Docstoc

RESETTLEMENT ACTION PLAN RAP REPORT INTERNATIONAL LIMITED

Document Sample
RESETTLEMENT ACTION PLAN RAP REPORT INTERNATIONAL LIMITED Powered By Docstoc
					      RAP REPORT FOR THE PROPOSED G4 INTERNATIONAL LTD
            KENYA FARMING PROJECT IN LOWER TANA




          RESETTLEMENT ACTION PLAN (RAP)
                            REPORT

                                  OF
G4 INTERNATIONAL LIMITED KENYA FARMING PROJECT
                       IN LOWER TANA




ENVIRONMENTAL CONSULTANTS               PROJECT PROPONENT



             AWEMAC
                                          G4 International Ltd
                                   Josem Trust Building,3rd Floor, Rm 7
 Africa Waste and Environment
                                   P.O.Box 617-00100,NAIROBI,Kenya
        Management Centre
                                         Tel.+254-20-2015422
  Muthaiga Mini Market Shopping
              Complex,
         Left Wing, 3rd Floor
 P.O Box 63891-00619, NAIROBI.
 Tel : 020-2012408/ 0722-479061
 Email : awemac_ken@yahoo.com
   Website: www.awemac.org
                        JANUARY 2010
     RAP REPORT FOR THE PROPOSED G4 INTERNATIONAL LTD
           KENYA FARMING PROJECT IN LOWER TANA                                                                                 January 22, 2010

                                                                      
                                                            TABLE OF CONTENTS 

TABLE OF CONTENTS .............................................................................................. 2 
LIST OF FIGURES ........................................................................................................ 6 
LIST OF TABLES .......................................................................................................... 6 
ABBREVIATIONS ........................................................................................................ 7 
EXECUTIVE SUMMARY ............................................................................................ 8 
1  INTRODUCTION ................................................................................................  7    1
   1.1        Background information ................................................................................................................. 17 
   1.2        Project description and location ..................................................................................................... 18 
   1.3        Project Farming Technologies ....................................................................................................... 19 
   1.4        Objective ........................................................................................................................................ 20 
   1.5        Resettlement Methodology ............................................................................................................ 20 
   1.6        Objectives....................................................................................................................................... 21 
   1.7        Scope of Work................................................................................................................................ 22 
   1.8        Resettlement Guiding Principles .................................................................................................... 22 
                                                                                              2
2  MINIMIZING RESETTLEMENT ...................................................................  4 
   2.1 Efforts to Minimize Displacement ........................................................................................................ 24 
   2.3 Mechanisms Minimize Displacement during Implementation ............................................................. 24 
                                                                               2
3  CENSUS AND SOCIO‐ECONOMIC SURVEYS ..........................................  5 
   3.1  Census, Assets Inventories, Natural Resource Assessments, and Socioeconomic Surveys ...... 25 
      3.1.1  Project Area ........................................................................................................................... 25 
      3.1.2  Household Head Occupations ............................................................................................... 25 
      3.1.3  Socio-economic Activities ...................................................................................................... 26 
      3.1.4  Households and Gender Parity.............................................................................................. 27 
      3.1.5  Housing Typology and Related Infrastructure. ...................................................................... 28 
      3.1.6  Road Accessibility .................................................................................................................. 30 
      3.1.7  Health Facilities and HIV/AIDS .............................................................................................. 31 
      3.1.8  Waste Management ............................................................................................................... 32 
      3.1.9  Sanitary facilities use, access and drinking water treatment................................................. 32 
      3.1.10  Access to Water and its quality.............................................................................................. 33 
   3.2  Identification of Project Impacts and Affected Populations ........................................................... 34 
      3.2.1  Design of Farming Project ..................................................................................................... 34 
      3.2.2  Potential Social and Environmental Impacts ......................................................................... 34 
      3.2.3  Positive Developments associated to the G4 International Kenya Farming Project ............. 35 
      3.2.4  Challenges associated to the project..................................................................................... 37 
   3.2  Resultant Issues from Consultations with Affected People ........................................................... 37 
   3.3  Updates to Census, Assets Inventories, Natural Resource Assessments, and Socioeconomic
   Surveys ...................................................................................................................................................... 39 


                                                                                                                                                                  2
AWEMAC                                                                                            G4 INTERNATIONAL LTD
   RAP REPORT FOR THE PROPOSED G4 INTERNATIONAL LTD
         KENYA FARMING PROJECT IN LOWER TANA                                                                           January 22, 2010

4  POLICY, LEGAL AND INSTITUTIONAL FRAMEWORK 
                                                           4
GOVERNING ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT IN KENYA ...............  0 
 4.1  Introduction to Relevant local Laws and Custom for Resettlement............................................... 40 
 4.2  Environmental Problems in Kenya................................................................................................. 40 
 4.3  Environmental Policy Framework .................................................................................................. 41 
 4.4  Institutional Framework .................................................................................................................. 41 
 4.5  National Environmental Management Authority (NEMA) .............................................................. 41 
    4.5.1  Provincial and District Environment Committees ........................................................ 43 
    4.5.2  District Environment Committee ..................................................................................... 43 
    4.5.3  Provincial Environment Committee ................................................................................ 43 
    4.5.4  Public Complaints Committee.......................................................................................... 43 
 4.6  National Environment Action Plan Committee............................................................................... 44 
 4.7  Standards and Enforcement Review Committee........................................................................... 45 
 4.8  National Environmental Tribunal .................................................................................................... 45 
 4.9  National Environmental Council (NEC).......................................................................................... 45 
 4.10  National Environmental Action Plan (NEAP) ................................................................................. 46 
 4.11  Environmental Legal Framework ................................................................................................... 46 
 4.12  Land Tenure and Land Use Legislation ......................................................................................... 47 
    4.12.1  The Government Land Act, Cap 280 .............................................................................. 48 
    4.12.2  Registration of Titles Act Cap 281 .................................................................................. 48 
    4.12.3  Land Titles Act Cap 282 ................................................................................................... 48 
    4.12.4  The Trust land Act, cap 285.............................................................................................. 49 
    4.12.5  The Land Acquisition Act, cap 295 ................................................................................. 49 
 4.13  The Tana and Athi River Development Act (Cap 443) .................................................................. 49 
 4.14  The Irrigation Act (Cap 347)........................................................................................................... 50 
 4.15  The Forest Act (Cap 385) .............................................................................................................. 51 
 4.16  The Agriculture Act (Cap 318) ....................................................................................................... 51 
 4.17  Public Health Act (Cap. 242).......................................................................................................... 51 
 4.18  Local Authority Act (Cap. 265) ....................................................................................................... 52 
 4.19  Physical Planning Act, 1999 .......................................................................................................... 53 
 4.20  Land Planning Act (Cap. 303) ........................................................................................................ 54 
 4.21  Water Act, 2002 ............................................................................................................................. 54 
 4.22  Building Code 1967 ........................................................................................................................ 55 
 4.23  Penal Code Act (Cap.63) ............................................................................................................... 55 
 4.24  Factories and Other Places of Work Act (Cap 514) ...................................................................... 55 
    4.24.1  Health.................................................................................................................................... 56 
    4.24.2  Safety .................................................................................................................................... 56 
    4.24.3  Welfare ................................................................................................................................. 56 
    4.24.4  Employment act, Cap 226 and the regulation of wages and condition of
    Employment Act Cap 229 ................................................................................................................ 57 
    4.24.5  Relevant Government Sessional Papers ......................................................................... 57 
    Sessional paper No1 of 2002............................................................................................................ 57 
    4.24.6  The National Poverty Eradication Plan (NPEP)............................................................ 57 
    4.24.7  The Poverty Reduction Strategy Paper ........................................................................... 58 
                                                                                                                                                        3
AWEMAC                                                                                     G4 INTERNATIONAL LTD
    RAP REPORT FOR THE PROPOSED G4 INTERNATIONAL LTD
          KENYA FARMING PROJECT IN LOWER TANA                                                                           January 22, 2010

      4.24.8  International Conventions and Treaties .......................................................................... 58 
      4.24.9  The World Commission on Environment and Development (The Brundtland Com
      1987) 59 
      4.24.10  The Ramsar Convention ................................................................................................ 59 
                                                                                                         6
5   RESETTLEMENT SITES ..................................................................................  1 
  5.1  Process of Identifying and Involving Persons Affected by the Project .......................................... 61 
  5.2  Feasibility Study ............................................................................................................................. 62 
  5.3  Community Relocation Sites and House Replacement Strategy .................................................. 62 
  5.4  Proposed project details. ............................................................................................................... 62 
     5.4.1  Crambe................................................................................................................................. 63 
     5.4.2  Castor ................................................................................................................................... 63 
     5.4.3  Sunflower ............................................................................................................................ 63 
                                                   6
6  INCOME RESTORATION AND COMPENSATION FRAMEWORK ..  5 
  6.1  Options for resettlement................................................................................................................. 65 
  6.2  Economic Rehabilitation ................................................................................................................ 65 
     6.3  Compensation Rates............................................................................................................. 66 
  6.4  Restoration strategies, community livelihoods and variations within Project Area ....................... 66 
     6.4.1  Land‐based Compensation ............................................................................................. 66 
     6.4.2  Cash Compensation .......................................................................................................... 67 
  6.5  Risks of Impoverishment................................................................................................................ 67 
  6.6  Consultation with Affected Populations ......................................................................................... 68 
  6.7  Monitoring of Income Restoration .................................................................................................. 68 
                                                                                        6
7  INSTITUTIONAL ARRANGEMENTS ..........................................................  9 
  7.1  Institutional Framework ......................................................................................................... 69 
    7.1.1  G4 International Kenya Limited .................................................................................... 69 
    7.1.2  Wadadli Limited ................................................................................................................ 69 
    7.1.3  National Irrigation Board ............................................................................................... 70 
    7.1.4  National Environment Management Authority (NEMA) ........................................ 71 
                                                                                            7
8  IMPLEMENTATION SCHEDULE .................................................................  2 
  8.1  Implementation............................................................................................................................... 72 
  8.2  Organization Structure ................................................................................................................... 72 
     8.2.1 G4 International Resettlement Unit (G4RU) ................................................................... 72 
     8.2.2 PAP Committee (PC) .............................................................................................................. 72 
  8.3  Community Consultation ................................................................................................................ 73 
  8.4  Implementation Timelines .............................................................................................................. 73 
                                                                                   7
9  PARTICIPATION AND CONSULTATION .................................................  6 
  9.1  Introduction..................................................................................................................................... 76 
  9.2  Stakeholders .................................................................................................................................. 76 
     9.2.1  Directly affected people (squatters) ............................................................................ 77 
     9.2.2  Indirectly Affected Persons ............................................................................................ 77 
     9.2.3  Government Agencies and Other Organizations ...................................................... 77 
  9.3  Relocation Preparation and Planning ........................................................................................... 77 

                                                                                                                                                         4
AWEMAC                                                                                      G4 INTERNATIONAL LTD
     RAP REPORT FOR THE PROPOSED G4 INTERNATIONAL LTD
           KENYA FARMING PROJECT IN LOWER TANA                                                                     January 22, 2010

      9.3.1  Methods and Approach ................................................................................................... 78 
      9.3.2  Socio‐economic Survey ................................................................................................... 78 
      9.3.3  Community Meetings ....................................................................................................... 78 
   9.4  Implementation and Monitoring .................................................................................................... 79 
   9.5  Dissemination of RAP Information ................................................................................................. 79 
                                                                                                       8
10  GRIEVANCE REDRESS .................................................................................  0 
   10.1  Process of Registering and Addressing Grievances ..................................................................... 80 
   10.2  Mechanism for Appeal ................................................................................................................... 80 
                                                                                      8
11  MONITORING AND EVALUATION ........................................................  1 
   11.1  Monitoring and Evaluation ............................................................................................................. 81 
     11.1.1     Internal Monitoring ...................................................................................................... 81 
     11.1.2     External Monitoring and Evaluation........................................................................ 82 
     11.1.3     Responsible Parties ...................................................................................................... 83 
     11.1.4     Methodology for monitoring...................................................................................... 83 
     11.1.5     Data Collection............................................................................................................... 83 
     11.1.6     Data Analysis and Interpretation ............................................................................. 83 
     11.1.7     Reporting ........................................................................................................................ 83 
                                                                                                        8
12  COSTS AND BUDGETS ..................................................................................  4 
   12.1.1  Squatters entitlement .......................................................................................................... 84 
       .                                                                                                                     8
ANNEXES .....................................................................................................................  5 
   •     Minutes of the public meetings and lists of attendance ..................................................................... 85 
   •     Copies of census and survey instruments ......................................................................................... 85 
   •     Copies of notices for the public consultative meeting........................................................................ 85 
   •     Copy of interview questionnaire ......................................................................................................... 85 
   •     ANNEX A - Kenya Farm Feasibility Study Doc G4 RP 1075 V1 ....................................................... 85 
   •     ANNEX B - BUSINESS OPERATING MANUAL G4I-1000 Issue 2 _2_ ........................................... 85 
   •     ANNEX C - HEALTH SAFETY & ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT SYSTEM G4I-1018 Issue 285 
   •     ANNEX D - ETHICS POLICY G4I-1015 Issue 4 ............................................................................... 85 
   •     ANNEX E - ENERGY CONTROL AND MANAGEMENT POLICY G4I-1054 Issue 2 ....................... 85 
   •     ANNEX F - Energy Balance G4 RP 1050 V2 ................................................................................... 85 
   •     ANNEX G - Emergency Management G4 RP Draft V2 ..................................................................... 85 
   •     ANNEX H - EMPLOYEE HANDBOOK G4I-1063 Issue 1 ................................................................. 85 
   •     G4 Farm Project Draft Environmental & Social Management Plan ................................................... 85 
   •     Wachu Ranch Brochure V4 ............................................................................................................... 85 




                                                                                                                                                   5
AWEMAC                                                                                   G4 INTERNATIONAL LTD
      RAP REPORT FOR THE PROPOSED G4 INTERNATIONAL LTD
            KENYA FARMING PROJECT IN LOWER TANA                                                                           January 22, 2010


                                                        LIST OF FIGURES 
Figure 1: Farm Facilities ................................................................................................................................. 21
Figure 2: Bar graph representing the Occupation Status of household heads. ............................................ 26
Figure 3: Bar-graph Representing Squatters Economic activities ................................................................. 27
Figure 5: Subsistence Crop farming and Charcoal burning.......................................................................... 27
Figure 4: Pie-Chart showing the representation of male and female respondents ....................................... 28
Figure 6: Types of houses within and around the project area...................................................................... 29
Figure 7: Bar-graph of housing typology ........................................................................................................ 29
Figure 8: Bar-graph of road access types ...................................................................................................... 30
Figure 9: Pie-Chart showing Knowledge of HIV/AIDS ................................................................................... 31
Figure 10: Bar graph showing refuse disposal by squatters.......................................................................... 32
Figure 11: Domestic water pond within the Ranch ........................................................................................ 33
Figure 12: Area designated for farming in Wachu Ranch, Lower Tana ....................................................... 34
Figure 13: Environmental Management and Coordination Act Institutional Framework ............................... 47
Figure 14: Compensation framework ............................................................................................................. 65
Figure 15: Community Public Barazas/meeting held in Wachu Oda Location .............................................. 79


                                               LIST OF TABLES 
Table 1.1 Occupation of household heads  among squatters. ............................................... 25 
Table 1.2 Socio­Economic Activities of Squatters. ..................................................................... 26 
Table1.3: Gender Structure of Male and Female ........................................................................ 28 
Table1.4: Housing typology in the project area .......................................................................... 29 
Table 1.5: Road Access .......................................................................................................................... 30 
Table 1.6: Road Passable ..................................................................................................................... 30 
Table 1.7: Health facilities accessible by squatters ................................................................... 31 
Table 1.8: Knowledge of HIV/AIDS .................................................................................................. 31 
Table 1.9: Affected relatives of squatters with HIV/AIDS ....................................................... 31 
Table 1.10: Refuse disposal by squatters ...................................................................................... 32 
Table 1.11: Sanitary facilities used by squatters ....................................................................... 32 
Table 1.12: Access to separate bathrooms by squatters ......................................................... 32 
Table 1.13: Drinking water treatment by squatters ................................................................. 33 
Table 1.14: Domestic water uses by squatters. ........................................................................... 33 
Table 1.16: Summary of PAPs and Cost Compensation Entitlement .................................. 84 




                                                                                                                                                            6
AWEMAC                                                                                         G4 INTERNATIONAL LTD
   RAP REPORT FOR THE PROPOSED G4 INTERNATIONAL LTD
         KENYA FARMING PROJECT IN LOWER TANA                   January 22, 2010

                                   ABBREVIATIONS 
AIDS        Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome 
EMCA        Environmental Management and Coordination Act (EMCA) 
ESIA        Environmental and Social Impact Assessment 
EU          European Union 
HHs         Households 
HIV/AIDs    Human Immunodeficiency Virus 
IFC         International Finance Corporation 
G4RU        G4 Resettlement unit 
M&E         Monitoring and Evaluation 
MoU         Memorandum of understanding 
NEMA        National Environmental Management Authority 
PAPs        Project Affected People 
RAP         Resettlement Action Plan 
RLA         Registered Land Act 
PC          Public Complaints Committee 
G4          G 4 International Ltd 
L.R         Land Reference Number 
GoK         Government of Kenya 
IMU         Independent Monitoring Unit 
M&E         Monitoring and Evaluation 
 
 
 




                                                                                  7
AWEMAC                                          G4 INTERNATIONAL LTD
    RAP REPORT FOR THE PROPOSED G4 INTERNATIONAL LTD
          KENYA FARMING PROJECT IN LOWER TANA                                    January 22, 2010

 
                                      EXECUTIVE SUMMARY 
 
Introduction
G4  International  Limited,  herein  referred  to  as  the  proposed  project  proponent  have 
entered  into  a  legal  agreement  with  the  owner  of  the  property  registered  under  Kenya’s 
Law  as  Wachu  Ranching  (Directed  Agricultural)  Company  Ltd  located  in  the  land  parcel 
identified  through  the  Land  Reference  number  (L.R  No.)  13600  along  Lamu  road,  Garsen 
area  in  Tana  Delta  District  of  Coast  Province  in  the  Republic  of  Kenya  to  establish  an 
oilseed crop growing and processing facility in the property. The proposed farming project 
will be under irrigation anchored entirely on conservation agriculture, with an intension to 
bring  world  farming  practices  and  key  project  management  skills  to  the  Kenyan  farm  in 
conjunction with local expertise to gain the benefits of extremely fertile soil areas, with a 
year round growing climate. 

Background information 
The Kenyan Government has designed a comprehensive sector development strategy with 
clear division of roles and partnerships between the government, the private sector and the 
beneficiaries.  The  elaborate  legal  and  institutional  framework  detailed  in  the  Water  Act, 
2002 is aimed at accommodating the new operational environment. 

It  is  with  this  framework  that  the  proponent  will  be  working  closely  with  the  National 
Irrigation  Board  and  the  Ministry  of  Water  and  Irrigation.  They  will  offer  investigations, 
surveys,  design  and  supervision  of  civil  works  as  well  as  irrigation  management  and 
training.  This  will  prove  invaluable  to  the  project  management  team  both  in  the  initial 
period and for years to come. Historically and particularly in 2008, Kenya farming suffered 
from the following issues: 
         Poor/erratic rainfall during the 2008 long rains season. 
         Crop pests and diseases coupled with poor storage practices. Farmers lost over 30% 
         of their short rains 2006 crop produce due to greater grain borer (storage pest). 
         Inadequate  use  of  farm  inputs;  only  40%  of  farmers  use  certified  seeds  and/  or 
         fertilizers 
         Low adaptation to modern farming technology. 
         Inadequate markets and marketing strategies for livestock and grains 
         Over  dependence on  rain  fed  agriculture.  Only  38.6% of potential  irrigated  land  is 
         exploited. 
 
The  proponent  is  aware  of  the  issues  highlighted  above.  The  proponents  established 
farming  approach  and  business  model  will  establish  a  farming  project  whose  ultimate 
benefit  will  be  both  to  inject  important  wealth  into  coastal  part  of  Kenya  whilst  bringing 

                                                                                                       8
AWEMAC                                                        G4 INTERNATIONAL LTD
    RAP REPORT FOR THE PROPOSED G4 INTERNATIONAL LTD
          KENYA FARMING PROJECT IN LOWER TANA                                    January 22, 2010

farming techniques that can be utilized effectively downstream, a win/win situation for the 
country and other international partners.  

Since the inception of the Environmental Management and Coordination Act (EMCA) 1999, 
it has now become a legal requirement for all projects leading to the activities listed in the 
second  schedule  to  undertake  Environmental  and Social  Impact  Assessment  (ESIA) and a 
Resettlement  Action  Plan  if  the  project  will  involve  involuntary  displacement  of  persons 
from  one  area  to  another.  ESIA  is  a  tool  for  environmental  conservation  and  has  been 
identified as a key component in new project implementation. The report of the RAP must 
be submitted to the Donor for approval and subsequent use for resettlement. 
 
Project description 
The proposed farming project will be located in Land Reference Number 13600 along Lamu 
road  in  Garsen  area  of  Tana  Delta  District  ,  Coast  Province  within  the  Republic  of  Kenya. 
The  project  will  cover  an  approximate  area  of  28,911  hectares  to  be  leased  from  the 
management of Wachu Ranch. 
 
The initial crop will be groundnuts to add nitrogen to the soil with the harvest being sold to 
the World Food Program. The oils seed crops to be grown in the proposed G4 International 
Limited farming project include: 
    a) Crambe crop production. 
    b) Castor crop production. 
    c) Sunflower crop production. 
    d) Factory for oil production. 
    e) Social amenities and benefits 

The communities participating in the project will benefit from the following: 
   a) Communal Water points. 
   b) Roads and bridges. 
   c) Schools. 
   d) Health facilities. 
   e) Out growers scheme 
   f) Other community Projects working with the community 

The main water source  for the  proposed farm  will be  from  rain water  and supplemented 
with excess water harvested from floods. Water from the Tana river will be used to initially 
charge the irrigation system  and ditches and to recharge  when river  flow is not stressed. 
After clearance of the bushes, landscaping shall be undertaken to align the land for a pivot 
irrigation  system.  This  irrigation  system  is  preferred  over  the  other  irrigation  system 
because of minimum maintenance, minimum management, controllability and speed. 
                                                                                                       9
AWEMAC                                                        G4 INTERNATIONAL LTD
    RAP REPORT FOR THE PROPOSED G4 INTERNATIONAL LTD
          KENYA FARMING PROJECT IN LOWER TANA                                 January 22, 2010

G4 International Ltd will maximize yields through the following techniques:‐ 
 
   a) Precision Farming and Grid soil sampling annually, thus enabling soil fertility to be 
       maintained at highest levels 
   b) Full Field Irrigation including water conservation improvement techniques 
   c) Selection of seed varieties and hybrids to suit soil and climatic conditions  
   d) Seed  replication  on  farms  both  remotely  and  in‐country  to  ensure  maintenance  of 
       hybrid and inbred variety quality 
   e) Conservation  farming  techniques  are  employed  to  enhance  water  retention  and 
       maximize organic content of the soil. (Zero till). 
   f) Use  of  latest  technology  harvesting  machinery  reducing  harvesting  time,  reducing 
       losses and maximizing oil seed quality 
 
Wachu ranch was established in 1976 with the main activity of livestock rearing. The ranch 
lies along Malindi – Garsen road about 80km north from Malindi. The ranch covers a total 
of  28,911  hectares  and  is  surrounded  immediately  by  other  ranches,  including  Kitangale 
Ranch  and  Kurawa  Livestock  Marketing  Division.  The  road  from  Malindi  to  Garsen 
transects  the  ranch  about  17kms  across  the  Ranch.  The  livestock  keeping  activity  in  the 
ranch was devastated in 1984 when a severe drought rocked the country and the ranch lost 
2,700  cattle.  The  ranch  was  abandoned  and  was  overgrown  into  a  forest.  Approximately 
200  families  intruded  into  the  ranch  by  the  year  2007  and  according  to  the  household 
surveys  done  in  January  2010,  the  number  had  increased  to  approximately  500  families 
that have settled in the ranch. 
 
