Undergraduate_Student_Handbook_2008_09 by qihao0824

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									Undergraduate Handbook 2008-2009




CONTEMPORARY CHINESE STUDIES


UNDERGRADUATE HANDBOOK




2008-2009 EDITION


This handbook is provided for both new and returning undergraduate students and is
designed to provide you with information about the School of Contemporary Chinese
Studies and your course. There is also important information about University services
for students, examinations and various other student activities.
PLEASE READ THIS DOCUMENT CAREFULLY AND KEEP IT FOR FUTURE REFERENCE.
Feel free to discuss any matters that may arise with your Personal Tutor.

If you require this booklet in an alternative format, please contact the School‟s Admin
Office.




School of Contemporary Chinese Studies
The University of Nottingham




School of Contemporary Chinese Studies                                                    1
Undergraduate Handbook 2008-2009




CONTENTS
UNDERGRADUATE DEGREES IN THE SCHOOL OF CONTEMPORARY CHINESE STUDIES ..... 4
  UNIVERSITY REGULATIONS AND QUALITY MANUAL ..................................................................... 4
1.ENQUIRIES ..................................................................................................................................................... 5
  KEY CONTACTS ............................................................................................................................................. 5
  Mandarin Teaching Staff............................................................................................................................ 5
  MAKING ENQUIRIES ................................................................................................................................... 5
  KEEPING IN TOUCH .................................................................................................................................... 6
2.IMPORTANT DATES AND OPENING TIMES ......................................................................................... 6
3.STUDYING IN THE SCHOOL OF CONTEMPORARY CHINESE STUDIES ..................................... 7
  THE SCHOOL AND YOU .............................................................................................................................. 7
  SCHOOL STAFF AND THEIR RESEARCH INTERESTS ...................................................................... 7
  ADMINISTRATIVE STAFF ........................................................................................................................... 8
  PERSONAL TUTORS AND THE PARs SYSTEM .................................................................................... 8
  ADVICE............................................................................................................................................................. 8
  CONSULTATION TIMES – OFFICE HOURS .......................................................................................... 8
  E-MAIL .............................................................................................................................................................. 9
  ATTENDANCE ................................................................................................................................................. 9
  HANDING IN WORK ..................................................................................................................................... 9
4. DEGREE PROGRAMMES .......................................................................................................................... 10
  MODULAR STRUCTURE - FULL-TIME STUDENTS: ......................................................................... 10
  BA (HONS) CONTEMPORARY CHINESE STUDIES .......................................................................... 10
  QUALIFYING YEAR (YEAR 1): ................................................................................................................ 11
  PART I (YEAR 2): ....................................................................................................................................... 12
  Part II (Year 3): .......................................................................................................................................... 12
  PROGRESSION INFORMATION .............................................................................................................. 13
  ASSESSMENT METHODS ......................................................................................................................... 13
  DEGREE INFORMATION ........................................................................................................................... 13
  UNDERGRADUATE MODULE BRIEFING .............................................................................................. 14
  CONTEMPORARY CHINESE STUDIES TIMETABLE .......................................................................... 19
  YEAR ABROAD INFORMATION ............................................................................................................... 21
5.SERVICES AND INFORMATION ............................................................................................................. 22
  THE UNDERGRADUATE ENQUIRIES OFFICE .................................................................................... 22
  COMPUTING FACILITIES AND USE OF COMPUTERS .................................................................... 22
  FINANCIAL SERVICES .............................................................................................................................. 22
  SERVICES FOR STUDENTS WHO HAVE A DISABILITY, DYSLEXIA AND/OR A LONG-
  TERM ILLNESS ............................................................................................................................................. 22
  CHILDCARE SERVICES ............................................................................................................................. 23
  THE UNIVERSITY COUNSELLING SERVICE ...................................................................................... 24
  THE UNIVERSITY ACCOMMODATION OFFICE ................................................................................. 24
  CRIPPS HEALTH CENTRE ......................................................................................................................... 24
  CAREERS ADVISORY SERVICE .............................................................................................................. 24
  CHAPLAINS ................................................................................................................................................... 24
  HALL TUTORS .............................................................................................................................................. 24
  INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS BUREAU (ISB) .................................................................................... 24
  STUDENT ADVISORY SERVICE ............................................................................................................. 24
6.PROCEDURES .............................................................................................................................................. 24
  COURSEWORK, PRESENTATION AND FORMATTING .................................................................... 25
  SCCS Guidelines for Referencing in Coursework ........................................................................... 25
  Plagiarism ..................................................................................................................................................... 25
  Referencing systems ................................................................................................................................. 26
  Footnote referencing................................................................................................................................. 27
  Layout in bibliography .............................................................................................................................. 27
  Layout in footnotes ................................................................................................................................... 28
  Use of ibid. and op.cit. ............................................................................................................................. 28
  Harvard referencing .................................................................................................................................. 29
  Referencing internet material................................................................................................................ 29




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  Referencing newspaper material .......................................................................................................... 30
  Referencing sources not published in English ................................................................................. 30
  Using internet material for coursework ............................................................................................. 31
  STAFF-STUDENT CONSULTATIVE COMMITTEE ............................................................................... 33
  STUDENT EVALUATION OF TEACHING AND MODULES ............................................................... 34
7.ASSESSMENT ............................................................................................................................................... 34
  MARKING CRITERIA AND GRADES FOR ESSAYS AND EXAMS - HONOURS COURSE ..... 36
  RESIT EXAMINATIONS ............................................................................................................................. 37
  EXTENUATING CIRCUMSTANCES ......................................................................................................... 37
  RIGHT OF APPEAL ...................................................................................................................................... 39
8. STUDY SKILLS ........................................................................................................................................... 41
  MANAGING YOUR TIME ........................................................................................................................... 41
  MAKING NOTES .......................................................................................................................................... 41
  READING EFFECTIVELY............................................................................................................................ 42
  PREPARING AND WRITING ESSAYS/REPORTS ETC. .................................................................... 42
  PREPARING FOR EXAMINATIONS ........................................................................................................ 42
  PRESENTATIONS ........................................................................................................................................ 43
  DISSERTATIONS ........................................................................................................................................ 46
  GROUP WORKING ...................................................................................................................................... 46
9. YOUR RESPONSIBILITIES – CHECKLIST ........................................................................................ 47




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UNDERGRADUATE DEGREES IN THE SCHOOL OF CONTEMPORARY
CHINESE STUDIES


The School offers the following degree programmes:


BA Single Honours in Contemporary Chinese Studies (T130)
MSci Contemporary Chinese Studies (T134)
MSci Business and Economy of Contemporary China (T138)

Joint Honours

MSci Global Issues and Contemporary Chinese Studies (LT21)
French and Contemporary Chinese Studies (RT11)
German and Contemporary Chinese Studies (RT21)
Russian and Contemporary Chinese Studies (RT71)
Spanish and Contemporary Chinese Studies (RT41)

“ With Chinese Studies” degree
American Studies with Chinese Studies (T7T1)
Film and Television Studies with Chinese Studies (P3T1)
Economics with Chinese Studies (L1T1)
Geography with Chinese Studies (L7T1)
History with Chinese Studies (V1T1)
Management with Chinese Studies (N2T1)
Electrical and Electronic Engineering with Chinese Studies (H6T1/H6TC)
Environmental Sciences with Chinese Studies (F8T1)
Mathematics with Chinese Studies (G1T1)




Please see:

http://www.nottingham.ac.uk/prospectuses/undergrad.html




UNIVERSITY REGULATIONS AND QUALITY MANUAL

As a member of the University you will be expected to comply with University
Regulations. Every effort has been made during the compilation of this document to
conform with these regulations. However, should any conflicts arise then University
regulations apply. The University of Nottingham General Information and Regulations
should be carefully read and understood by all undergraduates. You should be familiar
with the student version of the university Quality Manual that is available via the
University Home Page.




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1.ENQUIRIES


KEY CONTACTS


Main Enquiries Office                             Room E06 International House
                                                  Tel: 66322
                                                 chinese.studies@nottingham.ac.uk

PhD Programme Director /                         Professor Stephen Morgan
Acting Research Director                          Tel: 32116
                                                  s.morgan@nottingham.ac.uk

Head of School                                   Professor Shujie Yao
                                                 Tel: 67769
                                                 shujie.yao@nottingham.ac.uk

Disability Liaison Officer                       Davina Malcolm
                                                 Room E06, Tel: 67769
                                                 davina.malcolm@nottingham.ac.uk


Academic Staff / PhD Supervisors

Dr Andreas Fulda                  tel:   66972   andreas.fulda@nottingham.ac.uk
Dr Daria Berg                     tel:   67479   daria.berg@nottingham.ac.uk
Dr Dylan Sutherland               tel:   67948   dylan.sutherland@nottingham.ac.uk
Dr Hongyi Lai                     tel:   66017   hongyi.lai@nottingham.ac.uk
Dr Jackie Sheehan                 tel:   15954   j.sheehan@nottingham.ac.uk
Dr Philippe Foret                 tel:   66194   philippe.foret@nottingham.ac.uk
Professor Shujie Yao              tel:   66179   shujie.yao@nottingham.ac.uk
Dr Stephen Morgan                 tel:   32116   s.morgan@nottingham.ac.uk
Dr Xiaoling Zhang                 tel:   66323   xiaoling.zhang@nottingham.ac.uk


Mandarin Teaching Staff

Dr Lu Yang                        tel:   32112   yang.lu@nottingham.ac.uk
Dr Naixia Wang                    tel:   67789   naixia.wang@nottigham.ac.uk
Ms Weiqun Wang                    tel:   32111   weiqun.wang@nottingham.ac.uk
Dr Yannan Guo                     tel:   68458   yannan.guo@nottingham.ac.uk



MAKING ENQUIRIES

Your first point of contact should be the School Office (Room E06), open Monday to
Friday 10.00 to 12.00 and 14.00 to 16.00, or your tutor. If you wish to see your tutor
or any other member of staff, please try to do so during consultation hours, which are
posted on the Undergraduate noticeboard in International House near Room E06.

If you wish to see the Head of                   School   please   email   for   an   appointment
(davina.malcolm@nottingham.ac.uk)




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KEEPING IN TOUCH

Please regularly check your email account and the Undergraduate noticeboard for
information relevant to you from the School.


2.IMPORTANT DATES AND OPENING TIMES


    DATES OF TERM

    Autumn Term: 22nd September 2008 to 12th December 2008
    Spring Term: 12th January 2009 to 20th March 2009
    Summer Term: 20th April 2009 – 19th June 2009


    DATES OF SEMESTER

    Autumn Semester: 22nd September 2008 to 20th March 2009
    Spring Semester: 20th April 2009 to 19th June 2009


    OPENING TIMES

    The School of Contemporary Chinese Studies is open Monday to Friday 10.00 to
    12.00 and 14.00 to 16.00 for students, apart from the following days when the
    University is closed:

    Christmas 2008:

    Thursday 25th December 2008 to Friday 2 nd January 2009

    Easter 2009:

    Friday 10th April 2009 to Tuesday 14 th April 2009

    Spring Bank Holidays:

    Monday 4th May 2009
    Monday 25th May 2009

    Late Summer 2009:

    Saturday 29th August 2009
    Sunday 30th August 2009
    Monday 31st August 2009




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Undergraduate Handbook 2008-2009




3.STUDYING IN THE SCHOOL OF CONTEMPORARY CHINESE STUDIES


THE SCHOOL AND YOU
The information in this booklet is provided to help make your time at Nottingham as
productive and enjoyable as possible. If you have any problems during your
undergraduate career, you should feel free to approach your Personal Tutor or any
member of staff for advice and counselling.


SCHOOL STAFF AND THEIR RESEARCH INTERESTS

Daria Berg is an Associate Professor in Contemporary Chinese Studies. Her main
research interests are in the areas of cultural history, literature, and popular culture,
with her recent work focusing on consumer culture and the internet in contemporary
China.

Philippe Foret is an Associate Professor in Contemporary Chinese Studies. His research
interests include the environment of arid areas, science policy, and the history of
cartography.

Andreas Fulda is a Lecturer in Contemporary Chinese Studies. His research interests
include democratisation and opposition parties in East Asia and citizen participation and
the role of NGOs in contemporary China.

Hongyi Lai is a Lecturer in Contemporary Chinese Studies. His research interests
include China‟s economic reform and transition, regional development programmes,
governance and institutional renewal, energy and maritime diplomacy, and policies for
addressing income and regional inequalities.

