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					Equity Audit
 ELEMENTARY
 TEACHERS’
 FEDERATION OF
 ONTARIO
      Building the Foundations of Equity
      November, 2006
WITH THANKS AND
APPRECIATION

I would like to acknowledge the women and men of the
Elementary Teachers’ Federation of Ontario for being
forthcoming and cooperative throughout the review process.

Many thanks,
Blye Frank, Ph.D.




                                           page 2 of 30
TABLE OF CONTENTS

Acknowledgments ......................................................................................................................................Page 02

Equality vs. Equity.........................................................................................................................................Page 05

Message from the Equity Auditor..............................................................................................................Page 06


Introduction and Background
The Elementary Teachers’ Federation of Ontario ................................................................................ Page 07


Key Findings
Policy Development ...................................................................................................................................Page 09

Accountability..............................................................................................................................................Page 10

Staff Development and Involvement.............................……………………………………………………Page 11

Professional Development .........................................................................................................................Page 12

Communications .........................................................................................................................................Page 13

Programs .......................................................................................................................................................Page 14

Outreach ......................................................................................................................................................Page 15

Service Area Development .......................................................................................................................Page 16


Recommendations
Framework of Equity and Accountability ................................................................................................Page 17

I. Hire an Equity Coordinator………………………………………………………………………………… Page 18

II. Institutional Climate .................................................................................................................................Page 18

III. Planning and Coordination...................................................................................................................Page 19

IV. Programs..................................................................................................................................................Page 20

V. Communication ......................................................................................................................................Page 20

VI. Human Resources and Organization..................................................................................................Page 21

VII. Research.................................................................................................................................................Page 22

VIII. Support...................................................................................................................................................Page 22




                                                                                                                                                               page 3 of 30
Implementation Approach
........................................................................................................................................................................Page 24


Conclusions
........................................................................................................................................................................Page 25



Appendices
Appendix A: About the Equity Auditor ..................................................................................................Page 27

Appendix B: Scope......................................................................................................................................Page 28

Appendix C: Methods.................................................................................................................................Page 29

Appendix D: Works Cited ...........................................................................................................................Page 30




                                                                                                                                                                      page 4 of 30
                    Equality vs. Equity

       “Equality means that different behaviours, aspirations and
needs are considered, valued, and favoured equally. It does not
mean that men and women have to become the same, but that their
rights, responsibilities, and opportunities will not depend on [age,
race, religion, gender, sexuality, or ability].
       Equity means fairness of treatment for [all] according to
their respective needs. This may include equal treatment or
treatment that is different but which is considered equivalent in
terms of rights, benefits, obligations, and opportunities.”

                   -Adapted from International Labour Organization (2000)1




                                                                    page 5 of 30
MESSAGE FROM THE EQUITY
AUDITOR
Dr. Blye Frank, Dalhousie University

The Canadian Labour Congress (1997)2 clearly states that the impact of
discrimination, including discrimination based on race, sex, religion, sexual
orientation, ethnicity or disability is detrimental to organizations, particularly labour
federations, and that the tendency to view all members of historically
marginalized groups as homogenous contributes to the harmful effects of
discrimination in the workplace.
With this recognition, a motion was passed by the Representative Council of the
Elementary Teachers’ Federation of Ontario (ETFO) to hire an external investigator
to conduct an equity audit, or systematic review of all aspects of the
organization, including policy, practice, and publications using an equity and
social justice lens.

This report documents the findings of that review as revealed through research:
observation and interviews, with members of the ETFO, as well as offers
recommendations for future directions. Additionally, this report recognizes, and is
encouraged by, the extensive policy development and the resources available
within the present organization.

Perhaps most clearly resonating from this equity audit is the need to lessen, if not
eliminate, the gap between what the ETFO states in print materials and public
forums and what it does in the everyday practices of the organization with
respect to equity policies. Further, this report encourages leaders to take on these
difficult equity issues and challenge discrimination not only in speeches,
brochures or other public forums, but also through continued financial
commitment to equity work.