The intention of G4 International Ltd Farming Project is to bring World farming practices 
and key project management skills to the Kenyan farms in conjunction with local expertise 
to gain the benefits of extremely fertile soil areas, with a year round growing climate. 
 
Africa  Waste  and  Environment  Management  Centre  ,  a  registered  consultancy  firm  with 
National  Environment Management  Authority,  (NEMA),  was  contracted  to  undertake      an 
assessment and subsequently prepare a Resettlement Action Plan of the proposed Farming 


                                                                                                  10
AWEMAC                                                      G4 INTERNATIONAL LTD
    RAP REPORT FOR THE PROPOSED G4 INTERNATIONAL LTD
          KENYA FARMING PROJECT IN LOWER TANA                                January 22, 2010

Project  in  Lower  Tana  in  response  to  the  request  by  the  G4  International  Limited  in 
partnership with a local company in Kenya. 
 
Objective  
The main objective of the assignment is to assist the G4 International Limited to prepare a 
Resettlement  Action  Plan  after  carrying  out  an  Environmental  Social  Impact  Assessment 
(ESIA)  of  Kenya  Farming  Project,  especially  for  resettling  squatters,  invaded  in  Wachu 
Ranch and who shall be affected by the proposed development project. 
 
Methodology 
The  objectives  of  the  study  were  met  using  systematic,  integrated,  participatory  and 
collaborative specialized approaches. The information that was collected was through field 
investigations, focus group discussions, use of thematic maps, census and inventory survey, 
literature document reviews and key informant interviews. Some of the people consulted 
were  Provincial,  District  and  Divisional  local  administrations  officers  including  chiefs, 
Community  and  Village  leaders,  local  Non‐Governmental  Organizations  and  interested 
groups, Wachu Ranch Members, Squatters, among others. 
 
Findings 
The RAP report was compiled in consideration of the grievances redress procedures of the 
Project  Affected  Persons  (PAPs),  Socio  Economic  and  the  Legal  framework  as  per  the 
Kenyan  Government  and  project  settings,  legal  requirements  in  issues  of  resettlement  of 
squatters. The RAP report also provides implementation framework and accountability and 
monitoring and evaluation mechanism. Key findings from the study are: 
    • During  the  study  it  was  revealed  that  approximately  500  families  would  be 
        displaced in Wachu Ranch to allow for the project implementation. It was noted that 
        there  are  makeshift  settlements  for  the  squatters  mainly  along  the  17  Kilometers 
        Malindi‐Garsen  Tarmac  road  that  bisects  Wachu  Ranch  by  ¾  dividing  the  farm  in 
        two  sectors,  approximately  18,000  Hectares  (intended  for  farming)  on  the  East  of 
        Malindi‐Garsen Road, and approximately 11,000 Hectares on the West of the road. 
    • For the squatters, more than half are absentee landlords, who have acquired acres 
        of land, and assigned care takers to tend to the farms, whilst they themselves stay in 
        far  off  places  such  as  Malindi,  Mombasa  and  up  country  and  only  make  technical 
        appearances on the farms. 

                                                                                                 11
AWEMAC                                                     G4 INTERNATIONAL LTD
  RAP REPORT FOR THE PROPOSED G4 INTERNATIONAL LTD
        KENYA FARMING PROJECT IN LOWER TANA                                     January 22, 2010

  Positive Developments associated to the G4 International Kenya Farming Project 
          I. Urbanization development 
  • The proposed project is expected to bring urbanization related developments in the 
     Tana area given the fact that the area has no single industry to employ locals and up 
     scale local income levels which are  currently less than a dollar per individual.  The 
     developments associated to the modern farming practices are expected to improve 
     the  facilities  in  the  area  including  access  to  modern  communication  facilities  and 
     civilization.  
         II. Development of local centres 
  • Local centres such  as Malindi town, Tarassa Division, Oda  Centre, Garsen Division, 
     Kurawa  Centre  will  soon  develop  into  urban  set  ups  due  to  need  for  settlements, 
     modern shops and improved transport in the area. Soon market centres will grow to 
     polis and polis will soon grow to metropolis. 
        III. Development of roads infrastructure 
  • Upon commissioning of the project, the only accessible tarmac road (B8) that bisects 
     the Wachu ranch , running from Malindi‐Ngongoni to Garsen‐Lamu, will need to be 
     upgraded into a highway by Government and others feeder roads will be opened up 
     to enhance accessibility of the area. 
        IV. Development of water supply 
  • The water use sources and access to drinking water is very limited in the area. The 
     residents  rely  on  water  ponds  and  river  water  fetched  more  than  8KM  away. 
     Therefore,  with  the  coming  of  the  Irrigation  project,  in  the  area,  it’s  expected  that 
     the situation will be improved and locals can have safe and accessible water sources 
     even  if  it  means  buying  at  low  sustainable  prices.  This  will  also  reduce  the  cost  of 
     living in the area and boost the health of the locals. 
         V. Development of Solid waste and sewerage disposal systems 
  • The Tarasaa Division, where the project is located, has inadequate and safe means of 
     solid  waste  management.  The  G4  International  farming  project  will  bring  modern 
     waste  management  practices  to  handle  waste  generated  from  its  farm  and  within 
     the  growing  urban  centres.The  company  will  consult  with  environment  consultant 
     to develop disposable sewerage systems. 
        VI. Availability of local farm products 
  • The project is going to major in production of oil based seed crops such as Castor oil, 
     Sunflower  and  Crambe  oil.  The  products  of  these  crops  will  also  sustain  an  oil 
     processing  factory  on  the  farm.  The  products  of  the  farm  will  earn  the  country 
     foreign  exchange  and  boost  the  local  per  capita  cash  flow.  The  local  farmers 

                                                                                                     12
AWEMAC                                                        G4 INTERNATIONAL LTD
  RAP REPORT FOR THE PROPOSED G4 INTERNATIONAL LTD
        KENYA FARMING PROJECT IN LOWER TANA                                  January 22, 2010

      practicing farming in the above crops can also gain access to available market in the 
      area.  The  income  earned  from  sales  will  sustain  the  socio‐economic  livelihoods  of 
      their household. 
        VII. Availability of ready market and improvement of livestock farming 
  •   The  existence  of  the  farming  factory  will  open  up  the  area,  its  accessibility  and 
      therefore enhance access to available livestock resources from the livestock keeping 
      community. The by products of crambe and sunflower will also be packaged to bran 
      meals facilitate nutrition status of livestock. 
       VIII. Improvement of eco­tourism activities 
  •   The lower Tana area is well endowed with tourism resources such as wildlife game 
      drives,  unique  Orma  and  Pokomo  Socio‐cultural  practices  and  lifestyles,  pivot 
      irrigation  farming  methods,  Oil  process  farming  and  indigenous  eco‐agriculture 
      activities. The farming activities will attract local tourists and students on academic 
      tour from colleges and university. 
         IX. Establishment of forest conservation programs 
  •   The  project  will  also  protect  the  environment  by  promoting  environmental  tree 
      planting  and  raising  of  indigenous  seedling  along  side  the  main  farming  activity. 
      This  will  be  aimed  at  encouraging  the  locals’  to  plant  trees  that  protect  the 
      environment and enhance local micro‐climate. 
          X. Development of women livelihoods and programs 
  •   The  women,  who  are  the  most  active  group  of  the  local  community  in  the  project 
      area,  are  usually  charged  with  mandate  to  provide  food  and  take  care  of  their 
      households,  while  the  men  provide  security.  The  G4  International  project  will 
      empower  women  through  funding  registered  women  group  activities  and  be 
      involved directly in project farming practices, seed collection and packaging of farm 
      produce.  Identified  women  groups  include;  Wachu‐Oda  Handaraku  Women  Group, 
      Imani Women Group, and Bokole Women Group. 
         XI. Development of Youth Livelihoods and Programs 
  •   Most youths, aged between 12‐24 years within the project area are idle and depend 
      on  their  parents  for  most  basic  needs.  The  youth  groups  will  benefit  from  the  G4 
      International  project,  participation  in  well  designed  seminars  and  exchange 
      programs to sensitize them on modern faming practices, youth creativity programs, 
      education and life programs. The sports sector will also be funded to promote local 
      talents. 
   
         XII. Diversification of Pastoralists livelihoods 

                                                                                                  13
AWEMAC                                                     G4 INTERNATIONAL LTD
    RAP REPORT FOR THE PROPOSED G4 INTERNATIONAL LTD
          KENYA FARMING PROJECT IN LOWER TANA                                  January 22, 2010

    •   The  pastoralists  rely  heavily  on  the  cattle  farming  for  their  livelihoods.  The 
        livelihoods  of  livestock  keepers  have  a  times  been  threatened  by  drought  cycles 
        leading  to loss of heads of cattle. The G4 International Kenya  farming   project will 
        bring on diversified livestock keeping skills that encourages local farmers to invest 
        in crop farming in the land that is still endowed with humus and nitrogenous 
 
    Other  results  of  the  consultations,  focused  group  discussions  and  household  surveys 
    held  during  the  site  visits  and  the  Public  Barazas  with  the  Project  Affected  Persons 
    (PAPs). These include: 
       One of the main concerns raised included, the need for Wachu Ranch Committee and 
       the Developer  to  acknowledge  land  use and  squatter  rights of the  current  persons 
       who may have been conned to pay out lump sums of money, to Village elders, initial 
       squatters, at the expense of getting land allocation in Wachu Ranch.  
     
       About 500 families of the squatters have been living in the area for about 2‐5 years 
       and  have  acquired  approximately  5‐15  Acres  of  land  each  practicing  mainly 
       subsistence and cash cropping 
      
       During  the  severe  droughts,  the  neighboring  locals  from  Pastoralists  Community 
       come with their livestock graze on the farms of farming community and this results 
       into  resource  conflict,  that  end  up  as    fights,    injuries  and  sometimes  death. 
       Therefore, this project will bring an end to such community conflicts. 
        
       There  is  insecurity  in  the  Wachu  Ranch  area  especially  along  the  Malindi‐Garsen 
       Road,  as  a  result  of  sporadic  assaults,  banditry  and  burglary,  targeting  both  local 
       livestock  and  foreigners  with  valuables.  The  project  will  enhance  security  in  the 
       area. 
        
       The  squatters  have  requested  the  investor  to  consider  providing  communal  social 
       amenities such as Primary and Secondary Schools, equipped Health Centres, piped 
       water,  electricity  supply  and  build  more  connector  roads  and  bridges.  Socio‐
       economic  activities  in  the  area  should  also  be  boosted  to  enhance  adequate 
       employment creation especially among the local youths; most of whom are Primary 
       and Secondary School leavers. 
        
       Among  the  squatters  are  persons  coming  from  varied  Kenyan  tribes  and  spatial, 
       diverse  communities.  The  squatters  who  are  not  indigenous  to  the  Mijikenda  and 
       Coast  Province,  for  example  coming  from  Luhya,  Luo,  Kamba  and  Kikuyu  tribes 
                                                                                                    14
AWEMAC                                                       G4 INTERNATIONAL LTD
   RAP REPORT FOR THE PROPOSED G4 INTERNATIONAL LTD
         KENYA FARMING PROJECT IN LOWER TANA                                    January 22, 2010

       claims  to  be  disregarded  and  ignored  by  both  the  indigenous  coastal  community, 
       local administration and local politicians. 
        
       There is an anticipated threat to social livelihood in that, with clearing of bush and 
       alteration of local’s food crop resource base to sunflower and castor oil plants, these 
       will  reduce  food  supply,  resulting  into  importation  and  subsequent  rise  in  food 
       prices  in  Malindi  and  Garsen  areas.  The  urban  development  will  overcome  the 
       challenge. 
        
       Squatters have always expressed great fear and suspicion to any visitor due to self 
       guilt  and  lack  of  knowledge on  actual  land  ownership  in  the  area, for  the  fact  that 
       some  have  stayed  for  over  four  years  in  the  Ranch  without  disturbances  or  any 
       private claims of vast idle land. They are now informed about the ownership of the 
       Ranch,  now  they  request  for  boundary  marking  of  the  ranch  to  know  its 
       geographical extent. 
        
       More than half the number of people interviewed expressed concern that one way of 
       ending  the  common  resource  conflicts  as  a  result  of  competitive  invasion  into  the 
       virgin Wachu Ranch by the pastoralists and crop farmers, can be resolved through 
       introduction  of  such  projects  like  the  proposed  farming  project,  where  by  none  of 
       the  communities  has  an  upper  hand  in  control  of  resources  and  subsequent 
       communal fighting and clashes. 

Recommendations 
 
The  developer,  with  assistance  from  the  Wachu  Ranch  officials,  should  consider  the 
squatters eviction process in a humane way, follow the described resettlement framework, 
and humanitarian compensation of physical assets so that the property owned by squatters 
and their associated socio‐economic livelihoods are well addressed to avoid conflicts that 
may  impede  the  project  implementation.  The  compensation  cost  for  resettling  the  500 
squatters  in  five  villages  within  Wachu  Ranch  is  estimated  to  cost  Kshs.5,  000,000 
(66,666.66 US Dollars)  
  
Most of the squatters came from neighboring Districts, in Malindi, therefore the developer 
and  Wachu  Ranch  Management  should  jointly  make  necessary  arrangement  to  provide 
improvement  in    social  amenities  such  as  water  supply,  hospitals  equipment  and  job 
creation that takes the squatters on board to improve their livelihoods. 
 

                                                                                                    15
AWEMAC                                                       G4 INTERNATIONAL LTD
    RAP REPORT FOR THE PROPOSED G4 INTERNATIONAL LTD
          KENYA FARMING PROJECT IN LOWER TANA                                 January 22, 2010

G4 International Ltd and Wadadli Ltd should consider assisting the squatters living in the 
project areas by involving them directly or indirectly in the project cycle, development 
components, by providing jobs as casual workers. 
 
During  the  project  implementation,  there  is  need  for  Environment  consultant,  developer 
and local organization to ensure the issues that may arise are addressed and PAPs are well 
resettled.  This  will  be  achieved  through  monitoring  and  evaluation  of  the  project  in  the 
operational phase. 
 
 




                                                                                                   16
AWEMAC                                                       G4 INTERNATIONAL LTD
                  RAP REPORT FOR THE PROPOSED G4 INTERNATIONAL LTD
                        KENYA FARMING PROJECT IN LOWER TANA

1      INTRODUCTION 

G4  International  Limited,  herein  referred  to  as  the  proposed  project  proponent  have 
entered  into  a  legal  agreement  with  the  owner  of  the  property  registered  under  Kenya’s 
Law  as  Wachu  Ranching  (Directed  Agricultural)  Company  Ltd  located  in  the  land  parcel 
identified  through  the  Land  Reference  number  (L.R  No.)  13600  along  Lamu  road,  Garsen 
area  in  Tana  Delta  District  of  Coast  Province  in  the  Republic  of  Kenya  to  establish  an 
oilseed crop growing and processing facility in the property. The proposed farming project 
will be under irrigation anchored entirely on conservation agriculture, with an intension to 
bring  world  farming  practices  and  key  project  management  skills  to  the  Kenyan  farm  in 
conjunction with local expertise to gain the benefits of extremely fertile soil areas, with a 
year round growing climate. 

1.1 Background information 
The Kenyan Government has designed a comprehensive sector development strategy with 
clear division of roles and partnerships between the government, the private sector and the 
beneficiaries.  The  elaborate  legal  and  institutional  framework  detailed  in  the  Water  Act, 
2002 is aimed at accommodating the new operational environment. 


It  is  with  this  framework  that  the  proponent  will  be  working  closely  with  the  National 
Irrigation  Board  and  the  Ministry  of  Water  and  Irrigation.  They  will  offer  investigations, 
surveys,  design  and  supervision  of  civil  works  as  well  as  irrigation  management  and 
training.  This  will  prove  invaluable  to  the  project  management  team  both  in  the  initial 
period and for years to come. Historically and particularly in 2008, Kenya farming suffered 
from the following issues: 
       Poor/erratic rainfall during the 2008 long rains season. 
       Crop pests and diseases coupled with poor storage practices. Farmers lost over 30% 
       of their short rains 2006 crop produce due to greater grain borer (storage pest). 
       Inadequate  use  of  farm  inputs;  only  40%  of  farmers  use  certified  seeds  and/  or 
       fertilizers 
       Low adaptation to modern farming technology. 
    RAP REPORT FOR THE PROPOSED G4 INTERNATIONAL LTD
          KENYA FARMING PROJECT IN LOWER TANA                                    January 22, 2010

         Inadequate markets and marketing strategies for livestock and grains 
         Over  dependence on  rain  fed  agriculture.  Only  38.6% of potential  irrigated  land  is 
         exploited. 
    
The  proponent  is  aware  of  the  issues  highlighted  above.  The  proponents  established 
farming  approach  and  business  model  will  establish  a  farming  project  whose  ultimate 
benefit  will  be  both  to  inject  important  wealth  into  coastal  part  of  Kenya  whilst  bringing 
farming techniques that can be utilized effectively downstream, a win/win situation for the 
country and other international partners.  


Since the inception of the Environmental Management and Coordination Act (EMCA) 1999, 
it has now become a legal requirement for all projects leading to the activities listed in the 
second  schedule  to  undertake  Environmental  and Social  Impact  Assessment  (ESIA) and a 
Resettlement  Action  Plan  if  the  project  will  involve  involuntary  displacement  of  persons 
from  one  area  to  another.  ESIA  is  a  tool  for  environmental  conservation  and  has  been 
identified as a key component in new project implementation. The report of the RAP must 
be submitted to the Donor for approval and subsequent use for resettlement. 

1.2 Project description and location 
The proposed farming project will be located in Land Reference Number 13600 along Lamu 
road in Garsen area of Tana Delta District of Coast Province within the Republic of Kenya. 
The  project  will  cover  an  approximate  area  of  28,911  hectares  to  be  leased  from  the 
management of Wachu Ranch. 
 
The initial crop will be groundnuts to add nitrogen to the soil with the harvest being sold to 
the World Food Program. The oils seed crops to be grown in the proposed G4 International 
Limited farming project include: 
    f)   Crambe crop production. 
    g)   Castor crop production. 
    h)   Sunflower crop production. 
    i)   Factory for oil production. 
    j)   Social amenities and benefits 


                                                                                                     18
AWEMAC                                                        G4 INTERNATIONAL LTD
    RAP REPORT FOR THE PROPOSED G4 INTERNATIONAL LTD
          KENYA FARMING PROJECT IN LOWER TANA                                 January 22, 2010

The communities participating in the project will benefit from the following: 
   g)   Communal Water points. 
   h)   Roads and bridges. 
   i)   Schools. 
   j)   Health facilities. 
   k)   Out growers scheme 
   l)   Other community Projects working with the community 

The main water source  for the  proposed farm  will be  from  rain water  and supplemented 
with excess water harvested from floods. Water from the Tana River will be used to initially 
charge the irrigation system  and ditches and to recharge when river  flow is not stressed. 
After clearance of the bushes, landscaping shall be undertaken to align the land for a pivot 
irrigation  system.  This  irrigation  system  is  preferred  over  the  other  irrigation  system 
because of minimum maintenance, minimum management, controllability and speed. 



1.3 Project Farming Technologies 
 
After  clearance  of  the  bushes,  pivot  irrigation  system  has  been  selected  for  the  project 
because of minimum maintenance, minimum management, controllability and speed.  
G4 International Ltd will maximize yields through the following techniques:‐ 
 
   g) Precision Farming and Grid soil sampling annually, thus enabling soil fertility to be 
        maintained at highest levels 
   h) Full Field Irrigation including water conservation improvement techniques 
   i) Selection of seed varieties and hybrids to suit soil and climatic conditions  
   j) Seed  replication  on  farms  both  remotely  and  in‐country  to  ensure  maintenance  of 
        hybrid and inbred variety quality 
   k) Conservation  farming  techniques  are  employed  to  enhance  water  retention  and 
        maximize organic content of the soil. (Zero till). 
   l) Use  of  latest  technology  harvesting  machinery  reducing  harvesting  time,  reducing 
        losses and maximizing oil seed quality 
 
 
 
 

                                                                                                   19
AWEMAC                                                       G4 INTERNATIONAL LTD
    RAP REPORT FOR THE PROPOSED G4 INTERNATIONAL LTD
          KENYA FARMING PROJECT IN LOWER TANA                                  January 22, 2010

History of Wachu ranch 
Wachu ranch was established in 1976 with the main activity of livestock rearing. The ranch 
lies along Malindi – Garsen road about 80km north from Malindi. The ranch covers a total 
of  28,911  hectares  and  is  surrounded  immediately  by  other  ranches,  including  Kitangale 
Ranch  and  Kurawa  Livestock  Marketing  Division.  The  road  from  Malindi  to  Garsen 
transects  the  ranch  about  17kms  across  the  Ranch.  The  livestock  keeping  activity  in  the 
ranch  was  devastated  in  1984  when  a  severe  rocked  the  country  and  the  ranch  was  not 
spared as the 2,700 cattle that were inside were lost. The ranch was abandoned and was 
overgrown  into  a  forest.  Approximately  200  families  intruded  into  the  ranch  by  the  year 
2007  and  according  to  the  household  surveys  done  in  January  2010,  the  number  had 
increased  to  approximately  500  families  that  have  settled  in  the  ranch  doing  farming 
activities.  
The intention of G4 International Ltd Farming Project is to bring World farming practices 
and key project management skills to the Kenyan farms in conjunction with local expertise 
to gain the benefits of extremely fertile soil areas, with a year round growing climate. 

1.4 Objective  
The main objective of the assignment is to assist the G4 International Limited to prepare a 
Resettlement  Action  Plan  after  carrying  out  an  Environmental  Social  Impact  Assessment 
(ESIA)  of  Kenya  Farming  Project,  especially  for  resettling  squatters,  invaded  in  Wachu 
Ranch and who shall be affected by the proposed development project. 