Stephen Morgan is an Associate Professor in Contemporary Chinese Studies. His main
research interests are 19th- and 20th-century Chinese business history and international
business and strategic management in contemporary China.

Jackie Sheehan is an Associate Professor in Contemporary Chinese Studies. Her main
research interests are the labour and political history of China since 1949, particularly
the Cultural Revolution and the democracy movement, and the reform of state-owned
enterprises since 1978.

Dylan Sutherland is a Lecturer in Contemporary Chinese Studies. His research interests
include industrial and corporate change and the emergence of the large corporation in
China, and the social and economic determinants of China‟s HIV/AIDS epidemic.

Shujie Yao is Professor of Economics and Chinese Sustainable Development. His main
research interests include economic development in China, agricultural economics, and
economic growth, income distribution and poverty in contemporary China.

Xiaoling Zhang is a Lecturer in Contemporary Chinese Studies. Her research interests
include Chinese literature, film, and television; Chinese media, communication, and
propaganda; new media technologies; and popular culture and identity.




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ADMINISTRATIVE STAFF

Joanna Black – School Manager
Davina Malcolm – School Administrator
Mandy Gloss –School Administration Assistant

PERSONAL TUTORS AND THE PARs SYSTEM

On arrival in the School of Contemporary Chinese Studies you will be assigned a
member of teaching staff who will act as your personal tutor. Your personal tutor will
be assigned during week 1.


Your Personal Tutor will meet you at regular intervals to discuss your academic and
personal development including feedback from examinations and other assessments
and your choice of optional modules in the second and third years. An outcome of
these meetings will be a document we call a Personal and Academic Record or PAR
which develops throughout your undergraduate career. At a later stage your Personal
Tutor will also be involved in discussion of your personal development beyond your
time at the University.


It is in your own interest to inform your Personal Tutor of any personal, or other,
circumstances which might be adversely affecting your academic performance. After
graduation your Personal Tutor will be prepared to act as referee for purposes of
employment and career development – but please ask them first!



ADVICE

The Chair of the Teaching Committee has overall responsibility for all aspects of
undergraduate teaching provision. One part of that person's function is to provide
advice to undergraduate students, individually and collectively, on module selection.
This role is meant to complement, not replace, the discussions you will have with your
Personal Tutor regarding your academic development. Having made a choice of
optional modules, all students must submit a completed module choice form to the
School office. You may also discuss any issues related to your course with the
appropriate person during their designated office hours that are posted on the in/out
board in International House. If you require advice regarding issues related to any
form of disability then you should contact Davina Malcolm in the first instance.


ACCESSING MEMBERS OF STAFF

CONSULTATION TIMES – OFFICE HOURS

It is perhaps worth pointing out at this stage that the School of Contemporary Chinese
Studies is both a teaching and a research community, and members of staff spend a
considerable proportion of their time in the latter activity. Clearly, they may not always
be readily available to deal with your immediate needs. It would greatly assist
everyone if you could try to see members of staff during consultation times. In
emergencies the School Office is probably the best point of contact in the first instance,
and an appropriate member of staff will be contacted. However, more substantive




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issues should be discussed directly with a member of staff at an appointed time. For
Consultation hours please see the noticeboard in International House.




E-MAIL
Shortly after arrival you will be given a password which will allow you to use the
University computer networks to receive and/or send e-mail. You may also have your
own e-mail address on non-University server/s.


Staff e-mail addresses usually take the form forename.surname@nottingham.ac.uk.
The e-mail addresses of all current members of School staff are listed on page 5 of this
Handbook.


ATTENDANCE

Although it is not practice to have registers for the larger lecture modules, teaching
staff may conduct regular and/or random checks on attendance. In any case, it is in
your own interest to attend all classes. You should check that you are attending all the
modules prescribed for your year and degree category. Attendance at tutorials is
compulsory and it is essential that you let your Tutor know in advance of unavoidable
absence, for example due to sickness.

Students who are absent without authority during term, or who have been irregular in
their attendance, or whose progress is unsatisfactory, may be refused permission to sit
their examinations at the normal time, be removed from the module, and/or be
required to repeat part of the course. In serious cases a student's course may be
suspended or terminated.

Where absence is due to illness extending over more than a few days a medical
certificate is required (see the Student Quality Manual for advice on Medical
Certificates from the Cripps Health Centre).

HANDING IN WORK

Two copies of your coursework should be handed in to the School Office. Details of
submission dates are shown in the module reading lists and on the School notice
boards. Work handed in after the deadline will be considered late and will be subject
to penalties.

You will be required to complete a „front sheet‟ which you should then date and time
stamp using the machine located by the School Office and put your stamped work in
the coursework box. The bottom tear off portion of the submission form is your proof
of receipt – please keep this safely should there be any problems at a later date.




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4. DEGREE PROGRAMMES

MODULAR STRUCTURE - FULL-TIME STUDENTS:

The University of Nottingham operates a modular system for undergraduate courses.
Each module (teaching/study unit) is assigned a number of credits (usually 10 or 20)
which is a reflection of the amount of time required, both within classes and
independently, to complete that particular module. To be awarded an Honours Degree
you need 360 credits, 120 during each year of study.

Each credit is considered to represent 10 hours of work. A 10-credit module should,
therefore, involve you in approximately 100 hours of study. An approximate
breakdown of these hours with respect to lectures, independent study, revision etc. is
given in the Catalogue of Modules which exists in both electronic and hard-copy form
(you will probably receive a Qualifying Year edition when you come to University).

The first year of study is called the Qualifying Year and represents a hurdle that must
be cleared before proceeding to the second year or Part I, which for the single-honours
Contemporary Chinese Studies course represents 40% of the final degree assessment.
The third year is called Part II and represents 60% of the final degree assessment.
Some of the modules taken by undergraduates are compulsory, while others are
optional and some may be from other Schools within the University - see the section
on course structure below.

Each academic year of approximately 30 weeks is divided into two semesters for
teaching and examination purposes, but residence is organised into three 10 week
terms. The first semester is 14 weeks long, interrupted by the Christmas vacation. The
first 12 weeks of the semester are for teaching and revision, followed by a 2 week
examination period. There is no vacation between the Autumn and the Spring
semester, which lasts for 16 weeks with a break for the Easter Vacation. Again, 12
weeks of the semester are taken up by teaching and then there is a longer 4-week
examination period.


BA (HONS) CONTEMPORARY CHINESE STUDIES

Educational Aims

This three-year course enables you to combine in-depth study of China's contemporary
society, media, culture, economy, politics, geography, and history with Mandarin Chinese
from beginners' to advanced level. You spend your second year at the China Campus in
Ningbo. The aims of the course are:

       Through research-led, interdisciplinary teaching, to develop your understanding
        of all aspects of contemporary Chinese society

       To provide a structured yet flexible programme with scope within it for students
        to tailor your programme of study to your own interests and career aspirations

       To develop your Mandarin language skills to at least intermediate level

       To give you first-hand experience of living and working in China through a second
        year spent at the Ningbo campus.




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       To enable you to engage with a variety of approaches to and conceptualisations
        of contemporary China
       To develop your ability to gather and process information from a variety of
        sources
       To foster a wide range of communicative and other transferable skills as a basis
        for career progression and lifelong learning


QUALIFYING YEAR (YEAR 1):

In the first year you take core modules on aspects of contemporary China and Mandarin
language from beginners‟ level, along with small-group tutorials in both the Autumn and
Spring semesters in which the emphasis is placed on reading and discussion of relevant
academic literature, essay writing and seminar presentations. Topics are drawn from the
core modules and from broader intellectual, cultural and political fields. Your remaining
optional modules are chosen from a list of approved Chinese Studies and other modules.

Compulsory Modules

Code            Title                              Credits                    Taught

T1112A          Mandarin Chinese for Beginners (1A)            20             Autumn
T1A103          Introduction to Contemporary China             10             Autumn
T11149          Contemporary Chinese Study Skills              10             Autumn
T1112B          Mandarin Chinese for Beginners (1B)            20             Spring
T1A104          China in the 21st Century                      10             Spring
T11147          Contemporary Chinese Studies Tutorial          10             Full Year

                                Total                          80

Optional Modules

Students must take a minimum of 10 credits per semester from this approved
list of Chinese Studies modules:


L81001          Countries in Transition: China and E Europe    10             Autumn
N1A131          E Asian Business in the Twentieth Century      10             Autumn
N1A132          E Asian Business in the Global Economy         10             Spring
T11003          Introduction to Chinese Law                    10             Spring

                                Total                          40


Optional Modules to be taken as necessary to bring the total credits for the year
to 120.




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PART I (YEAR 2):

You will spend your second year at the University of Nottingham Ningbo campus in
China. This is a compulsory part of the course. Unlike the year abroad in most four-year
Chinese Studies degrees, here all your work will count towards your final degree result.
You will again take core modules on contemporary China, this time with an emphasis on
training in research methods and practice in a Chinese context, while also continuing
with Mandarin language. All students participate in a three-week intensive field course in
the Spring semester, travelling to Shanghai, Jiangsu, Zhejiang, Beijing, and Hebei and
undertaking small-group and individual research projects. Your remaining optional
modules this year are chosen from a list of approved Chinese Studies and other
modules.

Compulsory Modules

T1222A          Mandarin Chinese for Intermediate Level (2A)             20    Autumn
T1B201          China in the Twentieth Century (Part 1) or equivalent    10    Autumn
CS3411          Dissertation Part One                                    20    Autumn
T1222B          Mandarin Chinese for Intermediate Level (2B)             20    Spring
T1B202          China in the Twentieth Century (Part 11) or equivalent   10    Spring
T1B181          Field School in China (B)                                20    Full Year

                                                     Total               100

Optional Modules to be taken as necessary to bring the total credits for the year
to 120.


Part II (Year 3):

In your final year you will write a 10,000-word dissertation on a China-related topic of
your own devising. All students take the Cultural Shift in a Globalizing China modules
(parts 1 and 2), while further Mandarin language modules and advanced translation
modules are available as options. Your remaining optional modules are chosen from a list
of approved Chinese Studies and other modules.

Compulsory Modules

T13172          Chinese Studies Dissertation                      40           Full year
T1B31A          Cultural Shift in a Globalising China (Part 1)    10           Autumn
T1B31B          Cultural Shift in a Globalising China (Part 11)   10           Spring
                                       Total                      60



Students must take a minimum of 40 credits from this group of approved
Chinese Studies modules:

LKB3MA          Inter Faculty Mandarin 3A                        10            Autumn
T1332A          Mandarin Chinese for the Advanced Level          20            Autumn
T1B16A          Translation between Chinese and English (Part 1) 10            Autumn
T1B301          China‟s Political Economy                        10            Autumn
T12229          Mao‟s China                                      10            Autumn
L3304A          Chinese Economy and Society A                    10            Autumn




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Undergraduate Handbook 2008-2009




LKB3MB          Inter Faculty Mandarin 3B                       10           Spring
T1332B          Mandarin Chinese for the Advanced Level         20           Spring
T1B16B          Translation between Chinese and English (Part 11)10          Spring
T1B302          Chinese Business and Society                    10           Spring
T13330          Individual, State and Society                   10           Spring
L3304B          Chinese Economy and Society B                   10           Spring
                               Total                            140

Optional Modules to be taken as necessary to bring the total credits for the year
to 120.


PROGRESSION INFORMATION

Although your Qualifying Year marks do not count towards your final class of degree,
you do have to obtain a pass mark of at least 40% in every module in order to
progress to Part I of the course. In some circumstances (see the online Quality Manual
for full details) it is possible to progress to Part 1 despite having marks of between
30% and 40% in a one or two optional modules, provided certain minimums are
achieved regarding number of credits passed and overall average mark. But fail
marks in any core, non-compensatable modules must be brought up to at least
40% by means of a resit exam or other summer reassessment, otherwise you
will not be permitted to proceed to the next year of your degree. If you do not
achieve a mark of at least 40% in these modules by the end of the summer
reassessment period, you will normally have to suspend your studies while the
necessary work is made up. This would also prevent you from undertaking a planned
year abroad in Part I.

Check your module entry form at the beginning of both your Qualifying Year and Part 1
to see which modules are non-compensatable and therefore have to be passed before
you can progress to the next year of your degree. In your Qualifying Year, the non-
compensatable modules are T1A103, Introduction to Contemporary China, T1A104,
China in the 21st Century, and T1112B, Mandarin for Beginners B.