Overall, a position more critical than the celebration of diversity is encouraged –
a perspective that recognizes disparities and takes difference into account
within, and across, groups is favored. This can be achieved by:

        defending equality, justice, and collective rights and
        responsibilities. These values are grounded in the labour
        movement’s belief in equitable and fair economic opportunities,
        popular participation in the political process, equal access to and
        treatment from our institutions, and the right to live in affordable
        and safe communities. (CLC, p.4)

With the acknowledgement that more than a written report is required to eliminate
equity disparities and discrimination throughout the ETFO, the goal is to have this set of
recommendations be accompanied by appropriate budget, resources, processes,
and follow-up. Ultimately, the hope is this report will be instrumental in building the
foundation of equity within the ETFO.

                                                                             page 6 of 30
INTRODUCTION & BACKGROUND:
THE ELEMENTARY TEACHERS’
FEDERATION OF ONTARIO (ETFO)
Throughout 2005-2006, the Elementary Teachers’ Federation of Ontario (ETFO) underwent a
systematic equity review which culminated in this report. A follow-up assessment is planned for
autumn 2007.

ETFO, established in 1998, is a federation of elementary public school teachers and
education workers. Currently, it is the largest teacher’s union in Canada (outside
Quebec), representing 65,000 employees. Of that number, 81% are women, 4% self
identify as visible minorities (other than Aboriginal), and 1% or less self identify as
Aboriginal, disabled, or belonging to the LGBT (Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender)
community. 3

The Elementary Teachers’ Federation of Ontario identified seven priority areas for the
2005-2006 year (www.etfo.on.ca). These are:

   •   Protect the collective bargaining rights of all members.
   •   Defend publicly funded public education.
   •   Serve the needs of the membership.
   •   Provide for the professional development of members.
   •   Promote social justice in the areas of anti-poverty, non-violence, and equity.
   •   Support international assistance and co-operation.
   •   Promote the care and protection of the environment.

This review is supported by these priorities and informed by Article 3.4 of the Elementary
Teachers’ Federation of Ontario constitution which is to foster a climate of social justice in
Ontario and continue a leadership role in such areas as anti-poverty, non-violence, and
equity. 4

The Statement on Social Justice and Equity is central:

       ETFO recognizes that we live in a society characterized by individual and systemic
       discrimination against particular groups. Within this context, ETFO defines equity as
       fairness achieved through pro-active measures which result in equality for all. 5

Eight goals5 have been identified by the Federation as part of its ongoing, long-range
equity implementation plan: Policy Development, Accountability, Staff Development &
Involvement, Professional Development, Communications, Programs, Outreach, and
Service Area Development


                                                                                  page 7 of 30
KEY FINDINGS &
RECOMMENDATIONS




          page 8 of 30
KEY FINDINGS

Policy Development

 ETFO’s own policies and practices must be exemplary, and as such will support our
 members’ own equity work as well as positively influencing the policies of other groups



Key findings with respect to the ETFO’s equity goal of Policy Development include
Interviewees reporting:

    •   Satisfaction with ETFO policy development when compared with that of
        other Federations
    •   Concern over the disconnect between appropriate policy development
        and subsequent implementation, evaluation, and action

Specifically, Interviewees request that the ETFO:

    •   Implement a systematic process for monitoring and accountability with
        respect to implementation of ETFO equity policies
    •   Support, monitor, and fully enforce the Human Rights Policy




                                                                            page 9 of 30
                                                    KEY FINDINGS

Accountability

 ETFO must develop clear indicators (for example, data on participation of
 members of equity-seeking groups in ETFO programs, leadership, and staff) by
 which our progress in equity can be measured, and report regularly on progress to
 the membership


Key findings with respect to the ETFO’s equity goal of Accountability include
Interviewees reporting:

    •   Content, at least initially, with the amalgamation and establishment of the
        ETFO, as well as excitement with respect to what the ETFO could accomplish

    •   Disappointment and growing negativity with time amongst members of the
        organization

Specifically, Interviewees request that the ETFO:

    •   Clarify its definition of ‘equity’ in order to work towards a common
        understanding
    •   Support Member views of disagreement or dissent, as currently, Members
        believe such views are regarded as evidence of disloyalty
    •   Create opportunities to allow for open dialogue and the ability to voice
        various opinions
    •   Hold Locals accountable to Employment Equity regulations (as cited in
        the 2000 Collective Agreement)




                                                                      page 10 of 30
KEY FINDINGS

Staff Development and Involvement

 ETFO must have a diverse staff, informed about and committed to social justice
 and equity



Key findings with respect to the ETFO’s equity goal of Staff Development and
Involvement include Interviewees reporting:

    •   Concerns surrounding the absence of diversity within the Executive
    •   Perceptions of favoritism and nepotism in the hiring process
    •   Daily incidences of subtle and systemic racism within the organization

Specifically, Interviewees request that the ETFO:

    •   Provide a safe institutional environment for Members that is free of both
        all levels of discrimination (that is, both explicit and subtle)
    •   Enhance and support visible diversity within the Executive
    •   Reconsider and evaluate current hiring procedures through an equity
        lens
    •   Communicate information regarding hiring procedures to Members
    •   Encourage, but not mandate, self-identification with respect to equity
        groups (e.g. race, ability, sexuality, age, religion, etc.)




                                                                       page 11 of 30
                                                    KEY FINDINGS

Professional Development

 ETFO must provide a variety of professional development opportunities, and other
 forms of education in equity, to members, staff, and provincial and local leadership



Key findings with respect to the ETFO’s equity goal of Professional Development
include Interviewees reporting:

    •   Demand for an increase in professional development, for all members, in
        the area of equity
    •   Apprehension over the amount of money spent on equity undertakings,
        such as “And Still We Rise”, deemed to be showy and consequently, off-
        putting

Specifically, Interviewees request that the ETFO:

    •   Conduct in-depth, on-going equity training (i.e. educational workshops)
    •   Mandate attendance for, and participation in, equity training programs
        by all Members, including the Executive, Representative Council,
        Coordinators, and Provincial Leaders




                                                                         page 12 of 30
KEY FINDINGS

Communications

 All ETFO publications must use inclusive language, represent diversity, recognize
 special needs, and include equity content. ETFO spokespersons must advocate for
 social justice and equity with members, governments, and the public


Key findings with respect to the ETFO’s equity goal of Communications include
Interviewees reporting:

    •   Content with the equity ideals espoused by the organization
    •   Satisfaction with the organization’s ability to formally communicate issues
        of equity
    •   Concern over the actual implementation of equity policies into action by
        the organization

Specifically, the Interviewees request that the ETFO:

    •   Promote its definition of equity by consistently implementing policy into
        action
    •   Establish regular and open communication regarding the progress of
        ETFO in promoting, implementing, and evaluating equity policies
        throughout the organization
    •   Implement on-going education with respect to effective and positive
        communication strategies




                                                                       page 13 of 30
                                                    KEY FINDINGS

Programs

 ETFO must provide programs consistent with its commitment to equity. Programs
 are needed for member education on issues of social justice and equity, and to
 support the particular identified needs of members who belong to equity-seeking
 groups



Key findings with respect to the ETFO’s equity goal of Programs include
Interviewees reporting:

    •   Perceptions that based on structural arrangements, Equity and Women’s
        Services is an insular group and is often intimidating to others
    •   Concerns with respect to the predominance of programs aimed at
        mainly white women

Specifically, Interviewees request that the ETFO:

    •   Deliver anti-racism and anti-homophobia training to all Members,
        focusing on subtle forms of racism and homophobia, as well as attending
        to what is specifically hurtful and objectionable to persons belonging to
        historically marginalized groups
    •   Provide an internal mentorship program for employees from historically
        marginalized groups
    •   Build an equity component into every ETFO workshop
    •   Clearly articulate the mandate of Equity and Women’s Services
    •   Promote appreciation, rather than tolerance, of difference through
        equity programs




