germ,    a
Though smaller than the pachyderm. a
    His customary dwelling place     b
   Is deep within the human race.    b
 His childish pride he often pleases c
 By giving people strange diseases. c
  Do you, my poppet, feel infirm? a
    You probably contain a germ.     a
SOME TYPES OF
   POETRY
  WE WILL BE
  STUDYING
    LYRIC
   A short poem
   Usually written in first person
    point of view
   Expresses an emotion or an idea
    or describes a scene
   Do not tell a story and are often
    musical
   (Many of the poems we read will
    be lyrics.)
   A longer version is called an Ode
NARRATIVE POEMS

   A poem that         Examples of
    tells a story.        Narrative
   Generally              Poems
    longer than the
    lyric styles of      “The Raven”
    poetry b/c the           “The
    poet needs to         Highwayman”
    establish
    characters and    “Casey at the Bat”
    a plot.            “The Walrus and
                         the Carpenter”
     FREE VERSE POETRY

   Unlike metered            Free verse
    poetry, free verse         poetry is very
    poetry does NOT            conversational -
    have any repeating         sounds like
    patterns of stressed       someone talking
    and unstressed             with you.
    syllables.

   Does NOT have             A more modern
    rhyme.                     type of poetry.
      BLANK VERSE POETRY

Written in lines of iambic pentameter, but
         does NOT use end rhyme.
               from Julius Caesar

  Cowards die many times before their deaths;
     The valiant never taste of death but once.
      Of all the wonders that I yet have heard,
  It seems to me most strange that men should
                         fear;
       Seeing that death, a necessary end,
             Will come when it will come.

				
DOCUMENT INFO