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					         OPSC5005 Treatise



             2009 Course Information




Produced by the University of Sydney, Discipline of Clinical Ophthalmology 2009




                                                                                  1
OPSC5005: Treatise



Unit of Study Supervisor:
Dr. John Grigg
        Discipline of Clinical Ophthalmology and Eye Health, University of Sydney
        Save Sight Institute, 8 Macquarie St Sydney 2001, Australia
        GPO Box 4337 Sydney NSW 2001 Australia
        Ph +61 2 9382 7302
        Fax +61 2 9382 7318
        johng@eye.usyd.edu.au




Unit of Study Structure

The student should note that the treatise is worth 12 credit points. The treatise is the additional
Unit of Study (UoS) to the Graduate Diploma in Medicine / Science in Medicine (Ophthalmic
Science) (GradDipMed(OphthSc)/GradDipScMed(OphthSc)) course. The treatise enables
students to enrol for the Master of Medicine (Ophthalmic Science) / Master of Science in
Medicine (Ophthalmic Science)(MM(OphthSc)/MScMed(OphthSc)) course.

This UoS can only be undertaken if the previous four UoS have been completed to a pass
level. The other UoS are Ophthalmic Anatomy, Ophthalmic Physiology, Ophthalmic Optics
and Practical Ophthalmic Science. It cannot be taken separately.

A candidate can only be awarded a Masters of Medicine degree in Ophthalmic Science if
he/she has successfully completed all five units

A web site for this UoS exists and the online forum should be consulted regularly as
announcements will be posted there. Important announcements will be emailed to
participants.



A) Learning Aims and Objectives of this Unit of Study

Successful candidates will demonstrate to the examiners that they have a detailed and
comprehensive knowledge of one area in the basic sciences or clinical ophthalmology. The
treatise may take one of two forms:

1) A written output (report or formal academic composition) on work performed during the
candidature from a supervised student project that contains between 10,000-25,000 words.

2) A scientific paper that arises from a supervised student‟s project and has been submitted to
a peer review journal for publication.




                                                                                                 2
Learning outcomes

On completion of this UoS the successful student will be able to:

1) Undertake a medical / scientific project and follow it to its completion.
2) Work constructively under the supervision of an ophthalmic supervisor
3) Display scientific thinking and apply this to ophthalmology
4) Attempt to publish their treatise or learn how to publish their work.



B) How will the Unit of Study be organised?

The UoS will be offered as a one semester course. For part-time students this can be
initiated at the completion of the other UoS. For full time students this can be begun
during second semester of first year. The treatise is ideally begun soon after
coursework is finished to benefit from the knowledge gained with the Graduate
Diploma.
Treatises can only be submitted if the student is enrolled in the treatise unit. Students
nominate the semester in which they intend submitting their treatise by enrolling in
the treatise unit for that semester. If students intend submitting the treatise after they
have finished the coursework, a separate enrolment must be completed for the
semester in which they intend submitting. Students should wait to enrol until they are
preparing to submit.
Additional enrolment fees will apply when the student fails to submit the treatise in
the nominated semester and submits in a subsequent semester.
The general format for treatise is summarised on the flow chart presented at the end
of this course outline. It requires students to:


  1. Develop a suitable idea:


  Your idea needs to be feasible and do-able within 6 months, e.g. a systematic
  review; an analysis of existing datasets; a small-scale epidemiological study.
  Topics should be chosen such that appropriate supervisors can be found. Your
  treatise should provide information that is at least of local interest.


  2. Finding a suitable supervisor:


  Internal: An internal supervisor i.e. from within the Discipline of Clinical
  Ophthalmology and Eye Health or member of RANZCO is mandatory. He/She
  must be someone who has methodological expertise in the area, is interested in
  your topic and has the time.
  External: You can have an additional supervisor who is not from the Discipline or
  RANZCO but this is optional. An external supervisor should be someone who is a
  content expert and approved by the course co-ordinator.




                                                                                             3
  3. Approval by Course Coordinator:

  This is to ensure the chosen topic is feasible and appropriate supervision has been
  arranged. The approvals are used to register students and their topics.


  4. Enrolment
  You should enrol in the treatise unit when you are preparing to submit.
  Please note that if a particular project requires an 'Ethics Approval', it can
  sometimes take up to 3 months and this duration has to be accommodated in the
  planning for the treatise.


