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					Continuing Education Center (CEC)


              Business Plan


                  Prepared By:

                  Hassan Diab
    Vice President, Regional External Programs




                                                 February 2008
                                   Table of Contents

                                                               Page

I      Executive Summary                                        2

II     Organizational Overview                                  3
       II.1  Mission                                            3
       II.2  Vision                                             3
       II.3  CEC Organizational Structure                       3
       II.4  CEC & REP                                          4
       II.5  Program Offerings                                  5
       II.6  Facilities                                         6
       II.7  Student Enrollment (1984-2007)                     7
       II.8  Student Composition                                8

III    CEC Service to AUB                                       9
       III.1 Community Service                                  9
       III.2 Institutional Re-accreditation                     9
       III.3 Source for Contributions                           9
       III.4 Positive Cash Flow                                 10

IV     Market Analysis Summary                                  11
       IV.1 Target Market Segments                              11
       IV.2 Main Competitors                                    11
       IV.3 Buying Patterns                                     11
       IV.4 CEC’s Competitive Advantage                         11

V      Expansion Strategy and Implementation Summary            13
       V.1   Addressing Staffing Gaps                           13
       V.2   Improving Facilities                               13
       V.3   Diversify/Expand Course Offerings                  19
       V.4   Expand Marketing Strategy                          20
       V.5   Adapting Policies to Meet Demand                   21

VI     Financial Plan                                           22
       VI.1 Historical Financial Picture                        22
       VI.2 Current Financial Picture                           22
       VI.3 Projected Net Revenue                               22

VII    CEC Performance During 2006-2007                         24

VIII   Summary for Strengthening CEC Operations in 2007-2008    25




                                                                      1
I. Executive Summary

Established in 1982 as a replacement to the Extension Program, the Continuing Education
Center (CEC) has been a critical part of the Office for Regional External Programs (REP)
and the broader American University of Beirut community. CEC upholds the motto of
AUB “so that they may have life and have it more abundantly” by extending the resources
of the University into the community and region by providing high quality educational
opportunities for people of all educational and professional levels. Inter-faculty and
multidisciplinary in nature, CEC programs are designed to cater to the personal and
professional growth needs of practitioners in a wide variety of areas including business,
information technology, education, and languages. Harnessing the expertise of AUB’s six
faculties, CEC offers individual non-credit courses, individual courses, programs leading to
a certificate and/or diploma, and training workshops.

CEC offerings are an important element in the institutional re-accreditation effort that AUB
has already started, which is related to Standard 13 (Related Educational Activities). In the
2004 Institutional Self Study Report, the Related Educational Activities Committee
recommended strengthening CEC programs because an accredited institution is expected to
offer certificate programs (post-secondary non-degree credentials) consistent with the
institutional mission that stresses “lifelong learning.”

CEC is currently housed in Building #23 (Old OPD). Total space allotted to CEC is an
insufficient 75m2. This includes two offices and a small room currently being used as a
computer lab. CEC is scheduled to vacate this space in December 2008. Accordingly, there
is dire need to identify the needed space for CEC in order to sustain its on-going CEC
activities, let alone facilitate new CEC programs such as Information Technology which
was temporarily stopped due to lack of availability of the needed computer laboratories.
Pending other viable alternatives, the study presents two plausible scenarios for addressing
the CEC spacing needs.

Looking ahead, an expansion of CEC facilities, marketing strategies, administrative support
and programs is needed to fully realize the potential of CEC. The envisaged space needed
for CEC will be complemented with a comprehensive, new marketing strategy. This
includes reaching out to the corporate community, expanding existing programs, re-
establishing the Lebanese Executive Forum, setting up a CEC satellite office, and rethinking
CEC policies. The financial future of CEC is positively correlated to expanding CEC
facilities, providing new course offerings, and increasing administrative support. By
providing CEC with the needed space, CEC is expected to earn over US$2 million over the
next ten years. Table 10 provides a detailed account of student enrollment, gross revenue,
expenses, and net revenue for CEC over the next decade with the needed space allocated for
CEC programs.




                                                                                           2
II. Organizational Overview

II.1   Mission

The mission of the CEC is to meet the lifelong learning and training needs of learners in the
local community and the region. Harnessing AUB resources in various fields of knowledge,
CEC offers a variety of standard and customized certificate programs, diploma programs,
and courses designed to enhance professional and technical skills and address the needs for
personal development and cultural enrichment for learners of all ages.


II.2    Vision

The Continuing Education Center aspires to become a center of excellence in providing
quality education and training in a variety of fields to a diverse population of learners in
Lebanon and the Middle East.


II.3   CEC Organizational Structure

During the November 2006 Board of Trustees (BOT) meeting, an expansion of REP
personnel was proposed to the REP BOT Committee. This proposal was in line with the
faculty inclusion initiative and the market intelligence initiative of REP’s strategic plan. The
proposal included:
   Advertising for the new position of Business Development Officer, to do market
      research and country/sector studies, build and manage a major database, and produce a
      monthly report on key market developments that should be on the REP radar screen.
   Conversion of the 50% Assistant VP (AVP) position in 2006 to full-time status and
      adding to the AVP’s tasks the business of overseeing the Continuing Education Center
      (CEC) programs.
   Initiating the REP Inter-faculty Advisory Committee (RIAC)


In the 2006-2007 fiscal year, REP executed this proposal and welcomed new personnel in
key positions in an effort to actively pursue REP’s strategic plan and strengthen REP’s
organizational structure. As can be seen from CEC’s Organizational Structure Chart (Figure
1), all CEC activities have coordinators that are full-time faculty members assigned by the
Dean of the respective Faculty to maintain quality assurance for the corresponding activity.




