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					 DISTRICT OF WEST VANCOUVER
SHORELINE PRESERVATION PLAN,
      BRITISH COLUMBIA

      DECEMBER 14, 2007




          Presented To:



west vancouver
   THE WATERFRONT COMMUNITY


    District of West Vancouver
     3755 Cypress Bowl Road
      West Vancouver, B.C.
              V7S 3E7




           Prepared by:




                          118 Garden Avenue,
                          North Vancouver, B.C V7P 3H2
                          Tel: 604.983.3111 Fax: 604.983.3454

                          Contact: Scott Christie
                          Foreshore File No.: P-2949
FORESHORE


                                       EXECUTIVE SUMMARY


        This document represents a Shoreline Preservation Plan (SPP) to address short and long term
damage to the District of West Vancouver’s (DWV) waterfront. The SPP accomplishes this by developing
near shore and subtidal works that reduce environmental and physical shoreline damage caused by such
factors as:

               urbanization and shoreline planning methods of the past,
               climate change and its effect of raising sea levels,
               waves driven by storm events and increased ship traffic, and,
               interruption of the upland and marine sediment transport systems.

       The SPP is based on a wide variety of information and physical works including:

               planning reports dating back to 1963,
               leadership and initiatives shown by DWV Council resolutions and directives,
               technical and physical support by DWV staff and Engineering Advisory Committees,
               regulatory agency support through the approval of shoreline preservation pilot projects, and
               construction of eight shoreline preservation pilot projects

       A key element in the formulation of the SPP was the information provided by the 2005 Engineering
Advisory Committee (EAC) report that comprehensively brought together the ideas of the past 30 years of
planning reports to develop a Shoreline Plan Action List. The SPP has adopted and executed on several of
the Action List items identified by the report.

      2006/07 saw the successful planning, construction and completion of eight pilot projects along the
West Vancouver shoreline from the mouth of the Capilano River to Navvy Jack Point. The goals
accomplished by each pilot project included increased wave protection, reduced shoreline erosion, habitat
enhancement and improved public access and awareness as to the importance of the shoreline to the
community.

        In a single 2007 rainfall event the MacDonald Creek bypass produced over 100 truck loads of sand,
gravel and cobble which was prevented from being directed straight out into deep water by a series of pilot
project structures. Components of these recovered sediments have subsequently been distributed along the
shore by wave and tidal action where other pilot project components directed and retained portions of these
materials along the upper beach. Areas of the shore that were continually losing material now have an
anthropogenic mechanism to allow retention of natural sediments to begin the process towards a balanced
system of sediment transport.

        The rocks and materials used to build pilot project elements were recovered from excavations
within the DWV and Sea to Sky Highway corridor. Rather than being used as fill or wasted at offshore
ocean disposal sites these materials became the sediment deflectors, wave trips and productive habitat
features of the pilot projects. The result has been the creation of more than 2,000 square metres of new
stable habitat surface area for species such as barnacles whose naupliar masses (larvae) and exuviae
provide an important food source for juvenile salmon. Post construction surveys indicate a barnacle
population increase on the order of 30,000,000 individuals in the first 6 months that is directly attributable
to pilot project structures. Increases in plant and algal life have also occurred with benefits arising to
rockweed, green string lettuce, bull and broad bladed kelps, sea lettuce and eelgrass.
                                                     -i-
FORESHORE



        Pilot project changes to the mouth of Lawson Creek
have provided wave protection and a more “fish friendly”
approach to the creek. Where salmon returns were in the “ones”
in past years they are now counted in the tens with over 42
salmon having been caught, tagged and managed by the WV
Streamkeeper       Society    as    of    December       2007
(www.streamkeepers.westvan.org). Salmon Numbers 39, 40
and 41 are shown at right .

        Plant and animal populations are expected to increase
over the next one to two years as the physical structure of the
pilot projects stabilize and species competition for the new
habitat reaches a balance. While the work required to quantify
the impact to fish and birds was beyond the scope of the pilot
projects, the measured increases in plant life and encrusting
species provides qualitative proof that the pilots have enhanced
opportunities for species of plants and animals along the entire
food chain.

        The Phase 1 pilot projects have demonstrated measurable positive impacts to the West Vancouver
shoreline. Material from MacDonald and Lawson Creeks has been redirected to bring more balance to the
erosion and accretion forces along the shore. Within the pilot projects zones of influence shoreline wave
protection has been accomplished at Capilano Groyne, Totem Groyne, Ambleside Pier, and along the shore
from Lawson Pier to Navvy Jack Point. All of the pilot projects have resulted in net gains to the
environment and increased public awareness and interaction with the shore.