ASSESSMENT METHODS

Some modules are assessed entirely by examination, some by course work – primarily
projects and small group activities – and some by a mixture of both methods, as
described in the online module catalogue. Full details will be given at the start of the
module in the module handbook.


DEGREE INFORMATION

Over the entire course students must take a minimum of 280 credits in modules offered
by the School of Contemporary Chinese Studies and/or other approved Chinese Studies
modules from the lists above.


Course Weightings %

Part I: 40.0
Part II: 60.0
Degree Calculation Model: Arithmetic Mean




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UNDERGRADUATE MODULE BRIEFING

AUTUMN

L81001 Countries in Transition: China and Eastern Europe (10 credits)
The module introduces students to the study of China, Russia and east and central
Europe. It adopts a comparative historical approach to examine the emergence and
development of Chinese and Soviet communism, the reform of Chinese communist
structures, and the collapse of Soviet communisim. Topics that will be covered include:
China before the communist regime, the Russian Empire before 1917, the development
of the Chinese and Soviet communist systems, recent economic reform in China, the
disintegration of communism in Eastern Europe, and the frameworks for understanding
countries in transition.
No Pre-requisites required

T11149 Contemporary Chinese Study Skills (10 credits)
This is an introductory course designed to provide students with appropriate study skills,
familiarity with resources, an understanding of the methodological approaches used in
studying contemporary China, to develop students' understanding of how to use critical
approaches to study all aspects of contemporary Chinese society. Sessions include:
practising organising work on a topic; understanding interdisciplinary approaches;
presentation skills; essay writing; group and team work; researching topics related to
China's contemporary society, media, culture, economy, politics, geography, and history;
library and online searches for primary and secondary sources; compiling bibliographies,
critical use of sources; discussion skills; leading discussion; summarising findings;
disseminating results; familiarity with e-learning resources; creating a portfolio of work
done in this module.
No Pre-requisites required

T1A103 Introduction to Contemporary China (10 credits)
The module provides students with an overview of contemporary China and establishes a
foundation of knowledge and skills for students who wish to pursue more advanced
studies of China in their second and third year. The module examines such changes as
politics and administration, economy, society and natural environment of China since the
founding of the Peoples Republic of China in 1949, though particular attention is paid to
the last two decades when China started economic reform and current trends.
No Pre-requisites required

T12204 Environment and Development in China (10 credits)
An introduction to environmental challenges in a rapidly developing China, including
critical issues in air, land, and water management. Special attention will be paid to the
period since 1978, including environmental governance in resource allocation,
management and pollution prevention policy. Discussions of environmental politics in
China will lead to identification of a trend of newly emergent social actors and their
contribution to environmental governance, including environmental NGOs, private
companies, and public consultation. A myriad of case studies will be explored throughout
the course.
No Pre-requisites required


T1B201 China in the Twentieth Century Part I (10 credits)
This module covers China's modern history from the last years of imperial rule through
the end of the Republican era (c.1900-1949), with an emphasis on political, cultural and
social change over the period. Major topics include:
     The 1911 revolution and the end of imperial rule




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    The intellectual and political ferment of the New Culture and May Fourth
     Movements
    The rise of mass politics in the 1920s
    The record and fate of the Nationalist government through the Nanjing Decade,
     Japanese occupation and China's Civil War (1927-49)
Pre-requisites required
T1A103 Introduction to Contemporary China or
T1A104 China in the 21st Century or permission of the convenor

T1B301 China's Political Economy (10 credits)
This module examines the interaction between politics and economy in China during the
economic reform period from 1978 onward. Particular attention will be given to the
progress and periods of China‟s reform, the political context of major economic policies,
reform of major aspects of the economy, evolution of economic institutions, as well as an
overview of economic development in China prior to 1978. Specific topics covered by the
module include:
    Overview of China‟s modernization prior to 1978;
    Periods of economic reform, as well as policy issues and debates for each period;
    Rural reform in the early 1980s and early 2000s;
    China‟s opening and its entry to the World Trade Organization (WTO);
    The rise of the non-state economy (private, collective, and foreign enterprises);
    Reform of state-owned enterprises and corporate governance;
    Governance and administrative reform;
    Income inequalities and remedial policies.
Pre-requisites required
T1A103 Introduction to Contemporary China or
T1A104 China in the 21st Century or permission of the convenor

T1B31A Cultural Shift in a Globalising China (Part I): Literature and Cinema (10
credits)
This module introduces culture and media in the context of a rapidly globalising China.
Part 1 focuses on an examination development of literature and cinema in China
embedded within the wider cultural, social and political contexts. Trends in modern
Chinese literature and cinema, with a primary focus on different genres and themes
developed since the founding of the People's Republic of China in 1949 are also explored.
By placing Chinese literature and film within their cultural, social and historical contexts,
students will analyse, interpret and appreciate such phenomena. It will include analyses
of individual texts in translation and films with English subtitles. The module will increase
students' awareness of the major developments in literature and film as they are
embedded in the wider changes in contemporary China.
Pre-requisites required
T1A103 Introduction to Contemporary China or permission of the convenor

T13329 Mao’s China (10 credits)
This module focuses on China under Communist Party rule in the pre-reform era (1949-
1976), examining how China was organised and governed, changes in rural and urban
society, the family, the economy and the Chinese workplace under Mao Zedong's CCP.
Major topics covered include: 1. The origins of communism in China and the CCP's rise to
power. 2. The transformation of rural and urban society under CCP rule. 3. Effects of de-
Stalinization on China and the Hundred Flowers movement. 4. The Great Leap Forward
and subsequent famine. 5. In-depth analysis of all phases of the Cultural Revolution up
to Mao's death in 1976.
Pre-requisites required
T1A103 Introduction to Contemporary China or
T1A104 China in the 21st Century or permission of the convenor
(Not available in 2008-9)




School of Contemporary Chinese Studies                                                     15
Undergraduate Handbook 2008-2009




SPRING

T11003 Introduction to Chinese Law (10 credits)
Module content Ten two-hour seminars will be delivered to provide an introduction to
Chinese legal system and contemporary Chinese law. Teaching will cover the history,
current status and certain criticism of Chinese legal system and main sections of Chinese
law. Particular emphasis will be given on the interaction between Chinese law and
international legal norms. While it is impossible to teach you everything about the
evolving Chinese legal system in a single course, you will learn a great deal about how
law operates in China. The more you read and participate in this class, the better
prepared you will be to go on to master specific areas of Chinese law.
Pre-requisites required
T1A103 Introduction to Contemporary China or permission of the convenor

T1A104 China in the 21st Century (10 credits)
This module examines academic debates over the the following features of contemporary
China, utilising books, journals articles, films, media reports and fiction: Geographic
regions Politics and government Legislative reforms Economy media and popular culture
Population planning Foreign relations
No Pre-requisites required

T12205 Environment and Development in China (10 credits)
An introduction to environmental challenges in a rapidly developing China, including
critical issues in air, land, and water management. Special attention will be paid to the
period since 1978, including environmental governance in resource allocation,
management and pollution prevention policy. Discussions of environmental politics in
China will lead to identification of a trend of newly emergent social actors and their
contribution to environmental governance, including environmental NGOs, private
companies, and public consultation. A myriad of case studies will be explored throughout
the course.
No Pre-requisites required

T1B180 Field School in China (A) (20 credits)
Approximately three week intensive field study period based primarily in Shanghai and
Beijing with frequent side trips into the surrounding regions. Teaching will concentrate
on the rationale and techniques of field study in China and on a range of themes linked
to China's reforms and opening to the outside world. Particular emphasis will be placed
on the design, practical activities and analysis of small research projects.
Pre-requisites
None. Please note that there is a fee chargeable to all students on this module

T1B202 China in the Twentieth Century Part II (10 credits)
This module covers China's contemporary history from the coming to power of the
Chinese Communist Party (CCP) in 1949 to the present day, with an emphasis on
politcal, cultural, social and economic change over the period. Major topics include:
The transition to socialism in urban and rural China and the Great Leap Forward
     The Cultural Revolution (1966-76)
     The post-Mao economic reforms
     Popular culture and society in the reform era
     The development of a democracy movement
     The PRC's international relations and world role
Pre-requisites
T1B201 China in the Twentieth Century Part I or permission of convenor




School of Contemporary Chinese Studies                                                     16
Undergraduate Handbook 2008-2009




T1B302 Chinese Business and Society (10 credits)
This module introduces students to the economic, social, cultural and institutional
settings in which businesses operate in China. Students will apply this knowledge to the
examination of key business and management issues in contemporary China, including
business organisations, multinational companies, human resource management
practices, marketing and business strategies. Students will also apply this knowledge to
the analysis of business opportunities and risks in contemporary China.
Pre-requisites
T1B301 China's Political Economy or permission of convenor

T1B31B Cultural Shift in a Globalising China (Part II): Media and
Communications (10 credits)
This module introduces students to the unprecedented transformation in Chinese culture
and media in the context of economic reforms and globalisation, technological change,
public participation and politics in China. Topics covered include the following: 1. Te
changing structure and function of the media in China before and after reforms; 2. The
impact of a socialist market economy on media industry in China; 3. Media, ideology and
democracy; 4. The making of news in China today; 5. The changing reality for
journalism and journalists; 6. Development of new media technologies and their
implications for China; 7. Internationalisation of chinese media.
Pre-requisites
T1B31A Cultural Shift in a Globalising China (Part I): Literature and Cinema
or permission of the convenor.

T13330 Individual, State and Society in Contemporary China (10 credits)
This module focuses on the changing relationships between state, society and the
individual in China from the 1970s to the present day, with particular attention to the
development of civil society in this period. Major topics covered include:
     Effects of political and legal reform on the state's relationships with individuals and
      social groups
     Chinese and other concepts of human rights and the development of a Chinese
      human-rights movement
     The development of autonomous students', workers' and citizens' organisations
     Social change, political reform and prospects for democratization
     Dissent, human rights and China's international relations
Pre-requisites required
T1A103 Introduction to Contemporary China or
T1A104 China in the 21st Century or permission of convenor




School of Contemporary Chinese Studies                                                      17
Undergraduate Handbook 2008-2009




FULL YEAR

T11147 Contemporary Chinese Studies Tutorial (10 credits)
Small group tutorials in both the Autumn and Spring semesters in which emphasis will
be placed on reading and discussion of relevant academic literature, essay writing and
seminar presentations. Topics will be based on those covered in the Qualifying Year
Chinese studies modules and from broader intellectual, cultural and political fields.
Co-requisites
T1A103 Introduction to Contemporary China
T1A104 China in the 21st Century

T12209 Environment and Development in China (20credits)
An introduction to environmental challenges in a rapidly developing China, including
critical issues in air, land, and water management. Special attention will be paid to the
period since 1978, including environmental governance in resource allocation,
management and pollution prevention policy. Discussions of environmental politics in
China will lead to identification of a trend of newly emergent social actors and their
contribution to environmental governance, including environmental NGOs, private
companies, and public consultation. A myriad of case studies will be explored throughout
the course.
No Pre-requisites

T13172 Dissertation (40 credits)
This is an individual dissertation project based on a Chinese studies topic to be agreed
by the candidate and the dissertation tutor (module convenor) and specialist supervisor.

.