                                                                                              3
                        Figure 1. CEC’s Organizational Structure


II.4   CEC & REP

The Continuing Education Center (CEC) has been a critical part of the Office for Regional
External Programs (REP) over the past 25 years. CEC offers non-credit courses and
programs that complement REP’s mission of being the premier provider of training and
related services in all areas of specialization offered by the University’s six faculties. The
following points justify CEC’s position as a division of REP:

      The external nature of REP’s work ensures that CEC operations have the needed
       attention and opportunities offered to local communities and the region.

      Organizationally, REP is the natural place for CEC, since its services cut across all
       AUB’s Faculties and Centers and administrative services are not duplicated.

      The flexibility of the type and format of course/certificate offerings within CEC is
       an element allowing for fast response to market needs for professional training and
       non-credit programs; a cornerstone for REP, as well as the follow up needed.

      CEC is already part of REP, for which a five-year strategic plan has already been
       approved and is now in its second year of implementation.

      REP has many regional contacts and ongoing projects, enabling it to play a more
       active role in attracting CEC contracts from the MENA region.

As part of REP, CEC activities and clients transcend the boundaries of Lebanon. CEC
services are offered in several countries throughout the Middle East. For example, CEC
certificates have been offered in Kuwait with the Technology Services and Training
Company and the Iraqi nurses and paramedics with the Iraqi Ministry of Health.




                                                                                            4
REP’s strategic plan, as approved during 2005-06 by the University Strategic Planning
Committee, includes four initiatives: the Faculty Inclusion Initiative, the Market
Intelligence Initiative, the Branding Initiative, and the Leveraging Initiative that apply to all
ongoing REP activities, including CEC. As the President mentioned in the Strategic
Initiatives Funding Meeting of January 18, 2007, “…we should be very conservative with
estimating income generation from REP; they might generate a lot more business but not a
lot more revenue. Also, these initiatives have already been approved, so they can’t be pulled
off the table.”


II.5.   Program Offerings

Current CEC programs include individual courses, primarily in business, information
technology, and languages. Courses may be taken in a concentration area leading to a
certificate. Certificates require a minimum of four to six courses and are currently offered
in human resource management, accounting, marketing, information technology, and office
management. Students are required to achieve a minimum grade of 60 to successfully
complete individual courses. However, for students pursuing CEC certificates a minimum
combined grade average of 70 must be achieved. Workshops can henceforth also be offered
in corporate communications/public relations/media crisis management, as separate mini
courses or as a component of ongoing marketing offerings. Therefore, CEC deliverables
are:
             Individual courses
             A program leading to a certificate
             A program leading to a diploma
             Training workshops

CEC, in cooperation with the Suliman S. Olayan School of Business (OSB), recently
launched the Human Resource Management (HRM) Diploma program. Recently, the
human resources field has gained much attention by corporate management as it is
continually impacting organizational strategic goals. Ultimately, people are responsible for
creating and sharing the knowledge that adds value to their organization’s capabilities and
are the human resource capital that influences companies’ growth and profitability. This
diploma program provides a comprehensive overview of HRM roles and responsibilities in
the workplace from a strategic perspective. It is targeted for people working in the human
resources field to foster and develop their professional expertise and varied competencies.
This diploma program involves an intensive education program using traditional classroom
instruction, hands-on case studies, executive presentations, and a practical internship
component.

Programs are constantly reviewed and adjusted to meet the academic/professional needs and
schedule limitations of the diverse client pool. To meet the needs of clients, CEC instruction
is offered through regular, customized, tutorial, off-campus programs and e-learning
environments. Delivery formats range in their duration, level of in-depth study and breadth
of areas.




                                                                                               5
                              Table 1: Course Offerings Over 10 Years

             Courses (according to category) Offered for the Past 10 Years
         Year    Business Info. Technology English Languages Others Total
       1996/97           19              7           14            3        2       45
        1997/98          18              5           14            2        3       42
        1998/99          15              5           15            6        1       42
        1999/00          14              7           14            4        6       45
        2000/01          15              6           14            6        5       46
        2001/02          16              9           17            2        4       48
        2002/03          20              6           17            4        3       50
        2003/04          16              3           13            2        1       35
        2004/05          18              1           15            3        0       37
        2005/06          20              2           16            4        1       43
        2006/07          23              0           11            3        4       41
       Average           17              5           15            4        3       43
       Fall 2008         10              0            5            2        1       18


                                   Table 2: Certificate Programs

                                 CERTIFICATES
    Year     Accounting Marketing Business HR              IT   Office Management    Total
   1996/97           x                        x            x            x             4
   1997/98           x                        x            x            x             4
   1998/99           x              x         x            x            x             5
   1999/00           x              x         x            x            x             5
   2000/01           x              x         x            x            x             5
   2001/02           x              x         x            x            x             5
   2002/03           x              x         x       x    x            x             6
   2003/04           x              x         x       x    x            x             6
   2004/05           x              x         x       x    x            x             6
   2005/06           x              x         x       x    x            x             6
   2006/07           x              x         x       x                 x             5
   2007/08           x              x         x       x                 x             5


II.6    Facilities

CEC is currently housed in Building #23 (Old OPD). Total space allotted to CEC is an
insufficient 75m2. This includes two offices and a small room currently being used as a
computer lab. CEC is scheduled to vacate this space in December 2008. Accordingly, there
is dire need to identify the needed space for CEC in order to sustain its on-going CEC




                                                                                             6
activities, let alone facilitate new CEC programs such as Information Technology which
was temporarily stopped due to lack of availability of the needed computer laboratories.