1.5  Resettlement Methodology 
The  objectives  of  the  study  were  met  using  systematic,  integrated,  participatory  and 
collaborative  specialized  approaches  where  public  meetings  and  key  informants  (District 
Officer, Local Chiefs, Lead Agency Officers and local Authorities) were conducted as part of 
the  qualitative  and  quantitative  methods  that  were  used  to  get  the  views  of  the  affected 
people.  The  information  that  was  collected  through  field  investigations,  focus  group 
discussions,  use  of  thematic  maps,  census  and  inventory  survey,  literature  document 
reviews  and  key  informant  interviews.  Some  of  the  people  consulted  were  Provincial, 

                                                                                                    20
AWEMAC                                                       G4 INTERNATIONAL LTD
           RAP REPORT FOR THE PROPOSED G4 INTERNATIONAL LTD
                 KENYA FARMING PROJECT IN LOWER TANA                              January 22, 2010

District  and  Divisional  local  administrations  officers  including  chiefs,  Community  and 
Village  leaders,  local  Non‐Governmental  Organizations  and  interested  groups,  Wachu 
Ranch Members, Squatters, among others. Resettlement Methodology 
The methodology that was used by the consultant is described below:‐ 
      i.     Consultation  with  the affected  people  along the  proposed  line  was  done  as  part of 
             participatory approach. 
      i.     Socio‐economic surveys of  all the affected people  (including seasonal, migrant and 
             host population).A comprehensive questionnaire for data collection was developed, 
             whereby  it  captured  the  following  information  household  bio  data,  livelihoods, 
             infrastructure  inventories  including  road  network,  water,  schools  and  health 
             facilities, Houses, Commercial properties and social services infrastructure 
     ii.     Thematic maps that identified features as population settlement, infrastructure, soil 
             composition, natural vegetation areas, water resources and land use pattern 
    iii.     Analysis  of  survey  results  and  studies  to  establish  redress  mechanism  and 
             resettlement parameters, to design appropriate income restoration. 
    iv.      An  Inventory  was  used  to  show  lost  and  affected  assets  at  the  household  level, 
             enterprise and community level. 
 
 
 
 




                                                                                                
 
                                              Figure 1: Farm Facilities

1.6  Objectives 
The main objective of RAP is to ensure proper guidelines and procedures are adhered to in 
the mitigation of the adverse impacts that might occur during the project implementation 
                                                                                       21
AWEMAC                                                G4 INTERNATIONAL LTD
    RAP REPORT FOR THE PROPOSED G4 INTERNATIONAL LTD
          KENYA FARMING PROJECT IN LOWER TANA                                  January 22, 2010

in order to ensure that the concerns of PAPs along the Malindi‐Garsen road are addressed 
due to the resettlement operations and impacts of the project. 

1.7  Scope of Work 
RAP is prepared to ensure that the losses that will be incurred in the project area, by PAPs 
are  well  addressed  and  the  squatters  are  assisted  to  relocate  to  other  places.  This  will 
enable  them  to  restore  their  living  standards  and  income.  RAP  ensures  that  the  affected 
people are not worse off than they were before the project came to place and this will be 
put  in  place  where  consideration  will  be  put  on  women,  vulnerable  groups,  disabled  and 
children who are usually the most affected in such situations. 

1.8 Resettlement Guiding Principles 
For  RAP  to  comply  with  best  practices  for  resettlement  of  the  affected  people  G4 
International  Ltd  and  Wadadli  Ltd,  shall  bind  themselves  to  the  principles  mentioned 
below to guide in the development of a  Resettlement Action Plans and hence the process. 
   i.  Consultation  with PAPs: The rights and interest of the PAPs are heard and  through 
       mitigations effected to their interest so that they don’t feel cheated 
  ii. Minimization of resettlement: In order to adhere to this, the developer must try as 
       much as possible to ensure that the design of the project has minimal displacement. 
 iii. Availability during relocation of the affected persons: The developer will ensure and 
       guarantee  the  provision  of  any  necessary  compensation  for  people  who  have 
       binding  agreements  that  justify  land  acquired  was  paid  for  and  purported  owner 
       has a legal document, or any other disturbances.  
 iv. Negotiated  compensation  options:  There  must  be  a  consensus  to  be  reached 
       between Wachu Ranch members and the developer to address the issue of squatters 
       who  will  be  affected  so  that  a  fair  and  equitable  compensation  made  must  be 
       reasonable,  any  house  structures  and  immature  crops  are  paid  for  or  given  a  90 
       days notification time before eviction according to the Kenyan law. 
  v.   Resettlement  must  take  place  to  ensure  PAPs  also  to  some  extent  benefit:  Those 
       who  are  affected  can  be  employed  and  sub  contracted  as  casuals  in  opportunities 
       that arise from the project. 
 vi. Establishment of  resettlement baseline  data: The following activities were done to 
       successfully  re‐establish  the  affected,  persons  and  property.  Activities  undertaken 
       before displacement were:‐ 
          • Inventory  of  immovable  assets  (building  and  structures)  in  order  to 
               determine fair and reasonable compensation levels or related mitigations.  
          • A Census survey detailing household composition and demography.  
                                                                                                22
AWEMAC                                                      G4 INTERNATIONAL LTD
        RAP REPORT FOR THE PROPOSED G4 INTERNATIONAL LTD
              KENYA FARMING PROJECT IN LOWER TANA                               January 22, 2010

                  The  asset  inventories  were  used  to  determine  and  negotiate  entitlements, 
                  while the census information was required to identify Year of settlement in 
                  the  Ranch,  homestead  type  and  home  District.  The  information  obtained 
                  from  the  inventories  and  census  was  entered  into  a  database  to  facilitate 
                  resettlement planning, implementation and monitoring. 
vii.      Resettlement  upfront  project  cost:  Unless  resettlement  is  built  in  as  an  Up‐front 
          project cost, it tends to be under budgeted, whereby money gets diverted away from 
          the resettlement budget to ‘more pressing’ project needs. The developer is therefore 
          to  ensure  that  compensation  costs,  as  well  as  those  resettlement  costs  that  fall 
          within  their  scope  of  commitment,  are  considered  in  the  overall  project  budget  as 
          up‐front costs. 
viii.     An  independent  monitoring  and  grievance  procedure:  In  addition  to  set  up  of 
          monitoring  mechanism  within  G4  International  Ltd  Kenya  Farming  Project,  an 
          independent Team comprising local administration , friendly NGO officials  and the 
          locals will undertake monitoring of the resettlement as an aspect of the project. All 
          the  generated  grievance  procedures  will  be  organized  in  such  a  way  that  they  are 
          accessible  to  all  affected  parties,  with  particular  concern  for  the  situation  of 
          vulnerable  groupings.  Monitoring  will  specifically  take  place  via  measurement 
          against the pre‐resettlement database. 




                                                                                                     23
AWEMAC                                                         G4 INTERNATIONAL LTD
    RAP REPORT FOR THE PROPOSED G4 INTERNATIONAL LTD
          KENYA FARMING PROJECT IN LOWER TANA                                     January 22, 2010

     
 
                              2        MINIMIZING RESETTLEMENT 
 
2.1 Efforts to Minimize Displacement 
The RAP document is meant to ensure that during the implementation of the project, the 
victims of resettlement are provided with either  
    1. Alternative  sites  to  settle  in  the  section  of  the  Ranch  that  will  not  be  used  for 
         farming,  
    2. Compensate  some  humanitarian  allowance  to  those  who  have  incurred  some 
         significant money to set up structures and therefore vacate the Ranch. 
    3. Buy some land in the neighborhood to resettle the squatters. 
However, the second option was adopted since the squatters have no legal entitlements to 
private  land.  Most  of  them  have  settled  on  land  for  less  than  five  years  and  are  aware  of 
their  illegal  occupation  of  private  land.  Therefore,  the  five  hundred  families  should  be 
compensated for property losses and resettlement allowance. 
 
2.3 Mechanisms Minimize Displacement during Implementation 
     i). G4 International Ltd should liase with Wachu Ranch to look into the possibility of 
          the  squatters  being  relocated  to  a  specific  land  within  the  ranch.  This  will  have 
          reduced mass displacement to unknown destinations. 
 
     ii). Due to displacement of the PAPs, the developer should help them in ensuring that 
          they are well resettled and if possible provide them with social amenities like water 
          and income generation activities. Their livelihoods should also be sustained in their 
          areas where they are displaced to settle. 




                                                                                                       24
AWEMAC                                                          G4 INTERNATIONAL LTD
      RAP REPORT FOR THE PROPOSED G4 INTERNATIONAL LTD
            KENYA FARMING PROJECT IN LOWER TANA                                 January 22, 2010

 
                       3       CENSUS AND SOCIO­ECONOMIC SURVEYS  
 
3.1      Census, Assets Inventories, Natural Resource Assessments, and Socioeconomic 
         Surveys 
     3.1.1 Project Area 
The Proposed project, which is located at Garsen, in Tana River district, will cover most of 
the 28,911 Hectares of land to be leased from the management of Wachu Ranch. The Ranch 
is  located  in  Wachu  Oda  Location  and  covers  28,911  Hectares  of  land  consisting  mainly 
bush and water ponds. There exists a seasonal ox‐bow lake in the northern side called Lake 
Godana Biyu. The Malindi – Garsen tarmac Road B8 bisects the Ranch into two portions in 
the  ration  of  1:3.  The  neighboring  areas  include,  Galana  Ranch  and  Tsavo  East  National 
Park  to  the  South  and  Onkolde  Ranch,  Kurawa  Livestock  Marketing  Division  and  Indian 
Ocean to the North, Kitangale Ranch and River Tana to the East. 
 
There  exist  about  500  families  of  squatters  who  have  invaded  and  settled  on  the  Wachu 
Ranch.  The  majorities  of  the  people  live  along  the  road  but  depend  mainly  on  land  for 
subsistence  farming  and  livestock  keeping,  seasonal  labor  and  remittance  from  their 
relatives. Big portions of land are still virgin land, and are inhabited by wild animals such as 
leopards, buffaloes, antelopes, hyenas, snakes, birdlife and hippos. 
 
The main  economic activity of squatters in  the Ranch is crop farming  supplemented with 
livestock  keeping  for  their  subsistence.  Most  of  the  crops  grown  are  maize,  beans,  millet, 
sorghum,  cassava,  sunflower,  and  paw‐paw  fruits.  Most  of  the  lands  are  rain  fed 
agricultural lands. 
 
     3.1.2 Household Head Occupations 
The occupational activities of the household heads for 500 families of squatters living in 
Wachu Ranch consist of crop farming and formal employment as represented in table 1.1 
below. From the results, 98.1% were crop farmers and 1.9% was in formal employment 
and in small scale business activities. 
Table 1.1 Occupation of household heads  among squatters. 
  Occupation Status                           Percentages %
  Crop Farming 
                                              98.1 
  Formal Employment 
                                              1.9 
                                                                                                    25
AWEMAC                                                        G4 INTERNATIONAL LTD
    RAP REPORT FOR THE PROPOSED G4 INTERNATIONAL LTD
          KENYA FARMING PROJECT IN LOWER TANA                                January 22, 2010

 
       Figure 2: Bar graph representing the Occupation Status of household heads.
                                                  




                                                                            
                                         Percentages % 
    3.1.3 Socio­economic Activities 
The  main  economic  activities  of  squatter  in  the  Ranch  consist  of  cash  crop  growing, 
subsistence;  livestock  keeping,  bee  keeping  and  others  including  game  hunting  and 
poaching.  Subsistence  crops  take  93.9%  whereas  the  others  follow  as  shown  in  the  table 
1.2 below. 
Table 1.2 Socio­Economic Activities of Squatters. 
 Activities                                 Percentage 
 Cash Crop Growing                          2 
 Subsistence Cropping                       92.9 
 Livestock                                  2 
 Bee Keeping                                1 
 Others e.g. Charcoal burning               2 




                                                                                                 26
AWEMAC                                                     G4 INTERNATIONAL LTD
    RAP REPORT FOR THE PROPOSED G4 INTERNATIONAL LTD
          KENYA FARMING PROJECT IN LOWER TANA                                 January 22, 2010

       Figure 3: Bar-graph Representing Squatters Economic activities
 




                                                               
 
Areas with subsistence crop farming farmers tend to be located on main road peripheries 
since this is the source of main transport to market centre. The road tends to pull homes 
along  it  with  families  setting  up  houses  and  market  centers  with  small  Kiosks  being 
established for income generation. 




                        Figure 5: Subsistence Crop farming and Charcoal burning 
 
    3.1.4 Households and Gender Parity 
The  social, economic  and  political  status of women  in  the entire  project  area is  relatively 
weak.  Apart  from  inferiority  in  land  ownership,  most  women  are  subjected  to  early 
marriages  where  their  roles  are  confined  to  the  household  works  and  agricultural 
production, food preparation, child rearing and take care of all the domestic chores. They 
depend on men economically to make the decision of the family. Women’s access to formal 
education is low in the affected areas. About 60% of the female respondents did totally not 
attend any school. This is a high percentage as to that of men who attended school, even at 
primary  level.  Men  are  mainly  involved  in  herding  of  livestock,  busy  in  the  making  of 
                                                                                                  27
AWEMAC                                                      G4 INTERNATIONAL LTD
      RAP REPORT FOR THE PROPOSED G4 INTERNATIONAL LTD
            KENYA FARMING PROJECT IN LOWER TANA                                January 22, 2010

charcoal for economic gain and also to provide security to the family and to the community 
due the effects of attack from bandits and other ethnic community, and on the other hand 
young and old men are found in groups around the market centers idling.  
 
Children are the most vulnerable members of the population due to the effects of famine, 
effects of diseases, and traveling long distances to schools where they can go and acquire 
Primary education.  
 
 
Table1.3: Gender Structure of Male and Female 
    Sex / Gender                                         Percentages % 
    Male                                        54.5 

  Female                                  45.5 
According to the table above and the pie‐chart figure below, 54.5 % of the squatter’s 
respondents were Male and 45.5 % were Female persons.  
 
            Figure 4: Pie-Chart showing the representation of male and female respondents
 




                                                
                     3.1.5 Housing Typology and Related Infrastructure. 
The housing in the project areas consist of different kind of housing structures but mainly 
temporary  housings.  The  houses  are  grass  thatched,  made  of  polythene  materials,  iron 
sheets, and some made of poles as shown in the left side of figure 6. This is mainly owned 
by  the  farming  community  such  as  Pokomo  and  Giriama.  The  house  type  on  the  right  of 


                                                                                                  28
AWEMAC                                                        G4 INTERNATIONAL LTD
    RAP REPORT FOR THE PROPOSED G4 INTERNATIONAL LTD
          KENYA FARMING PROJECT IN LOWER TANA                             January 22, 2010

figure 6 represents the houses owned by pastoralist community, found around the project 
area. 




                                                                                       
                    Figure 6: Types of houses within and around the project area.
The table 1.4 and figure 7 below shows that 70.6% of the squatters live in temporary 
housing typology, 29.4% live in Permanent houses, others are semi‐permanent. They 
anticipated that housing shall be improved from the project  
 
Table1.4: Housing typology in the project area 
 
  Housing Typology                               Percentage 
  Permanent                                          29.4 
  Semi‐Permanent                                      0 
  Temporary                                          70.6 
 
      Figure 7: Bar-graph of housing typology
 




                                                                   
 
                                                                                             29
AWEMAC                                                  G4 INTERNATIONAL LTD
   RAP REPORT FOR THE PROPOSED G4 INTERNATIONAL LTD
         KENYA FARMING PROJECT IN LOWER TANA                            January 22, 2010

    3.1.6 Road Accessibility 
The road accessibility is analyzed as shown in table 8 bellow. From the results, 96.1 % 
confirmed their access is mainly by path while 3.9% use gravel made roads.  
 
Table 1.5: Road Access 
 
  Road Access                                     Percentage 
  Path                                                96.1 
  Paved                                                 0
  Gravel                                               3.9 
  Other                                                 0 
 
 
 
      Figure 8: Bar-graph of road access types




                                                                      
 
The information on accessibility of the road shown in table 1.6 indicates that 74.5% of the 
access roads are passable all the time, while 25.5% are accessible some of the times. 
 
Table 1.6: Road Passable 
  Road Passable                                   Percentage 
  All the time                                        54.5 
  Sometimes                                           22.5 
  Never during rainy season                            23 
  Other                                                 0 
 
 


                                                                                           30
AWEMAC                                                  G4 INTERNATIONAL LTD
    RAP REPORT FOR THE PROPOSED G4 INTERNATIONAL LTD
          KENYA FARMING PROJECT IN LOWER TANA                        January 22, 2010

The analysis on where they seek health assistance is represented as below. Hospital 
captured 64.7% of the respondents 
 
     3.1.7 Health Facilities and HIV/AIDS 
The survey showed that, 64.7% of the household have access to hospitals31.4% to 
dispensaries and the rest to clinics as shown in table 1.7 below. 
Table 1.7: Health facilities accessible by squatters 
  Health Assistance                                Percentage 
  Hospital                                              64.7 
  Dispensary                                            31.4
  Clinic                                                 3.9 
  Traditional                                             0 
  Others                                                  0 
On HIV/AIDS the results were analyzed as follows. 90.6% had heard of HIV/AIDS, as shown 
in table 1.8 and figure 9 below. Further analysis indicates that 92.5% of the respondents 
had none of their relatives infected as indicated in table 10 below. 
          
Table 1.8: Knowledge of HIV/AIDS 
 
  HIV/AIDS                                         Percentage 
  Yes                                                   90.6 
  No                                                     9.4 
                                                           
 
      Figure 9: Pie-Chart showing Knowledge of HIV/AIDS 
 




                                                      
 
Table 1.9: Affected relatives of squatters with HIV/AIDS 
 
  Affected Relatives                            Percentage 
  Yes                                               7.5 
  No                                               92.5 
                                                                                        31
AWEMAC                                                 G4 INTERNATIONAL LTD
    RAP REPORT FOR THE PROPOSED G4 INTERNATIONAL LTD
          KENYA FARMING PROJECT IN LOWER TANA                            January 22, 2010

    3.1.8 Waste Management 
Analyses on waste management showed that 67.3% of the squatters throw refuse into the 
garden, 13.5% in rubbish pits while 19.2 % burn refuse as shown in table 1.10 and figure 
10 shown below.  
Table 1.10: Refuse disposal by squatters 
 
  Refuse Disposal                               Percentage 
  Thrown in the garden                              67.3 
  Rubbish pits                                      13.5 
  Burning                                           19.2 
  Others                                             0 
      Figure 10: Bar graph showing refuse disposal by squatters
 




                                                            
 
     3.1.9 Sanitary facilities use, access and drinking water treatment 
From the results obtained, 70.8% of the squatters use bush as a sanitary facility, while the 
rest use other means as shown in table 1.11 below. The   results show that 76.5% of the 
squatters had no separate bathrooms in table 1.12 below. Results also show that 47.2% of 
the squatters disinfect drinking water with chemicals as a preventive measure, while 
others mainly boil the water. 
Table 1.11: Sanitary facilities used by squatters 
                                               
  Sanitary                                       Percentage 
  Pit latrine                                        18.8 
  Dig a hole                                         10.4
  Bush                                               70.8 
 
Table 1.12: Access to separate bathrooms by squatters 
 
  Separate Bathroom                              Percentage 
  Yes                                                23.5 
                                                                                            32
AWEMAC                                                  G4 INTERNATIONAL LTD
   RAP REPORT FOR THE PROPOSED G4 INTERNATIONAL LTD
         KENYA FARMING PROJECT IN LOWER TANA                            January 22, 2010

 No                                                  76.5 
 
Table 1.13: Drinking water treatment by squatters 
                                              
  Preventive Measures taken by 
  household                                    Percentages % 
  Boiling                                           35.8
  Disinfecting with chemicals                       47.2 
  Filtering                                          0 
  None                                               17 
 
     3.1.10 Access to Water and its quality 
The main water sources were water wells by 61% and ox‐bow Lake by 12.2%, although 
some people get water from River Tana, roof water harvesting and surface run off into 
Ponds, as shown in table 1.14 below. The water sources and utilization is represented as 
below. The analysis captured domestic use and drinking as the main water uses for 
respondents. 




                                                                         
                          Figure 11: Domestic water pond within the Ranch
Table 1.14: Domestic water uses by squatters. 
                                          
 Domestic Water Sources                       Percentage 
 Ocean                                            2.4 
 Ox bow  lake                                    12.2 
 River                                            2.4 
 Wells/Borehole                                   61 
 Dam                                              9.8 
 Roof Catchment                                   4.9 
 Run off                                          7.3 
 Others                                            0 
                                                                                            33
AWEMAC                                                 G4 INTERNATIONAL LTD
    RAP REPORT FOR THE PROPOSED G4 INTERNATIONAL LTD
          KENYA FARMING PROJECT IN LOWER TANA                                January 22, 2010

On environment issues the analysis on the measures taken to protect water sources from 
contamination are as follows. From the analysis, 63.6% do not take any measure in 
protecting water sources from contamination. Responding to the measures taken, the 
36.4% have taken some measures to use clean water as shown in table 1.15. 
 
         Table 1.15: Measures taken by squatters to clean water and its source. 
  If any measures taken to clean water             Percentages % 
  Yes                                                    36.4 
  No                                                     63.6 
 
3.2      Identification of Project Impacts and Affected Populations 
     3.2.1 Design of Farming Project 
The project components will include, farming crops like Crambe, Castor Oil, Sunflower and 
Construction  of  an  Oil  Processing  factory.  Currently,  the  area  is  invaded  by  about  500 
squatters mostly Crop farmers living along the Malindi‐Garsen Road. See figure 12. 
 




                                                                                          
       Figure 12: Area designated for farming in Wachu Ranch, Lower Tana
 
   3.2.2 Potential Social and Environmental Impacts 
Some of the environmental and social impacts associated with the project are as follows. 
    



