Memorandum of Understanding Business Purchase by apt23289

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									Memorandum of Understanding




    College at Purchase
         and the
State University of New York




       December 2000
                                                           CONTENTS




Market Niche/Distinctiveness .................................................................................................. 1


Projected Institutional Position and Benchmarks of Success .............................................. 1
1.0      Enrollment/Admissions Selectivity .............................................................................. 2
 1.1     Enrollment growth........................................................................................................... 2
 1.2     Student mix ...................................................................................................................... 3
 1.3 Recruitment...................................................................................................................... 4
 1.4 Level on selectivity matrix............................................................................................... 4
 1.5     Comparisons with selected benchmark institutions ........................................................ 5

2.0      Student Outcomes.......................................................................................................... 6
 2.1     Student Life...................................................................................................................... 6
 2.2     Retention/graduation rates.............................................................................................. 7
 2.3     Student/alumni satisfaction ............................................................................................. 8
 2.4 Post-graduate success ..................................................................................................... 8
 2.5     Assessment planning........................................................................................................ 9
3.0      Faculty Development and Scholarship ........................................................................ 9
 3.1 Faculty recruitment ....................................................................................................... 10
 3.2 Faculty review, promotion, and tenure ......................................................................... 10
 3.3     Quality and quantity of scholarship .............................................................................. 10

4.0      Inter-Campus Collaboration ...................................................................................... 12
 4.1 Joint academic programs .............................................................................................. 12
 4.2     Articulation.................................................................................................................... 12
 4.3 Other cooperative activities .......................................................................................... 12
5.0       Academic Program Directions ................................................................................... 12
 5.1 Undergraduate education.............................................................................................. 12
 5.1.1 General education ......................................................................................................... 15
 5.2 Graduate programs ....................................................................................................... 15
 5.3 Responsiveness to local/regional/state needs................................................................ 15

6.0       Infrastructure Technology.......................................................................................... 16
 6.1      Facilities ........................................................................................................................ 16
 6.2 Academic technology..................................................................................................... 16

7.0       Mission Review Funding............................................................................................. 17


Appendix A............................................................................................................................... 18
                                Market Niche/Distinctiveness
                               Campus role within SUNY System

Founded in 1969, by then Governor Nelson Rockefeller, Purchase College was designed to
offer undergraduate professional and conservatory programs in the visual and performing arts
as well as a strong liberal arts and science program. Today, while students are primarily
attracted to Purchase because of its excellent national and international reputation in the arts,
with nearly half of its students enrolled in Arts programming, Purchase seeks to become
Westchester’s premier liberal arts and science college. It offers a distinctive program that is
attentive to student learning, utilizes a research orientated curriculum with small class sizes
and provides unique enrichment opportunities for students as a result of its long standing
strength in the fine arts.

Purchase College graduate programs are small and mainly related to its Visual and
Performing Arts Mission. Future plans include expansion of graduate opportunities in both
Dance and Music as well as in the Liberal Arts and Science area.

In order to respond to local needs, the College is developing business courses through its
School of Continuing Education, a BFA degree in Arts Management (recently approved), and
other entrepreneurial activities that reach out to the Westchester business community.
Purchase aspires to offer a Teacher Education program and it continues to expand
opportunities for students through articulation agreements with Orange, Rockland, Ulster, and
Westchester Community Colleges and SUNY College at Cortland.

Purchase is also proud of its public service mission, serving as a center for cultural activities
over a 60-mile radius. Its Neuberger Museum, rated as the nation’s 8th largest campus based
museum, and the Performing Arts Center, which hosts over 625 events each year, are “jewels”
of the Purchase campus.

To realize its aspiration, Purchase recognizes its need to bring greater unity, planning and
decision-making between its Visual and Performing Arts programs and its Liberal Arts and
Science programs. Its concept of “one college” is becoming a reality felt through the College
but it is recognized as a difficult challenge. Developing a single college from these two
cultures, while maintaining their uniqueness, is Purchase’s primary challenge.


                Projected Institutional Position and Benchmarks of Success

Purchase has begun planning to reach its “one college” concept. Strategies and benchmarks
are in place to raise admissions standards, increase enrollment (both in number and quality) in
Liberal Arts and Science, to beautify the campus and to expand articulation with other SUNY
Units. Most importantly, joint planning is occurring between Visual and Performing Arts
programs and Liberal Arts and Science programs that should lead to more interchange
between students, programs, curriculums and between faculty and staff. A Title III Grant
application to achieve that goal through general education and cross-divisional courses has
been submitted.



                                                1
Memorandum of Understanding                                                     College at Purchase


Benchmarks have been established for most items, including selectivity, enrollment,
scholarship, performance and facility development. The institution has also begun planning a
new assessment program, some of which has already been implemented, which will include
additional benchmarks for success. Purchase has in the past not paid sufficient attention to
measurement of goals or benchmarking. It plans to do much more over the next five years.
Over the next five years, Purchase plans to increase the percentage of Liberal Arts and
Science students as well as the number of transfer and commuter students.


1.0    Enrollment/Admissions Selectivity

1.1    Enrollment growth

Enrollment Management has become a major commitment at Purchase. As a result of sound
planning, a revamped admission procedure, the purchase of a new data base system, the
establishment of a tele-counseling team and a host of recruitment strategies, the College has
reached, in three years, its 1996 goal of 25% student growth by 2001-2002.