         The success of the eight pilot projects was the first phase in the SPP’s multi-year program of
shoreline enhancement and preservation. The next goals of the SPP include additional near shore intertidal
pilot structures at Lawson Park, Navvy Jack Point, Marr Creek and sections of the shoreline from Navvy
Jack Point to Dundarave Pier. Major projects have also been identified and developed based on the
successes of the first eight pilots and include subtidal works located offshore from Lawson Pier, Navvy
Jack Point and along the shore form Navvy Jack Point to Dundarave Pier.

        The 2005 EAC report identified the importance of having a list of long and short term projects to
restore and enhance the West Vancouver shoreline. The SPP’s first phase of pilot projects and those yet to
be executed represent goals that are Specific, Measurable, Attainable, Realistic and Timely - SMART. In
this regard the SPP identifies projects and funding requirements that must be accomplished to develop the
building blocks necessary to create a sustainable West Vancouver shoreline.




                                                  - ii -
FORESHORE




                                                         TABLE OF CONTENTS

                                                                                                                                        Page
Executive Summary..........................................................................................................................i

Table of Contents........................................................................................................................... iii

1       Introduction.............................................................................................................................1

2       Shoreline Preservation Plan – The SPP Is Underway.............................................................2

3       First Phase Pilot Project Status – 2006/07..............................................................................3
           3.1 Pilot Project Upgrades...............................................................................................3


4       Next Phase Pilot Projects – 2008............................................................................................4

5       Next Phase Major Projects – 2008..........................................................................................6

6       Monitoring the SPP Pilots ......................................................................................................6

7       SPP Scheduling – Timing is Everything.................................................................................7

8       Next Phase Pilot and Major Project Budget Planning ............................................................7

9       Summary.................................................................................................................................8

Appendix 1 – Why West Vancouver Shoreline Planning

Appendix 2 – 2005 Engineering Advisory Committee Action List

Appendix 3 – Pre Construction Layouts of 2006/07 Pilot Projects

Appendix 4 – Environmental Results of 2006/07 Pilot Projects

Appendix 5 – Next Phase Pilot and Major Project Drawings




                                                                         - iii -
FORESHORE

                                  DISTRICT OF WEST VANCOUVER
                                 SHORELINE PRESERVATION PLAN,
                                       BRITISH COLUMBIA

1    Introduction
        The northern shoreline of Burrard Inlet’s Outer Harbour region represents almost 30 kilometres of
foreshore along the District of West Vancouver in British Columbia. Despite its’ close ties to the waters of
Burrard Inlet the 2005 EAC Report found that the community of West Vancouver has no long term action
plan for the protection of this prized resource. In fact, the “recommendations from 50 years of studies and
reports on the coastal geomorphologic and biological processes occurring along the shoreline of West
Vancouver have generally not been implemented”. The result has been “an accelerated erosion of the
shoreline, diminished natural habitat for fish, birds and aquatic plants, compromised visual quality of the
shoreline and a reduction of public access to the foreshore” (2005 EAC report).




        Long term planning of coastal shorelines requires a regional approach and in many instances is beyond
the capacity of the primary stakeholder (for example the DWV). In addition, shoreline issues are usually the
result of a long history of a variety of factors that have become entrenched such as urbanization, development
of vessel traffic systems and or construction of large long lived facilities, see Appendix 1. While these factors
may seem daunting in the short term it is the targets set by the long term approach that will enable success.
There are no quick fixes. Any long term plan to repair shoreline damage must consider the visions, concerns,
suggestions and recommendations of the involved stakeholders. To this end the long term plan should ensure
that:

         community assets are directed effectively toward the long term goals,
         current and future goals are not lost and they link to other environmental initiatives,
         a regional approach to shoreline management is undertaken,
         environmentally sensitive areas are protected and enhanced,
         regulatory processes enhance project design and speed approval,
         community awareness and participation is elevated,
         it produces scientific and technical data to support authorities’ requirements,
         educational programs are developed for young people,
         it identifies, protects and enhances wildlife opportunities,
         conservation plans for fresh and marine environments are linked to the foreshore,
         the effects of upland development on beach stability are monitored,
         communication with community decision-makers about the state of the plan are maintained,
                                                      -1-
FORESHORE

        stakeholders are notified (DWV, DFO, EC, NWPD etc...),
        impacts of anthropogenic wave generated erosion are addressed,
        storm water upland discharges are managed with respect to shoreline processes,
        protocols related to emergency responses including extreme weather events are developed,
        specific projects are reviewed with respect to the SPP,
        identify preferred modes of shoreline protection,
        best management practices are developed and executed for shoreline works,
        processes are developed to better predict erosion events to avoid emergency responses,
        regional planning is more proactive,
        opportunities for shoreline protection such as pilot projects are acted upon,
        larger projects are developed using the information learned from the pilot projects,
        monitoring programs are maintained to measure the effectiveness of the pilot projects,
        severe short-term erosion, as well as chronic erosion


