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					APPENDIX I

PROGRAMME STRUCTURE

All full-time students MUST take 180 credits in each year of their degree.
Failure to take and pass 180 credits will prevent you from gaining a
Master’s degree.

For a full list of modules please see Appendix II.

HMNA        Atlantic History

Programme Director: Dr Dmitri van den Bersselaar

      FULL-TIME

      Semester 1
      HIST501    History and Theory (15 credits)
      HIST502    Sources and Methods for Historical Research (15 credits)
      HIST551    Atlantic History I (30 credits)

      Semester 2
      HIST500    Locating Historical Sources (15 credits)
      HIST504    Feasibility Study (15 credits)
      HIST552    Atlantic History II (30 credits)

      Summer Vacation
      HIST550  Dissertation (60 credits)

      PART-TIME

      Year 1

      Semester 1
      HIST551    Atlantic History I (30 credits)

      Semester 2
      HIST552    Atlantic History II (30 credits)

      Year 2

      Semester 1
      HIST501    History and Theory (15 credits)
      HIST502    Sources and Methods for Historical Research (15 credits)

      Semester 2
      HIST500    Locating Historical Sources (15 credits)
      HIST504    Feasibility Study (15 credits)

      Summer Vacation
      HIST550  Dissertation (60 credits)

                                        - 38 -
HICH         Cultural History

Programme Director: Dr Stephen Kenny

       FULL-TIME

       Semester 1
       HIST501    History and Theory (15 credits)
       HIST502    Sources and Methods for Historical Research (15 credits)
       HIST516    Themes in Cultural History (30 credits)

       Semester 2
       HIST500    Locating Historical Sources (15 credits)
       HIST504    Feasibility Study (15 credits)
       HIST520    Sites of Cultural History (30 credits)

       Summer Vacation
       HIST550  Dissertation (60 credits)

       PART-TIME

       Year 1

       Semester 1
       HIST516    Themes in Cultural History (30 credits)

       Semester 2
       HIST520    Sites of Cultural History (30 credits)

       Year 2

       Semester 1
       HIST501    History and Theory (15 credits)
       HIST502    Sources and Methods for Historical Research (15 credits)

       Semester 2
       HIST500    Locating Historical Sources (15 credits)
       HIST504    Feasibility Study (15 credits)

       Summer Vacation
       HIST550  Dissertation (60 credits)


HMHU         Historical Research

Programme Director: Dr Anne McLaren

       FULL-TIME

       Semester 1
       HIST501    History and Theory (15 credits)
       HIST502    Sources and Methods for Historical Research (15 credits)
                                        - 39 -
       HIST567     Literature Review (30 credits)

       Semester 2
       HIST500    Locating Historical Sources (15 credits)
       HIST504    Feasibility Study (15 credits)
       HIST568    Guided Reading Project (30 credits)

       Summer Vacation
       HIST550  Dissertation (60 credits)

       PART-TIME

       Year 1

       Semester 1
       HIST567    Literature Review (30 credits)

       Semester 2
       HIST568    Guided Reading Project (30 credits)

       Year 2

       Semester 1
       HIST501    History and Theory (15 credits)
       HIST502    Sources and Methods for Historical Research (15 credits)

       Semester 2
       HIST500    Locating Historical Sources (15 credits)
       HIST504    Feasibility Study (15 credits)

       Summer Vacation
       HIST550  Dissertation (60 credits)


HIMS         Medieval Studies

Programme Director: Dr Marios Costambeys

       FULL-TIME

       Semester 1
       HIST501    History and Theory (15 credits) OR
       ENGL683 Medieval Gender and Identity I (15 credits)
       HIST502    Sources and Methods for Historical Research (15 credits)
       HIST514    Power and Authority in the Middles Ages I (15 credits)
       CLAH641 Latin IA (15 credits) OR equivalent in other language

       Semester 2
       MODL501 Latin Palaeography (15 credits) OR
       HIST500    Locating Historical Sources (15 credits)
       HIST504    Feasibility Study (15 credits)
       HIST518    Power and Authority in the Middle Ages II (15 credits)
                                       - 40 -
     CLAH642     Latin IB (15 credits) OR equivalent in other language

     Summer Vacation
     HIST550  Dissertation (60 credits)

     PART-TIME

     Year 1

     Semester 1
     HIST501    History and Theory (15 credits) OR
     ENGL683 Medieval Gender and Identity I (15 credits)
     CLAH641 Latin IA (15 credits) OR equivalent in other language