While Purchase’s Enrollment plan includes a projected AAFTE increase of 4.03% from
planned 1999-2000 to 2000-2001, as indicated in the enrollment chart below, it actually
demands a reduction from both official fall 1999 headcount and 1999-00 AAFTE by 61 heads
and 85 AAFTE. In addition, for the next year, the first time full-time cohort will be reduced
from 698 to 645. Taking full advantage of this lower target, Purchase intends to improve the
quality of the incoming class. Purchase shows a fairly steady growth in headcount and
AAFTE of approximately 4.0% culminating in their goal of approximately 5,000 (5,131)
AAFTE in the fall of 2010/11. Over the same period, the ratio of LAS to Arts students will
grow from the current (fall 1999) 54%/ 46% to 70%/ 30% by fall 2010.

The College’s enrollment projections are as follows:

                        Fall 1999    Fall 2000       Fall 2001   Fall 2002   Fall 2003   Fall 2004
                        (Actual)    (Approved)       (Planned)   (Planned)   (Planned)   (Planned)
 Undergraduate
 FT first                  698          645             672         700         730         762
 FT transfer               392          373             388         403         420         436
 FT Cont/Ret              1,809        1,814           1,888       1,966       2,046       2,130
 Total FT                 2,899        2,832           2,948       3,069       3,198       3,328
 Total PT                  949          949             981        1,015       1,050       1,086
 Total Undergraduate      3,848        3,781           3,929       4,084       4,248       4,414
 Graduate
 FT                        97           101             110         115         115         115
 PT                         5            7               12          14          14          14
 Total Graduate            102          108             122         129         129         129
 Headcount total          3,950        3,889           4,051       4,213       4,375       4,543
 Total AAFTE              3,541        3,456           3,605       3,752       3,898       4,050




                                                 2
Memorandum of Understanding                                                  College at Purchase


Note: Enrollment goals may be affected by external factors such as changing economic
conditions, tuition increases, and fiscal constraints. Official enrollment targets that are the
basis for the University’s budget model are set annually through dialogue between campuses
and System Administration, and may differ somewhat from the above.

At the undergraduate level, most of the growth is expected in the Liberal Arts and Sciences,
or in programs that are interdisciplinary and mainly take advantage of the arts/liberal arts
connection, e.g. Creative Writing, Journalism, Black Studies, Women’s Studies, Dramatic
Writing, and New Media. Within the conservatory programs, growth is expected in Music
(approximately 50 to 100 FTE), while other programs will remain stable. Growth is also
expected in new programs that bridge the Liberal and Performing Arts, e.g., Arts Management
with a new BFA planned to open fall 2001; and Cinema Studies to open in 200l with an
enrollment target of 50 new students. The College is deeply concerned, however, that without
increasing the base budget allocation and creating additional housing it will not be able to
reach its overall enrollment goal of 5,000 students. Current indicators are that additional
housing planned for fall 2001 availability will be delayed, at least until fall 2002, thus
necessitating a cutback in the rate of growth.

1.2      Student mix

The College will continue being predominantly full-time undergraduate. The most significant
change will be a relative increase in the percentage of Liberal Arts and Sciences students, as
compared to students in the Visual and Performing Arts program, which will approach 70%/
30% by 2010. Limited growth is expected at the graduate level as Purchase’s graduate
offerings are small. The music conservatory has plans to grow its graduates and, in the long
run, Purchase also recognizes the need to pursue graduate growth in Dance,
Design/Technology, and in some of the liberal arts and sciences graduate programs.

       Matriculated
      Undergraduates     1999-00   2000-01    2002-03   2004-05    2006-07   2008-09    2010-11

      Liberal Arts and
                         54.16%     56.06%    59.51%     62.52%    65.26%     67.80%    70.16%
         Sciences
 Visual and Performing
                         45.84%     43.94%    40.49%     37.48%    34.74%     32.20%    29.84%
          Arts


Transfer Students

While Purchase will focus its growth on first-time full-time students, transfer growth is
expected as a result of ongoing and planned articulations with Westchester Community
College and other community colleges, including Ulster, Rockland, and Orange. Most
transfers are Liberal Arts and Science students (277/424 or 65%) and a great majority (88%)
of LAS students come from New York State. Similarly, the next two most numerous transfer
cohorts, Art and Design and Music students, together comprise 26% (112/424) of all transfers,
with 75% (84/112) coming for New York State. While Purchase wishes to maintain a broad-
based population, it will increase its efforts to attract more LAS and Arts students from
Westchester county as well as from Rockland, Putnam, Dutchess, Orange and the surrounding


                                               3
Memorandum of Understanding                                                       College at Purchase


counties of New York City and Long Island. A good part of that effort will be focused on
building better articulation agreements with the community colleges in these counties. In
addition, scholarship money from targeted gifts in the current capital campaign will be
directed toward commuter and transfer students.