2    Shoreline Preservation Plan – The SPP Is Underway
        The SPP represents the “Action” required to develop a sustainable West Vancouver waterfront. To
that end several elements of the SPP have already been accomplished or are underway. Of particular note are:

        the July 5, 2004 District of West Vancouver Council motion, “Council authorize the
        formation of an EAC subcommittee to prepare a report to the EAC with recommendations
        on action that can be taken by the Municipality to reduce erosion, preserve habitat and best
        manage maintenance costs for the Ambleside and Dundarave waterfront areas.”,
        the Long Term Shoreline Planning Framework document produced in 2005 by the
        Engineering Advisory Committee (EAC) Report,
        the April 4, 2005 District of West Vancouver Council motion, “Council direct staff to
        review the Ambleside-Dundarave Long Term Shoreline Planning Framework study in
        conjunction with the Engineering Advisory Committee and report back, within six months,
        on the development of a three year plan to begin implementation of the recommendations in
        the subject report”.,
        a move from study to action in November 2006 by the execution of the first phase of pilot
        projects along the West Vancouver shoreline to improve wave protection and habitat
        opportunities,
        the development of monitoring methodologies to measure and track the processes taking
        place along the West Vancouver shoreline, and,
        the creation of a website (www.westvanshoreline.ca) by the West Vancouver Shoreline
        Preservation Society (WVSPS) to provide information to the public on shoreline initiatives
        and their status.

        The SPP like any long term plan must have the opportunity to adjust, especially when considering
elements as variable as the environment and shoreline evolution. It must be able to span generations and take
advantage of new information. Where the 2005 EAC’s Long Term Planning Framework provides guidance
the SPP’s identifies tangible projects that are Specific, Measurable, Attainable, Realistic and Timely
(SMART). In addition to the action plan list of 32 items (see Appendix 2) the 2005 EAC report recommended
that the DWV:

        formulate a specific Three Year Initiative “Focus on the Shoreline” with the goal of
        addressing knowledge gaps and advancing shoreline pilot projects, and,
                                                    -2-
FORESHORE

        create a specific project budget for this initiative with a 50% allocation for advancing the
        knowledge base and the remaining 50% to fund tangible work to reduce maintenance costs
        and to construct pilot projects.


3    First Phase Pilot Project Status – 2006/07
       The first phase of pilot projects have been a success. While the projects were incremental in
development (limited to match available budget and materials) they were built to provide maximum benefit
and information to support subsequent projects. Detailed information on the first phase pilot projects can be
found in the following Appendices:

        Appendix 3 – Pre Construction Layouts of 2006/07 Pilot Projects
        Appendix 4 – Environmental Results of 2006/07 Pilot Projects

       All eight pilot projects resulted in net gains in habitat with a total increase in stable hard substrate
surfaces of over 2,000 square metres. The stable surfaces allow biota to attach and prevent their being crushed
between a “rock and a hard place” which is common with unstable substrates that move under the influence of
wave energy. Barnacles populations saw an estimated increase in 30,000,000 individuals over the past
growing season. Similar opportunities for other encrusting organisms and algae were also noted.

        Heavy rainfall events throughout the winter
resulted in significant volumes of sediments being
delivered to the foreshore from West Vancouver streams
and creeks. In one rain event alone over 100 truck loads
of material was deposited at the mouth of the MacDonald
Creek Bypass. Those materials were subsequently moved
by highwater storm driven waves along the beach where
pilot project features built into the beach prevented their
immediate loss into deep waters. The nature of these
sediments ranges from fine sand up to large boulders and
can often be differentiated from existing beach sediments
by their “just cleaned look” having been tumbled down
the creeks and streams.

       Much of the measurable success of the pilot projects was the result of their being constructed early in
the winter season of 2006. This timing allowed their effect on sediment deposition by local streams during
heavy rain events, common in the winter season, to be monitored at the earliest of stages. In addition the
presence of the pilot project features in early spring allowed maximum colonization by biota to occur so that
low tide monitoring could be accomplished during the day time low tides of the summer months.