     Semester 2
     MODL501 Latin Palaeography (15 credits) OR
     HIST500    Locating Historical Sources (15 credits)
     CLAH642 Latin IB (15 credits) OR equivalent in other language

     Year 2

     Semester 1
     HIST502    Sources and Methods for Historical Research (15 credits)
     HIST514    Power and Authority in the Middles Ages I (15 credits)

     Semester 2
     HIST504    Feasibility Study (15 credits)
     HIST518    Power and Authority in the Middle Ages II (15 credits)

     Summer Vacation
     HIST550  Dissertation (60 credits)


HMFA       Twentieth Century History

Programme Director: Dr Nigel Swain

     FULL-TIME

     Semester 1
     HIST501    History and Theory (15 credits)
     HIST502    Sources and Methods for Historical Research (15 credits)
     HIST503    Flashpoints and Watersheds in Twentieth Century History I (30
                credits)

     Semester 2
     HIST500    Locating Historical Sources (15 credits)
     HIST504    Feasibility Study (15 credits)
     HIST512    Flashpoints and Watersheds in Twentieth Century History II
                (30 credits)



                                       - 41 -
Summer Vacation
HIST550  Dissertation (60 credits)

PART-TIME

Year 1

Semester 1
HIST503    Flashpoints and Watersheds in Twentieth Century History I (30
           credits)

Semester 2
HIST512    Flashpoints and Watersheds in Twentieth Century History II
           (30 credits)

Year 2

Semester 1
HIST501    History and Theory (15 credits)
HIST502    Sources and Methods for Historical Research (15 credits)

Semester 2
HIST500    Locating Historical Sources (15 credits)
HIST504    Feasibility Study (15 credits)

Summer Vacation
HIST550  Dissertation (60 credits)




                                - 42 -
                                   APPENDIX II

LIST OF MODULES

For more detailed information about aims, learning outcomes, syllabus and
assessment, etc. of modules, please consult the relevant module descriptors on
the School website or through VITAL.

Http://www.liv.ac.uk/history/currentpg/index.htm

HIST500    Locating Historical Sources (15 credits)

HIST501    History and Theory (15 credits)

HIST502    Sources and Methods for Historical Research (15 credits)

HIST503    Flashpoints and Watersheds in Twentieth Century History I (30
           credits)

HIST504    Feasibility Study (15 credits)

HIST512    Flashpoints and Watersheds in Twentieth Century History II (30
           credits)

HIST514    Power and Authority in the Middle Ages I (15 credits)

HIST516    Themes in Cultural History (30 credits)

HIST518    Power and Authority in the Middle Ages II (15 credits)

HIST520    Sites of Cultural History (30 credits)

HIST550    Dissertation (60 credits)

HIST551    Atlantic History I (30 credits)

HIST552    Atlantic History II (30 credits)

HIST567    Literature Review (30 credits)

HIST568    Guided Reading Project (30 credits)

CLAH641    Latin IA (15 credits)

CLAH642    Latin IB (15 credits)

ENGL683    Medieval Gender and Identity I (15 credits)

MODL501    Latin Palaeography (15 credits)



                                       - 43 -
                                       APPENDIX III

LIBRARY QUICK GUIDE FOR HISTORY

                   How the University Library Service Helps

Why is the library service important?
Teaching and learning at university is very different from school or college. You
will need to do a much greater amount of independent study and reading. The
University Library Service provides web tools, books, journals, study spaces and
other services that you will need to carry out your studies.

Where can I find the libraries?
If you are using the internet you can find the library services anywhere. Use the
library website – www.liv.ac.uk/library - to find details about all our services and
to access academic-quality information over the web.

There are two main physical libraries on campus – the main library for History
students is the Sydney Jones Library, located on Abercromby Square. This library
contains the resources for arts, humanities and social science subjects. There is
also the Harold Cohen Library, which contains materials for science and medical
students (including some history of medicine titles).

The Sydney Jones Library has two wings – in the Abercromby Wing you will find
computers, group study rooms, silent study areas, and the Short Loan Collection
of high demand books. In the Grove Wing you will find more computers, silent
study spaces, and the main book collections.

How do I find the books I need?
Use the library catalogue at http://library.liv.ac.uk. You can also access the
catalogue on web-enabled mobile phones at http://library.liv.ac.uk/airpac/. The
catalogue is easy to use. If you know what book you want, find it by searching on
Title or Author. If you are looking for anything on a subject, search by Keyword.