                                 Summary of Geographic Origins
                                New Transfers Entering in Fall 1999
                                                 Division
                           LAS          Dance      Music     Theater/Film   Visual Arts       Total
        Westchester       (26.65%)     (0.00%)    (1.89%)      (0.00%)       (1.89%)        (30.42%)
       New York State     57.31%        0.24%      9.43%        3.30%        10.38%         80.66%
      Other US States      6.37%        1.18%      1.89%        3.07%         2.12%         14.62%
      Foreign Countries    1.65%        0.24%      0.94%        0.24%         1.65%          4.72%
            TOTAL         65.33%        1.66%      12.26%       6.61%        14.15%         100.00%



1.3      Recruitment

Most Liberal Arts and Science students come from New York City while 40-60% of students
in the performing arts, especially in the dance and acting conservatories, are from out of state.
Students in Art & Design and Music are primarily recruited in state. Only 50% (14/28) of
Theatre Arts and Film and 14% (1/7) of Dance students originate in New York. Both Dance
and Theatre Arts and Film have built national and international reputations and are especially
attractive to out-of-state and foreign students (first-timers as well as transfers).

The College plans, as part of its strategy to become more widely recognized as a liberal arts
and sciences college in Westchester, to increase its Westchester County enrollment as
follows: (% entry class includes first time, full time, new and transfer).

             1998-99                 1999-2000              2000-2001             2001-2002
             20.5%                    26.65%                  27%                     28%


In the long term, Purchase plans to have approximately 65% (3200/5000) students in
residence, but in the next five years will recruit more commuter students in order to maintain
its growth trajectory while a planned 1,200 bed student village is built in three or more stages.

The College has set a goal of $ 12 million, as part of its current capital campaign, for full and
partial tuition scholarships to support recruitment of gifted students. This ambitious effort is
well under way.

1.4      Level on selectivity matrix

Purchase’s Liberal Arts and Science programs for fall 1997-98 cohorts currently are in Group
3 (Very Selective). Plans are to raise standards in each of the next five years to reach Group 2


                                                    4
Memorandum of Understanding                                                           College at Purchase


(Highly Selective) by 2005. Visual & Performing Arts programs are largely selective and
would be in the equivalent of Group 1 (Most Selective), given the number of applications and
typical acceptance rate of 24%; admission to these programs is by talent, not SAT/HS
average. The College’s Arts deans are working on a model that would enable them to more
easily quantify the “talent-based” admissions criteria. The yield rate on accepted students in
the Arts programs is very high; for example 90-100% of students accepted to Dance &
Theatre programs enroll.

Purchase’s detailed undergraduate admission selectivity projection is as follows:

                                             Selectivity     Fall         Fall         Fall      Fall
                                                 Group       1999         2000         2001      2002
                                                           (actual)    (planned)    (planned) (planned)
          Regular Admits who have an SAT          Total      100. 0%       100.0%       100.0%   100.0%
          Score and a High School Average    In Group 1        11.6%        13.9%        15.6%    15.9%
                                             In Group 2        24.6%        29.2%        30.7%    32.1%
                                             In Group 3        38.4%        36.9%        36.1%    36.0%
                                             In Group 4        18.5%        14.3%        12.3%    11.0%
                                             In Group 5         6.9%         5.7%         5.3%     5.0%

                 Special Admits (EOP or Other Risk) as a       5.3%         8.5%         8.2%       7.9%
                   Percent of Total First-Time Full-Time



1.5        Comparisons with selected Benchmark Institutions

Purchase’s unique visual and performing arts mission makes comparisons to other SUNY
institutions difficult. Therefore, Purchase generally makes its comparisons at a program level
as follows: in the conservatory programs, Dance is comparable to Julliard; in Acting, New
York University, Julliard, Yale Graduate Program and North Carolina School of the Arts are
peers; Design and Technology competes for students with Carnegie Mellon, New York
University and Yale; in Film, New York University, North Carolina School of the Arts and
University of South Carolina are competitors; in Music, Julliard, and Manhattan; and in Art
and Design, Cooper Union, Pratt, Moore College, Rhode Island School of Design and SUNY
New Paltz. These are peer comparisons built on reputation in the professions and outside
evaluations, rather than data.

      •    In collaboration with System Administration, Purchase will seek ways to quantify
           such peer comparisons more closely.

Within the Liberal Arts Program, Purchase recognizes that it has not reached the level of
distinctiveness of the conservatory programs. At the program level, Purchase indicates that
the Natural Sciences compare well with all the SUNY four-year colleges and university
centers; Humanities compare favorably with Hamilton, Reed and Carlton; and Social Sciences
aspires to be comparable to Geneseo, Oswego and Oberlin.




                                                       5
Memorandum of Understanding                                                                   College at Purchase


Purchase recognizes the need to better market its programmatic distinctiveness and to raise
money for scholarships in order to raise standards and increase enrollment in the Liberal Arts
and Sciences. Success will also depend on the receipt of additional SUNY allocations.

The following tables include information from the College Board (1999) and Purchase
showing the College’s competitive position with respect to both its current and aspirational
peers—first, for Purchase overall, second, for Visual and Performing Arts specifically.