3.1 Pilot Project Upgrades

       Over the past year, monitoring of the 2006/07 pilots has identified additional cost efficient
opportunities to further enhance the wave protection and habitat values of these first projects. These
enhancements include the adjustment of a few rocks already present onsite or the addition of specific sized
materials. In all cases the upgrades can be planned to take advantage of resources mobilized for works
planned in 2008. A description of the upgrades and their associated costs are provided in Table 1.
                                                     -3-
FORESHORE


                                                                    TABLE 1

                                        WEST VANCOUVER SHORELINE PRESERVATION PLAN
                                                FIRST PHASE PILOT PROJECT UPGRADES
                                                                                                                  Estimated
              Location                                      Description of Project                                  Cost

          Totem Groyne      - placement of boulders or cobbles to create drift sill to run along shallow          $4,000.00
                              subtidal contour, length dependent on budget
                            - provide toe to stabilize beach sediments, flatten beach profile and
                              increase biodiversity

          Capilano Groyne   - placement of boulders or cobbles to create drift sill to run along shallow          $3,000.00
                              subtidal contour, length dependent on budget
                            - provide toe to stabilize beach sediments, flatten beach profile and
                              increase biodiversity

          Ambleside Pier    - adjust location of boulders to optimize drift sill effects at culvert opening        $600.00
                            - further improve sediment transport effects and habitat opportunities

          Lawson Pier       - shallow sloped tombola hump built with rock at low water/shallow subtidal           $8,000.00
                              immediately east and offshore of pier
                            - further improve sediment transport effects and habitat opportunities

          Lawson Creek      - addition of properly graded rocks not available during first phase pilot projects   $1,500.00
                            - increase size of low water drift sill at offshore end of creek delta
                            - increase stability of creek mouth features and habitat opportunities for
                              riparian vegetation
                            - prevent loss to deep water of creek sediments

          18th Street       - addition of boulders along base of seawall                                          $2,500.00
                            - improve wave protection and sediment trap efficiency

          MacDonald Creek   - targeted placement and addition of boulders                                         $1,200.00
          Bypass            - enhance effects of 2006 pilot, wave protection, shoreline stabilization
                            - improve near shore sediment transport

          MacDonald Creek   - adjustment of boulders at creek mouth                                                $800.00
                            - improve "fish friendly" nature of creek mouth




4    Next Phase Pilot Projects - 2008
        Information generated from the construction and monitoring of the first phase pilot projects including
habitat benefits of certain designs, geotechnical conditions of underlying beach sediments and observed effects
of the new structures on wave transmission and sediment transport were used to optimize the next phase of
pilot projects planned for 2008 and beyond. Each of the 2008 SPP pilot projects have been developed to
provide long term benefits in the areas of:

        shoreline stabilization and wave protection,
        improved sediment transport to balance erosion forces,
        habitat enhancement,
        continuity and synergy with 2006/07 pilots, and,
        information to build confidence in the success of larger more complex shoreline protection
        projects.

     A description of the new SPP pilot projects beginning in 2008 is provided in Table 2 and Appendix 5.
                                                               -4-
FORESHORE



                                                                           TABLE 2

                                                 WEST VANCOUVER SHORELINE PRESERVATION PLAN
                                                         NEXT PHASE PILOT PROJECT PROGRAM

                                                                                                                        Estimated
              Location                                              Description of Project                                Cost

  Lawson Park East (Type 1)       -   shallow sloped tombola hump built with rock at low water                           $45,000
                                  -   increased subtidal and intertidal habitat
                                  -   bring stability to a highly mobile beach profile
                                  -   crenellated shoreline with greater diversity as an aesthetic park feature

  Navvy Jack Point Boulder        - strategic placement and consolidation of boulders to seabed in the shallow           $35,000
  Consolidation                     subtidal and intertidal
                                  - stabilization of beach toe
                                  - retention of nearshore sediments
                                  - increase habitat/species diversity and populations

  Navvy Jack Point (Type 1)       -   shallow sloped tombola hump built with rock between -3m and -5m elevation          $45,000
                                  -   stabilization of beach toe
                                  -   retention of nearshore sediments
                                  -   maximize kelp production
                                  -   increase habitat/species diversity and populations

  Sandstone Promontory (Type 1)   - expansion of promontory by surrounding it with boulders to form a shallow            $45,000
  350 Metres West of                sloping islet
  Navvy Jack Point                - increased habitat surface area and bio-diversity
                                  - retention of nearshore sediments
                                  - improved sediment transport pathway