 Use these                                                                        Use these
 options to                                                                       options to
 see what                                                                         find specific
 books you’re                                                                     types of
 borrowing,                                                                       information.
 renew your
 loans,
 suggest
 books to
 buy, etc.

                 Use these options to decide how to search – title or author if
                 you know what you’re looking for, keyword if you don’t.


                                              - 44 -
Once you have found details of the book you want, make a note of its class
number and location. This will tell you where in the library you will find the book:




Which library has the book   The class number (printed on book’s   Due date if the book is
                              spine)                                on loan

If the book you want is on loan, you can:
     place a request through the catalogue – the book will be reserved for you on
       its return;
     click on the class number to find other books with the same or similar class
       number – these books will be on the same subject.

How do I borrow books?
You will need your University ID card. You can either:
   take your books to the issue desk where library staff will issue the books to
     you; or
   use the self-issue machines located throughout the library.

The self-issue machines are easy to use, and can save you from having to queue
at the desk.

When you leave the library, you will have to show all your library books to the
staff member at reception – if you don’t, an alarm will sound!

How many books can I borrow?
You can borrow up to ten items at a time. This includes up to two items from the
short loan collection.

How long can I borrow books for?
Books in the main collection can be borrowed for either two weeks or one week.
This is clearly marked on the books themselves. Books in the Short Loan
Collection can be borrowed for one day.

What other services can I use in the libraries?
As well as books, there are:
    silent study spaces;
    group study spaces (these can be booked at the Information Support Desk);
    computers, printers and photocopiers;
    DVDs and CDs;
    printed journals.

When is the library open?
Most of the time! During term, the Sydney Jones Library opens at 8.30am on
Monday and does not close until 9.30pm on Saturday. It is also open on Sundays
from 12pm to 9.30pm. Opening hours vary during vacation periods – updates are
on the library website (see section How do I keep up-to-date for information on
how to get automatic updates).


                                           - 45 -
What’s available online?
The library offers a huge range of journals and books online. Most of these are
not available to the general public. You can only access them as you are members
of the university. The best way to access them is to use the library website – this
means you will always be using the “right” link. If you are using a standard
search engine, they may give you the “wrong” link, and you won’t be able to
access the information.

The quickest way to get to resources for your subject is to go to the Electronic
Library section of the website and select “History” from the “Resources by
subject” menu. This will take you to the following screen:

                                  To do a broad search, just type your search here.




You will see from the above picture there are lots of different options and
resources you can use for finding good quality information for your work. Try
them out, and if you have any questions, ask a member of library staff.

Can I access online resources off-campus?
Yes. If you link to resources from the library catalogue or library website you will
be asked to enter your Liverpool computer username and password – you can
then use these resources in the same way as when you are on campus.

How do I keep up-to-date?
You can keep up-to-date with your use of the library in a number of ways. In the
library catalogue you can log into your own account to see:
     which books you are borrowing;
     when they are due back;
     renew the loans on books you’re borrowing;
     see if books you have reserved have been returned to the library.

If you use an RSS feeds reader Such as Netvibes, iGoogle or Pageflakes you can
subscribe to your library account for updates. You can also subscribe to news
about library services.

Facebook users can become fans of the University of Liverpool Library (just
search for “University of Liverpool Library” in Facebook). This will give you update
notifications on things like opening hours.
                                        - 46 -
Where do I go if I have a question?
A university library service is very different from a school or public library. If you
need further information about using the library or its resources, you can:
    ask at the Information Support Desk – this is in the link building that links
      the two wings of the Sydney Jones Library;
    ask a member of staff in the library (they will be wearing name badges);
    use the “Ask a Librarian” facility on the library website;
    contact the History subject librarian, Martin Wolf, either in person on the
      second floor of the library, or by email at Martin.Wolf@liverpool.ac.uk.




                                        - 47 -
                                   APPENDIX IV

                      THE PRESENTATION OF ASSIGNMENTS

i.     Assignments should be carefully proof-read prior to submission.

ii.    The prescribed word limit for each assignment should not be exceeded.
       Word limits do not include footnotes, bibliographies or appendices.

iii.   Every assignment should contain:

       a. Cover sheet
       b. Main body of the essay
       c. Bibliography

iv.    References

       The format of your references should adhere closely to the stylistic
       conventions set out in Appendix VII. References should be used to indicate
       the sources on which particular statements are based, and to give the
       source for any direct quotation. They should also be used when the writer
       is paraphrasing the views of a particular author, or when the information in
       a paragraph is drawn from some specific work.