C) How will the Unit of Study be assessed?
   1. Treatise evaluation
  Two examiners will be chosen by the treatise supervisor/s for their methodological
  and content expertise. The examiners may be either members of the Discipline of
  Clinical Ophthalmology and Eye Health or RANZCO. They are chosen by the
  course supervisor to review the treatise. They have two months to formulate their
  recommendations. They can either recommend:
       acceptance (usually with   correction of typographical and other errors);
       acceptance after emendations (more substantive changes, e.g. provision of
          additional text, tables, figures or deletions or revision of argumentation);
       revisionand re-submission (e.g. re-analysis and revision of results and
          discussion, the revised treatise is returned to the examiners). You do not
          have to reenrol when you are resubmitting;
       rejection.



2. Submission

Submission of the treatise is to Eleanor Viney, Postgraduate Administrator, Discipline
of Clinical Ophthalmology and Eye Health, Save Sight Institute University of Sydney,
GPO Box 4337, Sydney NSW 2001 Australia. A treatise may be submitted up to the
census date of the next semester (31 March for semester 1, 31 August for semester 2).
Specifically if a treatise is begun in semester 2 the candidate has until the census date
(31 March) of the first semester of the following year to submit. Students who do not
submit by the census date must re-enrol in the treatise for the next semester and they
have a further 6 months to complete. This however comes at a financial cost to the
student.
N.B. Please ensure that your Supervisor reads your treatise before you submit it
for review.




                                                                                         4
3. Examiners’ comments

Your examiners‟ comments will be emailed to you, usually 6 – 8 weeks after
submission census date. Please make any recommended changes and arrange to have
two copies of your revised treatise printed and bound in hard cover. Please forward
these two bound copies to Eleanor Viney, Postgraduate Administrator, Discipline of
Clinical Ophthalmology and Eye Health, Save Sight Institute University of Sydney,
GPO Box 4337, Sydney NSW 2001 Australia together with a statement of how you
have addressed the examiners‟ comments. (Please use the form provided on page 19
of this document.)



D) Workload Expectations

Students will be required to meet with their supervisor at least every three weeks to discuss
the progress and implementation of their project.

The format of the project may be of a systematic review of the literature, a case series, short
clinical trial, survey or other project acceptable to the course supervisor.

It is essential where there is the use of patient information or patient enrolment onto the study
that appropriate ethics approval is gained from the governing body where the project will take
place. Students need to be mindful of the time that ethics approval takes and incorporate it
into the project time allocation

The treatise to be submitted must take the form of either

1) A written output on work performed during the candidature from a supervised student
project that contains between 10,000-25,000 words.

2) A scientific paper that arises from a supervised student‟s project and has been submitted to
a peer review journal for publication.

Students need to inform the course supervisor of any changes to their project or difficulties
with their treatise supervisor.




E) Suggested Text Books

The Medical and Burkitt Ford libraries have numerous examples of successfully submitted
research treatises to the Faculty of Medicine that students have access to.

The Medical and Burkitt Ford libraries have numerous texts describing the authoring of
scientific papers that can be consulted.




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F) Further questions?

If in doubt ask your supervisor, the treatise coordinator or postgraduate administrator.
If there are further issues these can be referred to the course coordinators or discussed
on the web forum. SUPRA has a booklet: Practical aspects of producing a thesis at
the University of Sydney, available free to all postgraduate students. You should also
refer to the postgraduate student‟s website at:

http://www.supra.usyd.edu.au/Sections/Student_Advice/Resources.html

There are numerous treatises stored in the Discipline of Clinical Ophthalmology
library at the Save Sight Institute. These can be viewed upon permission by the
authors.