                                                                    page 14 of 30
KEY FINDINGS

Outreach

 ETFO must continually seek to include, involve and promote members who belong
 to equity-seeking groups. ETFO must build alliances with labour, parents,
 community groups and other partners to counter discrimination and to advocate for
 social justice


A key finding with respect to the ETFO’s equity goal of Outreach include
Interviewees reporting:

    •   Satisfaction with the public outreach efforts of the ETFO; efforts
        highlighted in the 2004-2005 ‘Welcome to the ETFO’ booklet, pp.18-19

Specifically, Interviewees request that the ETFO:

    •   Forge stronger links and partnerships with community groups, particularly,
        with equity groups




                 ETFO Public Outreach Highlights
Established Partnerships with:                 On-going Participation in:
    •   National Action Committee on                •   the Ontario Federation of Labour
        the Status of Women (NAC)                       (OFL) and the Canadian Labour
                                                        Congress (CLC) equity
    •   Anti-Racist Multicultural
                                                        committees and events
        Educators’ Network of Ontario
        (AMENO)                                     •   the Canadian Aboriginal Festival
                                                        events
    •   Women’s Future Fund (WFF)
                                                    •   Pride Day parades
    •   Canadian Race Relations
        Foundation (CRRF)                           •   International Women’s Day and
                                                        Take Back the Night events
    •   organizations addressing human
        rights issues and initiatives               •   Anti-violence Workshops



                                                                       page 15 of 30
                                               KEY FINDINGS

Service Area Development

 Equity and Women’s Services provides an operational focus for equity work:
 identification of equity issues, both internally and externally; making
 recommendations for action; and monitoring action in all the areas above


Key findings with respect to the ETFO’s equity goal of Service Area Development
include Interviewees reporting:

    •   Acknowledgement of Equity and Women’s Services efforts to continually
        bring equity issues to focus and to enhance the equity-training process
        (e.g. encouraging diversity among workshop presenters and topics)
    •   Disappointment and frustration that equity training is not on-going,
        mandatory, or available to Members across all levels of the organization,
        including Locals and Coordinators

Specifically, Interviewees request that the EFTO and in particular, Equity and
Women’s Services:

    •   Expand equity training programs to ensure all levels of the organization
        are properly informed and aware of all issues pertaining to equity
    •   Enhance workshops and training with specific attention to equity in
        processes such as Bargaining, Employment/Hiring, and Professional
        Development
    •   Mandate participation in equity-training programs by all Members,
        including Locals and Coordinators
    •   Advocate    and    execute      consistent,    regular,  and     on-going
        implementation of equity policies into discernible and appropriate action
    •   Evaluate equity efforts on an on-going basis to ensure accountability and
        commitment of the organization to equity policies




                                                                      page 16 of 30
 RECOMMENDATIONS

 The following recommendations are presented in terms of eight main thematic
 areas inherent to the ETFO, as revealed through the equity audit: Hire an Equity
 Coordinator, Institutional Climate, Planning and Coordination, Programs,
 Communication, Human Resources and Organization, Research, and Support.

 These recommendations are to be implemented and assessed within a 5 year
 plan. Implementation of the recommendations should occur as a 4 year process
 with an additional year for evaluation. Additionally, the recommendations have
 been situated within a framework of equity and accountability:




     Framework of Equity and Accountability

Clear Goals & Objectives                        Review & Recommendations




                                                     Adjustment of Budget

Assessment & Evaluation


                                        Implementation




 Additionally, these recommendations both echo and expand upon the key findings
 from Interviews with Members of the ETFO.




                                                                    page 17 of 30
I. Hire an Equity Coordinator
It is the overall recommendation that the ETFO hire an Equity Coordinator to
manage and oversee equity issues related to Planning and Coordination,
Communication, and Research. The Equity Coordinator is to be involved with
equity plans and policies surrounding the Institutional Climate, Human Resources
and Organization, Programs, and Support of the ETFO.
This position is:
•   independent of Equity and Women’s Services,
•   responsible for issues of equity horizontally across the ETFO, and
•   autonomous from, but works closely with, the Executive.
To be clear, this role is not to replace existing Equity services or positions within the
ETFO as the Equity Coordinator will have a different mandate. Collaboration, not
replacement, is the defining characteristic of this role.
Above all, it is the responsibility of the Equity Coordinator to ensure that the
accepted recommendations put forth in this report are implemented by March
31st, 2009 and evaluated by March 31st, 2010
The Equity Coordinator is to be hired by April 01st, 2007.