       References may also be used to elaborate on the text, e.g. by indicating
       different views of a question and where they may be found, or by expanding
       on a point raised in the text when such elaboration is of interest but not
       vital for the development of the argument.

       References may be in the form of footnotes, located at the foot of each page,
       or in the form of endnotes at the end of the essay. In either case, they must
       be numbered consecutively throughout.

v.     Bibliography

       Where appropriate, the bibliography should normally be divided into
       primary and secondary sources, and should conform to the stylistic
       conventions set out in Appendix VII. It should be arranged alphabetically
       by the surnames of authors, editors, or, if necessary, titles.

                                   SUBMISSION

You must submit TWO copies of all assessed coursework including your
dissertation.

All assessed work will be marked anonymously (with the exception of
dissertations). You must not therefore write your name on any part of the work,
only your student ID number on each page (you can incorporate this as part of a
header or footer). An anonymity cover sheet and plagiarism declaration, available
from the Postgraduate Secretary, must be completed and attached to one copy of
the work prior to submission.

                                        - 48 -
You will be asked to sign for all assessed work.      This is your only proof of
submission.

(See Section 3.8 for further guidelines on submitting assessed coursework).




                                      - 49 -
                                 APPENDIX V

THE FEASIBILITY STUDY (HIST504)

Introduction

You are required to submit a 3,000-word Feasibility Study by Monday, 18 May,
09. You should begin work identifying your preferred dissertation topic during
the first semester. A number of workshops will be held that are designed to
provide you with advice about writing the Feasibility Study. The dates of
these will be notified to you in due course, following consultation between
students and their Programme Director.

What is the Feasibility Study for?

The Feasibility Study has two main purposes:

   i)    It helps you to develop your research skills by applying them in a real
         context. You will, for example, have to carry out a literature search to
         identify the primary and secondary sources needed to write a
         dissertation on your chosen subject. You will have to consider what
         methodology is most appropriate. You will have to consider practical
         problems such as best way of gaining access to archives. While
         HIST500, HIST501, HIST502 and your programme-specific core modules
         will have helped you to develop many of these skills, they are most
         effectively learned by applying them to a real topic.

   ii)   The Feasibility Study will ensure that you begin your detailed research
         for your dissertation with a clear idea of: a) the secondary and primary
         sources you need to consult; b) the way in which you propose to tackle
         the question you have set yourself. You can then use the time from
         February onwards in the most constructive fashion, working on your
         optional modules while simultaneously beginning to consult the various
         sources you have identified. Your supervisor will advise you about the
         best way of developing your research, but as a general rule you should
         expect to have read all the relevant secondary literature by the end of
         June, so that you can use the summer for consulting primary sources
         and actually writing the dissertation.

FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS:

How does the Feasibility Study relate to HIST500: Locating Historical
Sources?

HIST500 helps you to develop both your basic I.T. and other skills and your
knowledge of such important questions as the correct way to reference your
written work. In addition to compiling an extensive bibliography in the field of
your proposed dissertation research, you are also required to write critical
commentaries on ten key secondary works. The Feasibility Study is designed to
encourage you to think about the best way of applying your own research skills to
a particular piece of research, as well as thinking about some of the more
complex theoretical and conceptual problems involved in planning an effective
                                      - 50 -
dissertation. The two modules together provide you with the skills you need to
write a dissertation.

What happens if I change my mind about the topic I wish to write a
dissertation about?

Planning a dissertation requires careful thought, which is why we encourage you
to identify a topic of research at any early stage in the course. It is possible that
you might want to change your mind at a later stage about the topic you want to
write about (perhaps because the Feasibility Study identified problems you had
not expected). If you are really certain that you want to change your mind, you
will need to speak to your Programme Director. He/she will then offer you advice,
which will normally include a recommendation that you write a Feasibility Study
for your new chosen topic.

What is meant to be in the Feasibility Study?

When the Feasibility Study is marked, your tutors’ are looking for a number of
attributes:

   1.     Evidence of a thorough literature review that identifies the relevant
          secondary literature (both monographs and articles in learned journals)
   2.     Evidence that suitable primary sources have been identified (which
          might, depending on the subject of the dissertation, include national
          and local archives, memoirs, collections of published documents, oral
          history archives, interviews to be carried out by the author, etc).
   3.     A preview of the likely layout of the dissertation (division into chapters,
          the purpose of chapters, etc).
   4.     A critical analysis of the problems that are likely to be encountered
          when carrying out further research for the dissertation, including: how
          evidence is to be used, the validity of the evidence to be used, how the
          problems can be overcome, etc.