School of Contemporary Chinese Studies                                                   18
         Undergraduate Handbook 2008-2009




                                                        CONTEMPORARY CHINESE STUDIES TIMETABLE
                                                                       YEAR 1
                                                                  AUTUMN SEMESTER

               09:00     09:30    10:00     10:30   11:00 11:30 12:00      12:30   13:00   13:30   14:00 14:30 15:00 15:30      16:00   16:30   17:00   17:30
Monday                                              T1112A/L1/01# 2-12                             T11149/W1/01 2-12
                                                    Mandarin Chinese For                           Contemporary Chinese Study
                                                    Beginners (1a)                                 Skills
                                                    JC-AMEN-B12                                    JC-AMEN-B13



Tuesday                                                                            T1112A/L2/01# 2-12           T1112A/L1/02# 2-12
                                                                                   Mandarin Chinese For         Mandarin Chinese For
                                                                                   Beginners (1a)               Beginners (1a)
                                                                                   UP-PSYC-A209+                UP-BIOL-B1+


Wednesday
                                       T1112A/L2/02# 2-12
                                       Mandarin Chinese For
                                          Beginners (1a)
                                         UP-PSYC-A210+

Thursday            T11149/W1/01 1-12                                              T1112A/P1/01# 1-12                           T1112A/P1/02# 1-12
                Contemporary Chinese Study                                         Mandarin Chinese For                         Mandarin Chinese For
                           Skills                                                  Beginners (1a)                               Beginners (1a)
                       JC-AMEN-A02                                                 JC-INTHSE-LANG                               UP-TRNT-C70-(LANG)+


Friday                                                                                                 T1A103/L1/01 1-12
                                                                                                         Introduction To
                                                                                                       Contemporary China
                                                                                                         UP-CHEM-X2+




         School of Contemporary Chinese Studies                                                                                                  19
           Undergraduate Handbook 2008-2009




                                                         CONTEMPORARY CHINESE STUDIES TIMETABLE
                                                                        YEAR 1
                                                                   SPRING SEMESTER

               09:00     09:30    10:00     10:30   11:00 11:30 12:00 12:30      13:00   13:30   14:00   14:30   15:00   15:30   16:00   16:30   17:00   17:30
Monday                                              T1112B/L1/01# 19-26, 31-33
                                                        Mandarin Chinese For
                                                          Beginners (1b)
                                                           JC-AMEN-B12


Tuesday                                                                          T1112B/L2/01# 19-26, 31-33      T1112B/L1/02# 19-26, 31-33
                                                                                    Mandarin Chinese For            Mandarin Chinese For
                                                                                       Beginners (1b)                  Beginners (1b)
                                                                                       UP-MAPH-C4+                     UP-MAPH-C4+


Wednesday                         T1A104/P/01       T1112B/L2/02# 19-26, 31-33
                                  China In The
                                                    Mandarin Chinese For
                                  21st Century
                                  UP-TRNT-C72-      Beginners (1b)
                                  (LANG)+           UP-CLIVEG-A31+
               T1A104/L1/01 19-26, 31-34
               China In The 21st Century
               UP-CLIVEG-A48+
Thursday                                                                         T1112B/P1/01# 19-26, 31-33                      T1112B/P1/02# 19-26, 31-33
                                                                                 Mandarin Chinese For                            Mandarin Chinese For
                                                                                 Beginners (1b)                                  Beginners (1b)
                                                                                 JC-INTHSE-LANG                                  UP-TRNT-A103-(LANG)+


Friday




           School of Contemporary Chinese Studies                                                                                                  20
Undergraduate Handbook 2008-2009




YEAR ABROAD INFORMATION

The second year of your three-year degree is spent abroad at the University of
Nottingham Ningbo Campus.

Ningbo is a bustling port city with a rich cultural heritage and a new centre of economic
development. It is located in the middle of China's coastline in Zhejiang province in the
south of the Yangzi Delta. Ningbo is divided from Shanghai by Hangzhou Bay. In ancient
times, Ningbo was the starting point of the Silk Road and the „China Road‟ from the sea.
Today Ningbo is one of China‟s main ports for foreign trade.

The University of Nottingham China Campus welcomed its first students in September
2004. All teaching is carried out in English by staff either seconded from Nottingham or
appointed internationally to University of Nottingham standards. The student population
is predicted to grow to 4,000 by 2010, with a second phase of expansion planned, and
the range of subjects on offer will expand accordingly, at postgraduate as well as
undergraduate level.

More information about the China Campus can be found at:
http://www.nottingham.edu.cn

Nottingham UK students who study at the China campus pay their tuition fees to
Nottingham in the normal way and are eligible for a China Campus bursary (currently
£500).

The International Office will assist students in applying for the necessary paperwork in
China in order to make a visa application and will give pre-departure briefings in May
and November (depending on departure date).

At Ningbo, International students are accommodated in the International Student
Residence Hall on campus where all the rooms are fully furnished. Students may opt to
live off campus, although we recommend that everyone moves into campus
accommodation for at least the first few weeks. All the rooms are for single occupancy
and each room is equipped with a telephone, broadband connection, a TV set, an air-
conditioner and a separate bathroom. There are two laundry rooms on each floor and
each one is fitted with two washing machines. There are two kitchens on each floor
where students may cook and eat. Each kitchen is equipped with a fridge, a microwave,
an electromagnetic cooker, an electric cooker, dining tables, etc. The accommodation fee
for   a    single   room     at   the    International  Student     Residence   Hall   is
12,000RMB (approximately £850) per year excluding fees for water, electricity and
Internet. International students can also choose to share a room with other international
students if they prefer, but these rooms are located in other Student Residence Halls.
There are rooms for two students and rooms for four students to share, and the
accommodation fees are 2600RMB and 1300RMB respectively per year.


Further information concerning the year abroad will be available at a later date.




                                                                                       21
Undergraduate Handbook 2008-2009




5.SERVICES AND INFORMATION


THE UNDERGRADUATE ENQUIRIES OFFICE

The School Office (Room E06), should normally be your first point of contact for matters
related to your study in the School. Students should make enquiries at the office which is
open week days during term time between 10:00 and 12:00 and 14:00 and 16:00.


COMPUTING FACILITIES AND USE OF COMPUTERS

At undergraduate registration you will be given a password which will allow you to use the
University and computer networks. Guidance and instruction will also be given about the
use of School computers and access to wider facilities, including the WWW and e-mail.

You are entitled to use PCs in any of the ISCRAs (Information Services Computer
Registration Areas) on campus.

Full details of location, facilities and access is available on-line at

www.nottingham.ac.uk/is/locations/iscra.

Please also refer to the code of practice regarding the University‟s computing facilities at

http://www.nottingham.ac.uk/is/support/knowledgebase/guides/IS0102.pdf .

Please note that Information Services also run a Basic IT Skills programme for
Undergraduates, for more information see www.nottingham.ac.uk/is/support/training/BITS

PHOTOCOPY FACILITIES

Photocopying facilities are available at all libraries on University and Jubilee Campus.

FINANCIAL SERVICES

Help and advice to students primarily in the areas of financial support. Applications for
student loans are dealt with as are applications for various hardship funds. Telephone
0115 9513710


SERVICES FOR STUDENTS WHO HAVE A DISABILITY, DYSLEXIA AND/OR A
LONG-TERM ILLNESS

The University is committed to promoting access for students who have a disability,
dyslexia and/or a long-term medical condition. Services provided aim to enable students
to fulfil the inherent requirements of the course as independently as possible.


What we need you to do ....
   Students are encouraged to make the University aware of their individual requirements.
   Students who have a disability, specific learning difficulty (such as dyslexia) or long-
   term medical condition are urged to inform the School Disability Liaison Officer (see
   below) and/or their personal tutor. The School has a Disability Disclosure and
   Confidentiality Policy through which students can choose either to request that
   information concerning their circumstances remain confidential between themselves and
   the staff member to whom they disclose, or they can sign a Disability Disclosure Form




                                                                                               22
Undergraduate Handbook 2008-2009




   which then permits staff to share information on a need to know basis in order to
   extend support to the student. Letting us know what you might need at an early stage
   will help us to help you.

What we can offer you ....

The university's Disability Statement listing services, facilities and opportunities available
throughout the University and be viewed at: www.nottingham.ac.uk/disabilityldisability-
statement.html


The Disability Liaison Officer for the School is Davina Malcolm. If you have any requirements
or concerns talk in the first instance to Davina and/or contact your personal tutor. Davina
Malcolm can be contacted on: Tel: 0115 84 67769 or
Email: davina.malcolm@nottingham.ac.uk

Academic Support in Student services, includes the Disability and Dyslexia Support teams,
and offers a range of academic and practical support for all students. It incorporates the
University of Nottingham Assessment Centre (UNAC) which provides assessments for
students who have applied for Disabled Student Allowances, the assessments required by
LEAs. Academic support is responsible for making recommendations for alternative
arrangements such as those required in examinations, assessments and for timetabling.
Assistance can also be given with regard to queries about adapted accommodation and
University provision of accessible transport.

Contact details are:
Tel: 0115 95 13710

Fax: 0115 95 14376
Minicom: 0115 95 14378
Email: ssc@nottingham.ac.uk

Web: www.nottingham.ac.uk/ssc

The Student Union has a voluntary group, Disability Action, working to make sure that all
students who have a disability can access a fair provision of education and services. They
provide information, support and advice to students, as well as organizing social events. If
you would like to get involved contact: Tel: 0115 84 68785

Email: suswd@nottingham.ac.uk

The University also has a Disability Policy Advisory Unit which assists in the development of
University policy and procedures relating to disability and their compliance with the Special
Educational Needs and Disability Act 2001
Web: www.nottingham.ac.uk/disability


CHILDCARE SERVICES


The University offers a wide range of child care services for students. Enquiries to 0115
9515222 or e-mail childcareservices@nottingham.ac.uk




                                                                                                 23
Undergraduate Handbook 2008-2009




THE UNIVERSITY COUNSELLING SERVICE

The University provides a confidential, free, counselling service. It has a number of trained
counsellors who are available to discuss any of your personal problems. In order to make an
appointment you can visit their office in Trent Building (A75-A85) or telephone internally on
13695 (externally on 951 3695) Monday to Friday, 9am to 1 pm and 2pm to 4.30pm.

THE UNIVERSITY ACCOMMODATION OFFICE
The accommodation office can be found on Cherry Tree Hill. It deals with both on and off
campus accommodation. Lists of off campus accommodation can be found there, so it is a
useful first port of call for whatever type of accommodation you are looking for. Telephone
13697 internally (951 3697 externally).

CRIPPS HEALTH CENTRE
When you arrive at University you should register with the Cripps Health Centre in order to
receive National Health Service provision. This will normally take place as part of your
Week One induction. It is unwise to be at University for any period of time and not be
registered with a doctor. Telephone 0115 846 8888

CAREERS ADVISORY SERVICE

The Careers Advisory Service, located on D Floor of Portland Building Extension on the
Main Campus, provides a wide range of services, including information and advice on
curriculum vitae preparation, interviews, career planning, work experience and placements
A Careers Advisory Service Guide is provided to all Nottingham students in their second
year. More information can be found on-line at: www.nottingham.ac.uk/careers

CHAPLAINS
The University Chaplains for a variety of denominations can be found on the mezzanine
floor at the west end of the Portland Building Telephone (95) 13930.

HALL TUTORS

If you are a resident in a hall on campus you will be assigned to a hall tutor who is a
senior member of the hall. If you have personal problems which you need to discuss with
someone other than your Personal Tutor, then you can speak in confidence to your hall
tutor.

INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS BUREAU (ISB)

The ISB helps international students to adjust to living and studying in the UK. Students
can ask about such matters as immigration, work permits, finance etc. Telephone (95)
14161.

STUDENT ADVISORY SERVICE

This is run by the Student Union and can provide advice on housing, money, education,
employment, legal, international and consumer matters. It is located in the Portland
Building and is open weekdays 09:00 to 16:00 (Wednesday 10:00 to 18:00)
www.student-advice-centre@nottingham.ac.uk


6.PROCEDURES




                                                                                          24
Undergraduate Handbook 2008-2009




COURSEWORK, PRESENTATION AND FORMATTING

Students should note that proper presentation of written coursework is regarded as
an essential element of the exercise, particularly as each piece of work is examined
by several members of staff and may well be scrutinised by an External Examiner.
You are therefore required to conform to the following guidelines.


         Late submission: an absolute reduction of 5% per normal working day.

         Over-length work: only the work contained within the page limit will be marked;
          anything beyond that will be disregarded and the essay/project treated as
          unfinished. Under-length work will also be penalised where important points have
          been omitted or left undeveloped.

         Inconsistent or incorrectly formatted references will be penalised with the
          deduction of up to five marks. Inadequate referencing constitutes plagiarism; see
          below.

       Plagiarism: this is an extremely serious academic offence. Plagiarised work can
        result in a zero mark for the piece of work or for the entire module and referral to
        the Head of School, University-level disciplinary procedures, and suspension or
        expulsion from the University. The University‟s policy on plagiarism is detailed in
        the Quality Manual
      www.nottingham.ac.uk/quality-manual/assessment/offences.htm



SCCS Guidelines for Referencing in Coursework1

References and a full bibliography in the appropriate format are an essential part of the
scholarly exercise of writing coursework essays, reports and dissertations. Inadequate,
inconsistent or incorrectly formatted referencing will be penalised (see mark scheme for
details).