                              Purchase       SUNY             SUNY            SUNY           SUNY         Hamilton
                               Overall      New Paltz         Oswego         Potsdam        Geneseo       College
    FT Undergraduate
                                2,481         4,933            5,998          3,300          5,086          1,704
    Enrollment
    Acceptance
                                54%             43%             60%            82%           56%3           40%
    Rate
    SAT (25/75
                              940/1160      930/1180          980/1160       920/1130      1130/1280     1150/1350
    Percentile)
    H.S. GPA
                                61%3            20%             72%            82%            97%            NA
    % > 3.0
    % Fulltime
                                36%             51%             73%            68%            75%           83%
    faculty
    Freshman
                                73%             79%             80%            77%            90%           91%
    Retention
    Graduation
                                37%           59%3              62%           51%3            77%           86%
    Rate (6 Year)
1
 SUNY College at Purchase; 2US News 2000; 3College Board, 1997



                       Purchase Visual   Julliard       N. Carolina      Rhode Island   Moore College   Pratt School
                       and Performing                    School of        School of       of Art &        of Arts
                            Arts                          Design           Design          Design
    FT Undergrad
                            1,025          NA              679              1,847           NA             2,226
    Enrollment
    Acceptance
                           24%1            NA              NA               38%             58%            75%
    Rate
                                                                                2                3
    SAT (25/75              1038                                            1175            1000
                                           NA           965/12502                                        870/1160
    Percentile)            (mean)                                          (mean)          (mean)
    H.S. GPA
                            70%            NA              NA               71%             55%            52%
    % > 3.0
    % Full Time
                            39%           43%              84%              34%             45%            15%
    faculty
    Freshman
                           87%1           92%              70%              96%3            80%            92%3
    Retention
    Graduation
                           48%1           75%2             37%              85%3            63%            44%2
    Rate (6 year)
1
 SUNY College at Purchase; 2US News 2000; 3College Board, 1997

2.0        Student Outcomes

2.1        Student Life

Purchase recognizes a need to focus attention on improving student satisfaction, especially in
housing, facilities enhancement, and curricula that bridge the Liberal Arts and Sciences with
the Conservatory programs. Purchase has already begun planning in this regard. However,
the College’s plans for enrollment increases are dependent on increased student residence


                                                          6
Memorandum of Understanding                                                  College at Purchase


capacity and increased resources. To accomplish this, Purchase has received approval for a
three-phase plan to first construct a 180-bed modular-construction residence unit originally
planned for fall 2000, but now delayed until fall 2001. This project will be followed by two
others: a Town House/Apartment project for faculty/staff housing; and construction of a
similarly sized structure for undergraduates, originally planned for fall 2001 but likely to be
delayed until fall 2002 at the very earliest. A third phase would be the start of a 1,200-bed
student village. Purchase has recognized the need to improve management of residential
facilities, to improve the quality of campus living and conditions for students, and to improve
the overall physical plant.

2.2          Retention/graduation rates

Improving retention and graduation rates is a major priority for Purchase. Recent cohort data
suggests that the emphasis should be placed on retaining students from freshman to
sophomore year, particularly those in the Liberal Arts and Science program.

Therefore, the College has established a Committee on Retention to oversee implementation
of a variety of recent initiatives designed to develop student academic/professional integration
and satisfaction and to better focus on at-risk students. Purchase’s goals for undergraduate
student Retention/Graduation are as follows:

                                                First Year   Graduation       Graduation
                                                Retention    Four Years        Six Years

          Overall                 Current         73%1         23.8%2           44%2
                                  3 Year Goal     75%          33.8%            53.6%
                                  5 Year Goal     77%          35.4%            55.5%


          Liberal Arts and
          Science                 Current        62.4%1        17.3%2           37.6%2
                                  3 Year Goal     72%          31.9%            53.9%
                                  5 Year Goal     75%          33.9%            55.9%


          Visual and
          Performing Arts         Current        85.3%1        32.6%2           52.8%2
                                  3 Year Goal    85.3%         36.9%             53%
                                  5 Year Goal    85.3%         38.1%            54.6%
      1
          Fall 1997 Cohort; 2Fall 1992 Cohort

Purchase indicates that a certain amount of attrition in the Arts is expected and in some cases
encouraged. Many Arts students are confronted with pivotal opportunities to enter
professional life before graduation. More generally, Purchase will work toward improved
retention and graduation across program areas over the next five years as indicated above.




                                                   7
Memorandum of Understanding                                                  College at Purchase


2.3    Student/alumni satisfaction

Purchase willingly participated in the 1998-99 SUNY Undergraduate Alumni Outcomes
Survey, which sampled 50% of the graduates from 1991 and 1994. For the most part,
Purchase alumni responses were similar to those found at other SUNY Comprehensive
Colleges. However, the College fared particularly well (on a 5-point scale, 5 being the
highest) in: atmosphere of ethnic, political, and religious understanding and acceptance (4.07
vs. 3.54); cultural/fine arts/speaker programs (4.25 vs. 3.48); and quality of instruction in the
major (4.25 vs. 4.17). Purchase alumni responded less favorably in areas such as the quality
of residential life, and preparation for a career. The College has also made a concerted effort
to track its 10,381 alumni (through the class of 1999) and has current contact information for
8,882 of these graduates. A new edition (the third) of the College’s alumni directory will be
published in fall 2000 by Harris Publishing. Updated contact, academic, personal and
employment information will be helpful in the planned alumni survey to assess outcomes in
terms of alumni and employer satisfaction with a Purchase education. The office of Annual
Giving and Alumni Affairs is working with Career Development to design the instrument, to
be sent out by the fall of 2002.

Purchase also participated in the SUNY Student Opinion Survey. Progress will be measured
by increased satisfaction in the SUNY-wide survey and by internal student surveys (provided
by the College’s enrollment management consultants) between 1999 and 2001.