II. Institutional Climate
The main theme arising from the equity audit is that equity efforts need to be
integrated into all aspects of the work of the ETFO. This involves attending to the
Institutional Climate of the organization, particularly with respect to the
transparency of: Language, Practice, Documents, and Policies.


It is recommended that the ETFO:


     1. Promote a language of equity, consistently, throughout all documents,
         materials, programs, processes, etc., of the organization so as to remain
         inclusive and representative of all members of the ETFO, particularly those
         from historically marginalized groups

     2. Espouse a consultative and collaborative equity model where all
         members’ perspectives are taken into account; that is, members feel
         respected, included, encouraged, and comfortable to share without fear
         of reprisal or dismissal. This is key to the process of establishing equitable
         institutional climate

     3. Identify and eliminate existing barriers which prevent the full participation
         of all members, particularly those from historically marginalized groups.
         For example: subtle and systemic racism, favoritism, and nepotism are
         linked to feelings of dissatisfaction and a withdrawal from participating in
         the organization
                                                                            page 18 of 30
    4. Adopt comprehensive strategies to ensure the full participation of
        members in the collective bargaining process: contract negotiations,
        bargaining conferences, contract language development, work
        stoppages and media communications strategies

    5. Ensure equitable inclusion on union executive committees and councils,
        with designated seats for members from historically marginalized groups,
        and in appointments of historically marginalized persons to standing
        committees, task forces, commissions, boards, agencies and international
        delegations

    6. Revitalize existing equity policies and statements so as to update and
        make clear the organization’s position on Equity

    7. Mandate appointed and elected Executive members, as well as staff to
        adhere to the equity policies and statements as a condition of holding
        office or staff positions in the organization. The Equity Coordinator is to
        oversee that equity policies and statements are implemented, followed,
        and addressed throughout the organization




III. Planning and Coordination
Planning and coordination processes need to consider: ETFO staff; teachers
served by the federation; equity programs; curriculum and pedagogy;
professional development; student activities; and institutional climate. The equity
audit revealed a common belief of members that while the ETFO is committed to
equity policies, there have been many challenges (e.g. communication,
structural barriers, and human resources) in translating that commitment into the
everyday practices of the organization.


It is recommended that the ETFO:


    1. Focus on implementing, monitoring, and evaluating current policies and
       procedure
    2. Adopt internal equity action plans with specific guidelines, as put forth in
       the Canadian Labour Congress (1997), addressing:
       o   recruitment                               o     equity research
       o   hiring practices and                      o     organizing plans
           goals for contract
                                                     o     collective bargaining
           positions
                                                           strategies
       o   permanent and full-time
                                                     o     public service strategies
           positions
                                                     o     a monitoring mechanism
       o   equity education


                                                                        page 19 of 30
    3. Increase the number of members of historically marginalized groups
       across all levels of staff positions, and in all areas of work including, but
       not limited to: equity, research, education, administration, executive,
       servicing, policy development, and human rights


IV. Programs
Like many other organizations, the ETFO is operating within predetermined
guidelines while attempting to meet the needs of its Members. Efficient and
accountable allocation of resources can minimize the challenges associated
with insufficient time and funds, while still yielding effective and positive equity
program development, communication, implementation, outreach, and
evaluation


It is recommended that the ETFO:


    1. Emphasize that equity is a priority of the Elementary Teachers’ Federation
       of Ontario, and not only of Equity and Women’s Services
    2. Provide mandatory equity education and training for all individuals
       involved in the Executive of the ETFO
    3. Revitalize its equity education plan of action, work toward the integration
       of an equity analysis into existing materials, self-education packages for
       leadership and staff, and ensure regular delivery of such equity programs
       with appropriate monitoring and evaluation
    4. Support the development and systematic delivery of equity workshops
       by, and for, members
    5. Continue to develop equity education materials in partnership with
       members
    6. Adopt policy guidelines for evaluating and monitoring the delivery of
       equity education workshops
    7. Develop community based equity education initiatives which provide
       counseling, support, and assistance to those who have been
       discriminated against based on age, race, sex, religion, sexual
       orientation, ethnicity or disability



V. Communication
Effective communication between, and among, those involved with the ETFO is
of paramount importance with respect to improving, developing, and
implementing successful equity policies. It is also critical in the steps to resolving
current equity issues, problems, or concerns experienced by members within the
ETFO.


                                                                        page 20 of 30
Additionally, communication of on-going evaluation and consideration of ETFO
equity work through policies, documents, and practice is essential.
It is recommended that the ETFO:


    1. Develop and communicate a clear definition of equity, and include this
       definition in ALL documents pertaining to equity to indicate the ETFO’s
       commitment to equity issues
    2. Engage constituents from the Executive, Senior Level Staff, Support Staff,
       Local Members, etc., particularly those from historically marginalized
       groups of the ETFO, in setting, and working toward, equity goals for the
       organization. Include opportunities for anonymous input and feedback,
       such as an online survey
    3. Revitalize current equity materials
    4. Promote and distribute equity newsletters, bulletins and            other
       publications, to all Members as well as the broader community
    5. Foster community partnerships through transparent and on-going
       communication in an effort to enhance current outreach strategies
    6. Ensure continued support and participation in human rights public service
       activities, highlighting these activities both internally and externally,
       through the media and other communication outlets


VI. Human Resources and Organization
The human resources of the ETFO – administrators, representatives, other
professionals, and support staff – are fundamental to the ETFO successfully
meeting each of its eight equity goals.
Above all, staff members must have an understanding and respect of the
complexities of equity work, as well as a commitment to issues of difference and
social justice.


It is recommended that the ETFO:


    1. Establish a liaison between the organization and the Equity Coordinator
       on human resource processes with respect to issues of equity
    2. Commit to active and on-going recruitment, employment, and training
       of a diverse staff, such that members of historically marginalized groups
       are included and adequately represented on the Executive and within
       Services
    3. Ensure the increase of members of equity groups occurs across
       employment levels, as well as implement a plan of action to increase
       participation of all members in both workplace and union activities


                                                                    page 21 of 30
    4. Organize an independent review of the organization’s hiring practices, to
       be completed by the Equity Coordinator
    5. Collaborate with: anti-racism; anti-sexism; minority; religious; disability;
       youth; Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender and Queer (LGBTQ); and
       women’s organizations to fight systemic discrimination in the ETFO



VII. Research
A number of recurring issues to arise during the equity audit might best be
addressed by undertaking, and participating in, collaborative research; that is,
working together with diverse groups and communities, both internally and
externally of the ETFO, to develop and enhance appropriate equity policies, in
both theory and practice.


It is recommended that the ETFO:


    1. Fund a research project designed to integrate an equity analysis into
       public policy work. This project will help to identify other organizations
       conducting equity work in Canada and other countries
    2. Facilitate research that functions in an inclusive and consultative manner,
       taking into account the different perspectives of its various constituents
    3. Collaborate with Ontario universities, community colleges, labour councils
       and organizations in research projects specifically related to issues of
       equity
    4. Continue to accumulate materials and develop an equity library which
       consists of relevant books, journals, law cases, reports, films, etc
    5. Promote materials as available and accessible to all Members within the
       organization as well as to the community, more broadly


VIII. Support
On-going support of, and continual investment in, the ETFO’s equity programs
and policies are critical. Committed staff members, in addition to devoted time
and specifically dedicated funds to the development, communication,
implementation, outreach, and evaluation of equity programs and policies, are
means to support the equity plan of the ETFO.