Plagiarism

Plagiarism is intellectual dishonesty and is unacceptable. The University regards it as a
serious academic offence, and penalties include the awarding of a zero mark for the
piece of coursework concerned or for the entire module. It can also result in a written
warning, suspension or expulsion from your course, or the revoking of the award of your
degree. When you hand in your coursework, you are required to sign the cover-sheet
declaration confirming that you have read the section relating to plagiarism in the
University Regulations and that the essay is your own work. Submission of an electronic
form of assignment with or without a coversheet assumes you have read and complied
with the regulations. All cases of suspected plagiarism will be reported to the Head of the
School for disciplinary action and may be referred to the University Academic Offences
Committee. See the Quality Manual section on Academic Offences for details of the
procedure (www.nottingham.ac.uk/quality-manual/appeals/offences.htm).

Plagiarism is presenting the work of another person as if it were your own. It is
plagiarism to quote another writer directly in your coursework without "quotation marks"
and a reference to the original source, including page numbers. It is also plagiarism to

    Last Modified: 21 August 2008
1




                                                                                          25
Undergraduate Handbook 2008-2009




summarise the views of another writer without attribution, even if you use your own
words. The important thing is never to let it be thought that you are claiming that a
particular position is original to you when it is not, and proper referencing will achieve
this.

Example: This passage on Mao and the Cultural Revolution is a direct quote from Jack
Gray, Rebellions and Revolutions (Oxford: OUP, 1990), pp. 378-9:

       In 1967, after encouraging hopes of a Paris Commune alternative to Party
       dictatorship, he repudiated the Shanghai Paris Commune established in his name,
       and insisted on the restoration of Party authority. At the moment of truth he
       chose the vanguard party. This final failure of nerve provides an a fortiori
       argument that Marxism-Leninism cannot democratize itself.

In your essay you might make a statement like this:

       Mao's failure to follow through with the implementation of the Paris Commune
       model in 1967 showed that the socialist system could not democratize itself.

This is a paraphrase of a specific argument made by another writer, Jack Gray, and must
be footnoted with page numbers as if it were a direct quotation. The same sentence
could be rephrased as:

       As Jack Gray has argued, Mao‟s failure to follow through … etc.

Provided the passage is footnoted with page numbers that would be full and correct
attribution. Anything less could constitute plagiarism.
Tutors (lecturers) will check all pieces of coursework for plagiarism. They may use
Internet search engines and specialist computer software such as “Turnitin” as well as
their own knowledge of the source material to do so. SCCS offers a number of modules
where assessment is 100% by coursework, and convenors of these modules are
particularly vigilant in checking for signs of plagiarism. In most instances plagiarism is
obvious to experienced teaching staff; don‟t take the risk.

Do I need to cite page numbers? There are different conventions among the
academic disciplines that span the China field. Historians would expect to see the page
number cited for any reference, whether a direct quote, data or a paraphrase. In
economics, business and management – and the social sciences generally – only the
journal or book is cited without the page number even for direct quotes, but the style
varies among publications. Since your note taking should include the exact page number
for any quote or data item, citing the page number does not involve much additional
effort and shows desirable accuracy. The SCCS recommends that page numbers are
always cited for direct quotes.


Referencing systems

In your coursework for SCCS modules, you may use either the footnote or the Harvard
in-text referencing systems. You must decide which of these systems to use and then
use it consistently. You cannot mix Harvard-style referencing with footnotes.

Examples of the approved format for notes and bibliography entries are given below. You
should ensure all your references conform to these models. Poorly and incorrectly
formatted referencing will be penalised. References, including those relating to material
on the Internet, will be checked when your coursework is marked, so ensure you keep
an accurate record of page numbers, full publication details, web-page addresses, date




                                                                                             26
Undergraduate Handbook 2008-2009




of access, etc, as you research your essay. It is very time-consuming to find these again
later if you haven't kept careful note of them, and inaccuracies will lose you marks.


Footnote referencing

Footnotes are used to cite the source of direct quotations, indirect quotations or
paraphrases as above, statistics, and other non-obvious facts. (Endnotes may be used
instead of footnotes, but use one format or the other, not a mixture of both.)

What is a non-obvious fact? For example, it is an obvious and well-known fact that Mao
Zedong proclaimed the founding of the People's Republic of China in a speech on 1
October 1949 in Tiananmen Square, so there is no need to footnote it. But if you assert
that Mao made that speech wearing his lucky pants, it would require a footnote telling
the reader where you found this information.

Footnotes count towards the essay word limit. They cannot be used to smuggle in text
which you have edited from the main body of the essay. They can be used for short
explanations of terms or brief asides which would clutter the flow of the essay, but keep
these to a minimum. In general, if the material is not important enough to go into your
text, it is not important enough to put in a footnote, either.

At the end of your essay you should include a full bibliography listing all the books,
articles, etc, which you have consulted. A bibliography is often called a reference list.
You should follow the examples given below when laying out your notes and
bibliography. The key thing to remember about references is that they are there to
enable the reader to find the sources of your information quickly and easily, so clarity
and consistency are the watchwords.


Layout in bibliography

Items in your bibliography should be listed alphabetically by the family name of the
author(s). If the bibliography includes more than one item by the same author, put them
in date order starting with the oldest work. If it includes both single- and co-authored
works by the same writer, list the single-authored ones first in date order, then the co-
authored ones in date order.

Book details should be given in this order: author (family name first), title (in italics or
underlined), place of publication, publisher, and publication date. A hanging indent
paragraph is a common paragraph formatting style. Example:

       Kampen, Thomas, Mao Zedong, Zhou Enlai and the evolution of the Chinese
           Communist leadership, Copenhagen: Nordic Institute of Asian Studies,
           2000.

Article details should be given in this order: author (family name first), title (in inverted
commas), name of journal (in italics or underlined - use the same format as you are
using for book titles), volume and issue number, date of issue (in brackets), and page
numbers on which the article starts and finishes. Example:

       Dirlik, Arif, "Narrativizing revolution: The Guangzhou Uprising (11-13 December
              1927) in workers' perspective", Modern China 23, 4 (October 1997), 363-
              397.




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Chapter in an edited volume: first give the author (family name first) and title (in
inverted commas) of the chapter, then the editor and title of the volume as for books.
Example:

       Strauss, Julia C, "The evolution of Republican government", in Frederic Wakeman
            and Robert L Edmonds (eds.), Reappraising Republican China, Oxford: OUP,
            2000.


Layout in footnotes

You do not need to give full publication details here because they are in your
bibliography. For the first mention of a work, give full details of the author and title (and
the name and issue of the journal for articles), and use a shortened version for all
subsequent mentions. Always give the exact page number or number range for direct
quotations, and give at least a range of pages where you are referring to more than one
passage in a work – do not leave the reader wondering where in an entire book or article
they can find the point to which you have referred. Examples:

       1. Thomas Kampen, Mao Zedong, Zhou Enlai and the evolution of the Chinese
       Communist leadership, 43-4.
       2. Arif Dirlik, "Narrativizing revolution: The Guangzhou Uprising (11-13 December
       1927) in workers' perspective", Modern China 23, 4 (October 1997), 368.
       3. Julia C Strauss, "The evolution of Republican government", in Wakeman and
       Edmonds (eds.), Reappraising Republican China, 118-124.
       And subsequently:
       4. Kampen, Mao Zedong, 67.
       5. Dirlik, "Narrativizing revolution", 372.
       6. Strauss, "Evolution of Republican government", 125.

In footnotes, where you are referring to material that has been quoted in another work,
you should give the original source of the material first, then details of the work in which
it is quoted. Do NOT cite the original source as if it was the source you consulted. That
will be deemed plagiarism because you have not actual read the source. Example as to
how to cite:

       1. Mao Zedong, "A single spark can start a prairie fire" (1930), quoted in
       Jonathan Spence, The Search for Modern China, 622.


Use of ibid. and op.cit.
These are short for "ibidem", meaning "in the same place", and "opere citato", meaning
"in the work cited". In contemporary books and articles these are often avoided. Instead,
an abbreviation of the original footnoted work is used. This is especially useful when you
are editing and perhaps swapping around paragraphs, which risks an ibid, for example,
referring to an incorrect previously referenced work.

Ibid. is useful - where you make two or more consecutive references to a work, instead
of repeating all the details in your footnotes, you can just use ibid. and the page
number/s after the first reference, like this:
        1. Jack Gray, Rebellions and Revolutions, 161.
        2. ibid., 163.
        3. ibid., idem.
The use of “idem” in the example note 3 means the reference is to the same page of the
same work cited in note 2, but most authors these days simply repeat the page number.




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Try to avoid having long strings of ibids at the foot of every page of your essay, as it will
look as if you haven't read many books. Condense them.

As stated above, the use of a shortened version of the original is more common these
days, especially in journals that retain footnotes. For example:
       1. Gray, Rebellions, 161.
       2. Gray, Rebellions, 163.

Op.cit. (“opere citato”, meaning “in the work cited”) is not commonly used any more and
should generally be avoided. If you move sentences and paragraphs around extensively
when editing a section that uses op.cit the likely consequence is a chaotic jumble of out
of sequence or seemingly inaccurate references.


Harvard referencing

This style of referencing is commonly known as in-text referencing. The reference is in
the text rather than in separate notes. It is widely used in the social sciences such as
business, economics, management, psychology, and so on. You may use it for your
essay if you prefer it to the footnote style. It can get messy if your references include
many original documents and less conventional sources, but if you are only referencing
published material, it works well. It must not be mixed with references in footnotes - use
one or the other, but not both. Harvard referencing for the works mentioned above
would look like this in the text of the essay:

       Mao Zedong played a leading role in the CCP's switch to a rural strategy (Kampen
       2000: 43), being one of the first to recognize the futility of persisting with
       disastrous urban insurrections such as the one in Guangzhou in December 1927
       (Dirlik 1997: 368; Strauss 2000: 120).

Harvard referencing requires a different bibliography format or reference list from
footnote referencing and is often called the author-year system. The publication year
must follow the author's name (author-year system). If there is more than one work by
a particular author on the list, use date order starting with the oldest. Here is an
example:

       Dirlik, Arif, 1997, "Narrativizing revolution: The Guangzhou Uprising (11-13
              December 1927) in workers' perspective", Modern China 23, 4 (October),
              363-397.

       Kampen, Thomas, 2000, Mao Zedong, Zhou Enlai and the evolution of the
           Chinese Communist leadership, Copenhagen: Nordic Institute of Asian
           Studies.

With Chinese authors, whichever system of referencing you use, it is advisable to give
the name in full every time, to avoid confusion between authors with the same family
name.


Referencing internet material

The general rule for references to documents, articles or data taken from internet sites is
that you use a form of citation that makes them for others who wish to locate them. In
the text, references should include the author and title of the document, the date, and
the web page address of the document. Examples:




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For footnote-style references:
    1. China Labour Bulletin, "CLB analysis of the new Trade Union Law",
       http://www.china-labour.org.hk, 2002.

For Harvard-style references the in-text citation is rather long:
       (China Labour Bulletin 2002, http://www.china-labour.org.hk)

Because Internet address can be long, it is useful to abbreviate the reference. For
example, you could simply have (CLB, 2002) in the in-text reference or footnote, but
you must ensure full details are in the bibliography, including the abbreviation.

Bibliography entries must include the full web page address of the article or information
and the date on which you accessed it. Examples:

Bibliography entry, footnote-style:
        China Labour Bulletin, "CLB analysis of the new Trade Union Law" (28 February
             2002), http://www.china-labour.org.hk/iso/article_pvadp?article_id=1976,
             accessed 13 March 2004.

Bibliography entry, Harvard-style:
        China Labour Bulletin [CLB], 2002, "CLB analysis of the new Trade Union Law"
             (28 February 2002), http://www.china-
             labour.org.hk/iso/article_pvadp?article_id=1976, accessed 13 March 2004.



Referencing newspaper material

References to newspaper articles generally give only the title of the publication (not the
author or title of the article), the date, and the page number/s. The publication title
should be in italics, like book and journal titles. In the footnote system, a reference
would look like this:
1. South China Morning Post, 31 August 2004, 4.

In the Harvard system, it would look like this:
       The private sector in China is still at a marked disadvantage in terms of access to
       capital, with more than 70% of bank loans still going to state-owned companies
       (South China Morning Post 31 August 2004: 4).