The space requirements needed is 1,400 m2 (Table 4). Pending other viable alternatives, this
study presents two plausible scenarios for addressing the CEC space needs as shown in
section V.2. The first scenario will provide around 34% of the needed space and the second
around 57%.


II.7   Student Enrollment (1984-2007)

Demand for CEC courses has increased over the past four years while the 2006-2007 fiscal
year saw the largest enrollment figures at CEC for the past decade. There was more than a
26% increase in students in 2006-07 from the previous academic year and around 20% more
than the decade (1997-2007) average. The student count in CEC programs over the past
years, as extracted from REP’s annual reports, is as follows:

         Table 3: Student, Instructor and Course Counts for CEC (1987-2007)

            Year           Student Count         Instructor Count    Course Count
        1987 - 1988             5250                    194                83
        1988 - 1989             4315                    133                51
        1989 - 1990             2926                    153               108
        1990 - 1991             2255                    117                84
        1991 - 1992             1926                    101                73
        1992 - 1993             1525                     92                72
        1993 - 1994             1146                     76                59
        1994 - 1995              521                     40                34
        1995 - 1996              639                     60                45
        1996 - 1997              529                     48                43
        1997 - 1998              472                     48                42
        1998 - 1999              510                     43                41
        1999 - 2000              517                     48                45
        2000 - 2001              490                     50                47
        2001 - 2002              529                     50                46
        2002 - 2003              567                     47                48
        2003 - 2004              404                     33                35
        2004 - 2005              453                     41                40
        2005 - 2006              476                     40                41
        2006 - 2007              601                     40                41
          Average
                                1,302                   72                 54
        (1987-2007)
          Fall 2008             172                     17                 18




                                                                                          7
II.8   Student Composition

The following is the CEC student composition during the current Fall 2008 semester:

Gender:                       Male= 33%, Female=67%.
Age group:                    Below 20=13% 20-29=40%, 30-39=30%, 40-49=14% 50+ = 3%.
Educational level attained:   University degree=60%, High School=26%, Vocational =14%.
Occupation:                   Banking/Marketing/Management/Administration/Accounting=40%,
                              Engineering=5%,     Students=20%,    Lawyers=7%,      IT=4%,
                              Pharmacists= 6%, Teachers=8%, Unemployed/Other=12%.

The following is the CEC student composition during the 2006-07 academic year:

Gender:                       Male= 42%, Female=58%.
Age group:                    20-30=50%, 30-40=35%, 40-50=15%.
Educational level attained:   University degree=60%, High School=26%, Vocational =14%.
Occupation:                   Banking/Marketing/Management/Administration/Accounting
                              =46%, Engineering=7%, Students=15%, Lawyers=4%, IT=4%,
                              Pharmacists= 6%, Teachers=5%, Unemployed/Other=13%.


As can be seen from the sample statistics, the majority (over 80%) of CEC students are aged
40 or less with 60% of the population holding a university degree. Furthermore, around
45% of the student body includes professionals in business and another 20% that are
students currently seeking degrees elsewhere.




                                                                                         8
III. CEC Service to AUB

Since its inception, CEC has been a key unit in maintaining AUB’s link with the local
community in Lebanon as well as in the region. The following sections represent some of
the justification for not only supporting CEC to address some of the difficulties it is facing
now but also to find ways to allow it to grow in the future as it can potentially develop into
a large program with many forms of educational deliverables including that targeted for the
professional local community.


III. 1 Community Service

CEC is a key component in AUB’s commitment to serve the local community and maintain
a regional presence. CEC is guided by President Waterbury’s vision to “seek ways to
benefit the broad community in which we live.”1 The importance of CEC rests in its
provision of lifelong learning and training needs of adults in the local community and the
region. CEC seeks to infuse knowledge in the community while upholding AUB’s
commitment to academic excellence. CEC collaborates with all academic deans to ensure
that the highest quality education is provided.


III. 2 Institutional Re-accreditation

CEC offerings are an important element in the Middle States institutional re-accreditation
effort that AUB has already started, which is related to Standard 13 (Related Educational
Activities). Standard 13 addresses several issues including that related to CEC programs and
the extent to which the institution commits sufficient resources to support these programs.
In the 2004 Institutional Self Study Report, the Related Educational Activities Committee
recommended that deans, school directors, and CEC administrators review and redesign, as
appropriate, current CEC programs to determine their nature, appeal, objectives, standards,
and outcomes. This recommendation was made in an effort to strengthen CEC programs
because an accredited institution is expected to offer certificate programs (post-secondary
non-degree credentials) consistent with the institutional mission that stresses “lifelong
learning.”


III. 3 Source for Contributions

CEC is an attractive alternative for local and international organizations seeking the services
of AUB. There have been several cases whereby an organization would seek to sign an
agreement to deliver CEC programs that address the professional training needs of their
employees as an alternative to direct financial contributions. Examples include companies
in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia such as SABIC, Maaden, Saudi-French Bank and Al-Saif
Engineering that want to cooperate with AUB by offering CEC programs to its employees
rather than through direct donations. This was recently indicated by Mr. Abdul Fattah Ghali,


1
    State of the University Address 2004




                                                                                             9
an active alumnus in the Riyadh chapter in a meeting attended by Dr. Imad Baalbaki during
2007.


III.4   Positive Cash Flow

CEC has provided AUB with a positive cash flow for the past decade. The annual average
net revenue over the past decade is US$69,183. In the 2006-2007 fiscal year CEC net
revenue from student tuition was the third highest in the past decade. It surpassed the
average of the past decade by $46,386, an increase of 67%. A conservative estimate of net
revenue for 2007-2008 is almost US$136,283 as elaborated further in section six.