Purchase has announced a major capital campaign with a goal of $25 million from private,
non-governmental sources, of which nearly $23.5 million will be slated for endowment. In
conjunction with the private, non-governmental campaign, the State of New York has pledged
$75 million in capital construction projects, bringing the total investment to $100 million over
five years. The Campaign is extraordinary not only in its size, but also in its focus. Purchase
is launching this campaign at a moment when the College’s enrollment, energy, momentum
are at an all-time high.

2.4    Post-graduate success

Purchase has graduated over 10,000 students many of whom dramatically impact the arts at a
national level, garnering such recognition as Academy, Obie, Emmy, and Grammy Awards.
Purchase also cites many examples of graduates in the liberal arts and sciences who have also
achieved national stature. The Office of Career Services tracks alumni with a year-out survey
and, in conjunction with the Alumni Office, is developing a new survey instrument to
measure graduate success and job placement. The new alumni directory will include more
updated career information. Graduates of the professional training programs in dance, music,
acting, and design technology are in great demand in their respective professions. Dancers
have been placed in every major dance company in the U.S. and abroad. Graduates in music
perform with major music organizations and actors are on stage, screen and television.
Graduates of design technology are sought on Broadway for their known expertise in stage
lighting, and set design. More quantified data wll be incorporated into the College’s ongoing
Outcomes Assessment plan.



                                                8
Memorandum of Understanding                                                   College at Purchase


Purchase has an active internship program with area businesses and corporations with eighty-
two students participating in this program. Every academic division engages alumni as guest
speakers and as visiting professionals to work with the current student body.

      •   Purchase will develop an internal instrument to measure graduate satisfaction by fall
          2002.

2.5       Assessment planning

Mandated by the last five-year Middle States evaluation, Purchase’s Outcomes Assessment
program has accelerated since 1996. The faculty is working to develop different strategies for
identifying and assessing the major and, in light of the new general education program,
general education. In fall 1999, Purchase created an Outcomes Assessment Task Force that
works closely with each Board of Study and faculty committee and council responsible for
course approval and outcomes assessment plans. It evaluates how the assessment models may
produce longitudinal and latitudinal data. To date, the Task Force has requested each major
submit an account of its assessment methods; it is also providing feedback and summarizing
assessment practices across programs. The Task Force has also surveyed general education
assessment methods currently used by the College, methods that include: course selectivity;
course-embedded questions; outside or multiple evaluation of portfolios; pre/post testing;
adapting the required Senior Project to assess two cross-disciplinary skills, information
management and critical thinking.

      •   Purchase will bring the general education outcomes assessment to a more complete
          stage now that the SUNY Provost’s Advisory Task Force on the Assessment of
          Student Learning Outcomes has issued its final report. Purchase will also work with
          each major to develop an acceptable standardized format, again in the light of the task
          force’s recommendations. A periodic review report is due on progress as part of the
          upcoming Middle States evaluation. Once the Task Force has reported, Purchase will
          firm up its timelines. The Middle States report is due 2001-2.

      •   In accord with the System Task Force recommendations, a yearly outcomes
          assessment report will be produced that will specify learning outcomes, derive
          evidence from their application to show the achievement of learning outcomes, and
          describe how results have been used to improve instructional quality and student
          learning.


3.0       Faculty Development and Scholarship

Purchase plans to put in place a comprehensive faculty development plan focusing on more
technology, faculty workshops in curriculum and pedagogy, the building of learning
communities, and the strategic hiring of faculty to coordinate faculty development and
training, and interactions with high schools.

      •   The comprehensive faculty development plan will be produced by spring 2001.


                                                 9
Memorandum of Understanding                                                     College at Purchase



      •   In addition, Purchase will create an endowment of $5 million through the new capital
          campaign for distinguished professorships, chairs, and faculty development.

3.1       Faculty recruitment

Purchase recognizes a need to improve its record of recruitment and retention of faculty from
underrepresented groups, particularly since the elimination of the SUNY’s minority faculty
initiative (1996). It has therefore developed a plan, beginning with the recent hiring of an
Affirmative Action Officer who reports directly to the President. In addition, the President
has committed resources to hire underrepresented faculty and has created an ad-hoc
committee for advisement purposes. The College has also expanded its recruitment and
advertising initiatives and is considering the implementation of a new-hire minority faculty
and professional employee-mentoring program to be implemented by spring 2001.

The recruitment of all faculty is made more difficult by low salaries and the high cost of
living in Westchester. (Most faculty must of necessity live 20 – 30 miles away from campus.)
With respect to cost of living, the College has adopted a ten-year salary plan. Faculty and
staff salaries will be augmented whenever state allocations permit from Purchase’s own
operating budget. The goal is parity with CUNY colleges. To date, the College has
committed over $600,000 to this purpose. Purchase is also pressing to build faculty housing
with a projected opening date of fall 2003.

3.2       Faculty review, promotion, and tenure

The College’s Appointment Promotion and Tenure process is rigorous and includes a
minimum of 3-5 confidential external peer reviews in the scholarship/creative areas. Faculty
are primarily evaluated on Teaching and Research/Professional achievements with Service
also being an important factor. Faculty are able to review recommendations and provide
rebuttal up to the Presidential review and decision. Faculty are also evaluated by students.
Every semester, each division distributes and collects teacher evaluation forms for all classes
they offer. The Arts Conservatories and the School of Art & Design have forms tailored to
the distinctness of their program. The three LAS divisions utilize a common form, currently
under revision by an evaluation committee. Departmental Heads and Deans review the forms
and make them available for faculty review.