Newspaper articles are not usually listed in the bibliography of either referencing system,
but if you have referred to articles in the same newspaper several times, you can list the
newspaper in the bibliography like this:

South China Morning Post, dates in text.
      Or:
South China Morning Post passim.

"Passim", meaning "here and there", indicates that the publication is mentioned quite
frequently throughout the text.



Referencing sources not published in English

If the title of a work or the name of a publication is not in English, you should provide an
English translation in brackets in both notes and bibliography. For Chinese titles or




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publication names, common practice is to use pinyin only rather than characters.
Increased ease of adding Chinese characters to English language text means that
Chinese characters are more frequently included. SCCS staff vary in their preference for
inclusion or not of Chinese characters.

The basic rule for any Chinese publication – book, article or Internet site – is that you
have sufficient information to enable it to be properly identified and followed up as you
would with an English-language book, article, or Internet site. Here are some examples
of a typical entries in a bibliography or reference list in the Harvard style (use the
examples above for footnotes and in-text citations for how to model the Chinese citation
– they follow the English-language format).

       Li, Jiaju 2005, Shangwu yinshuguan yu jindai zhizhi wenhua de zhuanbo
              (Commercial Press and the dissemination of modern knowledge), Beijing:
              Shangwu yinshuguan.

The same title using pinyin for author (Chinese authors must be listed alphabetically by
family name []) but with characters instead of pinyin for the other details.

       Li, Jiaju (李家驹) 2005, 商务印书馆与近代知识文化的转播 (Commercial Press and the
              dissemination of modern knowledge), 北京: 商务印书馆.

For a journal article, the format again follows the English-language format, as in the
example below. Note that this Chinese journal provided an English-language title for the
article, which is used rather than translate the article title again, though sometimes
these official translations may not be the most accurate.

       Cao, Shuji, 2005, „1959-1961 nian Zhongguo de renkou siwang ji qi chengyin‟
            (English titled given as: „The deaths of China‟s population and its root cause
            during 1959-1961‟), Zhongguo Renkou Kexue (Chinese Journal of
            Population Science), No.1 (February), 14-28.

The same journal item above, but with Chinese characters instead of pinyin in the title of
the article and the journal name.

       Cao, Shuji (曹树基), 2005, „1959~1961年中国的人口死亡及其成因‟ (English titled
            given as: „The deaths of China‟s population and its root cause during 1959-
            1961‟), 中国人口科学 (Chinese Journal of Population Science), No.1
            (February), 14-28.

Chinese articles can be downloaded from the China Academic Journals (CAJ)
database, accessed on campus via IP login or via the eLibrary Gateway.



Using internet material for coursework

If you use internet material in your coursework, remember that it must be listed in your
references and bibliography. The basic rule for any Internet source is that there must be
sufficient information to enable it to be properly identified.

E-JOURNALS

The online editions of scholarly journals have the same status as the print editions.
Articles in them have been subject to peer review (critical analysis by referees and
editors). For referencing and bibliographic practices, there is no difference
between the online e-journal version of the article and the hardcopy paper




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version. It is cited and listed exactly the same. You do not list the very, very long web
address from the full-text journal database.

ONLINE NEWS SITES AND JOURNALISM

Some of these sites are the online editions of daily or weekly newspapers (e.g.
www.guardian.co.uk; www.washingtonpost.com); others might collect news stories
relevant to China from other publications and agencies. Journalistic sources are very useful
to the study of contemporary China, especially on topics where the scholarly literature is
thin, but they are not subject to the same standards of methodology or evidence as
academic works. Specialist country correspondents have to justify the space they get in
their publication by making their reports seem significant, even dramatic, which can lead to
sensationalism. Journalists also tend to re-use old cuttings for background when they
return to a topic, which can mean that errors made in the heat of the moment get
reproduced and end up being accepted as fact just by being repeated often enough.
Journalistic material must therefore be handled critically, and corroborated by more reliable
sources wherever possible.

Some sites offering news stories on China should be treated with particular caution. If you
search the web on China topics, especially any to do with human rights, you are bound to
come across the Epoch Times (http://en.epochtimes.com). This bills itself as a source of
independent and uncensored news about China, but is linked with the Falun Gong
organization, and has a distinct anti-CCP bias. Bear in mind with this and similar sites that
someone is making editorial decisions about which stories to run and which to ignore;
many dwell on bad news about the PRC and material which lends itself to criticism of the
CCP government. This does not necessarily mean the stories are not true, but it does
indicate that they are being chosen with an agenda. It is also important to distinguish
between reportage, which, even when clearly biased or tendentious does give an account of
actual events, and editorials, which reflect the opinions of the writers or the site owners.


NGO SITES

Some of these can be valuable research resources, if handled critically. Factors to consider
when deciding on the reliability of NGO site material include the reputation of the
organization and how transparent it is about running the site and explaining its own
agenda. For example, Amnesty International‟s (www.amnesty.org) research reports are
accepted by the Home Office as evidence in applications for refugee status, so their factual
accuracy can be trusted to a considerable degree. There are one or two other well-
established human-rights organizations which would come into a similar category, e.g.
Human Rights in China (www.hric.com), and Human Rights Watch-Asia (www.hrw.com). If
you are trying to research the enforcement of the one-child policy in China, for instance,
these sites would generally be more reliable than those of campaigning anti-abortion
organizations, such as SPUC.

Campaigning sites such as www.eastturkestan.net, on the ongoing Uyghur Muslim
independence campaign in northwest China, do at least make their intentions and biases
clear. But if you are researching this topic, treat any factual claims made on these sites
with caution and phrase your references to them carefully unless you can find at least one
corroborating source than can be regarded as independent.

WIKIPEDIA

We all use it, but Wikipedia is not a reliable source for academic research, and it should
not appear in your footnotes! The whole point of Wikipedia is that anyone can edit
entries and post whatever they like, although some effort is made to flag entries which
are particularly disputed or felt to be biased. However, the flagging is done by the same




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people as the posting. For example, the Wikipedia site on the Epoch Times, which
appears to be accurate and fairly phrased, is heavily flagged as biased and problematic
by Falun Gong people, who never ignore a media reference to their organization and who
appear to resent being tagged as politically conservative and anti-CCP (they are widely
thought to be both).

If you can find an entry on your research topic where asserted facts are backed by
footnotes, follow up the sources cited in those footnotes instead of relying on the
Wikipedia entry itself. And as with NGO sites, if you cannot find a more reliable
corroborating source, do not hang your whole argument on an unreliable assertion –
phrase references carefully in your coursework to make it clear you are aware of the
problems with the source (this is the meaning of being „critical‟).

PRC GOVERNMENT SITES

These generally have propaganda and an informational function, but they can be useful
in research, at least in giving the CCP party line on issues. Government white papers are
available online, as are the text of many reform-era laws, speeches and writings of top
leaders, and the state-controlled press. While always remaining aware that these
sources are unlikely to dwell on problems that don‟t yet have solutions or anything else
which they think might make the PRC look bad in the eyes of the world, it is not safe to
assume that the truth is the opposite of whatever they say. As with all sources, consider
bias and plausibility, and look for corroboration before relying on any information in
print.

A particular useful PRC site is the National Bureau of Statistics (国家统计局), which has
both a Chinese and English-language web sites (http://www.stats.gov.cn/). You can
access back copies of the Chinese Statistical Yearbook and download tables directly to
Excel for your own data analysis and the drawing of charts. There are also many reports
and analyses of current economic and business conditions. Statistics, however, are not
value free, and the decisions all national statistical bureaux make about how to define
and classify economic and social activity can strongly influence the picture convey by the
numbers.


FEEDBACK TO US

STAFF-STUDENT CONSULTATIVE COMMITTEE

This committee consists of three members of staff including the Chair of the Teaching
Committee and representatives from each undergraduate year. The brief of the
committee is to receive and discuss student feedback regarding courses or any other
matters of concern to students. The committee is very informal and representatives
are encouraged to express frank, constructive and forthright views and opinions.
Matters raised in the committee carry considerable weight and many are reported back
to Staff Meetings and the Director for further action. The existence of this committee
does not mean that you cannot discuss similar matters, particularly if they are of a
personal nature, with your tutor. Rather it allows for more formal feedback on matters
that might affect the student body as a whole. The terms of reference, composition and
administration are as follows:


The purposes of the Undergraduate Staff Student Consultative Committee are:

1.    to ensure that the views of undergraduate students are given proper weight in
      the processes of course and module development in the SCCS.




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Undergraduate Handbook 2008-2009




2.    to ensure that undergraduate students' concerns about the SCCS courses are
      represented to the academic staff throughout the academic year.


The terms of reference are any matters related to teaching and learning that concern
undergraduate students in the School of Contemporary Chinese Studies.

The Committee will meet at a time that will allow feedback to be passed to Staff
Meetings, School Teaching Committee Meetings and Curriculum Review Meetings.
Minutes of meetings of the Committee will be posted on the appropriate Notice Board
within the School.


STUDENT EVALUATION OF TEACHING AND MODULES

The University has a formal mechanism for evaluating the teaching quality of all
members of academic staff. This is called the Student Evaluation of Teaching (SET)
scheme and involves you in filling in a questionnaire at the end of a module or at the
end of the contribution of a particular member of staff to a module. The questionnaire
is composed of some questions asked of all modules in the University, some questions
set by the Institute and some open-ended questions which invite comment. These
questionnaires are evaluated both by the University and the School. Your co-operation
in filling in these questionnaires in a thoughtful manner would be much appreciated.
The module lecturer/s will ask you to fill in another questionnaire dealing with the
structure and content of the module. These questionnaires are independent of the SET
scheme and are used by the School for module evaluation for curriculum development.
These questionnaires are a real opportunity for you to contribute to the development of
teaching and curriculum and, again, your thoughtful, frank and constructive response
is very much appreciated. We will endeavour to give feedback regarding SEM via the
Staff Student Consultative Committee. At the end of your course you will also be
asked to complete another questionnaire dealing with the course as a whole (SEC).


7.ASSESSMENT

The assessment for some modules includes a traditional written examination paper,
taken at the end of the appropriate semester.

Examination timetables are available well in advance and it is your own responsibility
to make sure that you turn up to each paper and the right time and in the right place.
If you do miss a paper „with sufficient cause‟ (i.e. for a good reason, such as il lness),
you should consult the Exams Officer as soon as possible; you will need to fill out the
appropriate form and submit it to the School within seven days ,together with
independent supporting evidence.

Students whose exam scripts are illegible will be invited to type their answers into a
computer under the supervision of the course convenor. They must then undergo an
assessment of their needs by Study Support, which might mean they are required to
use a computer (provided by the University) when sitting all future exams.

PUBLICATIONS OF MARKS

Since First Year (Qualifying) results are not classified there is no official pass list.
However, counseling sessions will be arranged after the results are available so that
tutors can advise students about their progress.




                                                                                        34
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FEEDBACK ON PERFORMANCE

You will receive a great deal of feedback on your performance in essays, seminars and
examinations. This will be positive and constructive in nature.

FEEDBACK ON ASSESSED COURSEWORK

Procedures for returning assessed work will vary according to the numbers on the
module concerned. Coursework will be returned to you personally or returned via the
School Office in International House.

FEEDBACK ON EXAMINATIONS

In addition to the official printout of your results, which will be handed to you at an
individual meeting with your Personal Tutor, module convenors will advertise times
when they will be available to discuss examination performance on individual scripts
with students who are interested in doing so.




                                                                                     35
         Undergraduate Handbook 2008-2009




         MARKING CRITERIA AND GRADES FOR ESSAYS AND EXAMS - HONOURS
         COURSE
         Below are guidelines to the qualities we associate with the different classes in our
         assessment of coursework and exams, and the corresponding marks or grades that will
         be awarded to your work. Only the marks or grades shown can be awarded (e.g. a mark
         of 60 is not allowed, unless it results from a penalty incurred). Within classes, markers
         are encouraged to give the mark/grade(s) shown in bold, where applicable.
CLASS     Mark/Grad    MARKING CRITERIA – ESSAYS/PROJECTS                    MARKING CRITERIA – EXAMS
          e
           100 A++     Outstanding work, going far beyond simply             Goes far beyond simply answering the question,
High                   answering the question. Full achievement of           adding original and scholarly
First      95 A+
                       objectives, coupled with an original and scholarly    insights into the topic(s) addressed, and
           90 A+/A     contribution to the topic(s) addressed. As good a
                       piece of work as could be achieved in the time        based on an encyclopaedic knowledge of
                       available.                                            the facts. As good an answer as could be achieved
                                                                             under examination conditions.