                                                                                      10
IV.       Market Analysis Summary

IV.1      Target Market Segments

Traditionally, CEC’s targeted market segments have been university students, adult
learners, and higher education institutions looking to expand their programs. For example,
some clients are AUB and non-AUB students interested in taking non-credit courses to
strengthen their language skills or learn more about an area of interest such as photography.
Other clients are professionals who need certificates in human resource management,
marketing, etc., to further their careers. Another group of clients are higher education
institutions interested in starting their own continuing education programs, such as Dhofar
University and more recently Prince Fahed Bin Sultan University, Tabuk, KSA. Moving
forward, CEC will widen its scope of target markets. This will be discussed in detail in
section V.


IV.2      Main Competitors

CEC continues to face increased competition. The primary competition comes from
universities that offer continuing education programs such as LAU, MECAT, and ESA. In
some cases, these universities also offer professional certificate training programs certified
in Europe and the United States. For example, ESA has exclusivity in preparing Lebanese
bankers for the Article XIII Security and Administrative Priority 103 certificate from
London.

Corporate organizations are developing in-house training divisions and are becoming less
dependent on external training because of greater self sufficiency. For example, Bank Audi
has an extensive in-house training program with in-house trainers who have undergone
“train the trainers” programs.


IV.3      Buying Patterns

The continuing education market is extremely price sensitive. Organizations with lower
prices or flexible payment programs attract individual customers. However, for most
corporate clients, branding, reputation, and solid relationships are more valuable than price.


IV.4      CEC’s Competitive Advantage

The increased competition makes it critical for CEC to highlight its competitive advantage:

         Multi-disciplinary research bearing on policy analysis and problem solving
         International state-of-the-art know-how with intimate local knowledge
         Over 25 years of excellence in serving the region
         Blending academic expertise and advanced professional know-how in a customized
          manner tailored to specific situations
         Continued presence for evaluation, feedback and post-implementation assistance




                                                                                           11
To complement this competitive advantage, CEC will embark on a comprehensive
marketing and expansion strategy. This strategy includes an expansion of CEC personnel,
facilities, programs, and marketing strategies.




                                                                                    12
V.     Expansion Strategy and Implementation Summary

V.1    Addressing Staffing Gaps

CEC already has a dedicated team. Under the Office of the Vice President for Regional
External Programs, the CEC staff was comprised of a Program Officer, Assistant Director,
and Administrative Assistant. On March 27, 2007, Dr. George Farag, Assistant Vice
President for REP, was named Acting Director of CEC and tasked with dedicating the
needed time to expand CEC operations.

Additionally, CEC benefits from the work of the following REP staff who have been
recently hired:

Journalism Director: Magda Abu-Fadil, a veteran journalist with international media in
the U.S. and across the Arab world, an academic, and formerly director of the Institute for
Professional Journalists at the Lebanese American University, was hired in April 2007 as
director of the newly-established Journalism Training Program (JTP). JTP will focus on
organizing workshops, training and seminars for professional journalists in the Arab world.
Although JTP will fall under REP, Abu-Fadil’s experience and programs will benefit CEC.

Business Development Officer: On April 2, 2007, Sophie Hallal joined the REP family as
the Business Development Officer (BDO). Although the BDO’s focus will be on identifying
and developing opportunities for REP, she will also identify workshop opportunities for
CEC in Lebanon and abroad.


V. 2   Improving Facilities

Expanding facilities is a top priority for CEC to fulfill its educational mission and to expand
its services to the community. CEC needs adequate space and modern facilities to meet the
present and future needs of its various educational programs and activities. It also needs
more office space for administration, faculty, and student services.

Moreover, the delivery of some of the existing CEC programs as well as the ones that will
be newly offered would require a number of activities rooms/studios that are specially
organized and equipped to meet the needs of the specific programs of study. Painting,
music, photography, child care, and cooking are examples of such courses.

It is critical to expand the space availability of CEC. The space allocated to CEC today is
less than 2% of the space CEC commanded during its most successful period from 1984 to
1994. It is no coincidence that CEC’s highest level of enrollment came at a time when
sufficient space was available for classrooms, laboratories, and administrative support. It
would be unrealistic to hope to return to the days when CEC had around 5,000 m2 of space.
Instead, as Table 4 demonstrates, the CEC is in need of approximately 1,750 m2 as opposed
to the currently available 75 m2. In what follows, two options will be provided to address
the CEC space needs.




                                                                                            13
                                   Table 4: Space Requirements
                                                                                           2
                                                          Capacity   Total # of   Area (m )    Subtotal
Category   Description                         Quantity                                                2
                                                           / Room    stations     / Station    Area (m )
           Reception Desk                         1                      1            15           15
General
  (1)
           Reception Area                         1                      1            45           45
           Sub-total                                                                               60
           Language Classroom IT Enabled          2         30           60          1.8          108
           Computer Labs                          3         30           90          2.5          225
Program    Learning Resources Rooms               1         40           40           2            80
   (2)     Spare Labs                             1         30           30          1.8           54
           Classrooms                             6         30          180          1.5          270
           Sub-total                                                                              737
           Management                             2          1           2           20            40
           Faculty                                7          1           7           14            98
           Faculty                                8          2           4            7            28
Offices
  (3)
           Non-Academic Staff                     8          1           8           10            80
           Student Services offices               1         20          20           2.5           50
           Spare                                  2          1           2           14            28
           Sub-total                                                                              324
           Lounge                                 1          6           6           2.5           15
           Library with a librarian’s office      1                      1           90            90
 Others    Activities room                        1                                  36            36
   (4)     Studios for art related courses        2                      2           20            40
           Meeting room (50 persons)                                                               75
           Three rooms for copiers/storage                               3           9             27
           Sub-total                                                                              283
                                       Total                                                     1,404
  (5)           Elect/Mech , Common Areas                              25%                        351
                                Gross Total                                                      1,755