                                                                                        6
Time                             Treatise Plan

0 Months                      Develop a Suitable Idea



                             Find Suitable Supervisor
1 Month                         (Internal / External)


                          Approval by Course Coordinator


                             Enroll (depending on likely
1.5 Month
                                     submission)




                                     WRITE
                                    TREATISE




                                     SUBMIT
6 Months

                        In SEM 2 (due date 31st March)
                                        OR
                        In SEM 1 (due date 31st August)




                                   Examined
8 Months                        (Two examiners)




            ACCEPTED
                


                  EMENDATION
                      and                                REVISE
                   ACCEPT                                 and
                                                        RESUBMIT




                                                                   7
                          UNIVERSITY OF SYDNEY
         DISCIPLINE OF CLINICAL OPHTHALMOLOGY AND EYE HEALTH

                                   TREATISE OUTLINE

                   For Master of Medicine (Ophthalmic Science) and
                   Master of Science in Medicine (Ophthalmic Science)

Definition of a treatise
A treatise is a formal piece of writing which sets out an exposition of a specific subject. It
must have direct relevance to the ophthalmic basic or clinical sciences. It is considered to
require a minimum of six months half time work. Specifically the process of ethics approval,
research question formulation, data collection, data analysis and writing up needs to take the
student a minimum of 2 ½ days a week for one semester (20 weeks).

Objectives
The purpose of a Masters treatise is for you to demonstrate satisfactorily that you can use the
skills and knowledge learnt from your coursework. To do this you have to show that you can:

    a) Define an ophthalmic topic or issue
    b) Summarize its main features and compare it with other similar problems recorded in
       the literature
    c) Phrase clear research aims or questions
    d) Use appropriate methods to investigate the issue
    e) Interpret the results and discuss their meaning in relation to the research aims and
       question
    f) Draw appropriate conclusions and make specific recommendations from future
       research or policy

Format
The treatise may be in one of the following three forms:

    a) A paper dealing with research on a specific topic which would be acceptable for
       submission to a peer reviewed scientific, academic or professional journal for
       consideration of publication. A treatise in this form needs be formatted in the way
       recommended by the submitting authority. No word limits apply. When submitting
       your treatise to the faculty it must be accompanied by a letter from the editors of the
       relevant journal stating that it has been submitted and will be appropriately reviewed.
       The treatise will be reviewed and recommendations given to the postgraduate
       students regardless of whether it is successful in its publication by the relevant
       journal.
    b) A report concerning certain health problems relevant to the eye, their causes and
       proposed solutions, which would be suitable for presentation to a government
       department, an independent agency or inquiry, the private health care industry,
       international aid health organizations, or a research granting body. This form is
       acceptable only if there is no censorship or other interference with your academic
       freedom from the government department or commissioning agency; if this may be a
       problem you should submit a separate treatise in the form of (c).

        For a) and b) the paper or report would normally be supplemented by appropriate
        appendices. The main body of the treatise should be direct and concise. Appendices
        should then be used for in-depth exposition of the methodology, more detailed
        presentation of sources and results, a full bibliography or an expanded discussion of
        certain arguments if necessary. Your treatise supervisor will be able to advise on the
        appendices necessary and the appropriate way of linking them with the main paper or
        report. In particular those who submit treatises to journals will need to add appendices
        to expand the context of their work and include material that would normally not be


                                                                                                 8
        submitted with their paper.

    c) A formal academic composition which clearly states the context and importance or
       relevance of the subject matter, specifies the research question(s) or aim(s), outlines
       the existing knowledge which has bearing on the research, describes methods used
       and results obtained, critically discusses these in the light of existing knowledge and
       ends with the formulation of conclusions and or recommendations.


The expected length of a treatise will vary according to the approach and subject matter, but
the main text should be between 8 000 and 25 000 words.

Structure and approach
Whichever of the above three forms you use, your treatise will usually include the following
elements.

Introduction and/or background
This section or chapter serves to introduce the subject of your treatise to the reader and to
discuss the reasons or justification for the work. Usually the aims and objectives of the project
will be discussed. This section may also include a literature review or describe the events
leading up to the project.

Methods
The methodology of your study must be documented in detail, dealing with sampling issues
(description of target population, method of sample selection, sample size), the study
procedure (a flow diagram may be useful), measurement issues (details of how each variable
was measured, justification of choice of measurement instruments) and data analysis method.
You should discuss all methodological problems such as sources of bias, repeatability and
validity of measurements and logistic problems. This section needs to be detailed enough so
that another scientist or researcher would be able to repeat your methods precisely without
error.

Results
The results section should include a presentation of response rates, a description of the study
population, descriptive statistics of other variables, results of tests of hypotheses and other
statistical analyses. In a formal treatise there may be more than one chapter of results,
depending on the design of your study and the number of research questions that you are
examining. When there are several result chapters, the results may be interpreted and
discussed at the end of each chapter. Try and avoid any discussion of your results when you
are presenting them.