3.3       Quality and quantity of scholarship

In fiscal year 1998, Research Foundation expenditures at Purchase were $1.3 million. Fiscal
year 1999 yielded an increase of 23 percent with $1.6 million total expenditure.
Purchase’s External Affairs and Development is redoubling efforts to increase faculty
involvement with sponsored research with demonstrable results.

      •   Purchase’s goal is to increase its total sponsored activity by 9% annually to a total of
          $2.7 million by 2005.




                                                  10
Memorandum of Understanding                                                College at Purchase


Purchase’s pursuit of sponsored funding is somewhat problematical. Comparisons with other
SUNY institutions are more difficult due to its distinct mission and program array, a small
faculty, budget cuts in the National Endowment for the Arts, and no graduate programs in the
sciences. However, Purchase has sought, and continues to encourage, more active
participation of faculty in sponsored research by:

   •   including sponsored research as a component of faculty review

   •   organizing an advisory committee of faculty across the disciplines to meet quarterly to
       explore cross-disciplinary proposals, faculty training, and rewards (initiated October
       1999)

   •   increasing Research Foundation overhead with new federal proposals to create faculty
       incentives

   •   exploring more inter-institutional relationships for proposal development, e.g. with
       community colleges and other institutions of higher education as well as with public
       school systems

   •   utilizing a course release program and undergraduate assistance to support faculty
       research

   •   continuing a faculty support program with mini-grants funded through the Purchase
       College Foundation

   •   forging new partnerships with area businesses and corporations to support research
       and scholarship

In addition, Purchase has experienced a dramatic rise in its level of endowment, which has
reached a level in corporate and individual giving that is comparable to the University
Centers. At the end of fiscal year 1997-1998, the Purchase College Foundation received over
$5 million in contributions and grants. The current combined-pooled endowment and the Roy
R. Neuberger Endowment exceed $26 million.

The pooled endowment, which supports college programs, faculty enrichment and scholarship
totals $12 million; the Roy R. Neuberger Endowment, restricted to supporting the Newberger
Museum of Art, totals $14 million. Annual contributions and pooled endowment earnings
supplement the College’s state budget with $1.9 million for scholarships and support of all
academic programs.




                                             11
Memorandum of Understanding                                                College at Purchase


4.0    Inter-Campus Collaboration

4.1    Joint academic programs

Purchase is currently concentrating on developing articulation agreements—as opposed to
joint academic programs, particularly with SUNY Community Colleges in its service area.
However, the College is also exploring with SUNY Cortland the possibility of a 4 + 1
combined bachelor and master’s program in Education.

4.2    Articulation

Until recently, and primarily because of conservatory selectivity, Purchase has had limited
articulation with other SUNY schools. However, several initiatives have now been
implemented with Westchester Community College, and Purchase has hosted a meeting with
several community colleges to discuss the development of new articulation agreements.
Articulation agreements are already in place or under development with Rockland, Dutchess
and Ulster Community Colleges, and with SUNY College of Technology at Morrisville.
Within the next two years, Purchase hopes to expand existing agreements and to establish new
articulations with Orange, Sullivan, Columbia-Greene, Nassau and Suffolk Community
Colleges and with the Fashion Institute of Technology.

4.3    Other cooperative activities

Purchase has one of the largest College/High School cooperative programs in SUNY, known
as the Westchester Partnership of Schools and Colleges. That involvement with the
Westchester Schools will expand, especially as the state explores “alternative” routes to
teacher certification. Cooperative ventures are also planned with the Tarrytown schools
(offsite programs) and Long Island University.


5.0    Academic Program Directions

5.1    Undergraduate education

Purchase recognizes its challenge to bring unity in diversity, to create what it calls “one
college” within the Liberal/Visual/Performing Arts nexus. It will do this through shared
student educational experiences including general education, co-curricula activities, and
administratively through examining its decanal structure and divisional reporting
relationships. (The College recently announced plans to bring in an advisory committee from
inside and outside the System, to advise on administrative responsibilities, including vice-
presidential and decanal positions.). Outcomes already realized include: dramatic increases in
Liberal Arts and Science enrollment; a newly revised general education program; new lecture
series; better institutional planning; and a reinvigorated Freshman Year Program, including an
innovative college writing program and a two-course sequence in Western Civilization and
Humanities.




                                              12
Memorandum of Understanding                                                  College at Purchase


As part of its overall assessment program, the College recently utilized an external committee
to evaluate its Liberal Arts and Science Programs. The report confirmed the need for greater
discussions in all areas and offered recommendations that have been established as goals. In
light of that Committee’s recommendations, Purchase will consider the following during
2000-2001:

   •   Determine role the arts will play in LAS curriculum. This is viewed as key to
       Purchase’s plans to become more selective and to increase enrollment in the Liberal
       Arts and Sciences program.

   •   Develop activities that bring faculty and students from Liberal Arts and Science and
       Visual and Performing Arts areas together and develop bridge programs that
       encourage curriculum and faculty interchange.

   •   Develop an integrative scheduling grid for implementation in fall 2001.