  Building 20 (Currently OSB Building) Option:
  Building 20, currently the venue of the Olayan School of Business, would be an appropriate
  location to alleviate the space shortage when OSB moves out to its new building currently
  under construction. CEC is in dire need of the classrooms that will be vacated by OSB.
  CEC has traditionally offered its classes in the evening. However, as the security situation
  in Lebanon continues to regress, students are becoming more reluctant to participate in
  evening courses. Therefore, to accommodate this situation CEC must offer a greater
  number of courses before 5 p.m. when regular AUB students are on campus and using the
  classrooms that are reserved for CEC in the evenings. Accordingly, CEC will benefit
  greatly from having the additional classroom space. Furthermore, as can be seen from
  Table 4, CEC needs space for labs, offices and other activities. In that respect, there are two
  possibilities suggested for Building 20:

  Scenario 1: CEC will relinquish the space it currently occupies in Building 23 and use three
  floors of Building 20, one of which will be shared. Classrooms, labs and conference rooms
  could be used by other faculties. Table 5 is an outline of how Building 20 could fulfill CEC
  needs. After relinquishing the currently available 75 m2, this scenario will provide slightly
  more than 500 m2 of additional space for CEC including common areas.




                                                                                                  14
            Table 5: CEC Space Requirements // OSB Available Space
REP / CEC                                        Room OSB   Area (m2)   Category
                                  Second Floor
Computer Lab                      Second Floor      102        22.7        2
Computer Lab                                       102A        21.2        2
Activities Room/Studio                              101         25         4
Instructor’s Office (Full-time)                    101a        10.9        3
Instructor’s Office (Full-time)                    101d        10.6        3
Elev., Lobby and Stairs                             100        12.3        5
Subtotal                                                      102.7
                                Third Floor
CEC Director                    Third Floor         205        26.5        3
Admin Assistant                                     203        14.2        3
Program Officer                                     204        13.2        3
Assistant to Director                               201        11.7        3
IT Officer                                          202        13.4        3
Conference Room                                     211        49.7        4
Student Services Officer                            207       12.47        3
Student Records Assistant                           209       16.86        3
Business Development Officer                        208        9.99        3
Student Help                                        212        6.18        3
Photocopy Room                                     215A        5.65        4
Elev., Lobby and Stairs                             200        25.8        5
Waiting Area                                       201A         13         1
Toilet                                             208a         11         5
Toilet                                             209a        10.6        5
Corridor                                            213        13.2        5
Kitchen                                             216        2.7         5
Store                                              211A        2.7         4
Balcony                                             217        8.1         5
Janitor Room                                        210        3.2         5
Lobby                                               215        14.9        1
Subtotal                                                     285.05
                                Fourth Floor
Activities Room/Studio          Fourth Floor       307          21         4
Activities Room/Studio                             306         11.6        4
Activities Room/Studio                             304        10.85        4
Faculty Office                                     303        10.45        3
Faculty Office                                     301        11.42        3
Marketing and Public Relations Officer             308         9.25        3
Program Coordinators Office                        310        13.06        3
Director for the Journalism Program                305        16.26        3
Workshops Coordinator                              302        15.44        3
Faculty Lounge                                     309        17.88        4
Elev., Lobby and Stairs                            300         59.3        5
Toilet                                             311         6.5         5
Toilet                                             312         6.8         5
Store                                              318         1.8         4
Store                                              319         2.2         4
Subtotal                                                     213.81
                TOTAL                                        601.56




                                                                                   15
  The following Table 6 shows the correlation of space needed to the space available for
  scenario 1.


           Table 6: Correlation of Space Needed to Space Available for Scenario 1
                                                         2
                                                Area (m )    Building 42 Area   % provided wrt
Category   Description                                           2
                                                              (m ) Available    to space needed
                                                 Needed

General    Reception Desk and Area                 60              27.9              47%
  (1)

           Language Classroom IT Enabled
           Computer Labs
Program
   (2)
           Learning Resources Rooms               737              43.9               6%
           Spare Labs
           Classrooms


           Management
           Faculty
Offices    Faculty                                324
  (3)                                                            221.88              69%
           Non-Academic Staff
           Student Services offices
           Spare


           Lounge
           Library with a librarian’s office
 Others    Activities room
   (4)     Studios for art related courses        283            148.38              51%
           Meeting room (50 persons)
           Three rooms for copiers/storage

                                        Total    1,404           442.06              32%
  (5)                         Common Areas        351            159.5               45%
                                 Gross Total     1,755           601.56              34%




  Scenario 2: Both CEC and REP would relinquish their space in two sites (Building 42 and
  Building 23) and move to Building 20. This will require using the entire space available in
  Building 20. It is important to note that the labs and conference rooms will be shared with
  other faculties. Table 7 is an outline of how Building 20 could fulfill REP and CEC needs:




                                                                                           16
     Table 7: REP & CEC Space Requirements // OSB Available Space
REP / CEC                                      Room OSB   Area (m2)   Category
                               First Floor
News Room                                        001         47.4        2
Language Lab                                     003         42.3        2
Activities Room                                  002         49.7        4
Student Services Officer                         004b        21.2        3
Student Records Assistant                        004          9.3        3
Lobby                                            005         21.1        1
Corridor                                         005a        29.2        5
Toilet                                           006          8.8        5
Toilet                                           007          9.1        5
Elev., Main Entrance Lobby and Stairs            009         34.7        5
Store                                            004a         2.2        4
Janitor Room                                     008          1.7        5
Subtotal                                                    276.7
                                Second Floor
Computer Lab                                      102        22.7        2
Computer Lab                                     102A        21.2        2
Activities Room/Studio                            101         25         4
Instructor’s Office (Full-time)                  101a        10.9        3
Instructor’s Office (Full-time)                  101d        10.6        3
Elev., Lobby and Stairs                           100        12.3        5
Subtotal                                                    102.7
                                Third Floor
Vice President for REP                            205        26.5        3
Deputy VP, REP                                    203        14.2        3
Administrative Assistant                          204        13.2        3
Contract Development Officer                      201        11.7        3
Financial Manager                                 202        13.4        3
Conference Room                                   211        49.7        4
Secretary                                         207       12.47        3
Assistant VP, REP                                 209       16.86        3
Business Development Officer                      208        9.99        3
Student Help                                      212        6.18        3
Photocopy Room                                   215A        5.65        4
Elev., Lobby and Stairs                           200        25.8        5
Waiting Area                                     201A         13         1
Toilet                                           208a         11         5
Toilet                                           209a        10.6        5
Corridor                                          213        13.2        5
Kitchen                                           216         2.7        5
Store                                            211A         2.7        4
Balcony                                           217         8.1        5
Janitor Room                                      210         3.2        5
Faculty Lounge                                    215        14.9        1
Subtotal                                                   285.05




                                                                                 17
…Table 7 (Contd.)
 REP / CEC                                         Room OSB    Area (m2)     Category
                                   Fourth Floor
 Activities Room/Studio                              307           21             4
 CEC Director                                        306          11.6            3
 Admin Assistant                                     304         10.85            3
 Program Officer                                     303         10.45            3
 Assistant to Director                               301         11.42            3
 Marketing and Public Relations Officer              308          9.25            3
 Program Coordinators Office                         310         13.06            3
 Director for the Journalism Program                 305         16.26            3
 Workshops Coordinator                               302         15.44            3
 Faculty Lounge                                      309         17.88            4
 Elev., Lobby and Stairs                             300          59.3            5
 Toilet                                              311          6.5             5
 Toilet                                              312          6.8             5
 Store                                               318          1.8             4
 Store                                               319          2.2             4
 Subtotal                                                       213.81
                                     Fifth Floor
 Library + Assistant Librarian                        400          66.0           4
 Librarian                                           400C          9.5            4
 Photocopy room                                      400D          6.2            4
 Lab                                                  402          23.2           2
 Stair                                               400B          10.8           5
 Lobby                                               400E          7.3            1
 Machine Room                                        400A          4.3            5
 Subtotal                                                         127.3
 TOTAL                                                          1,005.56



The following Table 8 shows the correlation of space needed to the space available for
scenario 2. After relinquishing the currently available REP space in building 42 (135 m2)
and CEC (75 m2) space totaling 210 m2, this scenario will provide almost 796 m2 of
additional space for REP and CEC including common areas.




                                                                                      18
           Table 8: Correlation of Space Needed to Space Available for Scenario 2
                                                            2               2
                                                  Area (m )       Area (m )      % provided wrt
Category     Description                                          Available     to space needed
                                                   Needed

General      Reception Desk and Area                 60              56.3             94%
  (1)

             Language Classroom IT Enabled
             Computer Labs
Program
             Learning Resources Rooms               737
   (2)                                                              156.8             21%
             Spare Labs
             Classrooms

             Management
             Faculty
 Offices     Faculty                                324            274.83             85%
   (3)       Non-Academic Staff                                  (108.22 are
             Student Services offices                             for REP)
             Spare

             Lounge
             Library with a librarian’s office
 Others      Activities room
   (4)       Studios for art related courses        283            259.53             92%
             Meeting room (50 persons)
             Three rooms for copiers/storage

                                          Total     1,404          747.46             53%
   (5)                          Common Areas         351            258.1             74%
                                   Gross Total      1,755         1,005.56            57%



V.3      Diversify/Expand Course Offerings

CEC is constantly seeing to expand and diversify its course offerings in order to meet the
changing demand of its clients and environment. The following are some initiatives
currently being explored by CEC:

Satellite Center: To reach a broader constituency and diversify offerings, CEC will open a
satellite center at AUB’s Agricultural Research Education Center (AREC), the Bekaa’.
During the early stages, the satellite center will offer certificates and courses in English and
information technology. This will allow CEC to reach a new target audience outside the
greater Beirut area.

Agriculture Workshops: FAFS is interested in providing CEC with the materials and staff
to offer certificates and workshops in agriculture in Beirut. FAFS has the materials for
workshops in Organic Agriculture, Urban Agriculture, Agro-tourism, and Management of
Rural Development Projects. These workshops will be marketed to government, non-




                                                                                             19
governmental, and international organizations in Lebanon and the region. Classes will be
held at CEC and/or workshops will be organized abroad.

Creative Writing: Several general managers of potential corporate clients, including Bank
Audi, Blom Bank and SGBL, recognize the importance of greater training for their
employees. To meet these corporate clients’ needs, CEC will organize new workshops in
areas such as creative writing and concise report writing.