                                                                                                 34
AWEMAC                                                     G4 INTERNATIONAL LTD
    RAP REPORT FOR THE PROPOSED G4 INTERNATIONAL LTD
          KENYA FARMING PROJECT IN LOWER TANA                                   January 22, 2010

  3.2.3 Positive  Developments  associated  to  the  G4  International  Kenya  Farming 
               Project 
           I. Urbanization development 
  The  proposed  project  is  expected  to  bring  urbanization  related  developments  in  the 
  Tana  area  given  the  fact  that  the  area  has  no  single  industry  to  employ  locals  and  up 
  scale  local  income  levels  which  are  currently  less  than  a  dollar  per  individual.  The 
  developments associated to the modern farming practices are expected to improve the 
  facilities  in  the  area  including  access  to  modern  communication  facilities  and 
  civilization.  Currently  the  communication  is  limited  in  coverage,  only  Zain  and 
  Safaricom network exists in parts of Tarasaa Division. 
          II. Development of local centres 
  Local  centres  such  as  Malindi  town,  Tarassa  Division,  Oda  Centre,  Garsen  Division, 
  Kurawa  Centre  will  soon  develop  into  urban  set  ups  due  to  need  for  settlements, 
  modern  shops  and  improved  transport  in  the  area.  Soon  market  centres  will  grow  to 
  polis and polis will soon grow to metropolis. 
         III. Development of roads infrastructure 
  Upon  commissioning  of  the  project,  the  only  accessible  tarmac  road  (B8)  that  bisects 
  the  Wachu  ranch  running  from  Malindi‐Ngongoni  to  Garsen‐Lamu,  will  need  to  be 
  upgraded into a highway by Government and others feeder roads will be opened up to 
  enhance accessibility of the area. 
         IV. Development of water supply 
  The  water  use  sources  and  access  to  drinking  water  is  very  limited  in  the  area.  The 
  residents rely on water ponds and river water fetched more than 8KM away. Therefore, 
  with the coming of the Irrigation project, in the area, it’s expected that the situation will 
  be  improved  and  locals  can  have  safe  and  accessible  water  sources  even  if  it  means 
  buying at low sustainable prices. This will also reduce the cost of living in the area and 
  boost the health of the locals. 
          V. Development of Solid waste and sewerage disposal systems 
  The  Tarasaa  Division,  where  the  project  is  located,  has  inadequate  and  safe  means  of 
  solid waste management. The G4 International farming project will bring modern waste 
  management practices to handle waste generated from its farm and within the growing 
  urban  centres.  The  company  will  consult  with  environment  consultant  to  develop 
  disposable sewerage systems. 
         VI. Availability of local farm products 
  The project  is going to  major in  production of oil based seed  crops such as Castor oil, 
  Sunflower  and  Crambe  oil.  The  products  of  the  farm  will  earn  the  country  foreign 
  exchange and boost the local per capita cash flow. The local farmers practicing farming 
                                                                                                     35
AWEMAC                                                        G4 INTERNATIONAL LTD
    RAP REPORT FOR THE PROPOSED G4 INTERNATIONAL LTD
          KENYA FARMING PROJECT IN LOWER TANA                                 January 22, 2010

  in  the  above  crops  can  also  gain  access  to  available  market  in  the  area.  The  income 
  earned from sales will sustain the socio‐economic livelihoods of their household. 
         VII. Availability of ready market and improvement of livestock farming 
  The existence of the farming factory will open up the area, its accessibility and therefore 
  enhance access to available livestock resources from the livestock keeping community. 
  The project will develop modern slaughter houses, veterinary health centre and cattle 
  dips in the area. The by products of crambe and sunflower will also be packaged to bran 
  meals facilitate nutrition status of livestock. 
        VIII. Improvement of eco­tourism activities 
  The  lower  Tana  area  is  well  endowed  with  tourism  resources  such  as  wildlife  game 
  drives,  unique  Orma  and  Pokomo  Socio‐cultural  practices,  lifestyles,  pivot  irrigation 
  farming  methods,  Oil  process  farming  and  indigenous  eco‐agriculture  activities  .  The 
  farming activities will attract local tourists and students on academic tour from colleges 
  and university. 
          IX. Establishment of forest conservation programs 
  The  project  will  also  protect  the  environment  by  promoting  environmental  tree 
  planting  and  raising  of  indigenous  seedling  along  side  the  main  farming  activity.  This 
  will be aimed at encouraging the locals’ to plant trees that protect the environment and 
  enhance local micro‐climate. 
           X. Development of women livelihoods and programs 
  The women, who are the most active group of the local community in the project area, 
  are  usually  charged  with  mandate  to  provide  food  and  take  care  of  their  households, 
  while  the  men  provide  security.  The  G4  International  project  will  empower  women 
  through funding registered women group activities and be involved directly in project 
  farming  practices,  seed  collection  and  packaging  of  farm  produce.  Identified  women 
  groups  include;  Wachu‐Oda  Handaraku  Women  Group,  Imani  Women  Group,  and 
  Bokole Women Group. 
          XI. Development of Youth Livelihoods and Programs 
  Most youths, aged between 12‐24 years within the project area are idle and depend on 
  their  parents  for  most  basic  needs.  The  youth  groups  will  benefit  from  the  G4 
  International  project, participation  in  well  designed  seminars  and  exchange programs 
  to sensitize them on modern faming practices, youth creativity programs, education and 
  life programs. The sports sector will also be funded to promote local talents. 
         XII. Diversification of Pastoralists livelihoods 
  The pastoralists rely heavily on the cattle farming for their livelihoods. The livelihoods 
  of livestock keepers have a times been threatened by drought cycles leading to loss of 
  heads  of  cattle.  The  G4  International  Kenya  farming  project  will  bring  on  diversified 
                                                                                                   36
AWEMAC                                                       G4 INTERNATIONAL LTD
    RAP REPORT FOR THE PROPOSED G4 INTERNATIONAL LTD
          KENYA FARMING PROJECT IN LOWER TANA                                   January 22, 2010

    livestock  keeping  skills  that  encourage  local  farmers  to  invest  in  crop  farming  in  the 
    land that is still endowed with humus and nitrogenous. 
 
    3.2.4 Challenges associated to the project 
 
   I.   Displacement of wildlife in the ranch 
It was noted by all present that if wachu ranch will be fenced off, the movement of existing 
wildlife will be curtailed and this will lead to human wildlife conflict in the neighbourhood. 
The  area  has  been  their  natural  habitats  and  their  feeding  grounds  especially  during 
drought for many years. 
  II. Indigenous vegetation clearance 
The proposed project will result in the clearance of indigenous virgin vegetation, therefore 
to  maintain  the  source  of  indigenous  herbal  medicine  now  only  available  in  the  Wachu 
bush, the developer is advised to keep some trees stands to cover such community needs. 
Other  sources  of  energy  alternate  to  wood  fuel,  can  be  also  be  availed  to  the  locals  to 
enhance supply of energy. 

       3.1.1.1 People Affected by the Project 
The Factory facility and farming activities have localized effects to the local residents but 
have regional effects to the environment resources off‐site. The people living at far distance 
and the entire population of a country may or can be affected positively by the project. 
 
3.2    Resultant Issues from Consultations with Affected People 
One major meeting was conducted at Vibao‐viwili center near settlements to be affected by 
the Farming project, within Wachu ranch. A total of 500 families living in the Wachu Ranch 
as  Squatters  were  targeted  to  enhance  consultation  with  affected  population  regarding 
information  of  the  new  project,  its  advantages  and  disadvantages  and  therefore 
participatory  identification  of  alternative  sites  for  the  project  and  PAPs,  and  possible 
vacating the Wachu ranch. 
During the Survey which was mainly targeted to the persons who have illegally acquired 
land or otherwise called squatters, along the 17Kilometrs stretch of the Malindi‐Garsen 
Road (Class B8).The following issues were raised. 
       One of the main issues raised include, the need for the government administration 
       structures, Wachu Ranch Committee and the Developer to acknowledge land use 
       and squatter rights of the current persons who may have been conned to pay out 
       lump sums of money, to Village elders, initial squatters, at the expense of getting 
       land allocation in Wachu Ranch. Therefore, they wanted to know what form of 

                                                                                                     37
AWEMAC                                                        G4 INTERNATIONAL LTD
  RAP REPORT FOR THE PROPOSED G4 INTERNATIONAL LTD
        KENYA FARMING PROJECT IN LOWER TANA                          January 22, 2010

    compensation between monetary and Acreage land sites for Resettlement, based on 
    their current status of replacement costs.  
     
    About 500 families of the squatters have been living in the area for about 3‐5 years 
    and have acquired approximately 15 Acres of land each ,practicing food and cash 
    crop including Maize and Cassava farming among other crops, therefore claims to be 
    the primary stakeholders in the coming project within the Wachu Ranch, for 
    example, ownership of some share‐dividends , allowed to farm sunflower on their 
    farms and sale to the investor for oil processing and or be prioritized in job 
    acquisition and employment from the oil company. 
     
    Majority of the persons are crop farmers who stay away from their farms, but have 
    assigned local shamba boys/caretakers to clear vegetation, put up temporary 
    shelters, practice crop farming and save earnings from the produce. During the 
    severe droughts, the neighboring locals from Pastoralists Community come with 
    their livestock; graze on the farms and Community resource conflict ensues, 
    resulting into injuries and sometimes death. 
     
    There is insecurity in the Wachu Ranch area especially along the Malindi‐Lamu 
    Road, as a result of sporadic assaults, banditry and burglary, targeting both local 
    livestock and foreigners with valuables. Therefore more Police Posts and regular 
    Police patrols are required within the ranch and its neighborhood to reinforce 
    security. 
     
    The squatters have requested the investor to consider providing Communal Social 
    Amenities such primary and Secondary Schools, equipped Health Centres, piped 
    water , electricity supply and build more connector roads and bridges. In all these 
    facilities, the locals should be allowed to provide Labour and be consulted through 
    appropriate forums and local administrations to suggest centers closer to most 
    persons for services. Socio‐Economic Activities in the area should also be boosted to 
    enhance adequate employment ration especially in the local youths, who most of 
    them are Primary and Secondary School leavers. 
     
    Among the squatters are persons coming from varied Kenyan tribes and spatial, 
    diverse communities. The squatters who are not indigenous to the Mijikenda and 
    Coast Province, for example coming from Luhya, Luo, Kamba and Kikuyu tribes 
    claims to be disregarded and ignored by both Mijikenda Community, Local 
    administration and local Politicians. Therefore request for equity without tribalism 

                                                                                        38
AWEMAC                                              G4 INTERNATIONAL LTD
      RAP REPORT FOR THE PROPOSED G4 INTERNATIONAL LTD
            KENYA FARMING PROJECT IN LOWER TANA                            January 22, 2010

        in decision making and resource use as regards Wachu Ranch and assorted 
        communal resources. 
         
        There is an anticipated threat to social livelihood in that, with clearing of bush and 
        altering of local’s food crop resource base to sunflower and castor oil plants, these 
        will reduce food supply, resulting into importation and subsequent rise in food 
        prices in Malindi and Garsen areas. 
 
        The squatters raised a concern that the boundaries of the Wachu ranch are not well 
        marked. This was seen to be crucial as it would enable people in the project area to 
        know if they were on the project site or not and thus avoid more conflict. 
         
        Squatters always exudes great fear and suspicion  to any visitor due to self guilt and 
        lack of knowledge on actual land owners in the area, for the fact that some have 
        stayed for many years in the Ranch without disturbances or any private claims of 
        vast idle land.  
         
        It’s expected that there are approximately five hundred families  within the Ranch, 
        with majority having acquired small 50m by 50m size plots to put up shanty 
        shelters along the road but cleared more vegetation to farm interiorly, in large 
        15Acres plots. Most of the Squatters are absentee land lords. 
         
        More than half the number of people interviewed expressed concern that one way of 
        ending the common Resource conflict tragedy as a result of competitive invasion 
        into the virgin Wachu Ranch by the pastoralists and crop farmers, can be resolved 
        through introduction of such a projects like vegetation clearing and sunflower 
        farming, where by none of the communities has an upper hand in control of 
        resources and subsequent communal fighting and clashes.  

 
3.3    Updates  to  Census,  Assets  Inventories,  Natural  Resource  Assessments,  and 
       Socioeconomic Surveys 
Updates shall be done as per the monitoring evaluation schedule documented in this report 
(See chapter 11). 
 




                                                                                              39
AWEMAC                                                    G4 INTERNATIONAL LTD
    RAP REPORT FOR THE PROPOSED G4 INTERNATIONAL LTD
          KENYA FARMING PROJECT IN LOWER TANA                                 January 22, 2010

         4      POLICY, LEGAL AND INSTITUTIONAL FRAMEWORK GOVERNING 
                         ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT IN KENYA 
 
This  section  describes  the  relevant  local  laws  and  customs  that  apply  to  Resettlement  of 
Persons Affected by the proposed development project.  

4.1     Introduction to Relevant local Laws and Custom for Resettlement 
There is a growing concern in Kenya and at global level that many forms of development 
activities  cause  damage  to  the  environment.  Development  activities  have  the  potential  to 
damage  the  natural  resources  upon  which  the  economies  are  based.  A  major  national 
challenge  today  is  how  to  maintain  sustainable  development  without  damaging  the 
environment. The Environmental Impact Assessment is a useful tool for protection of the 
environment from the negative effects of developmental activities. It is now accepted that 
development  projects  must  be  economically  viable,  socially  acceptable  and 
environmentally  sound.  It  is  a  condition  of  the  Kenya  Government  to  conduct 
Environmental  Impact  Assessment  and  a  Resettlement  Action  Plan  for  the  development 
Projects  that  have  impacts  on  environment  and  the  local  people,  who  live  on  the  land 
illegally. 
 
According to Sections 58 and 138 of the Environmental Management and Coordination Act 
(EMCA) No. 8 of 1999 and Section 3 of the Environmental (Impact Assessment and Audit) 
Regulations  2003  (Legal  No.  101),  all  industries  require  an  Environmental  Impact 
Assessment  project/study  report  prepared  and  submitted  to  the  National  Environment 
Management Authority (NEMA) for review and eventual Licensing before the development 
commences. This was necessary as many forms of developmental activities cause damage 
to  the  environment  and  hence  the  greatest  challenge  today  is  to  maintain  sustainable 
development without interfering with the environment. 
 

4.2    Environmental Problems in Kenya 
There  are  many  environmental  problems  and  challenges  in  Kenya  today.  Among  the 
cardinal  environmental  problems  include:  loss  of  biodiversity  and  habitat,  land 
degradation,  land  use  conflicts,  human  and  animal  conflicts,  water  management  and 
environmental  pollution.  This  has  been  aggravated  by  lack  of  awareness  and  inadequate 
information  amongst  the  public  on  the  consequences  of  their  interaction  with  the 
environment. In addition there is limited local communities’ involvement in participatory 
planning  and  management  of  environmental  and  natural  resources.  Recognizing  the 

                                                                                                   40
AWEMAC                                                       G4 INTERNATIONAL LTD
    RAP REPORT FOR THE PROPOSED G4 INTERNATIONAL LTD
          KENYA FARMING PROJECT IN LOWER TANA                                 January 22, 2010

importance of natural resources and the environment in general, the Kenyan Government 
has put in place wide range of policy, institutional and legislative framework to address the 
major causes of environmental degradation and negative impacts on ecosystem emanating 
from industrial and economic development programmes. 

4.3    Environmental Policy Framework 
Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) is a methodology used to identify the actual and 
probable impacts of the projects and programmes on the environment and to recommend 
alternatives  and  mitigating  measures.  The  assessment  is  required  at  all  stages  of  project 
development  with  a  view  to  ensuring  environmentally  sustainable  development  for  both 
existing  and  proposed  public  and  private  sector  development  ventures.  The  National  EIA 
regulations were issued in accordance with the provisions of Environmental Management 
and Coordination Act (EMCA) of 1999. The EIA Regulations must be administered, taking 
into cognizance provisions of EMCA 1999 and other relevant national laws. The intention is 
to  approve  and  license  only  those  projects  that  take  into  consideration  all  aspects  of 
concern to the public as they impact on health and the quality of the environment. 

4.4    Institutional Framework 
At  present  there  are  over  twenty  (20)  institutions  and  departments  which  deal  with 
environmental  issues  in  Kenya.  Some  of  the  key  institutions  include  the  National 
Environmental Council (NEC), National Environmental Management Authority (NEMA), the 
Forestry Department, Kenya Wildlife Services (KWS) and others. There are also local and 
international NGOs involved in environmental issues in the country. 

4.5     National Environmental Management Authority (NEMA) 
The object and  purpose  for  which  NEMA is established  is  to  exercise  general  supervision 
and  co‐ordinate  over  all  matters  relating  to  the  environment  and  to  be  the  principal 
instrument  of  the  government  in  the  implementation  of  all  policies  relating  to  the 
environment.  A  Director  General  appointed  by  the  president  heads  NEMA.  The  Authority 
shall: 
       •   Co‐ordinate the various environmental management activities being undertaken 
           by  the  lead  agencies  and  promote  the  integration  of  environmental 
           considerations into development policies, plan, programmes and projects with a 
           view  to  ensuring  the  proper  management  and  rational  utilisation  of  the 
           environmental resources on a sustainable yield basis for the improvement of the 
           quality of human life in Kenya. 


                                                                                                   41
AWEMAC                                                       G4 INTERNATIONAL LTD
  RAP REPORT FOR THE PROPOSED G4 INTERNATIONAL LTD
        KENYA FARMING PROJECT IN LOWER TANA                                  January 22, 2010

    •    Take  stock  of  the  natural  resources  in  Kenya  and  their  utilisation’s  and 
         consultation, with the relevant lead agencies, land use guidelines. 
    •    Examine land use patterns to determine their impact on the quality and quantity 
         of the natural resources. 
    •    Carry out surveys, which will assist in the proper management and conservation 
         of the environment. 
    •     Advise the government on legislative and other measures for the management 
         of the environment or the implementation of relevant international conservation 
         treaties and agreements in the field of environment as the case may be. 
    •    Advise the government on regional and international environmental convention 
         treaties  and  agreements  to  which  Kenya  should  be  a  party  and  follow  up  the 
         implementation of such agreements where Kenya is a party. 
    •    Undertake  and  co‐ordinate  research,  investigation  and  surveys  in  the  field  of 
         environment and collect and disseminate information about the findings of such 
         research, investigation or survey. 
    •    Mobilise  and  monitor  the  use  of  financial  and  human  resources  for 
         environmental management. 
    •    Identify  projects  and  programmes  or  types  of  projects  and  programmes,  plans 
         and  policies  for  which  environmental  audit  or  environmental  monitoring  must 
         be conducted under EMCA. 
    •    Initiate  and  evolve  procedures  and  safeguards  for  the  prevention  of  accidents, 
         which  may  cause  environmental  degradation  and  evolve  remedial  measures 
         where accidents occur.   
    •    Monitor  and  assess  activities,  including  activities  being  carried  out  by  relevant 
         lead  agencies  in order to ensure that the environment is  not degraded by such 
         activities,  environmental  management  objectives  are  adhered  to  and  adequate 
         early warning on impeding environmental emergencies is given. 
    •    Undertake, in co‐operation with relevant lead agencies programmes intended to 
         enhance  environmental  education  and  public  awareness  about  the  need  for 
         sound  environmental  management  as  well  as  for  enlisting  public  support  and 
         encouraging the effort made by other entities in that regard. 
    •    Publish and disseminate manuals, codes or guidelines relating to environmental 
         management and prevention or abatement of environmental degradation. 
    •    Render  advice  and  technical  support,  where  possible  to  entities  engaged  in 
         natural  resources  management  and  environmental  protection  so  as  to  enable 
         them to carry out their responsibilities satisfactorily. 
                                                                                                 42
AWEMAC                                                     G4 INTERNATIONAL LTD
    RAP REPORT FOR THE PROPOSED G4 INTERNATIONAL LTD
          KENYA FARMING PROJECT IN LOWER TANA                                  January 22, 2010

       • Prepare and issue an annual report on the state of the environment in Kenya and 
         in this regard may direct any lead agency to prepare and submit to it a report on 
         the state of the sector of the environment under the administration of that lead 
         agency and, 
     • Perform such other functions as government may assign to the Authority or as 
         are incidental  or  conducive to the exercise by  the authority of any or all of the 
         functions provided under EMCA. 
However, NEMA mandate is designated to the following committees: 

        4.5.1 Provincial and District Environment Committees
According  to  EMCA,  1999  No.  8,  the  Minister  by  notice  in  the  gazette  appoints  Provincial 
and  District  Environment  Committees  of  the  Authority  in  respect  of  every  province  and 
district respectively. 

        4.5.2 District Environment Committee
District  Environment  Committees  are  responsible  for  the  proper  management  of  the 
environment  within  the  District  in  respect  of  which  they  are  appointed.  They  are  also  to 
perform such additional functions as are prescribed by the Act or as may, from time to time 
be assigned by the Minister by notice in the gazette. The decisions of these committees are 
legal and it is an offence not to implement them.  
 

        4.5.3 Provincial Environment Committee
Like  in  the  case  of  District  Environment  Committees,  the  Provincial  Environment 
Committee  is  responsible  for  the  proper  management  of  the  environment  within  the 
province, which they are appointed.  They are also to perform such additional functions as 
prescribed by this Act or as may from time to time be assigned by the Minister by notice in 
the gazette.  
 

      4.5.4 Public Complaints Committee
The Committee performs the following functions: 
           •   Investigate  any  allegations  or  complaints  against  any  person  or  against  the 
               authority in relation to the condition of the environment in Kenya and on its 
               own motion, any suspected case of environmental degradation and to make a 
               report  of  its  findings  together  with  its  recommendations  thereon  to  the 
               Council. 
                                                                                                  43
AWEMAC                                                       G4 INTERNATIONAL LTD
    RAP REPORT FOR THE PROPOSED G4 INTERNATIONAL LTD
          KENYA FARMING PROJECT IN LOWER TANA                                  January 22, 2010

           •   Prepare  and  submit  to  the  Council  periodic  reports  of  its  activities  which 
               shall  form  part  of  the  annual  report  on  the  state  of  the  environment  under 
               section 9 (3) and 
           •   To perform such other functions and excise such powers as may be assigned 
               to it by the council. 
 

4.6    National Environment Action Plan Committee 
This  Committee  is  responsible  for  the  development  of  a  5‐year  Environment  Action  plan 
among other things. The National Environment Action Plan shall: 
           •   Contain analysis of the Natural  Resources of Kenya with an indication as to 
               any pattern of change in their distribution and quantity over time. 
           •   Contain  analytical  profile  of  the  various  uses  and  value  of  the  natural 
               resources  incorporating  considerations  of  intergenerational  and  intra‐
               generational equity. 
           •   Recommend  appropriate  legal  and  fiscal  incentives  that  may  be  used  to 
               encourage  the  business  community  to  incorporate  environmental 
               requirements into their planning and operational processes. 
           •   Recommend  methods  for  building  national  awareness  through 
               environmental  education  on  the  importance  of  sustainable  use  of  the 
               environment and natural resources for national development. 
           •   Set  out  operational  guidelines  for  the  planning  and  management  of  the 
               environment and natural resources. 
           •   Identify actual or likely problems as may affect the natural resources and the 
               broader environment context in which they exist. 
           •   Identify  and  appraise  trends  in  the  development  of  urban  and  rural 
               settlements,  their  impact  on  the  environment,  and  strategies  for  the 
               amelioration of their negative impacts. 
           •   Propose  guidelines  for  the  integration  of  standards  of  environmental 
               protection into development planning and management. 
           •   Identify  and  recommend  policy  and  legislative  approaches  for  preventing, 
               controlling  or  mitigating  specific  as  well  as  general  diverse  impacts  on  the 
               environment. 
           •   Prioritise areas of environmental research and outline methods of using such 
               research findings. 


                                                                                                    44
AWEMAC                                                       G4 INTERNATIONAL LTD
    RAP REPORT FOR THE PROPOSED G4 INTERNATIONAL LTD
          KENYA FARMING PROJECT IN LOWER TANA                                    January 22, 2010

            •   Without  prejudice  to  the  foregoing,  be  reviewed  and modified  from  time  to 
                time to incorporate emerging knowledge and realities and; 
            •   Be binding on all persons and all government departments, agencies, States 
                Corporation  or  other  organ  of  government  upon  adoption  by  the  national 
                assembly.  

4.7     Standards and Enforcement Review Committee 
This  is  a  technical  Committee  responsible  for  environmental  standards  formulation 
methods  of  analysis,  inspection,  monitoring  and  technical  advice  on  necessary  mitigation 
measures. 
 
Standards and Enforcement Review Committee consists of the members set out in the third 
schedule  to  the  Environmental  Management  and  Co‐ordination  Act.  The  Permanent 
Secretary  under  the  Minister  is  the  Chairman  of  the  Standard  and  Enforcement  Review 
Committee.  The  Director  General  appoints  a  Director  of  the  Authority  to  be  a  member  of 
the Standards and Enforcement Review Committee who is the Secretary to the committee 
and who provides secretarial services to the Committee. The Committee also regulates its 
own procedure. The Standard and Enforcement Review Committee may co‐opt any person 
to  attend  its  meetings  and  a  person  so  co‐opted  shall  participate  at  the  liberations of  the 
committee  but  shall  have  no  vote.  Finally,  the  Committee  shall  meet  at  least  once  every 
three months for the transactions of its business.   
 

4.8     National Environmental Tribunal  
This tribunal guides the handling of cases related to environmental offences in the Republic 
of Kenya.  
 