Purchase, with additional support and facilities renovations, is indicating the following
academic program direction while it builds towards 5,000 headcount in 2007-08.

       Dance – Overall enrollment will remain basically stable. A slightly larger proportion
       of graduate students is anticipated. Production resources remain a major problem.
       Purchase will continue to research solutions to this problem.

       Music – Overall enrollment will grow by approximately 20% over the next six years,
       with an eventual goal of equalizing graduate and undergraduate students. Some new
       growth could occur in Jazz and in a planned Production Major.

       Theatre Arts & Film –The conservatory program will remain stable in size. Growth is
       planned in Dramatic Writing, Cinema Studies, and depending on additional capital
       investment, areas of costume production.

       Art & Design – Overall enrollment already exceeds resources and capacity, and will
       be lowered slightly, along with a rise in quality of intake. Some expansion will occur
       at the graduate level once new studio renovations are undertaken.

       Interdisciplinary Arts – Arts Management will be a growth area across the divisions,
       as will New Media, Cinema Studies, Drama Studies, and Media Studies.

       Humanities – New programs in Journalism, Drama Studies, Creative Writing and Arts
       History have increased enrollment. Significant continuing growth is expected.

       Sciences – Will continue to grow significantly, while stressing a specialized
       “boutique” approach to science instruction. New Media and Computer Science will be
       growth areas.




                                               13
Memorandum of Understanding                                                    College at Purchase


       Social Sciences – Will plan to grow and will need special efforts to increase its
       majors. African American studies and Media Studies have potential for expansion.

       Continuing Education – Will reorient its programs toward community needs, and will
       continue to enrich its liberal studies degree, catering to mature students pursuing
       degrees. It will increasingly become the entrepreneurial arm of the College, serving
       the surrounding communities. A renaming as the School of Professional and
       Community Studies has now been achieved and will serve to reposition the College
       more aggressively in the entrepreneurial arena.

These and any other academic programs Purchase develops in the future will be reviewed for
consistency with mission, demonstrated market need, and evidence of academic quality. As
the College adds new programs, it will continue to review existing programs for relevance and
sufficient enrollment strength. When appropriate, the College will consider deactivation or
discontinuance.

Purchase cites a need for additional base budget funding to continue its commitment to the
new programs by which it has and will continue to expand its enrollment. These programs
have been mounted largely by “kickstart” funding from outside donors or by “floating” them
on Summer School IFR money.

In the past two years, and looking ahead, the following new programs have been developed:
Drama Studies, New Media, Creative Writing, Dramatic Writing, Cinema Studies,
Journalism, and Arts Management. New Media, Arts Management, and Dramatic Writing
have all been kickstarted with full time faculty lines, necessary to their establishment, on
“soft” money. These commitments involve a net increase of 3.5 faculty lines, plus adjunct
costs. Enrollment in all cases has been healthy and is exceeding projections; New Media, for
instance, is after two years the fourth largest major in Liberal Arts and Sciences. Purchase
now needs base resources to maintain and expand these programs. Initially, it was assumed
that continuing low enrollment would allow for redistribution of campus base state resources
from under-utilized areas to the areas of initiative, to essentially self-fund the new activities.
Their rapid enrollment growth now makes that impossible. Traditional areas of study have
increased; mathematics, for instance, has tripled its majors.

Without the investment of significant new state support to replace the soft start-up money,
these new initiatives are in danger of foundering. Hence in spring 2000, Purchase responded
to the Provost’s call for mission-related funding to continue support for these quality
enhancing and already sought after programs. At the same time, Purchase requested
additional funds for its new Western Civilization and Writing courses for General Education.
Purchase is also committed to rapid, strategic investments in technology designed to
strengthen the institution by expanding student access to instructional technology, establishing
the campus as a “niche” contributor in distance learning, and supporting new
programs/growing enrollment by bringing technology into the curriculum in mission-focused
key areas. The campus has succeeded in funding portions of this activity via an aggressive,
all-funds’ financing approach including capital dollars, grants, and their Technology Fee.




                                                14
Memorandum of Understanding                                                  College at Purchase


However, Purchase believes these vital initiatives are dependent for their success on
augmented funding from the State.

There is a vital part of Purchase’s mission and distinctiveness that cannot be overlooked.
Unlike all other four-year colleges in the System, Purchase has the distinction of having
nearly 50% of its enrollment concentrated in its conservatory arts programs. While the
balance between the liberal arts and the professional training programs in Theater, Dance,
Music and Art & Design will shift from 55%/45% to approximately 70%/30% over the next
decade, Purchase will remain very distinctive and internationally recognized; this stature
needs to be supported at an appropriate level. Unlike ordinary arts and science programs,
conservatory arts programs have distinctive needs in the areas of production, one-to-one
instruction, equipment, and space. While some recognition was given in the revised budget
model, Purchase believes additional incremental adjustment is needed.

Absent said incremental funding to-date, Purchase has been forced to identify one-time
dollars to fund its increased instructional operating budget requirements. This has resulted in
the College’s investing over half a million dollars of non-recurring College Reserve resources
to this recurring base instructional need—a tactic which is neither financially prudent nor
sustainable in the long term.