It is recommended that the ETFO:


    1. Maintain, if not increase, the designated 6% budget allocation toward
       Women’s programs

                                                                      page 22 of 30
2. Ensure that limited funds or a lack of other resources do not interfere with
   equity work of the organization
3. Establish a plan to review financial and other resource allocations to
   ensure efficient and accountable resource utilization with regard to
   equity
4. Encourage other Services of the organization to consider ways in which
   they might take issues of equity into account, including financial support,
   within their respective programs




                                                                  page 23 of 30
IMPLEMENTATION APPROACH
The following three considerations are necessary for any successful Equity
implementation strategy:




1. Leadership

       •   Identification of a “champion” or leader with regard to equity issues
           within the ETFO is critical to the implementation strategy of the
           accepted recommendations



2. Teamwork
       •   Establishment of both positive and collaborative teamwork is
           foundational for the management and implementation of the
           aforementioned recommendations, as well as for the maintenance of
           effective Equity efforts already in place



3. Priorities
       •   Clear priorities of Equity will be required as there are resource
           limitations. The Equity Coordinator will need to be given sufficient
           latitude within the scope of responsibilities

       •   Ideally, there will one or more signature projects produced to make
           visible the efforts and collaboration of Equity stakeholders within the
           ETFO, particularly as there will likely be a great deal of invisible work
           required at the outset

       •   Balance is required and recommended to ensure credibility and
           transparency of the efforts and work of the Equity Coordinator, the
           Executive, and other Equity services within the ETFO




                                                                         page 24 of 30
CONCLUSIONS

There currently exists extensive policy development, resources and experiences
with respect to equity within the present Elementary Teachers’ Federation of
Ontario, and it is my recommendation that this established expertise should serve
as a basis on which the organization continues to build. This is not to dismiss the
fact that a concerted effort to create an equitable institutional climate within the
ETFO is required.

This effort will necessitate the development of significant links between the various
components of the organization, and the action of hiring an Equity Coordinator
who is responsible for many aspects of equity program and policy development,
implementation, and evaluation.         Above all, the mandate of the Equity
Coordinator is to liaise and collaborate with, rather than replace, other Equity
services or groups already in existence within the ETFO.

Further, it is imperative that the issues brought to light through this review are
addressed. If this does not occur, much of the thoughtful, high-quality, and
significant policy and resource development work already done by the ETFO will
not find its way into the daily terrain of the organization.




                                                                        page 25 of 30
APPENDICES




             page 26 of 30
APPENDIX A: ABOUT THE
AUDITOR
Blye Frank is a Professor and Head of the Division of Medical Education, Faculty of
Medicine at Dalhousie University in Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada. Prior to this, Dr.
Frank held a position as Professor and Associate Chair of Graduate Studies in
Education at Mount Saint Vincent University in Halifax. He also worked as a public
school teacher for over fifteen years.

Dr. Frank has an active research career. He was principal investigator in the
Exemplary Schools Project, a federally funded study on successful schools in
Canada. He conducted an external review for the Halifax Regional School Board
of the Cole Harbour District High School and for the Southwest Regional School
Board of the Digby High School. He has held three major research grants from the
Social Science Humanities Research Council of Canada for research in the area
of gender and schooling.

In 1997, he was recognized for his outstanding teaching with the Mount Saint
Vincent University's Alumnae Association Teaching Award and in 1998, the
Distinguished Teacher Award from the Association of Atlantic Universities. In 1999,
Mount Saint Vincent University awarded Dr. Frank the Award for Research
Excellence. In 2006, he was awarded the Dr. May Cohen Award for Gender and
Equity in Medical Education.




                                                                       page 27 of 30
APPENDIX B: SCOPE
The following aspects and services of the organization have been taken into
account:

    •   Print and other media materials published by the organization

    •   Organizational practices (hiring, advocacy, collective bargaining, etc.)

Within these two broad areas, materials such as internal communications,
budget, policy and position statements, and statistics on members and member
involvement were also considered.