4.9    National Environmental Council (NEC) 
EMCA 1999 No. 8 part iii section 4 outlines the establishment of the National Environment 
Council  (NEC).  NEC  is  responsible  for  policy  formulation  and  directions  for  purposes  of 
EMCA;  set  national  goals  and  objectives  and  determines  policies  and  priorities  for  the 
protection of the environment and promote co‐operation among public departments, local 
authorities,  private  sector,  non‐governmental  organisations  and  such  other  organisations 
engaged in environmental protection programmes. It also performs such other functions as 
are assigned under EMCA. 
                                                                                                      45
AWEMAC                                                         G4 INTERNATIONAL LTD
    RAP REPORT FOR THE PROPOSED G4 INTERNATIONAL LTD
          KENYA FARMING PROJECT IN LOWER TANA                              January 22, 2010

 

4.10 National Environmental Action Plan (NEAP) 
The  NEAP  for  Kenya  was  prepared  in  mid  1990s.  It  was  a  deliberate  policy  effort  to 
integrate  environmental  considerations  into  the  country’s  economic  and  social 
development.  The  integration  process  was  to  be  achieved  through  a  multi‐sectoral 
approach  to  develop  a  comprehensive  framework  to  ensure  that  environmental 
management  and  the  conservation  of  natural  resources  are  an  integral  part  of  societal 
decision‐making.  
 

4.11 Environmental Legal Framework 
Environmental  Management  and  Co‐ordination  Act  No.  8  of  1999,  provide  a  legal  and 
institutional framework for the management of the environmental related matters. It is the 
framework  law  on  environment,  which  was  enacted  on  the  14th  of  January  1999  and 
commenced  in  January  2002.  Topmost  in  the  administration  of  EMCA  is  National 
Environment  Council  (NEC),  which  formulates  policies,  set  goals,  and  promotes 
environmental protection programmes. The implementing organ is National Environment 
Management  Authority  (NEMA).  EMCA  comprises  of  the  parts  covering  all  aspects  of  the 
environment.  
Part VIII, section 72 of the Act prohibits discharging or applying poisonous, toxic, noxious 
or  obstructing  matter,  radio  active  or  any  other  pollutants  into  aquatic  environment. 
Section 73 requires that operators of projects which discharge effluent or other pollutants 
submit  to  NEMA  accurate  information  about  the  quantities  and  quality  of  the  effluent. 
Section 74 demands that all effluent generated from point sources are discharged only into 
the existing sewages system upon issuance of prescribed permit from the local Authorities. 
. Figure 13 below shows the EMCA Institutional Framework. 




                                                                                               46
AWEMAC                                                    G4 INTERNATIONAL LTD
    RAP REPORT FOR THE PROPOSED G4 INTERNATIONAL LTD
          KENYA FARMING PROJECT IN LOWER TANA                                    January 22, 2010

 
       Figure 13: Environmental Management and Coordination Act Institutional Framework




 

4.12 Land Tenure and Land Use Legislation 
The Kenya constitution, which is the basic law of the land provides for protection of private 
property  from  deprivation  without  lawful  compensation.  The  constitution  also  provides 
that  such  property  may  be  “acquired  if  it  is  necessary  in  the  interest  of  defence,  public 
security,  and  public  morality”.  Land  is  a  crucial  national  resource  that  is  basic  to  the 
livelihood  and  well  being  of  Kenyans.  The  following  are  some  of  the  main  statutes  that 
regulate land ownership and land use in Kenya: 
 
                                                                                                     47
AWEMAC                                                        G4 INTERNATIONAL LTD
    RAP REPORT FOR THE PROPOSED G4 INTERNATIONAL LTD
          KENYA FARMING PROJECT IN LOWER TANA                                      January 22, 2010

 

        4.12.1 The Government Land Act, Cap 280
Under  this  act  the  president  through  the  commissioner  of  lands  may  allocate  any 
unalienated  land  to  any  person  he  so  wishes.  Once  allocated, such  land is held  as  a  grant 
from  the  government  on  payment  of  such  rents  as  the  government  may  announce.  The 
government may call back the land at the time for its own use. The act covers agricultural 
land  and  town  plots  within  local  authorities  which  are  allocated  on  application  by 
interested persons. Such land is held for a maximum period of a hundred years, subject to 
renewal.  Such  allocations  have  often  disregarded  social  and  environmental  imperatives, 
leading to degradation, inequity and other undesirable impacts. 
 

          4.12.2 Registration of Titles Act Cap 281
Section 34 of this Act states that when land is intended to be transferred or any right of way 
or other easement is intended to be created or transferred, the registered proprietor or, if 
the proprietor is of unsound mind, the guardian or other person appointed by the court to 
act on his/her behalf in the matter, shall execute, in original only, a transfer in form F in the 
First Schedule, which transfer shall, for description of the land intended be dealt with, refer 
to  the  grant  or  certificate  of  title  of  the  land,  or  shall  give  such  description  as  may  be 
sufficient to identify it, and shall contain an accurate statement of the land and easement, 
or  the  easement,  intended  to  be  transferred  or  created, and  a memorandum of  all  leases, 
charges and other encumbrances to which the land may be subject, and of all rights‐of‐way, 
easements and privileges intended to be conveyed. 
          

        4.12.3 Land Titles Act Cap 282
The  Land  Titles  Act  Cap  282  section  10  (1)  states  that  there  shall  be  appointed  and 
attached to the Land Registration Court a qualified surveyor who, with such assistants as 
may be necessary, shall survey land, make a plan or plans thereof and define and mark the 
boundaries  of  any  areas  therein  as,  when  and  where  directed  by  the  Recorder  of  Titles, 
either  before,  during  or  after  the  termination  of  any  question  concerning  land  or  any 
interest  connected  therewith,  and  every  area  so  defined  and  marked  shall  be  further 
marked with a number of other distinctive symbol to be shown upon the plan or plans for 
the  purposes  of  complete  identification  and  registration  thereof  as  is  herein  after 
prescribed. 
 

                                                                                                        48
AWEMAC                                                          G4 INTERNATIONAL LTD
    RAP REPORT FOR THE PROPOSED G4 INTERNATIONAL LTD
          KENYA FARMING PROJECT IN LOWER TANA                                   January 22, 2010

        4.12.4 The Trust land Act, cap 285
The constitution vests all land  which  is not registered  under  any act  of parliament  under 
the  ownership  of  local  authorities  as  trust  land.  Under  the  act,  a  person  may  acquire 
leasehold interest for a specific number of years subject to renewals. The local authorities 
retain the power to repossess such land for their own use should the need arise. 
 

        4.12.5 The Land Acquisition Act, cap 295
This  act  gives  powers  to  the  government  to  acquire  any  persons  land  for  public  utilities. 
The act however stipulates that once such land is acquired, prompt and full compensation 
be  paid  to  the  owner.  The  levels  and  modes  of  such  compensation  is  determined  by  the 
government. 

4.13 The Tana and Athi River Development Act (Cap 443) 
Section 3 of the act establishes an authority which shall be a body corporate by the name of 
the Tana and Athi rivers development authority whose main functions will be:‐ 
       a) To  advise  the  government  generally  and  the  Ministries  set  out  in  the  same 
           schedule  in  particular  on  all  matters  affecting  the  development  of  the  area 
           including the appointment of water resources; 
       b) To draw up and keep up to date a long range development plan of the area; 
       c) To  initiate  such  studies  and  to  carry  out  such  surveys  of  the  Area  as  it  may 
           consider  necessary,  and  to  assess  alternative  demands  within  the  area  on  the 
           resources  thereof,  including  electric  power  generation,  irrigation,  wildlife,  land 
           and other resources and to recommend economic priorities; 
       d) To  coordinate  the  various  studies  of,  and  schemes  within  ,  the  Area  so  that 
           human,  water  ,  animal,  land  and  other  resources  are  utilised  to  the  best 
           advantage, and to monitor the design and execution of planned projects within 
           the Area; 
       e) To effect a programme of monitoring of the performance of projects within the 
           Area  so  as  to  improve  that  performance  and  establish  responsibility  therefore, 
           and improve future planning; 
       f) To  ensure  close  co‐operation  between  all  agencies  concerned  with  the 
           abstraction  and  use  of  water  within  the  Area  in  the  setting  up  of  effective 
           monitoring of that abstraction and use; 
       g) To collect , assemble and correlate all such data related to the use of water and 
           other  resources  within  the    Area as  may  be  necessary  for  the  efficient  forward 
           planning of the Area; 
                                                                                                     49
AWEMAC                                                        G4 INTERNATIONAL LTD
    RAP REPORT FOR THE PROPOSED G4 INTERNATIONAL LTD
          KENYA FARMING PROJECT IN LOWER TANA                                   January 22, 2010

       h) To maintain  a  liaison  between  the  Government  , the  private  sector  and  foreign 
          agencies in the matter of the development of the Area with a view of limiting the 
          duplication of effort and ensuring the best use of technical resources; 
       i) To render assistance to operating agencies in their applications for loan funds if 
          required; and  
       j) To  cause  the  construction  of  any  works  necessary  for  the  protection  and 
          utilization of the water and soils of the Area  
 

4.14 The Irrigation Act (Cap 347) 
Section  3  of  the  Irrigation  Act  establishes  the  National  Irrigation  Board  which  is  a  body 
corporate having perpetual succession and common seal, with power to sue and be sued, 
and capable of purchasing or otherwise acquiring, holding, managing and disposing of any 
property movable or immovable, entering into contracts, and doing all the things necessary 
for the proper performance of its duties, and discharge of its functions under the Act and 
any subsidiary legislation made thereafter. 
 
Part IV of the regulations under section 27 of the irrigation Act states that any person who 
resides in, carries on business in, or occupies any part of the  scheme or grazes any stock 
thereon  shall,  unless  he  is  the  holder  of  a  valid  license  granted  to  him  under  these 
regulations  by  the  manager  with  the  approval  of  the  committee  or  is  the  authorized 
dependant of such a license, be guilty of an offence. 
 
Part VIII states that every license shall be granted subject to the conditions that:‐ a license 
holder shall devote his full personal time and attention to the cultivation and improvement 
of his holding and shall not allow any other person to hold or cultivate it on his behalf, he 
shall also maintain the boundaries of his holding, all field feeder and drainage channels to 
the satisfaction of the manager. The licensee shall also comply with all instructions given by 
the  manager  with  regard  to  good  husbandry,  the  branding,  dipping,  inoculating,  herding, 
grazing  or  watering  of  stock,  the  production  and  use  of  manure  and  compost,  the 
preservation of the fertility of the soil, the prevention of soil erosion, the planting, felling, 
stumping  and  clearing  of  trees  and  vegetation  and  the  production  of  silage  and  hay.  Any 
licensee who does not comply with the conditions shall be guilty of an offence.  
     




                                                                                                    50
AWEMAC                                                        G4 INTERNATIONAL LTD
    RAP REPORT FOR THE PROPOSED G4 INTERNATIONAL LTD
          KENYA FARMING PROJECT IN LOWER TANA                                       January 22, 2010

4.15 The Forest Act (Cap 385) 
Section 8 of the Forest Act states that except as provided in the Act and subject to any rules 
made there under, no person shall, except under the license of the Director of Forestry fell, 
cut , take , burn, injure or remove any forest produce; erect any building or cattle enclosure; 
set fire to any grass or undergrowth or any forest produce; depastures or allow any cattle 
to  be  therein,  clear,  cultivate  or  break  up  land  for  cultivation  or  for  any  other  purpose  ; 
construct a road or path or damage, alter, shift, remove or interfere in any way whatsoever 
with any beacon, boundary, mark, fence, notice or notice board.  
      

4.16 The Agriculture Act (Cap 318) 
Section 181 of the subsidiary legislation (Sugar settlement Organization Rules) under the 
Agriculture  Act  restricts  any  person  from  residing,  carrying  on  business  in,  or  occupying 
any part of a scheme or grazing any stock thereon, unless he is the holder of a valid license 
or  a  letter  of  allotment  granted  to  him  by  the  Commissioner  of  Lands  or  is  authorized 
dependant of that licensee or letter of allotment holder.  
 
Section 18 of the Sugar settlement Organization Rules further gives rules which a grower 
shall adhere to ,these include:‐ 
    • The grower shall comply with all instructions given b\y the trustees with regard to 
         the  preservation  of  the  fertility  of  the  soil,  the  prevention  of  soil  erosion  and  the 
         planting, felling, stumping and clearing of trees and vegetation;  
    • The grower shall also maintain in good order the boundaries of his holding and all 
         ditches, water courses, drainage ways and river banks thereon; keep cane free from 
         weeds at all times; apply fertilizer to the cane in accordance with the policy of the 
         trustees  and  carry  out  any  operation  considered  necessary  for  the  establishing, 
         maintaining, protecting, harvesting and marketing of cane grown in the holding. 

4.17 Public Health Act (Cap. 242) 
Part  IX,  section  115,  of  the  Act  states  that  no  person/institution  shall  cause  nuisance  or 
condition  liable  to  be  injurious  or  dangerous  to  human  health.  Section  116  requires  that 
Local  Authorities  take  all  lawful,  necessary  and  reasonably  practicable  measures  to 
maintain  their  jurisdiction  clean  and  sanitary  to  prevent  occurrence  of  nuisance  or 
condition liable to be injurious or dangerous to human health. 
 
Such nuisance or conditions are defined under section 118 as waste pipes, sewers, drainers 
or refuse pits in such state, situated or constructed as in the opinion of the medical officer 
                                                                                                         51
AWEMAC                                                           G4 INTERNATIONAL LTD
    RAP REPORT FOR THE PROPOSED G4 INTERNATIONAL LTD
          KENYA FARMING PROJECT IN LOWER TANA                                      January 22, 2010

of health to be offensive or injurious to health. Any noxious matter or waste water flowing 
or discharged from any premises into the public street or into the gutter or side channel or 
watercourse,  irrigation  channel,  or  bed  not  approved  for  discharge  is  also  deemed  as 
nuisance. Other nuisances are accumulation of materials or refuse which in the opinion of 
the medical officer of health is likely to harbor rats or other vermin. 
 
On responsibility of the Local Authorities Part XI, section 129, of the Act states in part “It 
shall  be  the  duty  of  every  local  authority  to  take  all  lawful,  necessary  and  reasonably 
practicable  measures  for  preventing  any  pollution  dangerous  to  health  of  any  supply  of 
water  which  the  public  within  its  district  has  a  right  to  use  and  does  use  for  drinking  or 
domestic purposes 
 
Section  130  provides  for  making  and  imposing  regulations  by  the  local  authorities  and 
others the duty of enforcing rules in respect of prohibiting use of water supply or erection 
of  structures  draining  filth  or  noxious  matter  into  water  supply  as  mentioned  in  section 
129.  This  provision  is  supplemented  by  section  126A  that  requires  local  authorities  to 
develop  by  laws  for  controlling  and  regulating  among  others  private  sewers, 
communication  between  drains  and  sewers  and  between  sewers  as  well  as  regulating 
sanitary conveniences in connection to buildings, drainage, cesspools, etc. for reception or 
disposal of foul matter. 
      
Part XII, Section 136, states that all collections of water, sewage, rubbish, refuse and other 
fluids which permits or facilitates the breeding or multiplication of pests shall be deemed 
nuisances and are liable to be dealt with in the matter provided by this Act. 

4.18 Local Authority Act (Cap. 265) 
Section  160  helps  local  authorities  ensure  effective  utilization  of  the  sewages  systems.  It 
states  in  part  that  municipal  authorities  have  powers  to  establish  and  maintain  sanitary 
services  for  the  removal  and  destruction  of,  or  otherwise  deal  with  kinds  of  refuse  and 
effluent  and  where  such  service  is  established,  compel  its  use  by  persons  to  whom  the 
services is available. However, to protect against illegal connections, section 173 states that 
any  person  who,  without  prior  consent  in  writing  from  the  council,  erects  a  building  on; 
excavate or opens‐up; or injures or destroys a sewers, drains or pipes shall be guilty of an 
offence.  Any  demolitions  and  repairs  thereof  shall  be  carried  out  at  the  expense  of  the 
offender.  
              

                                                                                                        52
AWEMAC                                                          G4 INTERNATIONAL LTD
    RAP REPORT FOR THE PROPOSED G4 INTERNATIONAL LTD
          KENYA FARMING PROJECT IN LOWER TANA                                     January 22, 2010

Section 170, allows the right to access to private property at all times by local authorities 
its officers and servants for purposes of inspection, maintenance and alteration or repairs 
of sewers. To ensure sustainability in this regard, the local authority is empowered to make 
by  laws  in  respect  of  all  such  matters  as  are  necessary  or  desirable  for  maintenance  of 
health,  safety,  and  well  being  of  the  inhabitants  of  its  area  as  provided  for  under  Section 
201 of the Act. 
 
The Act under section 176 gives powers to local authority to regulate sewage and drainage, 
fix  charges  for  use  of  sewers  and  drains  and  require  connecting  premises  to  meet  the 
related  costs.  According  to  section  174,  any  charges  so  collected  shall  be  deemed  to  be 
charges for sanitary services and will be recoverable from the premise owner connected to 
the  facility.  Section  264  also  requires  that  all  charges  due  for  sewage  sanitary  and  refuse 
removal  shall  be  recovered  jointly  and  severally  from  the  owner  and  occupier  of  the 
premises in respect of which the services were rendered. This in part allows for application 
of the “polluter‐pays‐principle”. 

4.19 Physical Planning Act, 1999 
The Local Authorities are empowered under section 29 of the Act to reserve and maintain 
all  land  planned  for  open  spaces,  parks,  urban  forests  and  green  belts.  The  same  section, 
therefore  allows  for  the  prohibition  or  control  of  the  use  and  development  of  land  and 
buildings in the interest of proper and orderly development of an area. 
   
Section  30  states  that  any  person  who  carries  out  development  without  development 
permission will be required to restore the land to it original condition. It also states that no 
other licensing authority shall grant license for commercial or industrial use or occupation 
of  any  building  without  a  development  permission  granted  by  the  respective  local 
authority. 
   
Finally, section 36 states that if connection with a development application, local authority 
is of the opinion that the proposed development activity will have injurious impact on the 
environment, the application shall be required to submit together with the application an 
environment impact assessment EIA report. EMCA, 1999 echoes the same by requiring that 
such  an  EIA  is  approved  by  the  NEMA  and  should  be  followed  by  annual  environmental 
audits. 
 



                                                                                                       53
AWEMAC                                                          G4 INTERNATIONAL LTD
    RAP REPORT FOR THE PROPOSED G4 INTERNATIONAL LTD
          KENYA FARMING PROJECT IN LOWER TANA                                    January 22, 2010

4.20 Land Planning Act (Cap. 303) 
Section  9  of  the  subsidiary  legislation  (The  Development  and  Use  of  Land  Regulations, 
1961)  under  this  Act  requires  that  before  the  local  authorities  submit  any  plans  to  then 
Minister for approval, steps should be taken as may be necessary to acquire the owners of 
any  land  affected  by  such  plans.  Particulars  of  comments  and  objections  made  by  the 
landowners should be submitted. This is intended to reduce conflict with the interest such 
as settlement and other social and economic activities. 

4.21 Water Act, 2002 
Part II, section 18, of the Water Act 2002 provides for national monitoring and information 
system  on  water  resources.  Following  on  this,  sub‐section  3  allows  the  Water  Resources 
Management  Authority  (WRMA)  to  demand  from  any  person  or  institution,  specified 
information,  documents,  samples  or  materials  on  water  resources.  Under  these  rules, 
specific records may require to be kept by a facility operator and the information thereof 
furnished to the authority. 
 
The  Water  Act  Cap  372  vests  the  rights  of  all  water  to  the  state,  and  the  power  for  the 
control of all body of water with the Minister, the powers is exercised through the Minister 
and  the  Director  of  water  resources  in  consultation  with  the  water  catchments  boards,  it 
aims at among others:   
 
    1.       Provision of conservation of water and  
    2.       Appointment and use of water resources. 
 
    Water apportionment board is a National Authority whose duty is to advise the Minister 
    on issues with respect to water use. Permission to extract underground water for large‐
    scale  use  lies  with  the  board  and  the  pollution  of  such  water  source  is  an  offence. 
    Failure to comply with such directives is an offence. The Minister is given the power to 
    appoint  undertakers  of  water  supply  and  in  most  cases  are  Town,  Municipal  and  City 
    Councils. 
 
    Further  in  order  to  provide  security  and  supply  of  water  the  Minister  can  declare  a 
    catchment’s area of particular source of water as protected area and restrict activities 
    in those areas. Such orders must be publicized in Kenya gazette. 
 


                                                                                                      54
AWEMAC                                                         G4 INTERNATIONAL LTD
    RAP REPORT FOR THE PROPOSED G4 INTERNATIONAL LTD
          KENYA FARMING PROJECT IN LOWER TANA                                 January 22, 2010

    Pollution of any water course is an offence and the Act also prohibits whoever throws, 
    conveys, cause or permits throwing of rubbish, dirt, refuse, effluent, trade waste to any 
    water.  It  enhances  the  Ministry’s  capacity  to  enforce  the  Act  by  reviewing  the  water 
    user fees. 
 
    Section 73 of the Act allows a person with a licence (licensee) to supply water to make 
    regulations  for  the  purpose  of  protecting  against  degradation  of  water  resources. 
    Section  75  and  sub‐section  1  allows  the  licensee  to  construct  and  maintain  drains 
    serves and other works for intercepting, treating or disposing of any foul water arising 
    or  flowing  upon  land  for  preventing  pollution  of  water  sources  within  his/her 
    jurisdiction. 
 
    Section 76 states that no person shall discharge any trade effluent from trade premises 
    into sewers of a licensee without the consent of the licensee upon application indicating 
    the  nature  and  composition  of  effluent,  maximum  quality  anticipated,  flow  rate  of  the 
    effluent  and  any  other  information  deemed necessary.  The  consent  shall  be  issued  on 
    conditions including payment of rates for discharge as may be provided under section 
    77 of the same Act. 

4.22 Building Code 1967 
Section 194 requires that where sewer exists, the occupants of the nearby premises shall 
apply to the local authority for a permit to connect to the sewer line and all the wastewater 
must  be  discharged  into  sewers.  The  code  also  prohibits  construction  of  structures  or 
buildings on sewer lines. 

4.23 Penal Code Act (Cap.63) 
Section  191  of  the  penal  code  states  that  if  any  person  or  institution  that  voluntarily 
corrupts or foils water for public springs or reservoirs, rendering it less fit for its ordinary 
use is guilty of an offence. Section 192 of the same Act says a person who makes or vitiates 
the atmosphere in any place to make it noxious to health of persons /institution is dwelling 
or business premises in the neighbourhood or those passing along public way, commit an 
offence. 

4.24 Factories and Other Places of Work Act (Cap 514) 
Before  any  premises  are  occupied,  or  used  a  certificate  of  registration  must  be  obtained 
from  the  chief  inspector.  The  occupier  must  keep  a  general  register.  The  Act  covers 
provisions for health, safety and welfare. 
                                                                                                   55
AWEMAC                                                       G4 INTERNATIONAL LTD
    RAP REPORT FOR THE PROPOSED G4 INTERNATIONAL LTD
          KENYA FARMING PROJECT IN LOWER TANA                                 January 22, 2010

         4.24.1 Health
The premise must be kept clean, daily removal of accumulated dust from floors, free from 
effluvia arising from any drain, sanitary convenience or nuisance and without prejudice to 
the generality of foregoing provision. A premise must not be overcrowded, there must be in 
each room 350 cubic feet of space for each employee, not counting space 14 feet from the 
floor and a 9 feet floor‐roof height. 
         