  Marr Creek Semi-Circles         -   two semi-circles of boulders centred over the mouth of the Marr Creek culvert      $35,000
                                  -   boulders placed intermittently along semi-circles
                                  -   outer semi-circle reaches to low water at furthest point from culvert
                                  -   inner semi circle reaches to point halfway between culvert and outer circle
                                  -   both semi-circles mirror the curve of the seawall
                                  -   disrupt wave energy striking seawall
                                  -   provide stable habitat and increase bio-diversity
                                  -   stabilize finer sediments on inshore side of semi-circles
                                  -   eelgrass enhancement opportunities
                                  -   trap sediment at base of seawall

  Marr Creek Boulder Garden       - one metre diameter boulders placed at the offshore end of the existing               $35,000
                                    intertidal concrete lock block wall located to the west of the Marr Creek culvert
                                  - boulder pattern to be similar those placed at offshore end of Lawson Pier
                                    during 2006/07 Pilot Projects
                                  - disrupt wave energy striking seawall
                                  - provide stable habitat and increase bio-diversity
                                  - stabilize finer sediments in between boulders
                                  - trap sediment at base of seawall

  Navvy Jack Point West to        - shallow sloped tombola humps constructed of boulders in lower intertidal zone        $45,000
  Dundarave Pier (Type 1)         - tombolas may be built as stand alone structures or in groups based on site
                                    specific conditions
                                  - disrupt wave energy striking seawall
                                  - provide stable habitat and increase bio-diversity
                                  - stabilize finer sediments in between boulders
                                  - trap sediment at base of seawall

  Navvy Jack Point West to        - combination of two shallow sloping drift sills                                       $50,000
  Dundarave Pier - (Type II)      - western sill runs roughly perpendicular to shore while the eastern sill, located
                                    30m east, curves westward at its offshore end just past the western sill
                                  - neither drift sill is connected to the existing rip rap shoreline
                                  - disrupt wave energy striking seawall
                                  - provide stable habitat and increase bio-diversity
                                  - trap sediment at base of seawall



                                                                 -5-
FORESHORE



5     Next Phase Major Projects - 2008
         Major projects by their nature contemplate more materials, larger budgets, and significant shoreline
effects in the areas of wave protection and habitat enhancement. As a result the major projects have been laid
out with the same limitations in mind as the former pilots such as changing materials supply and conditions
and are therefore scalable up or down in terms of cost and materials.

        The Major projects have also been planned to provide the same long term benefits as the pilot projects
and work in a synergistic fashion with the pilot projects. In other words shoreline preservation and habitat
benefits gained by the pilot projects will be enhanced by major project construction A description of the SPP
Major Projects is provided in Table 3 and Appendix 5.
                                                                          TABLE 3

                                               WEST VANCOUVER SHORELINE PRESERVATION PLAN
                                                          MAJOR PILOT PROJECT PROGRAM

                                                                                                                         Estimated
              Location                                            Description of Project                                   Cost

    Navvy Jack to Dundarave        - build a boulder/cobble drift sill running 2 metres in height along the -4m depth    $300,000
    Drift Sill                       contour                                                                                to
                                   - project cost based on 1.2 kms of drift sill but can be scaled based on              $350,000
                                     available materials and budget
                                   - stabilize sediments and flatten beach profile
                                   - raise beach elevations to provide wave protection to seawall
                                   - drift sill will increase bio-diversity including opportunities for kelp and other
                                     and other intertidal and shallow subtidal algae

    Navvy Jack Elevation Change    - rock material will be placed between -5m and -20m water depth to raise              $250,000
                                     the -7m contour to -4m elevation
                                   - provide bio diversity and stable substrate for biota to attach and
                                     expand kelp forest
                                   - stabilize toe of slope and allow sediment to collect in shallower depths
                                     flattening beach profile and providing wave protection by causing waves
                                     to break further offshore

    Lawson Pier Contour Alignment - rock material will be placed between -5m and -15m to realign the -5m contour         $1,000,000
                                  - provide bio-diversity and stable substrate for biota to attach and
                                    expand kelp forest
                                  - stabilize toe of slope and allow sediment to collect in shallower depths
                                    flattening beach profile and providing wave protection by causing waves
                                    to break further offshore