Journalism Training Program: Courses will be tailored to clients’ needs in Arabic,
English and French and will be conducted at AUB, in-house in Lebanon, and in-country
where requested. Funding will be provided by various sponsors and by nominal charges to
the journalists themselves. REP certificates of participation will be issued to journalists at
the end of each course that can last from two days to two or more weeks. In the future CEC
certificates in Journalism may be offered as well, pending approval.


V. 4   Expand Marketing Strategy

CEC Website: A new, user-friendly CEC website has been developed with updated course
and registration materials.

Target Corporate Clients: CEC will target corporate clients to meet a whole spectrum of
needs for organizations within Lebanon. Ongoing market research regarding potential
clients by Drs. Diab and Hallab that began in 2007 identified the following organizations
and institutions that expressed strong interest in CEC services:

      Arab Supply & Trading (ASTRA) Corporation, Saudi Arabia
      Kuwait Petroleum Corporation (KPC), Kuwait
      Bank Audi, Beirut, Lebanon
      Sukoni & Sukleen, Beirut, Lebanon
      First National Bank, Beirut, Lebanon
      Societe Generale de Banques au Liban, Beirut, Lebanon
      Banque du Liban et d’Outre Mer (BLOM), Beirut, Lebanon
      United Nations Agencies
      Industries in the Bekaa Region

CEC already has concrete requests for training. Societe Generale requested workshops in
“Corporate Communications in Human Resources” and “Corporate Communications in
Marketing.” These workshops would combine English language teaching with technical
business terminology and practical application. The bank stressed that follow-up sessions
are needed in order for participants to remain updated. Initially eight workshops have been
requested. Bank Audi is interested in a “Creative Writing” workshop which may be given
on a semi annual basis. Blom Bank also requested a “Creative Writing” workshop and a
“Report Writing” workshop focusing on more efficient report writing. Both workshops
would also be given semi annually. Therefore, potentially CEC may deliver 14 workshops
to three organizations over the coming year.




                                                                                           20
Lebanese Executive Forum: After a two-decade cessation, REP will re-establish the
Lebanese Executive Forum (LEF). LEF’s objective is to forge a closer relationship between
REP/CEC and the Lebanese business community. To do so, LEF will satisfy the needs of
local businesses in various managerial skills through training and consultancy. In addition,
LEF board members will serve as “Ambassadors” for REP and CEC in the community by
providing added visibility for CEC programs.

Export CEC Products: CEC workshops, certificates, and diplomas will be exported to the
GCC and North Africa. Plans are underway to export CEC programs and services to Dhofar
University and the newly established Prince Fahd Bin Sultan University in Tabuk.

Triangulation Initiatives: Explore joint collaborative initiatives between AUB and other
organizations to deliver CEC programs. For example, the advantages of an AUB/AUC
partnership in specific continuing education initiatives include:
        Designing products that draw on areas of strength in both universities.
        AUB-AUC brand name is expected to provide stronger marketability for
           continuing education products in many areas within the MENA region.
        AUB-AUC partnership may potentially attract USAID, EU, etc. funding for
           continuing education projects in the MENA region.

Advertising: CEC will embark on an aggressive advertising campaign in local newspapers
to ensure reaching the widest audience possible.


V.5    Adapting Policies to Meet Demand

Tuition: Currently CEC students are required to pay the full tuition amount at the time of
registration. In order to attract a more diverse pool of students, particularly those who
cannot afford to pay the entire amount immediately, CEC will look at some of the existing
systems for regular students such as deferred payments. This may include installment
payments at the beginning, middle, and/or end of the semester. Furthermore, CEC will look
into the possibility of attracting scholarships for CEC students.

Compensation: CEC will revisit the compensation package being offered to attract the
most qualified and motivated instructors possible.

AUB Staff: AUB non-academic employees seeking non-degree further education be
channeled through the CEC to register into one of the certificate programs.




                                                                                         21
VI. Financial Plan

VI.1   Historical Financial Picture

CEC has enjoyed a positive cash flow for the past decade. As indicated in Table 9, the
average net revenue for CEC over the past two years (2005-2007) was US$127,259 while
the average net revenue since 1998 was US$69,183.


VI.2   Current Financial Picture

As can be seen from the following table, a conservative estimate of total net revenue for
2007/2008 is US$136,283. This is almost double the average annual revenue since 1998.


          Table 9: Revenue and Expenses for CEC for the period 1998-2007

              Revenue and Expenses for CEC for the period 1998- 2006
                 Year        Revenue ($)     Expenses ($)    Net Revenue ($)
              1997-1998         172,959         164,832             8,127
              1998-1999         210,218         208,632             1,586
              1999-2000         207,906         156,404            51,502
              2000-2001         200,350         161,906            38,444
              2001-2002         193,526         126,413            67,113
              2002-2003         221,182         134,547            86,635
              2003-2004         184,696         148,639            36,056
              2004-2005         345,227         197,374           147,853
              2005-2006         323,002         186,067           136,935
              2006-2007         319,385         206,023           113,362
                Total          2,378,451       3,544,837          687,613
            Annual Average      237,845         354,483            68,761
              2007 - 2008
               (estimate)
                                325,000         188,717           136,283



VI.3   Projected Net Revenue

The financial future of CEC is positively correlated to expanding CEC facilities, providing
new course offerings, and increasing administrative support. By providing CEC with the
needed space, CEC is expected to earn over US$2 million over the next ten years, which is
over three times the net revenue ($688K) over the past decade (1997-2007) shown in Table
9. Table 10 provides a detailed account of the projected student enrollment, gross revenue,
expenses, and net revenue for CEC over the next ten years with the needed space allocated
for CEC programs.