Discussion
In this section the results are interpreted. The limitations of the methodology should be
examined and referred to where appropriate. Usually, the discussion should include an
examination of the practical implications of the results. Try and avoid making sweeping or
dogmatic statements about your results.

Conclusions and recommendations
It is essential to have a summary section. Often it will be appropriate to make
recommendations based on your findings and these may also be included in the final section.




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References
Part of what you are being tested on when you write a treatise is your ability to relate your
work to that of others in the field and to acknowledge your indebtedness to earlier researchers

You must give a reference to all sources cited in the text. There are two main reasons for
giving a reference:

    a) To allow the reader to find a source which you are quoting or paraphrasing
    b) To support a claim of scientific fact.

There is no need to support claims for universally accepted statements, trivial points or
matters that you have observed yourself. To support a claim, you should refer to a study that
investigated and demonstrated the point in question or to a reputable review or meta-analysis
of studies of the question. Making reference to other people‟s unsubstantiated opinions does
not support a claim. Avoid using abstracts, unpublished observations or personal
communications as references to support claims.

If you use someone else‟s ideas or words (whether paraphrase or quoted in full), give a full
reference that would enable the reader to find the source. Failure to do this is plagiarism. Nor
is it acceptable to copy passages of someone else‟s work and present it either verbatim or
slightly altered as if it were your own writing, even if you acknowledge the source at the end
of the paragraph. Summarize or paraphrase it briefly in your own words.

Endnote is an excellent referencing tool that simplifies the referencing process. You should
become familiar with its functions and incorporates its use in all your submitted work.
Assistance with endnote can be provided by tutors at the Save Sight Institute.

Bibliography
You should also include a list of all the other works you consulted but did not cite.

Appendices
This is the section of your treatise that can include a large amount of material that cannot be
used in the main body of the text. It is particularly useful for those submitting papers for
publication. Often published papers do not include a lot of the material necessary for a
project. This may include questionnaires, data sheets, flow diagrams, medline search
strategies, expositions on complicated scientific issues not familiar to the reviewer that will
assist in the review of the work, sources not used in the treatise, extra graphs or data sets etc.
Appendices if extensive may themselves need a reference list to direct the reviewer.
Appendices aim to provide a more complete picture of your work during the treatise and to
assist a reviewer in their understanding of your work. One should avoid unnecessary material
or appendices that just increase the word limit.

Document preparation
This guide assumes that you are typing the treatise yourself, using a word processor. If your
typing skills are not adequate and you need to employ a typist or word processing expert,
please consult the advice in the SUPRA guide.

Paper
Print on A4 paper. Print should only appear on one side of the paper. The final bound copy of
the treatise must be on acid free paper and have print only on one side.

Margins
Leave margins of 4cm on the side where the binding is and 2.5cm on the other three sides.
Page numbers appear in the margins at least 1.5cm from the edge of the paper on either the
top or bottom. Remember when your treatise is hard bound the edges will be trimmed. If you
reproduce questionnaires etc in the appendices, you may need to reduce them to make them fit
the margins above.


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Type style
Use 1 ½ line spacing in 12 pitch. We recommend you use either a typewriter font as Courier
or Prestige elite where every letter takes the same amount of space. You may also use a serif
face that is proportionally spaced like Times New Roman. Smaller sizes of type are not
acceptable, nor are sans-serif type faces such as Helvetica, which are too hard to read in large
blocks of text (although are suitable for tables, headings and captions). Do not attempt to
justify the right hand margin. Try and avoid breaking words at the end of lines. Displayed
quotations and references may be single spaced. You also need to be careful that you use the
correct characters for dashes, opening and closing quotation marks, italics and bold fonts etc.

Cover
Examining copies of your treatise need to be covered in an A4 plastic folder. The front needs
to have a label clearly stating your name, the title of the treatise, degree submitted for, year of
submission and the words: “Examination Copy Only”.

Binding
The treatise should be presented for examination in a temporary binding so that if
emendations are required they can be incorporated before permanent binding as a hardback
book. This temporary binding should be strong enough to withstand ordinary handling and
postage. The preferred binding method is spiral binding, plastic binding or “velobinding”.
Spring back folders and ring binders are not acceptable.

The degree will not be awarded until after the receipt of the approved final hard bound copy
of the treatise for the University Library.

