Docstoc

Material Balance Calculations (PDF)

Document Sample
Material Balance Calculations (PDF) Powered By Docstoc
					      Material Balance Calculations 
• All material balance calculations are variations of a 
  single theme: 
        Given values of some input and output stream 
      variables, derive and solve equations for the others

• Solving the equations is a matter of simple algebra, 
  however, you first need to: 
   vderive the necessary equations from a description of the 
    process and a collection of process data, and 
   vdetermine what is known and what is required. 


• Developing a standard methodology to solve 
  problems is the key to success! 
  Some problems can be complex… 
The catalytic dehydrogenation of propane is carried out in a continuous 
packed­bed reactor.  One thousand kilograms per hour of pure propane is 
preheated to a temperature of 670°C before it passes into the reactor.  The 
reactor effluent gas, which includes propane, propylene, methane, and 
hydrogen, is cooled from 800°C to 110°C and fed to an absorption tower, 
where the propane and propylene are dissolved in oil.  The oil then goes to a 
stripping tower in which it is heated, releasing the dissolved gases; these 
gases are recompressed and sent to a distillation column in which the propane 
and propylene are separated.  The propane stream is recycled back to join the 
feed to the reactor preheated.  The product stream from the distillation 
column contains 98% propylene, and the recycle stream is 97% propane. 
The stripped oil is recycled to the absorption tower. 


 To understand what is going on, it is necessary to draw a 
  flowsheet to represent the process and material flows
         Problems involving Material Balances 
•  Procedures will be outlined on single­unit processes (F&R 4.3) 
   –  No reaction (Consumption=Generation=0) 
   –  Continuous steady­state (Accumulation=0) 

•  Develop good habits now!! Problems will get more complex as 
   we extend the procedures to multiple­unit processes (starting in 
   Week 3) and processes with reaction (starting in Week 4 or 5) 
•  Procedures are summarized in F&R Section 4.3 and include: 
   –    process diagram (4.3a) 
   –    selecting a basis of calculation (4.3b) 
   –    Setting up material balances (4.3c) 
   –    Performing a degree of freedom analysis (4.3d)
Practice, Practice, Practice… 

  •  Read the textbook (Section 4.3)!! 
  •  Study and understand F&R examples (4.3­1 through 4.3­5) 
  •  CD with textbook:  Interactive Tutorial #2 
  •  Examples in next few lectures and Wk 2 tutorial 
  •  Posted assignment and solution from previous year 
  •  Assignment 2 (Material single unit processes without rxn)
           Flowcharts (F&R 4.3a) 
•  A flowchart is a convenient way of organizing process 
   information for subsequent calculations. 
•  To obtain maximum benefit from the flowchart in material 
   balance calculations, you must: 

 1.    Write the values and units of all known stream variables 
       at the locations of the streams on the chart. 
 2.    Assign algebraic symbols to unknown stream variables 
       and write these variable names and their associated units 
       on the chart. 

 Your flowsheet is an important part of the problem solution, 
         and will be assigned marks for completeness
              Standard Notation 
The use of consistent notation is generally advantageous.  In 
this course, the notation adopted in Felder and Rousseau will 
be followed.  For example: 
    m    – mass 
    & 
    m    – mass flow rate 
    n    – moles 
    & 
    n    – molar flow rate 
   V     – volume       (Volume is not conserved in a process!!) 
    & 
   V     – volumetric flow rate 
    x    – component fractions (mass or mole) in liquid streams 

    y    – component fractions in gas streams 
      Basis of Calculation (F&R 4.3b) 
•  Basis of calculation – is an amount or flow rate of one of 
   the process streams 

 v If a stream amount or flow rate (an extensive variable) is 
   given in the problem statement, use this as the basis of 
   calculation 