6     Monitoring the SPP Pilots
        A key component of the SPP is monitoring. It has and continues to be performed on the 2006/07 pilots
to provide data as to the success of the pilots and to develop strategies that will be employed in the next phase
of Pilots and Major projects. The level of monitoring and therefore cost is variable, however, for the purposes
of the SPP the monitoring program must provide information on:

         shoreline elevations,
         wave effects during major storms,
         estimates of accretion and erosion, and,
         overall habitat impacts and enhancements.
                                                                -6-
FORESHORE



7    SPP Scheduling – Timing is Everything
        The success of the 2006/07 Pilot Project program has demonstrated that maximum effect is gained
when projects are completed prior to extreme winter wave and sedimentation processes. Exposure to these
extremes allows the effectiveness of the pilot projects to be monitored at an earlier stage and an assessment of
their success to be determined prior to the next construction season. This allows successful strategies to be
carried into the next phase of each project.


8    Next Phase Pilot and Major Project Budget Planning
        As per the 2006/07 construction strategy the goal will be to take advantage of labour, equipment and
labour as it comes available in order to minimize cost and maximize construction. In 2006/07 rock from the
Squmaish Highway development and excavation projects taking place in West Vancouver were used to source
less expensive building materials for the pilots. In some cases the preferred material types were in short
supply, simply not available, or the materials that were available were significantly different than what was
desired. In these situations the project team resources included the ability to adjust pilot layouts while still
maintaining the physical and environmental intent of the project. This flexibility is critical in meeting budget
estimates where control over such factors as materials, tide and weather are not always possible.

       Where Tables 2 and 3 provide a list of projects to perform, Table 4 presents a spending program up to
2011 that will result in significant and measurable preservation effects along the West Vancouver shoreline.
                                                           Table 4

                                    WEST VANCOUVER SHORELINE PRESERVATION PLAN
                                        2006 - 2011 PILOT PROJECT BUDGET CONCEPT

                                                                            Approval &                  Yearly
    Date                                     Tasks                          Monitoring   Construction   Budget

 2006/2007   Develop Concepts and Approval for Projects                      $70,000                    $200,000
             Baseline Surveying for 2007 Pilot Projects                      $30,000
             Construction of Pilot Project                                                 $100,000

    2008     Monitor 2007 Pilots                                             $70,000                    $230,000
             Develop Concepts and Approval for New Pilots or Enhancements    $30,000
             Baseline Surveying for New Pilots or Pilot Enhancements         $30,000
             Construct 2008 Pilots / Enhance Previous Pilots                               $100,000

    2009     Monitor 2007 & 2008 Pilots                                      $70,000                    $230,000
             Develop Concepts and Approval for New Pilots or Enhancements    $30,000
             Baseline Surveying for New Pilots or Pilot Enhancements         $30,000
             Construct 2008 Pilots / Enhance Previous Pilots                               $100,000

    2010     Monitor 2007, 2008 & 2009 Pilots                                $90,000                    $500,000
             Develop Concepts and Approval for New Pilots or Enhancements    $30,000
             Baseline Surveying for New Pilots or Pilot Enhancements         $30,000
             Construct 2009 Pilots / Enhance Previous Pilots                               $350,000

    2011     Monitor 2007 thru 2010 Pilots                                   $120,000                   $120,000



         Table 4 identifies a conservative approach to shoreline preservation over the next three years and while
in itself is a “good start” the goal of a self sustaining shoreline will require greater levels of resources and
effort.
                                                           -7-
FORESHORE

9    Summary
         The first year pilot projects have demonstrated measurable positive impacts to the West Vancouver
shoreline. Material from MacDonald and Lawson Creeks has been redirected to bring more balance to the
erosion and accretion forces along the shore. Shoreline and wave protection has been accomplished at
Capilano Groyne, Totem Groyne, Ambleside Pier, and points along the shore from Lawson Pier to Navvy Jack
Point. Of special note is the “fish friendly” work performed on the approach to the mouth of Lawson Creek
and its role as a primary contributing factor to the significant increase in salmon observations and capture this
year. All of the pilot project works have resulted in net gains to the environment, shore protection and
increased public awareness/interaction with the shore. These successes are the first step in a multi-year
program of shoreline enhancement and preservation – the SPP. The next steps have been identified and are
ready to be taken.

        The 2005 EAC report identified the need to develop a list f projects that would from an integral part of
the program to restore and enhance the West Vancouver shoreline. The work contained in the SPP represents
the execution and ongoing development of projects that will lead to West Vancouver reaching its’ SMART
goal of preserving and protecting its’ most valuable asset – its’ waterfront and connection with the sea.




                                                      -8-

				
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