The Feasibility Study is, in short, meant to show that you can think critically
about the practical and methodological problems involved in doing research. The
Feasibility Study is a preparatory document that is written before you have begun
your detailed research. We are looking for evidence that you have both the skills
and the critical approach needed to write a good dissertation.

How should the Feasibility Study be laid out?

Further advice on this topic will be given at the workshops, but you should
normally use a structure that allows you to demonstrate that you have met the
various criteria set down in the previous section. You should therefore normally
have at least:

   i)     A section setting down the main secondary literature, along with a
          commentary indicating which works are likely to be most useful.
   ii)    A section setting down the main primary sources to be used, along with
          a commentary about their accessibility and validity.
   iii)   A section setting down the likely structure of the dissertation.

                                        - 51 -
  iv)   A section setting down the problems that are likely to be encountered in
        writing the dissertation, and possible ways of overcoming them.

Submission of the Feasibility Study

The Feasibility Study should be submitted like other written assignments,
according to the procedures set down in Section 3.8.




                                      - 52 -
                                       APPENDIX VI

THE ORGANISATION AND PRESENTATION OF THE DISSERTATION
(HIST550)

i.           Choice of dissertation topic

The dissertation offers the opportunity to investigate in some depth an
appropriate topic of your choice. You will be assigned a supervisor appropriate for
the area you choose to investigate; you will be encouraged to develop your own
ideas in deciding upon a more precise topic to explore, but the final choice of
topic must be approved by the supervisor and the Programme Director. Since the
dissertation should normally be based at least in part on primary sources, the
choice of topic must take into account the accessibility of such material. In the
feasibility study, to be submitted as the first stage in the preparation of the
dissertation, you will provide an outline of the topic to be explored and a
discussion of the sources to be used.

ii.           Approach

The essential task in a dissertation is to use evidence to unfold a continuous and
coherent argument which leads to significant conclusions relating to the research
question stated at the beginning. The introduction should define the precise
scope of the topic chosen for the dissertation, outline the problem or set of
questions to be considered for it, and justify the approach being adopted to
investigate the issues highlighted (with reference, where appropriate, to the
primary source material being used). The main body of the argument should
guide the reader towards the conclusions, which should distil the significance of
the dissertation’s findings.

iii.         Supervision

The dissertation is expected to be an independent piece of work. The supervisor’s
role is to advise on choice of topic and the likely source material available, to
discuss with the student the approach to be taken, and to give feedback on the
Feasibility Study.

Supervisors are allocated by the Programme Director for each MA programme
during Semester 2. Students are welcome to approach individual members of
staff with relevant expertise for preliminary discussions of potential topics.
However, please bear in mind (a) that supervision duties are shared out evenly
among staff each year, and (b) that any topic can be effectively supervised by one
of several members of staff.

All students are entitled to five meetings (of up to 45 minutes) with their
supervisor, as follows:

       (i)     Preliminary meeting during Semester 2 to provide guidance on the
               preparation of the Feasibility Study (HIST504). This would normally
               include discussion of the scope of the project and sources to be used.


                                            - 53 -
      (ii)      Meeting to provide feedback on the Feasibility Study (normally within
                three weeks from the submission deadline for HIST504). The scope of
                the research may well be revised at this stage.
      (iii)     Students are then entitled to three further meetings with their
                supervisor over the summer. An approximate schedule should be
                arranged at the second meeting. Students should be aware that all staff
                will be away from the University – and out of email contact – for periods
                of time over the summer.

Supervisors are permitted to read one draft of each dissertation chapter. The final
deadline for the submission of drafts is 31 August. Students should arrange
individual deadlines for the submission of draft chapters with their supervisors.

iv.           Source materials

Historians draw a distinction between primary and secondary sources. Primary
sources include material produced at the time as the events under examination
(e.g. letters, diaries, newspapers, estate papers, legal documents, chronicles,
charters, treaties and artefacts); and also accounts written later by participants
in or observers of those events (memoirs). Secondary sources include all other
treatments of the subject, mainly historical works. Some material is difficult to
classify under these headings – for example a novel used as historical evidence.

v.            Layout of dissertation

The dissertation should be preceded by an abstract of about 300 words. Every
dissertation should contain:

      1. Title page (title of dissertation, candidate’s name, date, degree for which
         work is presented)
      2. Table of contents, with chapter titles and page numbers.
      3. List of abbreviations (if necessary)
      4. Introduction (stating and justifying the scope and purpose of the
         dissertation)
      5. Main body of the dissertation
      6. Full list of references (as footnotes or endnotes; endnotes may be either at
         the end of each chapter or at the end of the dissertation)
      7. Appendices (if any)
      8. Bibliography, distinguishing between primary and secondary sources used.

vi.           Presentation of dissertation

The dissertation must not exceed 15,000 words. Footnotes and appendices
are included within this limit. It should be word-processed and printed on one
side of A4 paper with double spacing with a 2’’ margin on the left-hand side.
Footnotes/endnotes should be single-spaced. Two copies of the dissertation in
secure binders should be submitted. It is not necessary for the pages to be
stitched or bound, but they should be secure.

vii.          References and bibliography

Please see the relevant sections of Appendix VII.
                                             - 54 -
                                      APPENDIX VII

STYLISTIC CONVENTIONS

(a)        References: Footnotes

Correct referencing is the hallmark of an organised and scholarly mind. It tells
the reader that you have an eye for detail and have taken the time to check the
accuracy of your work before presenting it. References help the reader to re-trace
the steps you took in gathering material for your essay. We would urge you to
follow very carefully the method of citation given below, which is conventionally
accepted as a format that is appropriate for the discipline of history. Other
conventions may apply in other disciplines; however, we expect you to use the
format outlined below for all work you submit to the School.

Referencing essays consists of citing your sources in numbered footnotes or
endnotes to indicate the source of ideas, information and quotations which you
use in your essays. Footnote or endnote numbers should be put at the end of a
sentence, and the notes (numbered 1,2,3 … n) should appear at the foot of the
page or at the end of the essay. Most word processing packages will automate the
mechanics of foot or end noting, entering numbers in sequence, and making
space for them. Proper referencing is one of the criteria used to mark essays.

Citing a book by a single or joint authors:

List the author or authors (initial, then surname), title in italics OR underlined –
but not both – place and date of publication (in brackets), followed by the page
reference. Also, use capitals for all major words in the title.

Look at the following example closely:

           A. Campbell, The Scottish Miners, 1874-1939, Volume 2: Trade Unions and
           Politics (Aldershot, 1999), p.45.

If you are citing not just a single page – p.45 – but several pages in succession,
indicate this as follows: pp. 45-7. Do not use Pg. or any other variant of p. for
giving page references.

Subsequent references to a book should be given in short form as follows:

           Campbell, Scottish Miners, p. 68

If and only if a subsequent citation is in the footnote immediately following, use
Ibid., followed by the page number. Ibid. is an abbreviation for the Latin word
meaning `the same`. Please note, however, that if more than one work is cited in
a footnote, the subsequent note cannot employ ibid.

For example, look at the following sequence of footnotes/endnotes:

      1.      A. Campbell, The Scottish Miners, 1987-1939, Volume 2: Trade Unions
              and Politics (Aldershot, 1999), p.45
      2.      Ibid., pp. 58-9.
                                              - 55 -
   3.     R.Taylor, The TUC: From the General Strike to New Unionism (London,
          2000), p.17.
   4.     Campbell, Scottish Miners, p.42; Taylor, TUC, p.27.
   5.     Taylor, TUC, p.49.

Citing an article in a scholarly journal, or an essay in a volume of essays:

Articles in journals and essays in books should be placed within single inverted
commas, while the journal title or book should be put in italics (or underlined).

This is an example of an essay in an edited book:

        A. Campbell and J. McIlroy, `Miner heroes: three Communist trade union
        leaders`, in J. McIlroy, K. Morgan and A. Campbell, eds, Party People,
        Communist Lives: Explorations in Biography (London, 2001), p.144.

If you are citing an article from a journal, you need to give the volume number,
the issue number, and the year the journal appeared, as well as the page number
for the reference. It may also be necessary to add the publication series if there is
more than one.

This is an example of an article in a journal:

        C. Kidd, `North Britishness and the nature of eighteenth-century British
        Patriotisms’, Historical Journal, 39, 4 (1996), p. 936.

Citing a book review

Citations of book reviews follow the same conventions as citations of articles in
scholarly journals. Therefore, give the same information as before – volume
number, part number, month, year, page number(s) – but in addition add the
author of the review and `review of`. Thus:

        S. Kelly, review of D. Renton, Fascism, Anti-Fascism and Britain in the
        1940s, Basingstoke, 2000, in Labour History Review, 66, 1 (2001), pp. 112-
        13.