          5.1.1   General education

In December 1999, Purchase submitted its proposed general education programs to the
University. For the Liberal Arts and Sciences, Purchase found little difficulty in adjusting the
existing program to the Trustees’ requirements. For the professional conservatories, the
College proposed a modified program to allow for the concentrated nature of the BFA
programs.

      •   Purchase has been working with the Provost’s Advisory Council on General Education
          in developing a general education program that meets the requirements of the Board of
          Trustees’ Resolution 98-241, and has this program fully in place for the first-time
          students entering in fall 2000.


5.2       Graduate programs

Generally, with additional resources, graduate programs could realize their growth potential.
Growth is expected in Dance. Music proposes to expand, in particular to develop a more
comprehensive two-year program in its Master’s of Fine Arts. Art and Design will be
expanded to approximately 20 students from the current 6-8. Additional future plans include
at least one master’s level program in each LAS division and some cross-divisional programs.

5.3       Responsiveness to local/regional/state needs

Purchase’s public service mission makes it a significant quality contributor to the community
through its Performing Arts Center, Neuberger Museum, and School of Continuing



                                                15
Memorandum of Understanding                                                  College at Purchase


Education. The latter will expand aggressively its entrepreneurial stance and engagement with
local government and business entities, especially in the area of technology training. A major
initiative in Arts Management is under way, for instance, capitalizing on the College’s
strengths and the importance of the arts in Westchester and New York City.


6.0       Infrastructure Technology

6.1       Facilities

Purchase is moving aggressively into its five-year, $50 million Capital Projects Campaign, the
most important of which is the building, by 2002 or 2003, of an administrative support
building which will in turn allow for the refurbishment of vacated academic space to
accommodate increased enrollment. Simultaneously, the College is planning three initial
phases of residence construction: a 180-bed dormitory, faculty/staff/student townhouses and
apartments, with up to 160 beds and the first stage of a 1,200 bed student village, including
retail facilities. The goal is to have approximately 3,200 beds available for students by the
time enrollment rises to the planned 5,000 headcount in 2007. Other facilities expansion
includes an additional dining hall, student union, sports and performing arts facilities.
Matching fund projects planned for the Performing Arts Center, the Neuberger Museum, the
MFA Studios, and the Humanities Theater, already approved and in planning by the
Construction Fund, will further enhance the College’s growth and program quality.

6.2       Academic technology

Purchase will work to integrate a number of “home-grown” and System wide databases, and
plans to integrate instructional technology more fully into the curriculum.

Purchase has so far offered about a dozen courses on the SUNY Learning Network (SLN).
As the SLN requests that each campus offer distance learning courses in a specific academic
area, all courses offered thus far by the College fall roughly into the category of Media
studies/New Media. As of summer 2000, a faculty member has assumed the role of Director
of Instructional Technology, with responsibility for helping faculty use technology resources
in the classroom. Purchase hopes that as issues relating to the costs of mounting distance
learning programs are resolved, the College’s commitment to technology and the efforts of
the Director will spur faculty to develop SLN courses.

      •   Faculty specializing in instructional technology will be hired.

      •   A cooperative venture by Long Island University to build “smart” classrooms and a
          pending decision on whether the College will require computers for all students will
          also be important initiatives.

The construction of the new Student Services building, to be contracted spring 2001, will add
significantly to the inventory of classrooms as administrative functions are moved out of
existing buildings.


                                                 16
Memorandum of Understanding                                                      College at Purchase



      •   As part of its current Title III grant proposal, Purchase is proposing a significant
          increase in faculty involvement in educational technology.

      •   Purchase will use $5.5 million from its Capital Campaign for new and expanded
          undergraduate and graduate programs and to enhance library resources and technology
          including, computer and specialized instrumentation.


7.0       Mission Review Funding

Purchase College has received a $100,000 Mission Review funding award to facilitate
changes in and enhancements to campus mission. This competitive award was based on the
academic merit of Purchase’s proposal to:

      •   Develop programs in New Media and Dramatic Writing. Specifically, the award is
          intended to provide initial funding for two new faculty lines, one in each program.

This award is contingent upon the College meeting the reporting and other requirements
detailed in Appendix A. This report will enable System Administration to better evaluate the
strength and plausibility of future Mission Review funding proposals.



                                               * * * *


This Memorandum of Understanding was developed jointly by the College at Purchase and
the State University of New York System Administration to provide guidance for planning the
campus’ future and a framework for gauging the achievement of its goals. Recognizing that
individual institutions and the State University as a whole must be able to respond to changing
circumstances, both Purchase and System Administration will work together to realize the
goals and objectives articulated in this document.




                                                  17
Memorandum of Understanding                                                College at Purchase



                                         Appendix A

                                  Mission Review Funding

Purchase College has received a $100,000 Mission Review funding award to facilitate
changes in and enhancements to campus mission. This competitive award was based on the
academic merit of Purchase’s proposal to:

   •   Develop programs in New Media and Dramatic Writing. Specifically, the award is
       intended to provide initial funding for two new faculty lines, one in each program.

Funding is contingent upon an agreed-upon Memorandum of Understanding and upon the
hiring of the new faculty.


Reporting

At the conclusion of the year, Purchase will submit a report containing:

   Ø A narrative section describing the progress that has been made in developing these
     programs, including information on the new faculty that have been hired and the
     investment that has been made in program startup costs; and

   Ø A data section describing the new students who have applied, been accepted, and
     enrolled in these programs.




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