Number of copies
Three examination copies of a treatise must be submitted. You also will need to submit two
hard bound copies for the degree. One is for the University Library and the other for the
Discipline of Clinical Ophthalmology library. You should also consider two further hard
bound copies of the treatise, one for your supervisor and the other for your own library.

The parts of a treatise
       Title Page
       Abstract or Summary
       Acknowledgements
       Note on Authors Contribution
       Table of Contents
       List of Tables
       List of Figures
       List of Special Names or Abbreviations
       Main Text
       References
       Bibliography
       Appendices

Title page
The title page should include the title of the treatise, your full name, the month and year of
submission, and the statement:
“This treatise is submitted in partial satisfaction of the requirements for the Degree of Master
of Medicine (Ophthalmic Science), {or Master of Science in Medicine (Ophthalmic Science),
as appropriate} University of Sydney”
The term partial is used as the other requirements are satisfactory completion of coursework.




                                                                                                 11
Abstract or summary
This should preferably fit on one typed page and should be about 300 words long. State the
purposes of the study or investigation, basic procedures, main findings (main data and their
statistical significance) and the principle conclusions you have drawn from your findings. Do
not use headings in the submitted abstract (though this may be required for potentially
publishable papers). The abstract should be a highly condensed version of the central reasons
for you study, your methods, results and conclusions. It should not be a description of your
treatise or an advertisement or apology for it. Do not dwell on how remarkably original or
successful your study was or on the mishaps that prevented you from coming up with more
representative results. Do not use phrases like “The implications of theses findings are
discussed” or state “further work needs to be done” with out specific detail and relevance to
your study. Do not forget to state when and where the study was done. Do not report any
information or opinion that is not in the treatise itself. The abstract should not have any
footnotes or references to the literature, or any tables or figures.

Acknowledgements
It is courteous to acknowledge anyone who has given you assistance (financial, practical,
emotional or academic) at the outset of your treatise. Especially cite those who designed the
project or carried out the data collection if you were not involved at those stages yourself.

Note on authors contribution
If you were not involved at all stages of the research project or if major decisions affecting
your work were made by other people, you should make clear exactly what your role was. For
papers that are submitted for publication to peer review journals it is essential that you are the
first author of that paper. It is a convention in the scientific literature that first authors are the
ones who wrote the majority of the paper and contributed most to the project. A treatise with
you as not the first author on a paper will not be considered for review.

Table of contents
List the chapters or sections, subheadings and appendices with page numbers. (We
recommend you do this last after you have written the sections below). Start with the
introduction and omit the prefatory matter such as the dedication and material preceding the
contents list. Look at some published treatises for examples of the format of the table of
contents. If your contents list comes to more than two pages it is probably too detailed and
you should omit minor subheadings to make it more useful.

List of tables, figures and illustrations
Make sure that the titles appear exactly as shown on the tables and figures themselves

List of special names or abbreviations (if appropriate)
If there are special terms used in the text, or common terms used in a special sense, or many
abbreviations, it is helpful to list and explain them here. It is easier however, for your readers
if you use as few abbreviations as possible except for common ones as NSW or AIDS.

Main Text
Begin each chapter on a new page. Make sure you are consistent about the use of numbering
or different styles (such a bold, italics or underlining) to indicate levels of headings. Avoid
footnotes; put parenthetical matter in the text or in an appendix or omit it altogether it does
not support your study.

Avoid lone direct quotations in the text unless the exact form of words used by the author is
essential to your argument. Short quotations (less than two or three lines) should be enclosed
in quotation marks. Decide whether you want single or double quotation marks and stick to
that rule throughout the treatise. The only exception is for a quotation within a quotation when
you switch your style i.e. if you are using single quotation marks throughout your treatise then
the inner quotation needs to have double marks around it. Quotations longer than two or three
lines can be displayed i.e. set out with a blank line above and below, indented, more narrowly


                                                                                                   12
spaced and perhaps in smaller type. Do not use quotation marks in displayed quotations
unless there is a quotation within the quotation. Quoted material should be “letter for letter”
the same as the original. If there is an error in the original that might be confusing to your
reader, add the word „sic‟ in parentheses after it. If you omit any words from the original,
indicate the omission with three dots (…); there is no need to use the three dots at the start or
end of a quotation unless for some reason you need to emphasize that your extract begins in
the middle of something. If you add words of your own either in explanation or to adjust the
grammar of the quotation so that is fits into your own sentence, enclose the interpolated words
in square brackets.