Citing an unpublished thesis

Citations of unpublished theses are to be given as follows:

        R. Dobson, `Durham priory, `430-1500`, unpublished Ph.D. thesis,
        University of Oxford, 1957, pp. 36-8.

Citing Primary Sources

A primary source is something which was written at or close to the event you are
studying and may have been printed (newspapers, novels, parliamentary reports,
autobiography), or handwritten (letters, wills, diaries). Many manuscript primary
sources have been edited and published to make them more widely available but
they are still primary sources.

                                        - 56 -
Primary sources are so numerous in type that it is almost impossible to give full
information on citation in this document. If in doubt, please consult your tutors.
In brief, however, some of the main types that you will encounter are treated as
follows:

Newspapers should be treated thus: Liverpool Echo, 5 August 1963.          Or:
Manchester Guardian, 1 June 1945. Please note that The Times is the only
newspaper which has `The` before its title, so: The Times, 24 August 1976. You
do not need to give the page number when citing articles in newspapers.

Memoirs, journals and diaries are in general treated in the same way as books,
but again have their own conventions. These relate to whether the author
published the work herself, or himself, whether the work consists of a single text
that was complete in itself but edited and published (often but not always after
the author’s death) by someone else, or whether the work consists of a series of
bits and pieces that had to be put together to make a book Thus:

      J. Dobbs, Recollections of an Old 52nd Man (London, 1863)

      J. Pelete, The French Campaign in Portugal, 1810-1811, ed. D. Horward
      (Minneapolis, 1973)

      Marquis de Noailles, ed., The Life and Memoirs of C                    (London,
      1923)

Archival sources are treated in a variety of different ways. However, the general
principles are that the identity and location of the document you are using
should be as clear as possible, that it is particularly important to give the file and,
if possible, document number, and that you should be consistent in your
treatment of both sources and archives. Some examples are given below:

      Head Constable’s report to Watch Committee, March 1903, Proceedings of
      Liverpool City Council, Liverpool City Record Office (hereafter PLCC, LCRO),
      H352COU.

      Manuscript Autobiographical Notes, Undated, Lawrence Daly Papers,
      Modern Records Centre, University of Warwick (hereafter MRC),
      MSS301/5/8.

      Memorandum of F. Beda Pena, 5 July 1808, Archivo H
                                               -A, No. 91.

      S. Whittingham to W. Bentinck, 28 October 1808, National Archives, War
      Office Papers (hereafter NA, WO) 1/230, ff.140-1.

These examples all assume that in each case the collection concerned is being
cited for the first time. In all subsequent references, to the same collection, use
the abbreviated form as shown (or, where appropriate, ibid.) Thus;

      J. Green to E. Cooke, 1 September 1809, NA, WO 1/237, ff. 555-7.


                                         - 57 -
In the examples from the National Archives, please note the use of the
abbreviation ff. (folios) instead of pp. (pages). This is used where documents are
bound in volumes and given a number of each double-sided sheet of paper. On
other occasions each document might be numbered separately (as in the example
from the AHN.) or the files paginated in the ordinary fashion.

Until a change of name last year, the National Archives (NA) were called the
Public Record Office (PRO), and they are still often referred to as such (probably
even by your tutors). You are likely to come across many references to the PRO.
Note that such a reference refers to the NA.

A further source of documentary material is provided by collections of printed
correspondence. These are treated as edited books and cited as follows:

      Lord Wellington to Lord Wellesley, 22 June 1813, Supplementary
      Despatches, Correspondence and Memoranda of Field Marshal Arthur, Duke
      of Wellington, ed. Second Duke of Wellington (London, 1858-72), Vol. 8, p.3.

A great deal of primary material is now available on the internet. Letters or other
documents taken from this source should be cited in exactly the same fashion as
primary documents found in archives. However, instead of citing an archive,
substitute the website. Please provide full details e.g.

      Letters from Soviet Ambassador in the US, 1962-3, reproduced at
      http://www.mtholyoke.edi/acad/intrel/coldwar.htm; accessed 4 March
      2005

Finally there is also the issue of oral testimony. This should be cited thus:

      Oral testimony from Homer Simpson, recorded 12 May 2001, York City
      Record Office, OTE. I/354

      Oral testimony from J. Bloggs, recorded by the author, 25 October 2004.