                       Excellent work, worthy of retention for future        A comprehensive, complete and well-written answer
Clear      85 A        reference and application to teaching or research.    that shows a deep understanding of the subject.
First                  Based on critical appraisal of a large volume of      Critical and intelligent use of a wide range of
           80 A/A-     material, engaging with relevant theoretical          relevant material, showing some originality and
                       literature, and showing a deep approach to the        going far beyond lecture/seminar material.
                       subject.
                       Shows critical insight & appreciation of the topic    Perceptive and focused, with good use of relevant
First      75 A-       and associated literature, including relevant         material.    Abundant evidence of background
                       theoretical literature.    Well written & well        research. Well-structured work, with coherent lines
           72 A-/B+    presented. Abundant evidence of background            of   sustained    argument    and     well-balanced
                       research. Conclusions fully justified.                conclusions.
           68 B+       Thorough,     clear     treatment    showing     an   Good understanding of the issues plus a coherent,
                       understanding of the major arguments, facts,          well-read and stylish treatment, but lacking the
Upper      65 B
                       theoretical underpinnings and context. Sound          perception/ originality of a first-class answer.
Second                 and    coherent     conclusions.    Efficient   and   Analytical and critical treatment of material. Must
           62 B-
                       substantial use of literature/data, with no serious   show evidence of background research, going
                       flaws; minor typographical errors are acceptable.     beyond simply reproducing lecture/seminar material.

           58 C+       Pedestrian treatment of wide literature or            An answer with no factual errors, but based largely on
                       database OR adequate treatment of incomplete          lecture material. Little detail or originality, but
           55 C
Lower                  data or literature with little spark or critical      presented in an adequate framework. Lacks evidence
Second     52 C-       insight.     Reproduces material covered in           of significant background research and, while sound,
                       lectures/seminars but adds only a little that         does not penetrate the subject sufficiently, nor display
                       comes from the student‟s own research &               the critical evaluation needed for an upper second.
                       investigation.
           48 D+       Basic approach to a narrow or misguided               Engages with question, but poorly structured answer
                       selection of material. Deficient in background or     based entirely on lecture material or containing
           45 D
                       flawed in arguments. Lines of reasoning not           several important errors of concept and/or fact.
Third      42 D-       sustained and conclusions not supported by the        Overall, concepts are disordered or flawed, factual
                       text/project analysis.                                material is poorly presented and there is only
                                                                             shallow consideration of issues.

           38 D-/F     Adequate effort, but work is shallow and poorly       Some attempt to engage with the question, but with
                       presented and the approach is very basic.             significant errors of content and scope. Poor in
Fail       35 F
                       Lacking in sustained lines of thought or              knowledge, structure and expression. OR rushed
           32 F-       reasoning.    No conclusions or conclusions           answer that is brief (may be in note form), but which
                       incorrect.                                            shows some promise.
           25 X        Inadequate and without any serious scholarly          Inability to engage with the question. Either an
                       content, but with some saving graces.                 answer to an imaginary question, or material
           20 X/X-
                                                                             irrelevant to the question posed.
           15 X-       No adherence to project/essay outline or title.       Insignificant factual material and          no   relevant
                       No clue as to what was required.     Seriously        commentary or analysis of question.
           10 X-/Z+
                       deficient in effort.
           5   Z+      As above, but highly foreshortened and with clear absence of effort.

           0   Z       Copied or plagiarised answer with no intellectual input from the student. Cases of suspected plagiarism
                       will be referred to the Head of School for disciplinary action. OR work penalised for late submission,
                       having been submitted without the granting of a specific dated extension.




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*Cases of suspected plagiarism will be referred to the Head of School for disciplinary
action.


RESIT EXAMINATIONS
The modules that you may be required to resit will be identified for you by the
University Courses Office and you will be notified via the Portal in July. If you fail more
that 40 credits of modules you will always have to resit all failed modules.

Resit exams take place in late August/early September and it is your responsibility to
make sure that you have gathered the required revision materials and are available to
sit the examinations at the time.

EXTENUATING CIRCUMSTANCES

Extenuating Circumstances are factors that may have an adverse impact on the
academic outcome for all or parts (modules) of your course. The University recognises
such factors under the following categories:
      a disability or long-term medical condition
      missing an examination or an assessment
      impaired performance in an examination or an assessment

The following outline the procedures you must follow if you wish to register an
Extenuating Circumstance under each category and the possible implications for
assessments:

A DISABILITY OR LONG-TERM MEDICAL CONDITION
If your have a disability or long-term medical condition, or other circumstances that
are expected to have an impact on your performance in assessment, you should make
the School aware of your situation at the earliest possible opportunity so that
appropriate arrangements can be put in place.
MISSING AN EXAMINATION OR AN ASSESSMENT

If you miss an assessment you must complete an Explanation for Absence from an
Examination / Assessment Form which are available from the School Office. You must,
at the earliest possible opportunity, contact either the School Office or your Personal
Tutor to explain why you are not going to/have not taken it. The form should be
returned to the School Office within seven working days of having missed the
assessment, or as soon as you know that you will miss an assessment. If the form is
not submitted within this period, you will receive a mark of zero for the assessment,
unless there is a good reason for not submitting the form. You should complete section
A of the form and attach any evidence which you have in support of a claim of having
missed an assessment with "sufficient cause" (see below). Please note that a claim of
"sufficient cause" needs to be supported by independent, reliable, documentary
evidence of inability to undertake the assessment at the appropriate time. Candidates
should be aware that the Cripps Health Centre and many other Health Centres will not
normally issue medical certificates retrospectively. The form will be retained and your
extenuating circumstances will be taken into account at the appropriate Examiners
Board or Academic Board Assessment Committee (confidentiality, if requested, will be
observed in this process)




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IMPAIRED PERFORMANCE IN AN EXAMINATION OR AN ASSESSMENT

If you attempted an assessment or examination but wish to claim that there were
extenuating circumstances (examples of extenuating circumstances and appropriate
documentary evidence are given below) that affected your performance an Extenuating
Circumstances Form should be completed. Forms are available from the School Office.
It is essential that you submit claims for extenuating circumstances promptly, and
normally within 7 working days of the circumstances arising. The absolute latest
acceptable date is 7 working days after the scheduled completion date of the last
component of assessment for a module. The only circumstance in which a late claim
may be accepted is if you can provide an acceptable explanation of why you were
unable to make a claim earlier. Any claims for extenuating circumstances on medical
grounds must be accompanied by a medical certificate or letter from the Health Centre,
or appropriate medical adviser. A relatively mild illness which will not require medical
intervention (eg a cold) will not normally be regarded as an extenuating circumstance
and you should be aware that, outside the exam period, Cripps Health Centre will not
normally issue medical certificates for an illness of less than 7 days. Also the Health
Centre will not normally issue a medical certificate retrospectively.

When you have completed the form it must be signed by a member of the School staff.
If you have requested an extension to the deadline for handing in a piece of
coursework, then the extension period will be formally agreed. Otherwise the form will
be retained and your extenuating circumstances will be taken into account at the
appropriate Examiners Board or Academic Board Assessment Committee
(confidentiality, if requested, will be observed in this process)


EXAMPLES OF SUFFICIENT CAUSE/EXTENUATING CIRCUMSTANCES


NB THIS LIST GIVES EXAMPLES ONLY AND IS NOT EXHAUSTIVE
      Long-Term Illness. Evidence: medical certificate or letter from Health Centre
       or appropriate medical adviser. The document must be on headed paper,
       signed and dated. In the case of mental health illness, medical
       certificate/letter and/or letter from University Counselling Service.
      Short-Term Illness. Evidence: medical certificate or letter from Health Centre or
       appropriate medical adviser. The document must be on headed paper, signed
       and dated. If it is not possible to get this documentation due to the short-term
       nature of the illness, the student should contact the School or Undergraduate
       Office (Examinations) if possible on the day of the assessment.
      Bereavement where there is a demonstrably close relationship. Evidence:
       death certificate or letter confirming the death.
      Acute Personal/Emotional Circumstances. Evidence: supporting evidence from
       The University Counselling Service; medical evidence.
      Hospitalisation. Evidence: Medical letter/certificate/record from appropriate
       medical adviser.
      Family illness. Evidence: Medical certificate/letter from appropriate medical
       adviser (e.g. family doctor).
      Victim of Crime. Evidence: police crime reference number.
      Representing the University at a national event or involvement in some other
       significant prestigious event (including religious festivals). Evidence: letter of
       confirmation from the relevant body involved in organising the event.


In addition to the form, you may supply letters to explain your circumstances, and you
are encouraged to provide as much information as you wish if you think it will benefit
your case.




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It is particularly important to have adequate supporting documentation if your
Extenuating Circumstances require an extension beyond the end of a semester or an
academic year, as these will normally have to be ratified by the University
Undergraduate Assessment Committee. Common problems in cases which come before
the Committee are that a long-term medical condition is only confirmed in a medical
note dated near the start of the illness, without subsequent notes confirming the
duration of the illness; both are needed to substantiate a case. It should also be noted
that relationship breakdown in and of itself does not represent Extenuating
Circumstances. It would come into that category where its adverse effects on a
student‟s ability to work were confirmed in a doctor‟s note or documentation from the
Counselling Service, for example, or where it resulted in temporary homelessness
and/or interruptions to childcare arrangements.

Students often assume that where they have registered Extenuating Circumstances
with the School, if they then under-perform in assessments, a certain number of marks
will be added to reflect the mark they would have been expected to get. This is not the
case, however. Extenuating Circumstances are taken into account in cases of
borderline marks, and will often result in an Examination Board opting for the higher
side of the borderline. But they will not result in any automatic amendment of the
actual marks achieved. This being the case, if you are feeling seriously ill or otherwise
unfit to undertake an examination or finish a piece of coursework by the deadline, it is
nearly always best to take the option of a resit as a first attempt in the summer (for
exams) or an extension (for coursework) rather than struggling on as best you can,
because the marks you are able to achieve in an impaired performance will be the ones
which go on your record and count towards your final class of degree.

CONFIDENTIALITY

When you discuss any kind of problems or Extenuating Circumstances with your
Personal Tutor or any other member of staff, you can be assured that they will treat
what you say in confidence and will not pass the information on to any third party
without your permission. In sensitive cases, therefore, provided the tutor is aware of
the detailed nature of your extenuating circumstances, what is filled in on the form
which may be circulated to your other module convenors and placed in your file need
not contain details which you or e.g. family members would not want to be generally
known. On very rare occasions, the Extenuating Circumstances may arise from events
so distressing that the student does not wish any indication of them to be made on a
form which may be seen by a number of people around the University. In such a case,
the student can include details of the Extenuating Circumstances in a letter which is
passed, in a sealed envelope, to the Chair of the Undergraduate Assessment
Committee, and which will only be read by the Chair and one other member of the
Committee. The resealed envelope will then be kept secure by the University until the
student graduates, whereupon it will be destroyed. It should be stressed that cases
requiring this level of confidentiality are wholly exceptional, but if you think it might
apply to your circumstances, talk to your Personal Tutor about the procedure.

RIGHT OF APPEAL

The University operates a range of procedures covering the rights of students to
appeal against decisions of committees or other bodies concerned with academic
matters. Full details are published in the Quality Manual on the University web site
www.nottingham.ac.uk/quality-manual/appeals/appeals.htm

   Against degree classification

   Against a decision to terminate a course on the grounds of academic failure




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   Against a decision of an Academic Offences Committee (i.e. about cheating or
    plagiarism)

   Against an academic progress decision




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8. STUDY SKILLS

MANAGING YOUR TIME

In higher education, you will be expected to take responsibility for your own studies and
learning. Your lecturers and tutors will provide a framework of study through lectures
and seminars but you need to learn to make the most of opportunities presented to you.
An important part of this learning process is time management. Much of your time at
university will be unsupervised and you will be confronted with essay deadlines and
examination dates. Many essay deadlines will be close together so you must learn to
manage your time effectively to meet these important dates. First make a note of all
such dates in your diary and/or year planner and plan a timetable of private study for
your tasks for the coming semester.