Materials Included in the Review:
Print and other media materials published by the organization:

    •   “Voice” the Magazine of ETFO (copies from 2002-Winter 2006)
    •   ETFO Health Information (2004-05)


Internal Communications:

    •   Annual Meeting documents including Annual Meeting Reports(1998-
        2005), Workbooks (2005), Supplementary Reports (1999-2003), Standing
        Committee Reports (2005), and Representative Council Reports (2005)
    •   Member Mail-outs and Information (2004-2005)
    •   Women’s Services Information (2005)
    •   Strategic Planning Documents (2000-2003)
    •   Executive Meeting Materials(2005-2006)
    •   Diversity Materials (2004-2005)
    •   Student Learning Brochures
    •   ETFO Reference Book (2004-2005)
    •   Financial Statements (2003-2005)


Budget, Policy, and Position Statements:

    •   2004/05 Policy and Position Statements
    •   2004/05 Budget


Statistics on Members and Member Involvement:

    •   Member Statistics, Annual Report 2004-2005, pp 8-9
                                                                     page 28 of 30
APPENDIX C: METHODS

The information gained through this review was collected using the following three
distinct data collection strategies: Document Review, Observation, & Interviews.

Document Review
“Text and document are not only produced, but also, in turn, are productive”6

The Elementary Teachers’ Federation of Ontario is an active producer of public
documents. These include: newsletters (Link, Women’s Issues); magazines (Voice);
position papers (i.e. – Blurred Vision: Equity in the Curriculum); briefs (government
agencies); and, communiqués. This also includes internal communications as well
as policy and position statements

The document review component of this project consisted of gathering print
copies of resources, as listed above, and carefully reading with a social
justice/equity lens.



Observation
“Documentary sources are not surrogates for other kinds of data. We cannot, for
instance, learn through written records alone how an organization actually
operates day by day.”7

For this reason, observation and interviewing techniques were also employed.

The observation component of the study consisted of attending, and in some
instances participating in, various Elementary Teachers’ Federation of Ontario
meetings, conferences, and workshops. Each observation was conducted with
issues of equity and social justice in mind. A compendium of field notes was
accumulated and particular incidences are reported on.

Interviews
In-depth, open-ended, semi-structured interviews were conducted with members
from across employment levels of the Elementary Teachers’ Federation of
Ontario. The interviews were confidential, thus, no identifying features will be
included in this report. They were conducted either in person (n = 8) or by
telephone (n = 42) and lasted approximately 30-45 minutes and focused on
participants’ impressions of the ETFO with regard to issues of equity. While detailed
field notes were collected, no interviews were audio-tape recorded; therefore,
there are no direct quotations appearing in the subsequent report.




                                                                    Page 30 of 30
APPENDIX D: WORKS CITED
1. International Labour Organization (2000). ABC of Women Worker’s Rights &
         Gender Equality. Geneva: ILO.

2. Canadian Labour Congress Taskforce (1997). Challenging racism: going
       beyond recommendations: Report of the CLC antiracism taskforce,
       Ottawa: Canadian Labour Congress.

3. Elementary Teachers’ Federation of Ontario, Member Statistics, Annual Report
       2004-2005, pp 8-9.

4. Elementary Teachers’ Federation of Ontario, Statement on Social Justice and
       Equity, Definition of “equity” adopted by ETFO Executive, October, 1999,
       http://etfo.ca/display.aspx?pid=97&cid=2126 (accessed February 2006)

5. Elementary Teachers’ Federation of Ontario, Statement on Social Justice and
       Equity, Long Range Equity Implementation Plan,
       http://etfo.ca/display.aspx?pid=97&cid=2126 (accessed February 2006)

6. Prior, L. (2004). Doing things with documents. In D. Silverman (Ed) Qualitative
          Research: Theory, Method and Practice, London: Sage, 76-94.

7. Atkinson, P. & Coffey, A. (2004). Analyzing documentary realities. In D.
         Silverman (Ed) Qualitative Research: Theory, Method and Practice,
         London: Sage, 56-75.




                                                                     Page 30 of 30

				
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