Tables
Tables should be simple and clear as possible. For a formal treatise you may provide fuller
more complex tables than you would normally use for other publications such as journal
articles. For example in a systematic review you may wish to list in an appendix all the
articles you reviewed whereas in the published article you only list the ones that are relevant
to your research question. Very large tables can be included in an appendix and simpler tables
and graphs used in the body of the text to display summary information.

Tables may appear:
     At the appropriate point in the text
     On a separate page in the text after the page referring to the table
     In a separate section at the end of the section or chapter
The first system is easiest for the reader, but may pose some problems for large tables
breaking over the ends of pages.

The title of the table should tell what the data represent: who, where, when and what. The
source of any data not your own should be indicated in a footnote under the table.

Figures
Keep graphs simple and avoid fancy computer graphics as unnecessary shading, confusing
diagonal hatching or three dimensional effects.

Lists
Lists can be incorporated within a sentence, introduced by a colon, with the items separated
by commas. If individual items contain commas the items may be separated by semicolons. If
the list is set out vertically there is no need for punctuation at the end of each item. Be
consistent about the style you use for set-out lists, do not switch from bracketed numbers to
unbracketed numbers or letters and bullets etc. Bullets are preferable to asterisks or dashes for
lists where no order or hierarchy is intended.

References
There is a large range of acceptable referencing styles. If your treatise will be submitted to a
peer review journal for publication, you should follow carefully the referencing format of the
submitting authority. It is preferable for postgraduate students to learn how to use Endnote to
assist with their referencing. It is convenient, saves time and can quickly convert from one
referencing format to another. Endnote is available to postgraduate students through the
University of Sydney server.


Appendices
Information not required in the text itself but relevant to the treatise may be included in an
appendix, for example questionnaires, detailed tables on which graphs in the text are based,
expanded tables, grant proposals for the study if appropriate etc




                                                                                                 13
‘The Bakis 9 points to treatise success’

1) Work out early on what you want to get out of your treatise beyond simply
   handing it in and graduating (which is an achievement in itself offcourse) –want to
   get as much mileage out of it as possible i.e.: think of where you can present it eg
   annual college meeting, and what journal you want to publish it in

2) Pick your topic carefully and make it appropriate to you and why you did this
   course
   a) make sure that it is a very focused question and a do-able one
   b) I suggest you write it as a paper with appendices so that you have a head start
      in then going on to publish it

3) Pick the right supervisor
   a) Find out what interests different people have and match those to your own
   b) Make sure you get along together as you‟ll be spending a lot of time together

4) Mentally prepare yourself for what is to come
   a) The downside is that you will go through extreme agony to finish it; once you
      acknowledge this, things can only look up from there
   b) The upside is two-fold: you can put into practise all the knowledge you‟ve
      acquired during your course; it‟s also a challenge to which you can rise

5) Next point is very important: timetabling – this works on several levels
   a) You have to give yourself a definite and immovable endpoint as a finish date:
      i) excepting some major catastrophe you will hand it in and there is no
          extension available
      ii) My advise is finish it ASAP – don‟t drag it out
   b) Start early – if you can start doing work on it this year
   c) For the 6 months before it‟s due – set short term deadlines and use your
      meetings with your supervisor as the deadline
      i) Each meeting should end with definite attainable goals for the next
          meeting; make the meetings frequent – 2nd weekly if need be

6) Ensure that both you and your supervisor have the same end goals for the treatise
   a) Make sure you are both clear on the short and long term goals – doing major
      revamps of the treatise 2 weeks before is not much fun

7) Have pride in your work
   a) Give it your best
   b) Its not going to be often for many of us that we will be able to have our own
      research bound and put on a library shelf (even if it just sits and gathers dust)
      so create a piece of work that you can be proud of.