(b)   References: Bibliography

Every essay or dissertation you submit should contain a bibliography at the end.
A bibliography lists all the sources you have cited in the references. When listing
in a bibliography the books, articles and essays you have cited in your footnotes
or endnotes, use the format explained above exactly, but with the following
changes:

1.    Some essays will only refer to secondary sources and should list these in
      the bibliography. If you have cited both primary and secondary sources, a
      bibliography should be divided into primary and secondary sources.

      A secondary source is comment and analysis written some time after the
      event (historical monographs, articles in journals, chapters in books, and
      reviews of books fall into this category).

2.    For each entry, put the author’s surname first (rather than the initial, as
      you would do for a reference.
                                       - 58 -
3.    List authors in alphabetical order by surname.

4.    Include the full range of page numbers of articles and essays, not only the
      pages cited in your foot/endnotes.

Example of the difference between a reference and a bibliography entry:

      [Reference:]

C. Kidd, `North Britishness and the nature of eighteenth-century British
Patriotisms`, Historical Journal, 39, 4 (1996), p. 935.

      [Bibliography entry:]

Kidd, C., `North Britishness and the nature of eighteenth-century British
Patriotisms`, Historical Journal, 39, 4 (1996), pp. 935-61.




                                      - 59 -
                              APPENDIX VIII

                      CRITERIA FOR ASSESSMENT


Grade    Qualities identified

70%+     Distinction
         Excellent use and grasp of relevant concepts, issues and debates
         Very extensive knowledge of relevant texts and other materials.
         Extremely clear aims and objectives.
         Very high degree of reflexivity and critical insight.
         Highly developed sense of argument, sense of style and expression.
         Excellent use and understanding of references and bibliography.


60-69%   Pass-Good
         Good use of relevant concepts, issues and debates.
         Extensive knowledge of relevant texts and other materials.
         Very clear aims and objectives.
         High degree of reflexivity and critical insight.
         Developed sense of argument, style and expression.
         Good use and understanding of references and bibliography.


50-59%   Pass-Fair
         Competent use and grasp of relevant concepts, issues and debates.
         Adequate knowledge of relevant texts and other materials.
         Aims and objectives sufficiently articulated.
         Limited sense of reflexivity and critical insight.
         Limited sense of argument, style and expression.
         Sufficient use and understanding of references and bibliography.


0-49%    Fail
         Insufficient use and grasp of relevant concepts, issues and debates.
         Poor knowledge of relevant texts and other materials.
         Aims and objectives poorly articulated.
         Very little sense of reflexivity and critical insight.
         Very little sense of argument, style and expression.
         Poor use and understanding of references and bibliography.




                                   - 60 -
APPENDIX IX

                              EXAMPLE OF FEEDBACK FORM

SCHOOL OF HISTORY, MA COURSEWORK ASSIGNMENT                             (FIRST MARKER)


MODULE CODE:                           STUDENT ID NUMBER:

DEADLINE:                              DATE OF SUBMISSION:
                                       (EXTENSION):


FEEDBACK

Clarity of aims and objectives:


Knowledge of relevant sources:


Depth and coherence of argument:


Degree of reflexivity and critical insight:


Syntax, grammar and spelling:


References and bibliography:


GENERAL COMMENTS




First marker:                                      Date:


Provisional mark:                                  Penalty for late submission
                                                   (if applicable)



 Agreed internal mark (subject to confirmation by Board of Examiners):




                                              - 61 -
                                APPENDIX X

               CALENDAR AND SUBMISSION DATES: 2008/09

23 September            Induction for new and returning students and welcome
                        reception

SEMESTER 1

29 September            Teaching begins

Weeks 8-12              Assessed coursework submission (submission dates for
                        each module are provided in the relevant module
                        handbook or see Section 3.5)

19 December             End of term

19 January              Coursework submission (see Section 3.5)


SEMESTER 2

26 January              Teaching begins

Weeks 7-12              Assessed coursework submission (submission dates for
                        each module are provided in the relevant module
                        handbook or see Section 3.5)

6 April                 Easter vacation begins

27 April                Summer term begins

18 May                  Coursework submission (see Section 3.5)

12 June                 End of session

September*              Dissertation submission

November*               Final Boards of Examiners

December*               Graduation

*     Exact dates to be confirmed




                                      - 62 -
APPENDIX XI

BUILDING PLANS
 ABERCROMBY SQUARE




                              GROUND
                              FLOOR




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   FIRST   FLOOR




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ABERCROMBY SQUARE
  SECOND   FLOOR




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ABERCROMBY SQUARE
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