 v If no stream amounts or flow rates are known (i.e., only 
   intensive variables), assume one, preferably a stream of 
   known composition 
        –  if mass fractions are known, choose a total mass or mass flow 
           rate of that stream (e.g., 100 kg or 100 kg/h) as a basis 
        –  if mole fractions are known, choose a total number of moles or 
           a molar flow rate
 Methodology for Solving Material Balance Problems 
                    (F&R 4.3e) 
1.  Choose a basis of calculation 
2.  Draw and fully label a flowchart with all the known and unknown 
    process variables as well as the basis of calculation.  Be sure to 
    include units!! 
3.  Express what the problem statement asks you to determine in 
    terms of the variables labeled on your flowchart 
4.  State your assumptions (i.e., steady­state, ideal gas, etc.) 
5.  Determine the number of unknowns and the number of equations 
    that can be written to relate them.  That is, does the number of 
    equations equal the number of unknowns? 
6.  Solve the equations 
7.  Check your solution – does it make sense? Calculate the quantities 
    requested in the problem statement if not already calculated 
8.  Clearly present your solution with the proper units and the correct 
    number of significant figures
  Degrees of Freedom Analysis (F&R 4.3d) 
•  A degree­of­freedom analysis (DFA) is simply an accounting of the number 
   of unknowns in a problem and the number of independent equations that can 
   be written.  The difference between the number of unknowns and the 
   number of independent equations is the number of degrees­of­freedom, DF 
   or n  , of the process. 
       df 

                              unknowns  - n 
                      ndf  = n                       t 
                                           independen  equations 


•  Possible outcomes of a DFA: 
    –  n  = 0, there are n independent equations and n unknowns. The problem can be 
        df 
       solved. 
    –  n  > 0, there are more unknowns that independent equations. The problem is 
        df 
       underspecified. n  more independent equations or specifications are needed to 
                         df 
       solve the problem. 
    –  n  < 0, there are more independent equations than unknowns. The problem is 
        df 
       overspecified with redundant and possibly inconsistent relations. 
   Sources of equations that relate unknown process 
   variables include: 

1.  Material balances – for a nonreactive process, usually but not always, the 
    maximum number of independent equations that can be written equals the 
    number of chemical species in the process 

                       nd 
2.  Energy balances – 2  half of course 

3.  Process specifications – given in the problem statement 

4.  Physical properties and laws – e.g., density relation, gas law 

5.  Physical constraints – e.g., mass or mole fractions must add to 1 

6.  Stoichiometric relations – systems with reaction

  A set of equations is independent if you cannot derive one 
  by adding and subtracting combinations of the others. 
    Independent Equations è Linear Algebra 

Is this set of equations independent?               3×3 Matrix form: 
               x + 2 y + z = 1                              é1 2 1 ù é x ù é1    ù
                                                                                 ú
                                                            ê 2 1 -1ú ê y ú = ê 2 
               2 x + y - z = 2                              ê       úê ú ê ú
                                                                    ûë û ë ú
                                                            ê0 1 2 ú ê z ú ê 5 
                                                            ë                    û 
                    y + 2 z = 5 
                                                                        Gauss 
Matrices: 
                                                                ß     Elimination 
An n x n matrix A has a rank r < n only if |A|=0 
                                                             é1 0 0 ù é x ù é 6  ù
                                                                                  ú
                                                             ê0 1 0 ú ê y ú = ê -5 
If |A|=0 then A is called a singular matrix.                 ê      úê ú ê ú
Otherwise, it is non singular.                               ê0 0 1 ú ê z ú ê 5  ú
                                                             ë      û ë û ë û 


An n x n matrix has rank r = n only if |A| ¹ 0            Rank = 3.  No non­zero 
                                                           rows in reduced form 
The rank of matrix A is equal to the maximum 
number of linearly independent rows (or             Solution:  x= 6, y= –5, z = 5
columns) of A. 
Are these sets of equations independent? 