                                                                                      14
8) Once your work has been handed in and accepted don‟t forget to
   a) Congratulate yourself/ your supervisor and other admin staff who have helped
      you along the way/congratulate your family and friends who have supported
      you through it
   b) And off course enjoy your graduation because – you should have a huge sense
      of achievement

9) So you‟ve done all this work, you‟ve graduated with a Masters in Ophthalmic
   Science:
   a) Why not take it that one step further and put your work in the public arena in a
       way that having it sitting on a library shelf can‟t do and a high quality
       publication is great for your CV and your supervisors
       i) The steps to achieving this are similar to the ones I‟ve outlined above for
          getting the treatise done
          (1) If you already have your treatise in the format of a paper you‟re half
              way there
          (2) Pick the right journal – don‟t underestimate the high quality of your
              work and go for the widest readership you can get
          (3) Set the time within which you have to have it ready
          (4) If the paper is not accepted by the first journal don‟t take it personally ,
              just revise it and send it to the next one until it does get accepted


So in summary, getting your treatise finished and published is based on finding the
right topic, format and supervisor, setting lots of short and long term deadlines,
mentally prepare yourself for what is ahead and perseverance

GOOD LUCK

Dr Sophie Bakis
BA, MB BS, MMed(ClinEpi)




                                                                                        15
                           THE UNIVERSITY OF SYDNEY
                 Discipline of Clinical Ophthalmology and Eye Health

                   Masters in Medicine / of Science in Medicine
                              (Ophthalmic Science)


Treatise Topic Registration Form
When you have decided on a topic and supervisor for your treatise, you should complete
this form and ask your proposed supervisor/s to sign it and forward to Eleanor Viney,
Postgraduate Administrator (Education and Research), Discipline of Clinical
Ophthalmology & Eye Health, Save Sight Institute, University of Sydney, GPO Box 4337
Sydney N.S.W. 2001

Name of Candidate: ...................................................................................................
Student ID: ……………………………………………………………………………….
Email: ..............................................................................................................................
TREATISE TOPIC (Please write in block letters)
............................................................................................................................................
............................................................................................................................................
............................................................................................................................................
............................................................................................................................................

Name of Supervisor: ..................................................................................................

Aim(s) of Treatise:

1. ………………………………………………………………………………………………..

2. ………………………………………………………………………………………………...

3. ………………………………………………………………………………………………...


Proposed Methodology:

…………………………………………………………………………………………………..

…………………………………………………………………………………………………..

…………………………………………………………………………………………………..



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This project will / will not (please circle) require ethics approval.

If ethics approval is required, please forward details of the ethics approval number and
awarding body when available.

I agree to supervise this candidate for his/her treatise topic


Signature of Supervisor: .................................................................Date........................
Address of Supervisor and email if not located at the Discipline of Clinical
Ophthalmology and Eye Health

..........................................................................................................................................

..........................................................................................................................................

..........................................................................................................................................

If your supervisor is not a member of the Discipline of Clinical Ophthalmology, you
should have an associate supervisor within this School to monitor your progress.
Name of Associate Supervisor (if applicable)
...........................................................................................................................................

Signature of Associate Supervisor: …................................................Date........................
Registration of a topic and supervisor is not binding - if you want to change, fill in another form. The topic
does not have to reflect the final title of the treatise, just an indication of the research area.

Please return to: Eleanor Viney, Discipline of Clinical Ophthalmology and Eye Health, Save Sight Institute
University of Sydney, GPO Box 4337, Sydney NSW 2001, Australia




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                        UNIVERSITY OF SYDNEY
       DISCIPLINE OF CLINICAL OPHTHALMOLOGY AND EYE HEALTH



DEGREE OF MASTER OF MEDICINE (OPHTHALMIC SCIENCE)



STATEMENT THAT RECOMMENDATIONS IN EXAMINERS’ REVIEWS HAVE
BEEN ADDRESSED


Name of Candidate…………………………………………………

Title of
Treatise…………………………………………………………………………………………

……………………………………………………………………...............................................

……………………………………………………………………...............................................




Please state clearly how you have addressed the changes specified by your examiners.

Appraisal 1:

e.g.

Page 11: The statement “PUK, otherwise known as marginal keratitis” has been removed as
suggested.

All of the following grammatical errors have been corrected:

Page 33: Third last line: “Finding an orbital biopsy”
Page 49: Para 1, line 4: “ in 1982 patients with…”
Page 51: Para 2, line 1: “ particularly high”


Appraisal 2:

e.g.

Page 27: I have included a description of the use of the endonasal powered drill in para. 4 of
the Discussion as suggested.



Signed/Date




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