The circulation of fresh air must secure adequate ventilation of workrooms. There must be 
sufficient and suitable lighting in every part of the premise in which persons are working 
or passing. There should also be sufficient and suitable sanitary conveniences separate for 
each sex, must be provided subject to conformity with any standards prescribed by rules. 
Food and drinks should not be partaken in dangerous places or workrooms.  
 
Provision  of  suitable  protective  clothing  and  appliances  including  where  necessary, 
suitable  gloves,  footwear,  goggles,  gas  masks,  and  head  covering,  and  maintained  for  the 
use  of  workers  in  any  process  involving  expose  to  wet  or  to  any  injurious  or  offensive 
substances. 

         4.24.2 Safety
Fencing  of  premises  and  dangerous  parts  of  other  machinery  is  mandatory.  Training  and 
supervision of inexperienced workers, protection of eyes with goggles or effective screens 
must  be  provided  in  certain  specified  processes.  Floors,  passages,  gangways,  stairs,  and 
ladders  must  be  soundly  constructed  and  properly  maintained  and  handrails  must  be 
provided for stairs. 
 
Special precaution against gassing is laid down for work in confined spaces where persons 
are  liable  to  overcome  by  dangerous  fumes.  Air  receivers  and  fittings  must  be  of  sound 
construction and properly maintained. Adequate and suitable means for extinguishing fire 
must be provided in addition to adequate means of escape in case of fire must be provided. 

       4.24.3 Welfare
An  adequate  supply  of  both  quantity  and  quality  of  wholesome  drinking  water  must  be 
provided. Maintenance of suitable washing facilities, accommodation for clothing not worn 
during  working  hours  must  be  provided.  Sitting  facilities  for  all  female  workers  whose 
work  is  done  while  standing  should  be  provided  to  enable  them  take  advantage  of  any 
opportunity for resting. 
 

                                                                                                   56
AWEMAC                                                       G4 INTERNATIONAL LTD
    RAP REPORT FOR THE PROPOSED G4 INTERNATIONAL LTD
          KENYA FARMING PROJECT IN LOWER TANA                                 January 22, 2010

Section  42  stipulates  that  every  premise  shall  be  provided  with  maintenance,  readily 
accessible means for extinguishing fire and person trained in the correct use of such means 
shall be present during all working periods. 
 
Section  45  states  that  regular  individual  examination  or  surveys  of  health  conditions  of 
industrial  medicine  and  hygiene  must  be  performed  and  the  cost  will  be  met  by  the 
employer. This will ensure that the examination can take place without any loss of earning 
for the employees and if possible within normal working hours. 
   
Section  55B  provides  for  development  and  maintenance  of  an  effective  programme  of 
collection,  compilation  and  analysis  of  occupational  safety.  This  will  ensure  that  health 
statistics, which shall cover injuries and illness including disabling during working hours, 
are adhered.  

         4.24.4 Employment act, Cap 226 and the regulation of wages and condition of
                 Employment Act Cap 229
These  Acts  deal  with  employee  rights.  Employment  Act  fixes  minimum  standards  of 
employment,  while  regulation  of  wages  and  conditions  of  employment  Act  creates  wages 
fixing  institutions  like  the  wages  board  and  councils  to  continuously  review  the  human 
standards of employment on a sector basis. These acts effectively deal with issues such as 
prohibition  of forced  labour,  child  labour, and  discrimination  in  employment  as  provided 
for in the respective ILO conventions which Kenya has since ratified. 

        4.24.5 Relevant Government Sessional Papers

Sessional paper No1 of 2002
This    Sessional  paper  for  sustainable  development  which  is  an  update  of  Sessional  paper 
N0.4  of  1984  on  population  policy  guidelines,  addresses  issues  on  environment,  gender, 
poverty and problems faced by segments of the population including the youth, the elderly 
and persons with disabilities. Outlined in the paper are population and development goals 
and  objectives  including  improvement  on  standards  of  living  and  quality  of  life  of  the 
people; full integration of population  concerns  into  development process;  motivating and 
encouraging Kenyans to adhere to responsible parenthood; and empowerment of women. 
The problem of HIV/AIDS is also addressed. 

       4.24.6 The National Poverty Eradication Plan (NPEP)
The  NPEP has  the objective  of  reducing  the  incidence of  poverty  in  both  rural  and  urban 
areas by 50 percent by the year 2015; as well as strengthening the capabilities of the poor 
                                                                                                  57
AWEMAC                                                      G4 INTERNATIONAL LTD
    RAP REPORT FOR THE PROPOSED G4 INTERNATIONAL LTD
          KENYA FARMING PROJECT IN LOWER TANA                                  January 22, 2010

and  vulnerable  groups  to  earn  income.  It  also  aims  to  narrow  gender  and  geographical 
disparities  and  create  a  healthy,  better‐educated  and  more  productive  population.  This 
plan has been prepared in line with the goals and commitments of the World Summit for 
the Social Development (WSSD) of 1995. The plan focuses on the four WSSD themes of the 
poverty  eradication;  reduction  of  unemployment;  social  integration  of  the  disadvantaged 
people and the creation of an enabling economic, political, and cultural environment. This 
plan  is  to  be  implemented  by  the  Poverty  Eradication  Commission  (PEC)  formed  in 
collaboration  with  Government  Ministries,  community  based  organizations  and  private 
sector.  

        4.24.7 The Poverty Reduction Strategy Paper
This  document  outlines  the  priorities  and  measure  necessary  for  poverty  reduction  and 
economic growth. The objectives of economic growth and poverty reduction are borne out 
of  realization  that  economic  growth  is  not  a  sufficient  condition  to  ensure  poverty 
reduction. In this regard, measures geared towards improved economic performance and 
priority  actions  that  must  be  implemented  to  reduce  the  incidence  of  poverty  among 
Kenyans have been identified. 

        4.24.8 International Conventions and Treaties
Conventions  are  legally  binding  contracts  that  bind  all  concerned  member  countries  to 
respect  and  act  according  to  its  provisions.  Kenya  has  ratified  several  international 
conventions and should live with regard to the proposed Chipboard Manufacturing Plant. 
 
In  June  1992  the  United  Nations  Conference  on  the  environment  and  development 
(UNCED)  approved  three  documents;  the  Rio  Declaration  on  environment  and 
Development Agenda 21. This is a comprehensive plan to guide national and international 
action  towards  sustainable  development  and  a  statement  of  15  principles  for  sustainable 
management of forests. 
 
In  addition  two  international  treaties  were  signed;  the  convention  on  biological  diversity 
which  came  into  force  on  29th  December  1993  and  the  convention  on  climate  change, 
which  came  into  force  in  1994.  These  key  international  conventions  and  regional 
agreements aim at protecting the environment. 
 
In  Africa,  for  example,  realization  of  the  dangers  of  uncontrolled  toxic  wastes  led  to  a 
convention  on  hazardous  waste  movement  and  management,  signed  in  1991  in  Bamako, 
Mali: 
                                                                                                    58
AWEMAC                                                       G4 INTERNATIONAL LTD
    RAP REPORT FOR THE PROPOSED G4 INTERNATIONAL LTD
          KENYA FARMING PROJECT IN LOWER TANA                                    January 22, 2010

 
“In  an  effort  to  control  levels  of  air  pollutants  from  industries  sources,  the  Geneva 
Convention  on  long‐range  trans‐boundary  air  pollution  was  signed.  Other  conventions 
include  the  convention  on  the  law  of  the  sea  (1994).  Conventions  on  nuclear  accidents 
(Notification Assistance) 1986; the Montréal Protocol on substances that deplete the ozone 
layer, the Biological and toxin weapons etc” 
 

         4.24.9 The World Commission on Environment and Development (The Brundtland Com
                1987)
The  commission  focused  on  the  environmental  aspects  of  development,  in  particular  the 
emphasis  on  sustainable  development  that  produces  no  lasting  damage  to  the  biosphere 
and  to  particular ecosystems.  In addition  to environmental  sustainability is  the  economic 
and  social  sustainability.  Economic  sustainable  development  is  development  for  which 
progress towards environmental and social sustainability occurs within available financial 
resources.  While  social  sustainable  development  is  development  that  maintains  the 
cohesion of a society and its ability to help its members work together to achieve common 
goals, while at the same time meeting individual needs for health and well being, adequate 
nutrition, and shelter, cultural expression and political involvement.  

         4.24.10The Ramsar Convention
Kenya  ratified  the  Convention  in  June  1990.  The  Ramsar  Convention  on  Wetlands  is 
primarily  concerned  with  the  conservation  and  Management  of  Wetlands.  Parties  to  the 
Convention  are  also  required  to  promote  wise  use  of  wetlands  in  their  territories  and  to 
take  measures  for  the  conservation  by  establishing  nature  reserves  in  wetlands,  whether 
they  are  included  in  the  Ramsar  list  or  not.  The  proposed  project  is  expected  to  observe 
strictly to the Ramsar Convention’s principles of wise use of wetlands in the project area. 
Wetlands are defined by the Convention on Wetlands or the Ramsar Convention (1971) as: 
“Areas  of  marsh,  fen,  peat  land  or  water,  whether  natural  or  artificial,  permanent  or 
temporary with  water that  is  static  or  flowing,  fresh,  brackish or  salty,  including  areas of 
marine water the depth of which at law tide does not exceed six meters” 
     
In  Kenya,  as  well  as  in  Eastern  Africa,  wetlands  are  defined  as:  “Areas  of  land  that  are 
permanently, seasonally or occasionally water logged with fresh, saline, brackish or marine 
water, including both natural and man‐made areas that support characteristic biota”. The 
latter  definition  has  the  approval of the  national  Wetland  Standing  Committee of Kenya’s 
Inter‐ministerial  Committee  on  Environment  (IMCE).  It  is  the  refinement  of  the  Ramsar 

                                                                                                     59
AWEMAC                                                        G4 INTERNATIONAL LTD
    RAP REPORT FOR THE PROPOSED G4 INTERNATIONAL LTD
          KENYA FARMING PROJECT IN LOWER TANA                                 January 22, 2010

Convention’s definition for the Eastern Africa and does not exclude anything defined by the 
Ramsar Convention. This definition included swamps, marshes, bogs, soaks, shallow lakes, 
ox‐bow  lakes,  river  meanders  and  flood  plains,  as  well  as  riverbanks,  lakeshores  where 
wetland  plants  grow.  It  also  includes  marine  and  inter‐tidal  wetlands  such  as  deltas, 
estuaries,  mudflats,  mangroves,  salt  marshes,  sea  grass  beds  and  shallow  coral  reefs.  For 
the  purpose  of  the  Environmental  Management  and  Co‐ordination  Act  1999,  wetland 
means  “an  area  permanently  or  seasonally  flooded  by  water  plants  and  animals  have 
become adopted.  
 




                                                                                                   60
AWEMAC                                                       G4 INTERNATIONAL LTD
    RAP REPORT FOR THE PROPOSED G4 INTERNATIONAL LTD
          KENYA FARMING PROJECT IN LOWER TANA                               January 22, 2010

                                 5       RESETTLEMENT SITES 
 
During the field study, the team leader, experts and field assistants identified key areas that 
the proposed G4 International Farming Project is likely to involuntarily impact on squatters 
population  households,  developed  infrastructure  and  natural  resources  in  Wachu  Ranch. 
Since the area proposed for the farming project has human activity and settlements; however 
illegal it is, there is need to handle squatters in a socially acceptable and humanitarian way. 
The  squatters  to  be  affected  by  the  project  have  occupied  the  main  areas  along  the  17 
Kilometers  stretch  of  Malindi‐Garsen  road  B8,  which  bisects  the  road  cutting  through  the 
Wachu Ranch.  
Some of the villages occupied by the squatters include; Hurara village, Hurara Rau‐Kwa Mwa 
village, Kaza Roho village and Kwa Mzee Dula village 

5.1    Process of Identifying and Involving Persons Affected by the Project 
Project  affected  Persons  (PAPs)  were  identified  in  the  following  series  of  steps,  as  per 
Resettlement Guidelines and Kenya Regulations: 
    • Step One: Thematic mapping of the identified features such as population settlements, 
       infrastructure, natural vegetation areas, water resources and land use patterns. 
    • Step Two:  Taking of a census survey that facilitated enumeration and registration of 
       the affected persons according to locations (Village level), noting their full names, age, 
       contacts, education level, and  main sources of income. 
    • Step  Three:  Conducting  an  inventory  of  anticipated  lost  and  affected  assets  at  the 
       households, their enterprises and as a community. 
    • Step Four: Undertaking of household Socio‐economic survey and studies of all affected 
       population. 
    • Step  Five:  Analysis  of  the  results  of  surveys  and  studies  to  establish  compensation 
       parameters  to  design  appropriate  income  restoration  and  sustainable  development 
       initiatives and thereafter identify baseline monitoring indicators. 
    • Step  Six:  (Public  Consultation  in  local  Administration  Barazas.  One  well 
       represented  Public  meeting  was  conducted at  Vibao  Viwili  centers  within  the  Wachu 
       Ranch. A total of 316 persons attended the meetings aimed at facilitating consultation 
       with affected population regarding information of the new project, its advantages and 
       disadvantages  and  therefore  participatory  identification  of  alternative  sites  for 
       handling  the  project  and  PAPs,  assessment  of  advantages  and  disadvantages  of  each 
       site and to select preferred sites. However, most affected persons preferred to be dealt 
       with, based on the law on illegal settlements in private land but with consideration to 
       their plight by providing alternatives to their vacating this land they occupy illegally. 
                                                                                                   61
AWEMAC                                                       G4 INTERNATIONAL LTD
    RAP REPORT FOR THE PROPOSED G4 INTERNATIONAL LTD
          KENYA FARMING PROJECT IN LOWER TANA                                January 22, 2010

5.2     Feasibility Study 
According to feasibility studies conducted by December 2009, it was noted that over the years 
and particularly in 2008 in Kenya farming suffered from issues related to poor/erratic rainfall 
during  the  2008  long  rains  season,  crop  pests  and  diseases  coupled  with  poor  storage 
practices. Most farmers lost over 30% of their short rains 2006 crop produce due to greater 
grain borer (storage pest) and there is inadequate use of farm inputs; only 40% of farmers use 
certified seeds and/ or fertilizers. There is low adaptation by local farmers to modern farming 
technology  and  there  are  inadequate  markets  and  marketing  strategies  for  livestock  and 
grains  in  most  parts  of  the  country.  The  other  issue  is  over  dependence  on  rain  fed 
agriculture. Only 38.6% of potential irrigated land is exploited. 
         
All of these issues can be well addressed by the farming approach which embraces irrigation 
strategy  and  business  model,  the  ultimate  benefit  of  the  project  is  that  it  both  injects 
important wealth into Southern Kenya whilst bringing farming techniques that can be utilized 
effectively down stream, a win/win situation for Kenya.  
 

5.3     Community Relocation Sites and House Replacement Strategy 
 
According to the findings of the full Social and Environmental Impact Assessment Study, the 
project does not require community relocation sites, since all occupants of the Wachu Ranch 
are illegal migrants who have an original home, and can only be compensated at a flat rate for 
their household structures and relocation allowance. About 90 percent of the PAPs are willing 
to relocate their houses on condition that they are given enough time to relocate, reconstruct 
and a little compensation for labour, materials and inconvenience caused. All the PAPs have 
been involved in a participatory process guided by consultants during assessments, meetings 
and focused group discussions. After identification of houses; along and within the proposed 
project  area,  the  PAPs  were  then  involved  in  developing  an  acceptable  solution  of  being 
offered voluntary upon notification of the same. A committee of PAPs within a given village in 
the  project area  was  selected,  after  which  deliberations  of  proposed  mode  of moving  out  of 
the  project  area  was  recommended  and  forwarded  to  the  local  administration  for 
implementation. 
 

5.4    Proposed project details. 
The  main  features  of  the  proposed  project  include  a  pivot  irrigation  farming  for  Crambe, 
Castor,  Sunflower  crop  production  and  construction  of  the  Factory  for  oil  processing  and 
                                                                                                    62
AWEMAC                                                      G4 INTERNATIONAL LTD
    RAP REPORT FOR THE PROPOSED G4 INTERNATIONAL LTD
          KENYA FARMING PROJECT IN LOWER TANA                                    January 22, 2010

production.  Community  social  amenities  and  benefits  such  as  set  up  of  schools,  hospitals, 
water points. 

        5.4.1 Crambe  
Crambe  is  well  adapted  to  a  broad  range  of  climates.   It  can  be  grown  as  far  south  as 
Venezuela and as far north as Sweden.  It is relatively drought resistant due to a long tap root. 
 As  Crambe  is  a  short  season  crop  with  no  vernalization  requirement  its  nutritional 
requirements  are  generally  lower  than  longer  season  crops.   Crambe  is  more  resistant  to 
shedding loss than crops such as Oilseed Rape. Crambe is a proven and excellent break crop in 
cereal  rotations  and  there  is  evidence  of  suppression  of  soil  nematode  pests  from  its 
roots/straw.  Crambe  is  indigenous  to  North  East  Africa,  its  meal  can  be used for  cattle  feed 
and its oil is increasing demand as a high performance lubricant and slip agent. 

        5.4.2 Castor  
Castor is indigenous to East Africa and establishes itself easily as a "native" plant. It is widely 
grown  as  a  crop  in  Ethiopia  and  its  oil  is  also  the  source  for  undecylenic  acid,  a  natural 
fungicide.  Because  of  its  deep  reaching  rooting  system  Castor  is  quite  drought  tolerant  and 
helpfully has little sensitivity to daylight length. It also shows natural resistance to Nematodes 
and provides a valuable break crop for Maize, Millet etc. Castor meal makes good fertiliser and 
its oil has excellent viscosity at high temperatures making it a good technical oil. It also has 
medicinal and energy uses. 

        5.4.3 Sunflower 
Sunflower is a short season crop with tolerance to a wide range of minimum and maximum 
temperature. Although the sunflower plant is not highly drought tolerant it has an extensive, 
heavily  branched  tap  root  system  which  permits  it  to  extract  more  soil  moisture  than  corn 
roots. Short periods of drought may not greatly reduce seed yield because growth can proceed 
at night when transpiration is low. Sunflower plants grow well in soils ranging in texture from 
sand to clay. Due to it being sown in wide rows its mechanical  in crop inter‐row cultivation 
can be used for problem weed control if such a situation arises and without the need to use 
herbicide. Sunflower seedlings are strongly rooted and usually not injured by rotary hoeing or 
other similar implements. 




                                                                                                        63
AWEMAC                                                        G4 INTERNATIONAL LTD
                 RAP REPORT FOR THE PROPOSED G4 INTERNATIONAL LTD
                       KENYA FARMING PROJECT IN LOWER TANA

       Table 1.16: PAPs within the Wachu Ranch 
                                          
S/N  NUMBER OF PEOPLE AFFECTED     PHYSICAL ASSETS OBSERVED 
     IN FIVE SQUATTER VILLAGES  



5    500 households families       Temporary  living houses 
        a) Hurara village,          (mud walled with Makuti/Coconut leaves, grass 
        b) Hurara Rau‐Kwa          or iron sheet roof) and Kitchen 
            Mwa village, 
        c) Kaza roho   
        d) Kwa Mzee Dula 
            village 

 
       DRAFT RAP REPORT FOR THE PROPOSED G4 INTERNATIONAL LTD                             January 22,
                KENYA FARMING PROJECT IN LOWER TANA                                          2010

            6           INCOME RESTORATION AND COMPENSATION FRAMEWORK 
 
The squatters residing within Wachu ranch can be resettled using any of the following 
options. 

6.1 Options for resettlement 
The people who have invaded this property herein referred to as squatters were given 
several options to be executed as complimentary gesture to this proposed project. 
 
    a) They could be offered employment once the project takes off. 
    b) They can be given opportunities of buying shares in the ranch. 
    c) They can exist as out growers through schemes outside and within the ranch 
    d) They could be offered some land (say 5 acres/ per family) within the ranch. 
    e) They can be compensated and then evicted from  the ranch 
 
The proposed compensation framework is aimed at achieving an amicable and sound 
income restoration of the squatters in the Wachu Ranch. See the figure 14 below. 
 
       Figure 14: Compensation framework
 
 

                                      G4 International
                                      Ltd
                                      Compensation



                                      Income
                                      Restoration
                                      Strategies
          Economic Rehabilitation                                  Cash Compensation on
          & Livelihood Restoration                                 Housing Assets and
                                                                   Inconvenience
                                                                   allowance




6.2 Economic Rehabilitation 
The  proposed  project  will  lead  to  resettlement  inconveniences  to  the  squatters  within 
which  the  project  is  located.  This  therefore  requires  adequate  economic  rehabilitation  of 
the affected people with due vetting of their entitlements. The project proponent will not 
fully compensate affected people for loss of physical assets, revenue, and income resulting 
from economic displacement or physical relocation whether these losses are temporary or 

     AWEMAC ENVIRONMENTAL CONSULTANTS AND G4 INTERNATIONAL LTD                                     65
       DRAFT RAP REPORT FOR THE PROPOSED G4 INTERNATIONAL LTD                                January 22,
                KENYA FARMING PROJECT IN LOWER TANA                                             2010

permanent.  However  there  are  plans  to  find  a  more  accommodative  approach  to  the 
squatters so that they can at least benefit from this project; through offering employment 
or  through  temporary  replacement  and  G4  International  Ltd  should  liase  with  Wachu 
Ranch to look into the possibility of the squatters being relocated to a specific land within 
the ranch. This will have reduced mass displacement to unknown destinations. The project 
proponent has established transparent methods for the valuation of all assets affected by 
the  project  as  required  under  the  laws  of  the  land.  These  methods  included  consultation 
with  the  affected  individuals  together  with  their  representatives,  to  assess  the  adequacy 
and  acceptability  of  the  proposed  plan  of  action  to  ensure  a  humane  relocation  of  all  the 
affected people. 

6.3 Compensation Rates 
The  compensation  rates  that  have  been  agreed  on  in  this  report  do  reflect  the  prevailing 
market rates of the affected people’s property. This includes compensation for any house 
structures  built  on  the  land  and  relocation  allowance  per  family.  The  established 
compensation rates have been applied throughout the 500 families with consistency in the 
respective  project  phases  with  allowances  for  adjustment  for  a  case  of  the  staggered 
compensation payments. Each family shall get ten thousand Kenyan shillings upon vacation 
of the Ranch. This shall be implemented through use of local administration, village elders 
and Wachu Ranch members. 
 
6.4  Restoration strategies, community livelihoods and variations within Project Area 
 
The  squatter’s  restoration  strategies  to  be  applied  by  the  developer  are  aimed  to  ensure 
income  of  the  affected  communities  is  restored.  The  overall  objective  of  the  adopted 
strategy is to ensure no negative change in the livelihood of the affected persons and their 
respective  activities;  however,  their  lives  can  be  improved  for  the  better  through  direct 
employments in the new company as casuals or be integrated in the merchandise activities 
of  the  project.  The  strategies  aim  at  livelihood  promotion  through  various  economic 
incentives to the affected.  
 