                                                                                        22
                                                       Table 10: Ten Year Net Revenue Forecast (US$)

                             2006-07   2007-08    2008-09       2009-10      2010-11   2011-12   2012-13    2013-14   2014-15   2015-16   2016-17     Total

          Student Count        601       661        727           800          880       968      1,065      1,171     1,288     1,417     1,559      11,137

          Revenue from
                             291,485   320,634    352,697       387,967      426,763   469,440   516,383    568,022   624,824   687,306   756,037   5,401,557
          courses
          Revenue from
                             27,900    32,085     36,898        42,432       48,797    56,117    61,729     67,901    74,692    82,161    90,377     621,088
          Other Activities
          Gross
                             319,385   352,719    389,595       430,399      475,560   525,556   578,112    635,923   699,516   769,467   846,414   6,022,646
          Revenue ($)
          CEC
                             206,023   216,324    246,610       281,135      320,494   365,363   416,514    437,339   459,206   482,167   506,275   3,937,449
          Expenses
                                                 Instructors   Additional    Admin.      IT
          Additional Staff                                                                       Director
                                                 Salary Inc.   Instructors   Officer   Officer
          Total
                             206,023   216,324    246,610       281,135      320,494   365,363   416,514    437,339   459,206   482,167   506,275   3,937,449
          Expenses ($)
          Net
          Revenue ($)
                             113,362   136,394   142,985       149,264       155,067   160,194   161,598    198,584   240,309   287,300   340,139   2,085,196


This forecast is based on the following conservative assumptions:

      A modest 10% yearly increase in student enrollment for the coming ten years.
      No increase in CEC tuition over ten years to remain competitive.
      Only a 15% annual increase in revenue from other activities such as the Journalism Training Program and corporate workshops until
       2012, and then a drop to 10% (when the JTP project is completed) until 2017.
      An annual 14% increase in expenses over 4 years to account for new staff. This includes an Administrative Officer (handling student
       affairs and librarian responsibilities), an IT Officer, and a CEC Director at the beginning of the 2011-2012 academic year.
      An annual 5% increase in expenses from 2013/2014 through 2016/2017.




                                                                                                                                                                23
VII.   CEC Performance During 2006-2007

During the 2006-2007 fiscal year CEC made significant accomplishments:

      The syllabi and requirements for all certificate and non-certificate courses were
       updated this year. This exercise contributed to adding CEC to the AUB Banner
       registration program for the first time. While in the past registration for CEC took
       place manually at the CEC office, the fall 2008 semester marked the first time that
       CEC students registered on the Banner system. Being integrated into the Banner
       system will ensure accuracy in all CEC registration procedures and data. It will also
       facilitate future reporting and the generation of statistical charts.

      Demand for CEC courses has increased over the past four years while this fiscal year
       saw the largest enrollment figures at CEC for the past decade with a student count of
       601. This represented more than a 26% increase in student enrollment as compared to
       the previous academic year.

      CEC in cooperation with the Suliman S. Olayan School of Business (OSB), created
       the curriculum and program design for the first CEC Human Resource Management
       (HRM) Diploma program. The new diploma program builds on the already
       established CEC Certificate in Human Resource Management and was launched in
       the fall 2007 semester.

      For the first time a detailed listing of CEC’s programs with certificate requisites,
       admission requirements, and course descriptions was created and included in the
       2007-2008 AUB Catalogue. This 25 page document replaced the one-page
       description of CEC traditionally included in the AUB Catalogue.

      Plans were developed to begin the Professional Journalism Certificate, under the
       Continuing Education Center's auspices. The certificate would be a non-academic
       four or five course program for working journalists. Professional journalists would
       enroll to take one course per semester and stretch the process over two academic
       years, for example. The following is a list of possible courses we could offer:
           1. Reporting, writing and editing
           2. Investigative journalism
           3. Multi-media/online journalism
           4. Media law & ethics
           5. Newsroom management

      Quality assurance measures at CEC were revisited. To begin enhancing these
       measures the organizational structure of REP in general and CEC in particular was
       expanded to include CEC program coordinators (selected from AUB’s full-time
       faculty). These coordinators will be responsible for quality assurance of CEC
       certificates and non-certificate programs, local workshops, and regional workshops.




                                                                                         24
VIII. Summary for Strengthening CEC Operations in 2007-2008

Some of the challenges and plans for the future include:

   1) CEC offerings should be reviewed by REP and the REP Interfaculty Advisory
      Committee to meet the demands of the community in light of a detailed study for
      market needs.

   2) In light of the new universities, institutions and centers, that have become competitors
      to CEC over the past decade, it is essential to review not only CEC’s course offerings
      but also the fee structure which is currently in practice.

   3) Quality assurance (QA) procedures should be revised which may necessitate the
      formation of a quality assurance unit within CEC that would be in charge of course
      and instructor evaluations carried out at the end of each term as well as exit surveys
      and support staff assessment, etc. This unit will also ensure that QA procedures are
      implemented. This may include assigning more coordinators for CEC deliverables
      including certificate/diploma programs to supervise and recommend courses,
      textbooks and set standards.

   4) Improving CEC’s marketing strategies including exporting CEC products to the
      MENA region.

   5) Reactivation of the Lebanese Executive Forum (LEF) that played an important role in
      keeping channels open with the community by allowing main key players in our
      potential clientele to engage in active roles pertaining to CEC operations.

   6) The provision of space for expansion of CEC operations as well as ensuring quality
      teaching for existing programs.

   7) Setting up CEC satellite centers outside the main campus such as in AREC, Beka’.

   8) Exploring joint collaborative initiatives between AUB and other organizations to
      deliver CEC programs.




                                                                                           25