x + 2 y + z = 1     é1 2 1 ù é x ù é 1 ù    (Eq. 2) ­ 2 (Eq. 3) = 0    é1 2 1 ù é x ù é1  ù
  2 y + 4 z = 10                        ú
                    ê0 2 4 ú ê y ú = ê10                                                  ú
                                                                       ê0 0 0 ú ê y ú = ê0 

    y + 2 z = 5 
                    ê      úê ú ê ú
                    ê0 1 2 ú ê z ú ê 5 ú
                    ë      ûë û ë û
                                                   Þ                   ê      úê ú ê ú
                                                                       ê0 1 2 ú ê z ú ê5 
                                                                       ë      ûë û ë ú    û 




x + 2 y + z = 1 
                    é1 2 1 ù é x ù é1  (Eq. 1) + (Eq. 2) = (Eq. 3)  é1 2 1 ù é x ù é1 
                                         ù                                             ù
2 x + y - z = 2                          ú
                    ê 2 1 -1ú ê y ú = ê 2                                              ú
                                                                    ê3 3 0 ú ê y ú = ê3 

    x 
   3  + 3 y = 3 
                    ê
                    ë
                            úê ú ê ú
                    ê 3 3 0 ú ê z ú ê 3 
                            ûë û ë ú     û
                                                   Þ                ê      úê ú ê ú
                                                                    ê3 3 0 ú ê z ú ê3 
                                                                           ûë û ë ú
                                                                    ë                  û 




               Rank = 2 in both cases 
DF = 3 unknowns – 2 independent equations = 1 (underspecified) 
 DF Analysis:  For a system with N species, it is possible to 
 formulate N+1 material balances.  But only N of these (at 
 most) will be independent! 

 One thousand kg/h of an ethanol/methanol stream is to be separated in a 
 distillation column. The feed has 40.0 wt% ethanol and the distillate has 
 90.0% methanol by wt. 80.0 wt%of the methanol is to be recovered as 
 distillate. Determine the wt% methanol in the bottoms product. 
                                                                      Distillate,  D 




                                        Feed,   F       Dist. Col. 




# of unknowns = 
                                                                       Bottoms,   B 
# of independent material balances = 
# of additional eqs = 
DF =
  There are two common situations where you will find fewer 
  independent equations than species 

   1.  Balance around a divider (splitter) 
       –    single input à two or more outputs of the same composition 
       –    x  = x  = x 
             1    2    3 
       –    Only 1 independent equation 
       –    Splitters are used for: 
             •  Purge streams (reactor systems with recycle) 
             •  Total condensers at the top of distillation columns              m  kg/h 
                                                                                    2 
                                                                               x  kg­A/kg 
                                                                                2 
                                                                             (1­ x  ) kg­B/kg 
                                                                                   2 
                                                 m  kg/h 
                                                    1              DIVIDE 
                                               x  kg­A/kg 
                                                1                                m  kg/h 
                                                                                    3 
                                             (1­ x  ) kg­B/kg 
                                                   1                           x  kg­A/kg 
                                                                                3 
                                                                             (1­ x  ) kg­B/kg 
                                                                                   3 
# of species = 2 
# of independent material balances = 1
 2.  If two species are in the same ratio to each other wherever they appear 
 in a process and this ratio is incorporated in the flowsheet labeling 
     –  See F&R pg 127 
     –  Classic example is air in non­reactive system (21 mol% O  ; 79 mol% N  ) 
                                                                     2        2 
     –  E.g.; vaporization of liquid carbon tetrachloride into an air stream 

                                                          n  mol O  /s 
                                                           3       2 
                  n  mol O  /s                            3.76 n  mol N  /s 
                                                                3         2 
                   1       2 
                  3.76 n  mol N  /s                       n  mol CCl  / s 
                                                           4          4(v) 
                        1       2 


                n  mol CCl  / s 
                 2        4(l)                            n  mol CCl  / s 
                                                           5        4(l) 




   # of species = 3 
   # of independent material balances = 2 
     –  Better to treat air as a single species in this situation 

Recognize these common situations, and always check that your 
equations are independent!

				
DOCUMENT INFO
Shared By:
Categories:
Stats:
views:233
posted:3/19/2011
language:English
pages:15