    6.4.1      Land­based Compensation 
There will be no land‐based resettlement options for the squatters displaced by the project. 
Although  the  livelihoods  of  squatters  are  based  on  use  of  the  land,  since  there  is  no  land 
ownership documents exist in these cases, the only available legal procedure is to issue a 
legal notice to allow the squatters to leave the land. These options may include relocation 
to their original homes or alternatively they are offered work in the proposed project as the 

     AWEMAC ENVIRONMENTAL CONSULTANTS AND G4 INTERNATIONAL LTD                                         66
       DRAFT RAP REPORT FOR THE PROPOSED G4 INTERNATIONAL LTD                             January 22,
                KENYA FARMING PROJECT IN LOWER TANA                                          2010

proponent company policy may deem fit. In some cases where compensation on land takes 
place, the following are the guiding principles for land to land compensation options: 
        New land should be located in reasonable proximity to land from which people will 
        be displaced; 
        New  land  should  be  provided  free  of  any  “transaction  costs”  such  as  registration 
        fees, transfer taxes, or customary tributes; 
        New land should be prepared for productive levels similar to those of the land from 
        which  people  will  be  displaced;  preferably,  affected  people  should  be  paid  by  the 
        project to do this work. 

    6.4.2       Cash Compensation 
Cash compensation option can be adopted in that; the affected persons have access to cash 
allowance  for  resettlement  especially  when  land‐for‐land  compensation  does  not  apply, 
given  that  they  are  squatters.  In  this  case  the  only  applicable  cash  compensation  is 
convenience  allowance  as  per  compensation  budget  .The  following  are  the  guiding 
principles for cash compensation option: 
        Compensation  rates  should  be  calculated  in  consultation  with  representatives  of 
        affected populations to ensure that rates are fair and adequate; 
        Compensation  for  land,  crops,  trees,  and  other  fixed  assets  should  be  sufficient  to 
        enable affected people to restore their standard of living after resettlement; 
        Compensation  for  structures  should  cover  full  replacement  cost  exclusive  of 
        depreciation and inclusive of all fees such as construction permits and title charges 
        and labour costs; 
        Compensation payments should be made before any acquisition of assets or physical 
        resettlement  takes  place  unless  those  payments  are  staggered  to  enable  affected 
        people to begin preparation of new sites; 
        Compensation for dismantled infrastructure or disrupted services should be paid to 
        affected  communities,  or  to  local  government  as  appropriate,  at  full  replacement 
        cost, before civil works begin; 
        Compensation for lost earnings should be paid to proprietors and employees for the 
        duration of work stoppages resulting from the relocation of enterprises. 
 
6.5 Risks of Impoverishment 
 
To ensure the affected persons are not in any way rendered poor by the proposed project, 
the  following  categories  of  affected  people,  including  squatters,  sharecroppers,  grazers, 
nomadic  pastoralists  and  other  natural  resource  users,  shopkeepers,  vendors  and  other 
service  providers,  communities, and  vulnerable  groups were  considered. All  types  of  loss 

     AWEMAC ENVIRONMENTAL CONSULTANTS AND G4 INTERNATIONAL LTD                                      67
       DRAFT RAP REPORT FOR THE PROPOSED G4 INTERNATIONAL LTD                              January 22,
                KENYA FARMING PROJECT IN LOWER TANA                                           2010

associated  with  each  category  above,  including  loss  of  physical  assets;  loss  of  access  to 
physical  assets;  loss  of  wages,  rent,  or  sales  earnings;  loss  of  public  infrastructure  were 
factored  in.  All  types  of  compensation  and  assistance  to  which  each  category  is  entitled, 
including  compensation  for  structures,  assets,  wages,  rent,  or  sales  earnings;  moving 
assistance and post‐resettlement support such as technical assistance, extension and skills 
training, and access to credit were also factored in.  
 
6.6  Consultation with Affected Populations 
 
To ensure the interests of the affected persons are fully entrenched in the RAP process and 
income  restoration,  the  consultant  adopted  a  thorough  consultation  with  the  affected 
persons,  representatives  of  any  affected  group,  any  interested  group  and  the  various 
administrative and government departments all through the project area. The consultation 
is as  described  in the Participation  and Consultation  Chapter of this report which was all 
encompassing.  
 
6.7 Monitoring of Income Restoration 
The  income  restoration  strategies  used  in  this  Action  plan  are  aimed  at  ensuring  the 
affected persons are reinstated to their prevailing state at the beginning of the project and 
adequate  measures  are  in  place  to  assist  them  progress  further.  The  monitoring  process 
and  the  responsible  parties  are  as  described  in  the  Monitoring  and  Evaluation  section  of 
this  report.  The  key  indicators  of  the  performance  of  the  income  restoration  measures 
within the restoration strategies adopted are: 
    • Poverty variation among the affected persons 
    • Conflicts within the affected persons, social, political, crime rate or religious 
 
 




     AWEMAC ENVIRONMENTAL CONSULTANTS AND G4 INTERNATIONAL LTD                                       68
       DRAFT RAP REPORT FOR THE PROPOSED G4 INTERNATIONAL LTD                             January 22,
                KENYA FARMING PROJECT IN LOWER TANA                                          2010

                           7      INSTITUTIONAL ARRANGEMENTS 

7.1  Institutional Framework 
The major issue in land acquisition, resettlement implementation and management is the 
appropriate  institutional  framework  for  all  concerned  parties  including  the  project 
developer.  It  is  important  to  ensure  timely  establishment  and  effective  functioning  of 
appropriate  organizations  mandated  to  plan  and  implement  land  acquisition, 
compensation, relocation, income restoration and livelihood programs.  
 
The proposed development project is primarily for the G4 International Ltd in partnership 
with a local company Wadadli Ltd, However there are other institutions that are relevant to 
this project in order to ensure successful implementation of the Resettlement Action Plan.  

    7.1.1        G4 International Kenya Limited  
G4 International Limited is an international company with several interests in the African 
continent  through  local  partnership.  The  company  operations  have  a  special  interest  in 
farming. It is guided by Mission, Vision and Values, and with the intention with this project 
is to bring modern farming practices and key project management skills to the Kenyan farm 
in conjunction with local expertise to gain the benefits of extremely fertile soil areas and a 
year round growing climate. The project is technically and commercially above average in 
its potential in terms of returns and technical risk. The major hurdles to overcome bearing 
in  mind  the  financial  support  of  the  Danish  Government  are  the  political  issues  in  Kenya 
and the buy in of the local community. Due to the lack of projects getting off the ground in 
the Tana River area there is a strong will to make this project successful and it believes it 
meets or exceeds the CSR and Environmental requirements. 
 

     7.1.2     Wadadli Limited 
This is the chosen local partner in support of G4  International Kenya Ltd for the provision 
of land management activities. Wadadli has undertaken projects within the five countries 
in  the East African  Region  namely  Kenya, Uganda, Tanzania, Sudan  and Rwanda. Wadadli 
Ltd also has close working relationship with South Africa. Wadadli’s approach is marked by 
a  commitment  to  professional  project  management,  supported  by  experienced  technical 
and  professional  staff  with  a  thorough  knowledge  of  government  and  business 
organizations.  




     AWEMAC ENVIRONMENTAL CONSULTANTS AND G4 INTERNATIONAL LTD                                      69
       DRAFT RAP REPORT FOR THE PROPOSED G4 INTERNATIONAL LTD                             January 22,
                KENYA FARMING PROJECT IN LOWER TANA                                          2010

 

    7.1.3        National Irrigation Board 
Irrigation  in  Kenya  has  a  long  history  spanning  over  400  years.  Historical  records  show 
that irrigation in Kenya has existed for many years along the lower reaches of River Tana 
and  in  the  then  Elgeyo‐Marakwet,  West  Pokot  and  Baringo  districts.  Rice  irrigation 
activities  also  existed  along  the  river  valleys  around  Kipini,  Malindi,  Shimoni  and  Vanga 
where  slaves  were  used  to  construct  the  rice  schemes  in  the  early  nineteenth  century. 
Asian  workers  building  the  Mombasa–Nairobi  Railway  line  also  started  some  irrigation  
activities around Makindu  
  
In  1946,  the  African  Land  Development  Unit  (ALDEV)  for  the  first  time  focused  on 
irrigation as part of a broad agricultural rehabilitation programme. The Unit, in pursuing its 
objectives, initiated a number of irrigation schemes including Mwea, Hola, Perkerra, Ishiara 
and  Yatta.  Cheap  labour  supplied  by  Mau‐Mau  detainees  was  used  to  establish  these 
schemes.  Most  of  the  detainees  were  eventually  settled  in  the  schemes. 
 
The National Irrigation Board was established in 1966 through an Act of Parliament (Cap 
347) to take over the activities of ALDEV. The Board took over the running of Mwea, Hola 
and  Perkerra.  Later,  the  Board  developed  Ahero,  West  Kano,  Bunyala  and  Bura  schemes. 
The first three schemes were developed as pilot schemes in the 1960s and early 1970s and 
remain  so  even  today.  The  NIB  later  expanded  the  Hola  and  the  Mwea  schemes  and 
transferred  the  control  of  the  Bura  Irrigation  Scheme  to  the  Ministry  of  Agriculture.  The 
Board  has  also  facilitated  research  leading  to  the  development  of  some  public  assisted 
irrigation schemes, such as the Yala Swamp and the South West Kano Schemes, which have 
been implemented by other agencies.  
 
The water Act, 2002 provides the legal framework for the management, conservation, use 
and control of water resources and for the acquisition and regulation of right to use water 
in  Kenya.  It  also  provides  for  the  regulation  and  management  of  water  supply  and 
sewerage  services.  In  general,  the  Act  gives  provisions  regarding  ownership  of  water, 
institutional framework, national water resources, management strategy, and requirement 

     AWEMAC ENVIRONMENTAL CONSULTANTS AND G4 INTERNATIONAL LTD                                      70
        DRAFT RAP REPORT FOR THE PROPOSED G4 INTERNATIONAL LTD                                January 22,
                 KENYA FARMING PROJECT IN LOWER TANA                                             2010

for permits, state schemes and community projects. Part IV of the Act addresses the issues 
of water supply and sewerage. Specifically, section 59 (4) of the Act states that the national 
water services strategy shall contain details of: 
       Existing water services 
       The number and location of persons who are not being provided with basic water 
       supply and basic sewerage 
       Plans for the extension of water services to underserved areas 
       The time frame for the plan; and 
       An investment programme 
 

  7.1.4       National Environment Management Authority (NEMA)  
NEMA  is  established  under  the  Environmental  Management  &  Coordination  Act.  The 
mandate  of  NEMA  as  spelt  out  in  Section  9  of  the  Act  is  inter  alia  is  to  exercise  general 
supervision  and  co‐ordination  over  all  matters  relating  to  environment  and  to  be  the 
principal  instrument  of  Government  in  the  implementation  of  all  policies  relating  to  the 
environment.  NEMA  is  further  mandated  to  promote  integration  of  environmental 
considerations  into development policies, plans, programmes and projects with a view to 
ensuring  proper  management  and  rational  utilization  of  environmental  resources  on  a 
sustainable yield basis for the improvement of the quality of human life. 
In  the  implementation  of  the  project  herein,  G4  International  Limited  is  enjoined  to 
collaborate  with  the  above  institutions  to  ensure  compliance  with  all  the  requirements 
relevant  with  the  project.  They  believe  the  project  should  move  forward  to  completion 
including the submission of the studies to NEMA. 




     AWEMAC ENVIRONMENTAL CONSULTANTS AND G4 INTERNATIONAL LTD                                          71
       DRAFT RAP REPORT FOR THE PROPOSED G4 INTERNATIONAL LTD                           January 22,
                KENYA FARMING PROJECT IN LOWER TANA                                        2010

 
                            8       IMPLEMENTATION SCHEDULE 
8.1     Implementation 
The implementation of the RAP calls for collaboration from all the stakeholders. This would 
require a properly constituted structure for the administration of the same. 
8.2     Organization Structure 
The  organizational  structure  elaborates  on  the  role  of  various  stakeholders  in  the 
implementation and administration of the RAP. It further clarifies the role of PAPs and their 
responsibility in the entire exercise. 
     8.2.1 G4 International Resettlement Unit (G4RU) 
The structure of the unit shall be as follows: 
     • Company Legal Advisor 
     • Government representative 
     • Surveyor 
     • Socio‐Economist 
     • Environmental Expert 
     • Community Liaison Officer 
     • Wachu Ranch  Officer 
     • Community leaders(CBOs and NGOs) 
 
The G4RU will be responsible for the following: 
     i) Oversee the implementation of the RAP. 
    ii) Oversee the formation of PAP Committee (PC) 
  iii) Ensure  maximum  participation of  the  affected  people  in  the  planning  of  their own 
        relocation and post relocation circumstances. 
   iv) Accept any financial responsibility for payment or stipend in terms of convenience 
        allowance  as  per  the  company  policy  upon  the  existing  law  governing  relocations 
        and other designated related costs. 
    v) Ensure monitoring and evaluation of  the PAPs and the undertaking of  appropriate 
        remedial  action  to  deal  with  grievances  and  to  ensure  that  income  restoration are 
        satisfactorily implemented. 
   vi) Ensure  initial  baseline  data  is  collected  for  the  purposes  of  monitoring  and 
        evaluation report as per the indicators provided by the RAP. 
     8.2.2 PAP Committee (PC)   
Under  the  guidance  and  coordination  of  G4RU,  the  PC  will  be  formed  one  week  after  the 
formation of the G4RU, which will act as a voice PAPs. The committee shall comprise of the 



     AWEMAC ENVIRONMENTAL CONSULTANTS AND G4 INTERNATIONAL LTD                                    72
       DRAFT RAP REPORT FOR THE PROPOSED G4 INTERNATIONAL LTD                              January 22,
                KENYA FARMING PROJECT IN LOWER TANA                                           2010

above committee. The PC shall have a Chairperson and a Secretary appointed or elected by 
PAPs. The chairperson ought to be from the local area. 
The PC will be concerned with the following: 
a)       Public Awareness: Includes extensive consultation with the affected people so that 
they can air their concerns, interests and grievances. 
b)       Reimbursement:  Involves  ratifying  reimbursement  rates,  and  serves  as  dispute 
resolution  body  to  negotiate  and  solve  any  problem  that  may  arise  relating  to  relocation 
process.  If  it  is  unable  to  resolve  any  such  problems,  will  channel  them  through  the 
appropriate grievance procedures laid out in this RAP. 
c)       Monitoring  and  Evaluation  (M&E):  Involves  developing  the  monitoring  and 
evaluation protocol 
d)       Logistics: Involves exploring all mechanisms by which RAP can be implemented 
e)       Employment,  Training  and  Counseling:  Involves  employment  protocol  in  the 
project (if any) for those who cannot find alternative employment. The committee will also 
counsel the PAPs both socially and economically. 
8.3      Community Consultation 
Relocation of PAPs needs communication or dialogue with the stakeholders; as such it is a 
never‐ending  exercise,  until  implementation  of  RAP  is  over.  This  will  be  easy  as  this 
involves people who don’t own the said land and only need to be informed of the intention 
of  the  ranch  owners  their  intended  procedures  and  due  notices  are  given  out  as  the  law 
requires.  The  consultant  undertook  an  extensive  consultation  with  the  PAPs  and  we  are 
aware the ranch ownership has also done considerable bit of work towards this end. In our 
discussions, we encouraged the community and the PAPs to: 
     i) Be open and make known their concerns and claims 
    ii) Be free to access the formally established grievance process for lodging complains 
   iii) Allow and give the necessary assistance to the M&E team 
   iv) Ranch and proponent personnel would continue to conduct a series of consultation 
         and focused group meetings with the PAPs. During these meetings, the PAPs will be 
         informed of the results of the survey findings and plans for the area including actual 
         dates  of  expiry  of  notices  to  leave.  These  consultative  meetings  should  include  all 
         stakeholders. 
 
8.4      Implementation Timelines 
The implementation times will be pegged on the following process 
     • G4RU is constituted 
     • PC is constituted 
     • PC signs off on the RAP. This constitutes the proponent’s acceptance of the terms of 
         the RAP. 
       AWEMAC ENVIRONMENTAL CONSULTANTS AND G4 INTERNATIONAL LTD                                     73
         DRAFT RAP REPORT FOR THE PROPOSED G4 INTERNATIONAL LTD     January 22,
                  KENYA FARMING PROJECT IN LOWER TANA                  2010

    •    PC draws up timelines for vacating this private land. 
 




        AWEMAC ENVIRONMENTAL CONSULTANTS AND G4 INTERNATIONAL LTD            74
                    RAP REPORT FOR THE PROPOSED G4 INTERNATIONAL LTD
                          KENYA FARMING PROJECT IN LOWER TANA

        Table 1.17: Gantt Chart showing Implementation Timelines 

                                                                   MONTH 1                MONTH 2                MONTH3 

ID  TASK NAME                     START             FINISH         Wk1   Wk2   Wk3  Wk4   Wk1  Wk2   Wk3   Wk4   Wk1   Wk2   Wk3   Wk4 
 1  Implementation Tasks          MON 1/2/10        MON 3/5/10                                                                      
 2  G4RU Constituted              MON 1/2/10        THU 4/2/10                                                                      
 3  Collection of M&E Baseline    FRI 5/2/10        MON 15/2/10                                                                     
 4  Valuation of Assets           TUE 16/2/10       MON 1/3/10                                                                      
 5  Formation of PC               TUE 2/3/10        FRI 5/3/10                                                                      
 6  PC and G4RU meeting           MON 8/3/10        MON 8/3/10                                                                      
 7  PC Comments on RAP            TUE 9/3/10        FRI 12/3/10                                                                     
 8  PC Signs Compensation         MON 15/3/10       MON 15/3/10                                                                     
 9  Announce of Compensation   TUE 16/3/10          WED 17/3/10                                                                     
10  Category1: A B,C,D agree      THU 18/3/10       FRI 19/3/10                                                                     
11  Category 1: A B,C,D agree     MON 22/3/10       WED 24/3/10                                                                     
12  M&E                           THU25/3/10        THU 8/4/10                                                                      
13  Category 2: E,F,G,H agree     FRI 9/4/10        TUE 13/4/10                                                                     
14  Category 2: E,F,G,H agree         WED14/4/10    FRI16/4/10                                                                      
15  M&E                           MON19/4/10        THU 22/4/10                     

16  Reporting                     WED 2/12/09       FRI 29/4/10                                                                     
17  RAP Final Report              FRI15/1/10        FRI15/1/10                                                                      
18  Category 1 ‐ M&E Report       TUE 23/3/10       TUE 23/3/10                                                                     
19  Category 2 ‐ M&E              MON 29/3/10       MON 29/3/10                                                                     
20  Comments on Reports           TUE 6/4/2010      MON 12/4/10                                                                     
21  Final M&E Report              MON 26/4/10       FRI 29/4/10                                                                     
       DRAFT RAP REPORT FOR THE PROPOSED G4 INTERNATIONAL LTD                            January
               KENYA FARMING PROJECT IN LOWER TANA                                        2010

                    9      PARTICIPATION AND CONSULTATION   
 
9.1     Introduction 
Public  consultations  for  the  proposed  farming  project  were  conducted  as  required  in 
EMCA, 1999 section 58. Door to door public consultations were conducted for the squatters 
within the Wachu Ranch, neighbouring villages and, focus group meetings convened within 
the trading centres to ensure comprehensiveness in the RAP. This chapter outlines the key 
issues/concerns  raised  during  the  public  consultations  exercise  and  household  surveys. 
The  proposed  mitigation  measures  suggested  by  the  public  that  the  proponent  should 
incorporate  to  minimize  environmental  degradation  and  promote  good  working 
relationship with the community has been integrated in this chapter.  
 
During the fieldwork two meetings were conducted within the footprint of the project with 
households that are likely to be affected by the project in presence of local administration, 
Wachu officials and community leaders and elders.  
 
9.2     Stakeholders 
During  the  public  consultations  multiple  groups  of  stakeholders  were  consulted.  The 
stakeholders were those who have an interest in the project development, and who will be 
involved in the further consultative process. The main groups of stakeholders are:  
    1. Squatters found within the Ranch. 
    2. Locals  living  in  the  neighbouring  villages  composted  of  the  crop  farming 
       communities, the pastoralists’ communities, traders, etc. 
    3. Government  Institutions  and  departments/officials  at  national,  provincial,  district 
       and divisional levels. 
    4. Local Authority leaders e.g. Area Councilors 
    5. Researchers at the various research institutions operating within the study area and 
       others  operating  outside  the  study  site  whose  research  is  of  relevance  to  the 
       proposed farming project. 
    6. NGOs  operating  at  National,  regional  and  local  levels  who  in  one  way  or  another 
       may have interest in the proposed project. 
    7. Members of parliament and local leaders from the project area. 
    8. Local Community Representatives (Village representatives). 
 
 
 
           RAP REPORT FOR THE PROPOSED G4 INTERNATIONAL LTD                                     January
                                                                                                     77
                             KENYA FARMING PROJECT IN LOWER TANA                                   2010

   9.2.1        Directly affected people (squatters) 
Directly affected people are those who reside in or derive their living from areas where the 
project  will  have  a  direct  impact;  i.e.  those  who  reside  along  the  Malindi‐Garsen  road  B8  
that  bisects  Wachu  Ranch.  The  land  targeted  for  development  is  currently  hosting 
approximately 500 household’s families on ‘squatting terms’ with a family size of between 
4‐8 persons. All the directly affected people were informed and consulted on major issues 
concerning  relocation,  livelihood  rehabilitation  and  income  restoration.  They  all 
participated in the socio economic survey.  
 

   9.2.2        Indirectly Affected Persons  
This group of stakeholders includes all those who reside in areas neighbouring the project 
area  or  are  reliant  on  resources  in  the  project  area.  It  was  established  that  the  villages 
neighbouring the land targeted for the establishment of the proposed farming land can be 
grouped in to pastoralist villages and crop farming villages who will have no change or the 
project  may  not  adjust  their  livelihood  e.g.  groups  such  as  those  residing  far  from  the 
project area but have farms near the proposed project area.  
 
   9.2.3        Government Agencies and Other Organizations 
These include:  
   • Office of the president 
   • Provincial  Administration  (Provincial  Commissioners,  District  Commissioners, 
       District Officers, Area Chiefs and Assistant Chiefs)  
   • National Environment Management Authority (NEMA), ‐ Tana River District 
   • Ministry of Lands  
   • Ministry of Roads  
   • Ministry of Agriculture  
   • County Councils  
   • Ministry of Labour, department of Occupational Health and Safety 
   • Ministry of Water and Irrigation 
   • Ministry of Wildlife and Forestry ‐Tsavo East National Park 

9.3      Relocation  Preparation and Planning 
Relocation of PAPs needs communication or dialogue with the stakeholders; as such it is a 
never‐ending  exercise,  until  implementation of  RAP  is  over.  This  will  involve people  who 
don’t own the said land and only need to be informed of the intention of the Ranch owners, 
their  intended  eviction  procedures  upon  provision  of  eviction  notices  in  90  days  are 
required by the law. 