Below are a few key points your may wish to consider concerning time management:

      Get the complete picture – the first step in organising your study time is to set
       out your work commitments explicitly so that you know what you have to do,
       what you want to do and how little time there is to do them

      Prioritise – most of the time, you will probably do this unconsciously anyway, but
       sometimes it can help to rate your commitments in some kind of order of
       importance.

      Set goals – it is usually easier and more motivating to work towards clear and
       achievable objectives. This helps to focus your efforts and gives you a good
       excuse to construct a personalised reward system.


MAKING NOTES

The ability to make effective and useful notes is in fact one of the most valuable skills
that you can learn as a student. There are in fact four good reasons why students
make notes:

      Organisation – the process of making notes can help to structure and organise
       chunks of information into more easily understood patterns and maps of
       knowledge.

      Knowledge retention – the very act of making notes in your own words can be a
       very effective and active learning process which helps you to remember and
       recall ideas, concepts, theories and examples.

      Preparation – notes can be used in the preparation of essays, projects,
       presentation, examinations, and subsequent lectures and seminars.

      Reference – notes can act as a reliable reference point for all the important
       material that is covered during the course of a module.

Notetaking in Lectures

Perhaps the most important notes that you will have to make are those initially taken
in your lectures. There are two main ways that students tend to approach the problem
of making lecture notes. One is to copy down almost everything that the lecturer both
says and displays in the hope of making sense of everything after the lecture. The
other is to try and understand what the lecturer is saying as they say it, and then to
make brief notes or summaries of what has been understood during pauses in the
delivery. Neither method is necessarily better than the other. The choice of method
depends to a large extent on the particular skills and needs of the individual.




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The important points to remember are that you want a note making system that is
efficient, concise and useful.


READING EFFECTIVELY

During your course it will soon become apparent why studying for a degree is called
„reading‟ for a degree. Do not be daunted by long reading lists, pick a few of the most
relevant books and articles for the topic. Effective reading depends on the nature of
the material you are studying. Generally you can get the „gist‟ of the text without
processing every single word. With practice you can speed up your reading by
increasing your word span to five or six words, and increase your reading rate to
several hundred words per minute.


PREPARING AND WRITING ESSAYS/REPORTS ETC.

The following are the main points to bear in mind when writing essays and reports
(and, in most cases, answering examination questions).

      Relevance - have you fully understood and dealt with all aspects of the
       question? Make sure your answer is focused on the question.

      Information content - it is important to condense and summarise effectively
       both ideas and information from other relevant sources as an aid and/or
       precursor to, or an element of, the analytical and critical component of the
       essay. The descriptive element should not, however, dominate the essay.

      References and bibliography - when writing essays it is important to distinguish
       between your own ideas and those of others. It is also important to show the
       reader that you are using other academic sources as a basis for your work and
       that you have a firm grounding in the literature relevant to the topic of the
       essay. All these aspects of your writing can be dealt with by using a referencing
       system and constructing a bibliography for inclusion in your essay.

      Analysis and criticism - this is usually the most important part of an essay - it is
       simply not enough to describe the literature. Your essays should contain an
       analysis of relevant information and must be critical, thoughtful pieces of work.
       To get the highest marks the amount of analysis and criticism must be
       substantial and of high quality.

      Logical development, structure and clarity - all the above advice is rendered
       redundant if your arguments and ideas are not presented in a clear, structured
       and concise manner.

      Presentation - all coursework must be word-processed. The University offers
       free access to word processing facilities, although you will be charged for
       printing. You will be given a username for access to central computing facilities
       (including email and the internet).


PREPARING FOR EXAMINATIONS

Most formal examinations are 2 hours long and you will have to provide essay type
answers. The format of examination papers can vary by module however. The module
convenor will inform you of the paper format at the start of the module, and any past




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papers are available on the university web site.     In preparing for examinations you
should bear in mind the following points:

      Examination questions will assume that you have knowledge of the whole
       module

      You should not assume that examination questions will correspond to individual
       lecture topics; indeed, most questions will require you to integrate knowledge
       and ideas from several lectures and other sources.


      Some questions may not relate to material specifically covered in lectures and
       may be based on material included in directed reading.


PRESENTATIONS


For many of the modules, student presentations in seminars and tutorials represent an
important component of the required work. Preparing and delivering presentations are
also an excellent way of organising and learning complex material. The ability to stand
in front of a room of people and make yourself understood will additionally prove
valuable outside of the University when applying for jobs and in your wider career.

Preparation

Whilst no two presentations are the same, below are some general issues to consider:

      Establish the aims of your presentation - this will help to determine the content
       of the presentation. Are you intending to inform or persuade? If it is the latter,
       emphasis will typically be on why you did things that way, rather than simply
       describing what you did. If you haven't been given a remit - and it is important
       to read module outlines thoroughly to determine whether this is the case - then
       try to think what would be of most interest to your audience.

      Identify the key points which you want to communicate to your audience - it
       may be useful to start here and plan your presentation around these points.
       It is easy to lose the main points if you don't highlight them - and there will
       be little chance of your audience discovering them for themselves.

      Plan around the time limit - class time is usually limited and presentations are
       typically very closely timed. It is important that you practice the art of saying
       what you want to say in a limited time period. Moreover, this should also help
       you to identify and focus on what is important and what can be left out. If there
       are other groups presenting at the same time, it might be useful to think about
       how your presentation will stand out amongst these in order to make it
       interesting and entertaining for the audience.


      Know your audience - this is the key to good presenting. Pitch your information
       and delivery at the right level - not too difficult and not too easy. Also, knowing
       how many people you are to face can help to calm your nerves.




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STRUCTURING YOUR PRESENTATION

All presentations should have a beginning, a middle and an end. This may sound
obvious, but you would be surprised how many people launch straight in to the subject
without an introduction, and how many finish off without summing up. It may also be
easier for you to plan and deliver the presentation when it is split into sections as
follows:

      Introduction - it is important to introduce yourself (and your group if you are
       working in a team) since this is a good way of starting and it will help to calm
       you down and get into your stride.

      Overview - it is also useful to give an outline of what is included in your
       presentation when you begin, how it will run, and who will speak about what.
       This gives signposts to your audience so that they can follow what you are
       saying, and see how it is fitting into the whole. It also lets them know how far
       you have got and what is still left for you to cover.

      Key Issues/topics - this should be the most interesting part of the presentation.
       It makes sense to structure the main part of your presentation around a
       number of key points or topics. These points should be clear and they should
       follow a logical and consistent pattern. It helps if from time to time you refer to
       the overall structure of your presentation so that the audience knows where you
       are in your talk.

      Review - it is a good idea to round up the main points that you have made in
       order to reiterate what you feel the audience should have understood.


      Conclusion - you should always offer some kind of a conclusion to your talk,
       either in terms of drawing implications from what you have said, or developing
       plans for the future.
DELIVERY

In making presentations, how you say things matters as much as what you actually
say. Presentations are dependent on your skills as an orator in helping them to be
interesting and informative. Points to remember include:

      Speak slowly, clearly and audibly - it may seem to you as if you are shouting,
       but it is much better to be louder than necessary than for no one to hear. Do
       not be afraid to take pauses to add weight to what you are saying, although
       admittedly this is easier said than done and takes practice over time.

      Don't rely on notes - you should aim to know your presentation as much as
       possible, although remembering it parrot fashion is not necessary. It is perfectly
       OK to use notes as prompts to keep you on track, but remember that you
       should always avoid reading directly from them. Reading lends the delivery an
       inferior tone compared with speaking or presenting. It also focuses you on the
       script rather than the audience. Notes on cards with keywords are more
       effective than a full script as they force you to think about and process what you
       are saying. Alternatively, many speakers now use bullet point visuals as a
       structural and content guide to themselves as well as for their audience.

      Use eye contact - always try and maintain eye contact with your audience.
       Think how it feels to suddenly have someone's eyes on you: you sit up and take
       notice. The same applies to your audience if you can use this tactic when you




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       are presenting. It will also help you to be heard, and it will allow you to keep an
       eye on the response of your audience. Are they interested? Bored? Comatose?

      Be aware of your body language - your physical demeanour speaks volumes. If
       you slouch, shuffle your feet, pace the room, wring your hands, fiddle with your
       clothes or pick your nose then these all send signals to the audience about your
       enthusiasm, nerves and even your self-esteem. Try to avoid distracting
       mannerisms: think what you look like when you stand in front of an audience.

   Is this the best image to project? Run to time -a good presentation is succinct, to
   the point and does not overrun. You will need to pace yourself through the
   presentation. Make sure that you have spent enough time on the main points so
   that they have been sufficiently covered. By practicing beforehand you should
   discover which parts you need to cut down on and which points you can expand.
   Don't try to say everything. You should not be in a position where you have to be
   called to a halt midway through a sentence because you have not finished in time.
   This simply shows poor preparation on your part.

      Visual Aids - visual aids, such as PowerPoint presentations. posters or OHP
       slides may be used to help convey ideas and information in a way which is more
       easily understood by your audience. You will often be called upon to use various
       visual aids during presentations.

GROUP PRESENTATIONS

The important thing to remember with group presentations is that it is the group which
should present. It may be tempting to let someone experienced with public speaking
do all the talking but ultimately it is you who will fail to develop the requisite skills.
Some lecturers now specifically look for group participation, and since all of you will
get a shared mark from the presentation it is only fair to share the pleasure! Some
other points to bear in mind when presenting as a group are:

      Practice as a group - it is all very well getting your section right, but if you don't
       know who you follow, where they will be standing or sitting what your cue is,
       and who follows you, the total impression will be of a poor presentation.

      Even when not presenting, you should be involved - if you have had your turn
       it's easy to turn off, drop out, and let your gaze wander round the room. It is
       distracting for the audience who may focus their attention on you rather than on
       the presenter. Concentrate on what each person is saying and be ready to step
       in if they falter. Most of all, don't start talking to your co-presenters in the
       background.


      Think about the team's image - there is no need to form a queue of presenters,
       you are not waiting for a bus! Try to arrange a group of chairs so those not
       presenting are out of the way, but are still involved. Remember that the way
       the group is dressed will also have an impact on the audience.




NERVES

Many students are nervous making presentations, and whilst nerves can be valuable
in giving your presentation an edge, they can also prove debilitating if not controlled.
Some ways to lessen the impact of nerves include:




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      Being organised - good preparation and organisation goes a long way to
       reducing anxiety Make sure that you have all the visual aids and other materials
       that you need and don't lose them. Think of things that can go wrong and make
       contingency plans.

      Think success - visualise yourself in the room giving a successful presentation.
       Think of role models, people you have thought of as good presenters and try to
       copy what they do.

As a final point, however you present and however your presentation is going, always
try to maintain your enthusiasm. After all, if you are not interested in what you are
taking about, how can you expect your audience to be?



DISSERTATIONS

The Dissertation forms a very important part of the final year assessment. You will be
provided with guidance and handbook/s during the second year.

GROUP WORKING


Considerable emphasis is placed on developing your skills in team-working. As a result
it is likely that you will often find yourself working in groups with other students.

Much of the group work that you will undertake will be assessed in some way (usually
by way of a group report and/or presentation), and it is likely that it will contribute to
your assessment. It is therefore important that you learn how to organise yourself and
your group in order to get the most from the situation and to produce the best work of
which you are capable. Ideally, groups should work as a team in a synergistic fashion:
the capabilities of the team exceeding the sum of those of their individual members.




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9. YOUR RESPONSIBILITIES – CHECKLIST

      Checking announcements – email and post

You must check the announcements on the academic notice board outside School Office
(Room E06), in International House on a regular basis. You must also check your e-
mail regularly.

Department communications, including information about the year abroad, will
not be sent to your college address.

      Checking Web-Ct

If your teachers have told you that they will put course information on WebCt you will
need to check this regularly.

      Informing the department if you are ill or absent for good reason.


      Providing mitigating circumstances evidence for Boards of Examiners

If you have serious medical or other personal problems which may affect your academic
performance it is your responsibility to draw this to the Department‟s attention at the
earliest possible opportunity.

      Submitting assessments

All assessments must be submitted by the due date as specified in the module outline.
However, you may apply to the Head of the Teaching and Learning Committee for an
extension if you are ill or have another good reason.

Assessments will not be accepted by e-mail.

      Attendance at examinations

You must attend all assessments in-class tests and oral and written examinations
timetabled.




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