     AWEMAC ENVIRONMENTAL CONSULTANTS AND G4 INTERNATIONAL LTD                                        77
           RAP REPORT FOR THE PROPOSED G4 INTERNATIONAL LTD                                  January
                                                                                                  78
                             KENYA FARMING PROJECT IN LOWER TANA                                2010

 
The objective of these consultations was to secure the participation of all people affected by 
the project during project planning and implementation, particularly in the following areas: 
    • alternative project design; 
    • assessment of project impacts; 
    • relocation  strategy; 
    • inconvenience allowance rates and eligibility for entitlements; 
    • choice of relocation site and timing of relocation; 
    • development opportunities and initiatives; 
    • development of procedures for redressing grievances and resolving disputes; and 
    • Mechanisms for monitoring and evaluation and for implementing corrective actions. 
 

    9.3.1      Methods and Approach  
The  consultation  team  consisted  of  Soil  Surveyor,  Fisheries  expert,  Livestock  expert, 
Vegetation expert, Hydrologist, Environment & Social Impact Assessment Specialist Socio‐
Economists and research assistants. In most cases, the team was accompanied by four local 
representatives. The local representatives were instrumental in the selection of venues and 
timing for the meetings.  
 
In  order  to  have  adequate  participation  of  the  communities,  notices  were  given  to 
respective  communities  through  the  local  area  D.O,  Chiefs  and  Elders.  These  leaders 
assisted  in  mobilization  of  the  community  to  attend  public  consultative  meetings.  In 
addition,  pictorial  aids  showing  the  locations  of  the  different  project  area  were  prepared 
and used during information gathering and dissemination.  
 
    9.3.2      Socio­economic Survey  
During the consultation process, a socio‐economic survey was conducted where interviews 
were held with individual PAPs in order to establish a socio economic status baseline for 
the PAPs that could facilitate future monitoring after relocation. The survey also included 
questions  about  opinions/suggestions  on  livelihood  restoration,  sites  for  relocation  and 
type of compensation. Information was gathered by use of structured questionnaires which 
was administered by the team of consultants. 
 

   9.3.3      Community Meetings  
Community  meetings  were  held  within  the  project  area  to  give  information  about  the 
project and gather people’s perceptions, opinions, suggestions and fears about the project. 

     AWEMAC ENVIRONMENTAL CONSULTANTS AND G4 INTERNATIONAL LTD                                      78
           RAP REPORT FOR THE PROPOSED G4 INTERNATIONAL LTD                                   January
                                                                                                   79
                             KENYA FARMING PROJECT IN LOWER TANA                                 2010

The community meetings acted as a forum for discussions between the RAP team and the 
community  members.  See  figure  15  bellow.  The  information  gathered  was  used  as  input 
into the Resettlement Action Plan. 




                                                                                                   
       Figure 15: Community Public Barazas/meeting held in Wachu Oda Location

9.4     Implementation  and Monitoring 
G4 International personnel will continue to conduct a series of meetings and hearings with 
the Project affected people, informing them of the results of any survey conducted and the 
plans for the area. In these meetings there will also be negotiations to determine when the 
actual relocation will take place.  
 
The RAP will be implemented by the proponent and the present owners of the ranch. A G4 
International  Resettlement  Unit  for  the  project  has  been  constituted  and  is  charged  with 
the responsibility of monitoring and supervision of RAP implementation. 
 

9.5      Dissemination of RAP Information 
Resettlement  or  compensating  PAPs  needs  communication  or  dialogue  with  the 
stakeholders,  as  such  it  is  a  never  ending  exercise,  until  implementation  of  RAP  is  over. 
Extensive consultation with the potentially affected persons is continuing through ongoing 
meetings with project affected people. The PAP RAP Committee and proponent relocation 
unit  will  attend  all  PAPs  consultation  meetings  and  inform  them  of  the  procedures  and 
schedule  for  relocation  easements,  reorganization  and  resettlement arrangements  among 
others.  
 




     AWEMAC ENVIRONMENTAL CONSULTANTS AND G4 INTERNATIONAL LTD                                        79
           RAP REPORT FOR THE PROPOSED G4 INTERNATIONAL LTD                                   January
                                                                                                   80
                             KENYA FARMING PROJECT IN LOWER TANA                                 2010

                                  10      GRIEVANCE REDRESS 

10.1  Process of Registering and Addressing Grievances 
Dissatisfactions  may  arise  through  the  process  of  reimbursement  for  the  relocated 
members  of  the  community  for  a  variety  of  reasons,  including  disagreement  on  the 
inconvenience  value  during  the  resettlement  process,  controversial  issue  on  property 
ownership  etc.  To  address  the  problem  of  PAPs  during  implementation  of  relocation,  a 
Grievance Redress Committee will be established in project affected areas. 
 
The composition of the Grievance Redress Committee is depicted below: 
    • Representative of local Administration (Chair person) 
    • Representative of Land Administration‐Ranch ownership (Secretary) 
    • Respected local Elders (Members) 
 
The  main  function  of  the  committee  would  be  arbitration  and  negotiation  based  on 
transparent  and  fair  hearing  of  the  cases  of  the  parties  in  dispute  between  PAPs  and  the 
implementing  agencies  for  local  government.  The  committee  gives  solution  to  grievances 
related  to  reimbursement  amounts,  delays  in  payment  of  the  relocation  easements  or 
provision of different type of relocation assistance. 

10.2  Mechanism for Appeal 
Disputes  will  be  referred  to  G4  International  Ltd,  Wadadli  Ltd  and  the  environment 
consultant  then  if  necessary,  the  PAPs  Committee  who  will  be  asked  to  provide 
recommendations as to how it is to be addressed. The Committee may decide that the case 
be re‐investigated and, depending on the nature of the grievance, it may be referred to the 
National Environmental Tribunal or Public Complaints Committee (PC). 




     AWEMAC ENVIRONMENTAL CONSULTANTS AND G4 INTERNATIONAL LTD                                      80
           RAP REPORT FOR THE PROPOSED G4 INTERNATIONAL LTD                                January
                                                                                                81
                             KENYA FARMING PROJECT IN LOWER TANA                              2010

                          11      MONITORING AND EVALUATION 
 
In order to guarantee that the relocation plan is smoothly performed and the benefit of the 
affected  persons be  well  treated, the  implementation of  the  relocation  plan  will  be  under 
monitoring  throughout  the  whole  process.  Monitoring  will  be  divided  into  two  parts,  i.e. 
internal and external monitoring. 

11.1  Monitoring and Evaluation 

11.1.1 Internal Monitoring 
It  is  the  responsibility  of  the  proponent  to  conduct  regular  internal  monitoring  of  the 
relocation  performance  of  the  operation  through  G4RU,  which  will  be  responsible  for 
implementing  relocation  and  reimbursement  activities.  The  monitoring  should  be  a 
systematic evaluation of the activities of the operation in relation to the specified criteria of 
the condition of approval. 
The objective of internal monitoring and supervision will be: 
     a) To  verify  that  the  valuation  of  assets  lost  or  damaged,  and  the  provision  of 
          relocation, resettlement and other rehabilitation entitlements, has been carried out 
          in accordance with the resettlement policies provided by the GOK. 
     b) To oversee that the RAP is implemented as designed and approved; 
     c) To  verify  that  funds  for  implementation  of  the  RAP  are  provided  by  the  Project 
          authorities in a timely manner and in amounts sufficient for their purposes, and that 
          such funds are used in accordance with the provisions of the RAP. 
 
             i) The main internal indicators that will be monitored regularly: 
            ii) That the proponent’s entitlements are in accordance with the approved policy 
                and that the assessment of vacation compensation is carried out in accordance 
                with agreed procedures 
           iii) Payment  of  vacation  compensation  to  the  PAPs  in  the  various  categories  is 
                made in accordance with the level of relocation described in the RAP 
           iv) Public  information  and  public  consultation  and  grievance  procedures  are 
                followed as described in the RAP. 
            v) Relocation and payment of subsistence and shifting allowances are made in a 
                timely manner. 
           vi) Restoration of affected public facilities and infrastructure are completed prior 
                to construction. 
 



     AWEMAC ENVIRONMENTAL CONSULTANTS AND G4 INTERNATIONAL LTD                                    81
           RAP REPORT FOR THE PROPOSED G4 INTERNATIONAL LTD                                   January
                                                                                                   82
                             KENYA FARMING PROJECT IN LOWER TANA                                 2010

11.1.2 External Monitoring and Evaluation 
The Consultant recommends that an independent monitoring unit (IMU) be established to 
evaluate implementation of the relocation and resettlement. 
The  IMU  shall  be  appointed  to  monitor  the  resettlement  and  compensation  process  and 
implementation  of  requirements  to  verify  that  compensation,  resettlement  and 
rehabilitation  have  been  implemented  in  accordance  with  the  agreed  RAP.  The  IMU  will 
also be involved in the complaints and grievance procedures to ensure concerns raised by 
PAPs are addressed. 
 
More specifically, the IMU will carry out the following: 
     i) Review  the  results  of  the  internal  monitoring  and  review  overall  compliance  with 
         the RAP 
    ii) Assess  whether  relocation  objectives  have  been  met  especially  with  regard  to 
         housing, living standards, compensation levels, etc. 
   iii) Assess general efficiency of relocation and formulate lessons for future guidance 
   iv) Determine overall adequacy of entitlements to meet the objectives. 
 
The Consultant recommends that the proponent establish an IMU that draws on personnel 
with  resettlement/relocation  and  social  development  experience.  The  Consultant  further 
recommends  that  relevant  representatives  from  the,  G4RU.  The  project  affected  persons 
should be represented through relevant local administration. 
 
The objective of this unit will also be to provide a forum for skills sharing and to develop 
institutional capacity. It is important that the Unit is able to maintain a strong independent 
position and provide constructive feedback to the project to ensure the objectives are met. 
 
The  RAP  would  be  implemented  by  the  proponent.  The  G4RU  and  Public  Complaints 
Committee (PC) will carry out the M&E. The G4RU will be responsible for the overall M&E 
while the PC will monitor and evaluate respective communities where they will have been 
formed. 
 
Progress and performance of the RAP would be before, during, and after implementation. 
Using the baseline information that is being compiled by the consultant through this RAP 
report, the M&E  advisors would be in a position to  note changes  that may have occurred 
before and after relocation. Some of the baseline indicators that are relevant to this study 
are: 
1.       Income  statistics:  Average  annual  family  income  within  the  communities  should 
not  fall  below  an  agreed  upon  factor  in  the  first  18  months  after  the  move.  Data  should 
       AWEMAC ENVIRONMENTAL CONSULTANTS AND G4 INTERNATIONAL LTD                                     82
           RAP REPORT FOR THE PROPOSED G4 INTERNATIONAL LTD                                January
                                                                                                83
                             KENYA FARMING PROJECT IN LOWER TANA                              2010

indicate that the socio‐economic situation of the affected people is stable after one year. If, 
after a year, the situation of PAPs are found to be deteriorating further interventions may 
considered. 
2.      Entitlement Listing. In the event of relocation to alternative site for the PAPs such 
site  should  have  comparable  services  and  amenities  to  the  previous  site.  The  basis  of 
comparison could be qualitative, although a quantitative measure could also be developed 
based  on  per  capita  maintenance  costs.  The  consultant  has  however  recommended 
financial compensations along side vacation. Thus, the choice of the relocation site would 
depend on the PAPs. 

11.1.3 Responsible Parties 
Due to the variable magnitude of the  project, it is recommended that PC be charged with 
the task of monitoring and evaluation of the PAPs. It will therefore be enlisted to continue 
the  post  project  evaluation  system  and  conduct  actual  monitoring  and  reporting.  G4 
International Ltd will obtain Category M&E reports from the PCs for compilation. 

11.1.4 Methodology for monitoring 
The  approaches  and  methods  used  would  require  regular  dialogue  and  surveys  of  the 
affected  communities.  The  dialogue  will  provide  a  forum  for  affected  parties  to  air  any 
grievances or complaints that may arise. The survey will provide a more objective form of 
progress measurement to complement the more subjective consultations/dialogue. 

11.1.5 Data Collection 
Qualified  census  personnel  will  collect  data  from  a  respectable  research  firm  or 
government agency. The surveys should be conducted with the full consent and permission 
of affected parties. 

11.1.6 Data Analysis and Interpretation 
The  data  should  be  able  to  measure  changes  in  net  welfare  based  on  pre‐resettlement 
profile and post resettlement conditions. Where negative welfare is noted, G4 International 
Ltd should immediately address the same. 

11.1.7 Reporting 
Post‐resettlement monitoring results should be subject to review by, representatives of the 
affected  community  through  the  PC  and  representatives  of  G4  Industries  Kenya  Ltd.  The 
Monitoring Team must write its reports before the end of each visit and submit them to the 
G4 International Ltd Project Manager and the PC. The Monitoring Team should structure its 
reporting in conjunction with accepted variables set out in the Annex. 
 

     AWEMAC ENVIRONMENTAL CONSULTANTS AND G4 INTERNATIONAL LTD                                    83
            RAP REPORT FOR THE PROPOSED G4 INTERNATIONAL LTD                                    January
                                                                                                     84
                              KENYA FARMING PROJECT IN LOWER TANA                                  2010

                                   12      COSTS AND BUDGETS  
 
The  source  of  the  money  to  be  used  for  resettlement  of  squatters  in  Wachu  Ranch  is 
expected to be part of the plans made by the developer, G4 International Ltd and Wadadli 
Ltd.  Since  the  squatters  have  no  legal  entitlements  to  the  land  use  in  Wachu  Ranch,  they 
will only be given a resettlement allowance to facilitate them vacate the Ranch to pave way 
for  farming  project.  There  are  approximately  500  households  with  an  average  of  2500 
persons who are expected to benefit from this allowance offered on humanitarian basis. 
The squatters to be affected by the project have occupied areas along the stretch of 
approximately 17 Kilometers Malindi‐Lamu road B8, which bisects Wachu Ranch.  
The main villages are HURARA village, HURARA RAU‐KWA MWA village, KAZA ROHO 
village and KWA MZEE DULA village in Wachu Ranch located in lower Tana. 
12.1.1 Squatters entitlement 
An approximate number of 500 households are to be affected by this project. The affected 
families  will  only  benefit  with  a  vacating  compensation  allowance  of  10,000  shillings 
(133.33  Dollars)  per  family.  This  is  to  assist  the  families  to  transfer  and  settle  in  their 
original homes. Most of the squatters have been on the farm for less than five years. They 
are fully aware of their illegal occupation of Wachu Ranch. Therefore they do not have any 
land compensation entitlements. See table 1.16 below. 
 
             Table 1.16: Summary of PAPs and Cost Compensation Entitlement 
    Affected             No. of            Total                Cost of                Total Cost  
  Villages in         Households         Number of  compensation per                      (Kshs) 
Wachu Ranch                              residents           family (Kshs) 
     e) Hurara  Approx. 180               Approx.                10,000                1,800,000 
         village,                           2500                                               
     f) Hurara                            families                                             
         Rau‐                 100                                                      1,000,000 
         Kwa                                                                                   
         Mwa                                                                                   
         village,                                                                              
     g) Kaza                                                                                   
         roho               160                                                        1,600,000 
     h) Kwa                                                                                    
         Mzee                                                                                  
         Dula                80                                                          800,000 
         village 
                                                                                               
TOTAL COST                500                                                      Kshs.5,000,000.00 
                                                                                     USD 66666.67  
 

     AWEMAC ENVIRONMENTAL CONSULTANTS AND G4 INTERNATIONAL LTD                                         84
        RAP REPORT FOR THE PROPOSED G4 INTERNATIONAL LTD        January
                                                                     85
                          KENYA FARMING PROJECT IN LOWER TANA      2010

ANNEXES 

  • Minutes of the public meetings and lists of attendance  

  • Copies of census and survey instruments 

  • Copies of notices for the public consultative meeting  

  • Copy of interview questionnaire 

  • ANNEX A ­ Kenya Farm Feasibility Study Doc G4 RP 1075 V1 

  • ANNEX B ­ BUSINESS OPERATING MANUAL G4I­1000 Issue 2 _2_ 

  • ANNEX C ­ HEALTH SAFETY & ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT 
    SYSTEM G4I­1018 Issue 2 

  • ANNEX D ­ ETHICS POLICY G4I­1015 Issue 4 

  • ANNEX E ­ ENERGY CONTROL AND MANAGEMENT POLICY G4I­1054 
    Issue 2 

  • ANNEX  F ­ Energy Balance G4 RP 1050 V2 

  • ANNEX G ­ Emergency Management G4 RP Draft V2 

  • ANNEX H ­ EMPLOYEE HANDBOOK G4I­1063 Issue 1 

  • G4 Farm Project Draft Environmental & Social Management Plan 

  • Wachu Ranch Brochure V4 

     




   AWEMAC ENVIRONMENTAL CONSULTANTS AND G4 INTERNATIONAL LTD         85
          RAP REPORT FOR THE PROPOSED G4 INTERNATIONAL LTD                                January          86
                            KENYA FARMING PROJECT IN LOWER TANA                              2010


Public Resettlement Grievance Form

RPP RAP Reference No.

Full Name

Contact Information                           Address:

Please mark how you wish to be
contacted
(mail, telephone, e-mail)                     ---------------------------------------------------
                                              Telephone:-----------------------------------------------
                                              Email-----------------------------------------------------

Preferred Language for                        English
Communication(Please mark how you
wish to be contacted)                         Kiswahili

National Identity Number

Description of Incident or Grievance:                   What happened?
                                                        Where did it happened?
                                                        Who did it happen to?
                                                        What is the result of the problem
Date of Incident/Grievance
                                              One time incident/grievance(date----------------)
                                              Happened more than once(How many times-----
                                              ---)
                                              Ongoing (Currently experiencing
                                              problem………)
What would you like see happen to solve the problem?

Signature:
Date:
Please return this form to:
G4 International Ltd C/o Wadadli Ltd
Josem Trust Building,3rd Floor,Room 7
P.O.Box 617-00100,NAIROBI, Kenya
Tel.+254-20-2015422




         AWEMAC ENVIRONMENTAL CONSULTANTS AND G4 INTERNATIONAL LTD                                         86
          RAP REPORT FOR THE PROPOSED G4 INTERNATIONAL LTD                          January      87
                            KENYA FARMING PROJECT IN LOWER TANA                        2010

Census Form
Household Head Name…………………………… Household Number………………

Village Name………………………………………

Date……………………………………………………


    Name     Sex   Age     Primary         Secondary      Highest  Income        Illness
                           Occupation      Occupation     level of Remittan      symptoms
                                                          educatio ce            within past 2
                                                          n                      weeks *
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
Illness symptoms code:- 1) Diarrhea, : 2 ) Skin rash :3 )fever, : 4 ) Other (Specify)




         AWEMAC ENVIRONMENTAL CONSULTANTS AND G4 INTERNATIONAL LTD                               87
        RAP REPORT FOR THE PROPOSED G4 INTERNATIONAL LTD            January    88
                          KENYA FARMING PROJECT IN LOWER TANA          2010


Physical Assets Survey Form
Household Name:…………………………………………..Date:…………………………….
Village Name……………………….Home District……………Year/Month of settlement………
Item                Quantity Description/      Replacement Cost Total Observation
                             Construction Type                  Cost
                                               materials Labour
Residence
House fence
Kitchen
Latrine/bathroom
Paddock fence
Grainery
Animal shed
Water well
Harvest shrine
Graves
Others


TOTAL




        AWEMAC ENVIRONMENTAL CONSULTANTS AND G4 INTERNATIONAL LTD              88
          RAP REPORT FOR THE PROPOSED G4 INTERNATIONAL LTD                          January        89
                            KENYA FARMING PROJECT IN LOWER TANA                        2010



                                             AWEMAC


              AFRICA WASTE AND ENVIRONMENT MANAGEMENT CENTRE
                       Muthaiga Mini Market, Left Wing, 3rd Floor,
                         P.O. Box 63891-00619, Nairobi, Kenya
                           Tel: +254 20-2012408/ 0722-479061
                           E-mail: awemac_ken@yahoo.com,
                                    www.awemac.org
                     PUBLIC NOTICE!
    PUBLIC MEETING ON ENVIRONMENTAL, SOCIAL IMPACT
   ASSESSMENT AND RESETTLEMENT ACTION PLAN (RAP) FOR
   THE PROPOSED G4 INDUSTIRES KENYA FARMING PROJECT,
                      LOWER TANA.
Our client and the proponent, G4 International Ltd is proposing to undertake the above mentioned
project. The proponent proposes to clear the bush, farm Sunflower oil and process to oil in Wachu
Agricultural land. The local community/or neighbour to the proposed project site, are hereby asked
to attend a public meeting scheduled to take place as indicated below:


Date:         Thursday 28TH January, 2010
Venue:        VIBAO VIWILI-KURAWA-Wachu Ranch, Garsen;
Time:         11.00 A.M
The purpose of the meeting is to collect views from the general public and any other party who in
any way will/ might be affected by the proposed project within its project cycle. As a requirement of
EMCA 1999 Section 58 on Environmental Impact Assessment, public participation is an important
exercise for achieving the fundamental principles of sustainable development.

Contact persons:-
Mr. Elijah Muthusi-0721802056, Dominic Munyao-0715708670
Chief Wachu Oda -0712 951158
D.O Tarasaa Division Henry Otieno- 0728795153

NEMA 2009 LICENCE NO. 0044


Prof Jacob K.Kibwage
Lead Environmental Consultant, Africa Waste and Environment Management Centre




         AWEMAC ENVIRONMENTAL CONSULTANTS AND G4 INTERNATIONAL LTD                                 89
          RAP REPORT FOR THE PROPOSED G4 INTERNATIONAL LTD                          January        90
                            KENYA FARMING PROJECT IN LOWER TANA                        2010

17/01/2010


                                             AWEMAC



              AFRICA WASTE AND ENVIRONMENT MANAGEMENT CENTRE
                       Muthaiga Mini Market, Left Wing, 3rd Floor,
                         P.O. Box 63891-00619, Nairobi, Kenya
                           Tel: +254 20-2012408/ 0722-479061
                           E-mail: awemac_ken@yahoo.com,
                                    www.awemac.org
                     PUBLIC NOTICE!
 WACHU RANCHING MEMBERS MEETING ON ENVIRONMENTAL,
SOCIAL IMPACT ASSESSMENT AND RESETTLEMENT ACTION PLAN
  (RAP) FOR THE PROPOSED G4 INDUSTIRES KENYA FARMING
                  PROJECT, LOWER TANA.
Our client and the proponent, G4 International Ltd is proposing to undertake the above mentioned
project. The proponent proposes to clear the bush and farm on Wachu Ranch Sunflower oil and
process to oil. The local community/or Neighbour to the proposed project site, are hereby asked to
attend a public meeting scheduled to take place as indicated below:
Date:         Wednesday 26th January, 2010
Venue:        Tarasaa Primary School ; Time:                    3.00 P.M
The purpose of the meeting is to collect views from the general public and any other party who in
any way will/ might be affected by the proposed project within its project cycle. As a requirement of
EMCA 1999 Section 58 on Environmental Impact Assessment, public participation is an important
exercise for achieving the fundamental principles of sustainable development.

Contact persons:-
Mr. Elijah Muthusi-0721802056, Fredrick Juma-0710349175
Chief Wachu Oda -0712 951158
D.O Tarasaa Division Henry Otieno- 0728795153


Prof Jacob K.Kibwage

Lead Environmental Consultant, Africa Waste and Environment Management Centre




         AWEMAC ENVIRONMENTAL CONSULTANTS AND G4 INTERNATIONAL LTD                                 90

				
DOCUMENT INFO