Docstoc

Tragedy Averted the multidisciplinary use of Learning Commons

Document Sample
Tragedy Averted the multidisciplinary use of Learning Commons Powered By Docstoc
					Tragedy Averted: the multidisciplinary use of a Learning Commons 
 
Erin DeLathouwer 
University of Saskatchewan 
University Learning Centre 
 
Tragedy of the Commons 
 
I want to begin this presentation by familiarizing (or, re‐familiarizing) all of you with the commons 
dilemma, nicely exemplified by the idea of the tragedy of the commons. Garrett Hardin, in a paper by 
that name1, gives a tractable example of a common pasture open to all. Ranchers bring animals to the 
pasture, taking advantage of this communal resource. Eventually a sustainable maximum is reached, but 
there is no incentive for any individual rancher to heed this maximum. Just one more animal 
in the pasture seems to pose no problem for any individual rancher, but collectively, overuse will 
deplete the land, and so the commons will not be sustainable. The commons dilemma, more generally, 
captures the idea that individual rationality and group rationality are often at odds. Ranchers increase 
use of the commons out of rational self‐interest, but if all ranchers act in this way, collectively, their 
actions seem irrational. The tragedy is that we seem bound to act out of rational self‐interest even when 
we know that doing so will make things worse for everyone (including ourselves) in the end.  
 
The paper by Garrett Hardin, published in 1968 in the journal Science, focuses on population control as a 
solution to the tragedy of the commons. Hardin argues that, like an overgrazed common pasture, the 
earth’s pollution problem has everything to do with too many people selfishly vying for too few 
resources. The freedom to breed was, and still is, a contentious subject. The analogue in institutions of 
higher learning might be thought of as access to education, or the freedom to learn. I am not here to 
argue that institutions of higher learning ought to revert back to some imaginary ideal, where ivory 
towers were only graced by society’s elite. Quite the contrary, I want to suggest that population 
restrictions (whether for the benefit of our environmental commons or a learning commons) are not the 
way out of the tragedy. I want to pick up on the point that education is key to averting tragedy, and, like 
Hardin, endorse the Hegelian notion that "freedom is the recognition of necessity," but extend it beyond 
the limited, top down view which I think Hardin has in mind when he concludes that “it is the role of 
education to reveal to all the necessity of abandoning the freedom to breed.” 
 
Hardin writes: “Freedom in a commons brings ruin to all.” Like the ranchers acting in rational self‐
interest, the use of any commons is, by definition, free.  Hardin ponders how to legislate temperance. 
But at every turn, legislation seems to defeat the very nature of a commons.  In several places Hardin 
refers to education as a means to quelling our freedoms.  But it strikes me that to recognize the 
necessity of our situation, inclusiveness (not exclusiveness) and collaboration (not coercion) are 
required.  
 
In order to understand better the relevance of Hardin’s paper to the topic of this conference, two 
important features of the tragedy of the commons must be pointed out. 

                                                             
1
   Garrett Hardin, “The Tragedy of the Commons,” Science 162 (December 1968): 1243 ‐ 1248. 

 
                                                     1 

 
 
(1) the common goods sought in a commons are limited (finite), and  
 
(2) there is no ‘technical solution’ to the problem of sustainability.  
 
Hardin defines a technical solution as follows: 
 
         “A technical solution may be defined as one that requires a change only in the 
         techniques of the natural sciences, demanding little or nothing in the way of change in 
         human values or ideas of morality.” 
 
So, for Hardin, tragedy in the form of environmental unsustainability cannot be averted by advances in, 
say, geo‐engineering or space exploration, but only by moderation or population control. I want to 
suggest, however, that in the case of a Learning Commons, a change in human values can affect the 
finiteness of the goods sought there.  In this way, tragedy can be averted. 
 
Clearly a Learning Commons will have some features in common with other types of environmental 
commons (e.g., oceans, atmosphere, public parks, etc.). For example, when viewed merely as a physical 
space, one could see how the tragedy might unfold. Obviously study space is limited, and certainly 
booking systems for group study rooms have the potential for abuse. When viewed as a social space, on 
the other hand, the goods acquired in it are limitless, and thus the tragedy is avoidable. To make the 
case that the most important goods of our Learning Commons are limitless, however, a new attitude 
toward collaborative learning must be nurtured. We face a huge challenge in liberating our students, 
faculty, and staff from the notion that the Learning Commons is merely a physical space and 
encouraging the notion that knowledge, unlike the kinds of resources we’re most familiar with in a 
commons, is something that only grows when shared. Thus, our main objective in using the physical 
space for multidisciplinary discussion and debate is to nurture the belief that collaborative learning 
yields unlimited goods. It’s our goal to give students, faculty and staff the opportunity to live as though 
there is no limit to learning, and as though knowledge is not a commodity, but rather an endless 
process. 
 
Solutions to the big problems require multiple kinds of expertise, and as such, require collaboration. 
 
There are two striking features about Hardin’s paper that are relevant to our main objective. The first 
has to do with the inherently multidisciplinary nature of the big problems (e.g., climate change, poverty, 
population growth, etc.).  Even in 1968, a leading scientific journal recognized the important role of the 
humanities in taking seriously the big problems, by publishing an article that might have been better 
suited to an ethics journal. Indeed, the idea that the tragedy of the commons has no ‘technical solution’, 
but rather, must be addressed by a sort of enlightened, moral attitude toward reproduction, is value 
laden. But to see the interplay of values, problems, and technical solutions, requires the expertise of 
diverse researchers collaboratively working together for the common good. Unfortunately, university 
students, faculty, administrators, etc. (even today) are often far less concerned with the vast benefits of 
collaboration across disciplines, and far more focused on preserving academic autonomy and/or 
directedness toward short term economic security.  Hardin’s paper is an interesting example of 
multidisciplinary relevance. In fact students from Sociology, Psychology, Philosophy, Biology, and 
Economics (to name a few) are often presented with the Tragedy of the Commons to consider from one 
or more angles. The University Learning Centre, as one of the partners in the new Learning Commons, is 
                                                      2 

 
committed to influencing the shape of our new space, such that the a wide range of members from the 
university community converging, discussing, and sharing, becomes the norm. Thus, the idea of tragedy 
striking a commons served as a great topic for the first in a series of multidisciplinary panel discussions 
held in the new Learning Commons space at the U of S.  
 
Our space is defined by its use. 
 
The second relevant feature has to do with the commons dilemma as it applies to the definition of a 
Learning Commons. If a Learning Commons is defined merely in terms of the physical space, services, 
and resources it contains, then the tragedy is forthcoming, for all of these things are limited, and 
students accessing the place tend to grow in number. Furthermore, an enlightened, communal attitude 
among the users of the space cannot be expected without some explicit guidance. Given the futility, and 
even hypocrisy, in trying to enforce moral conduct with rigid rules, that guidance might be better aimed 
at instilling a sense of academic community among the users of the Learning Commons. The commons 
dilemma holds important relevance as a topic for open discussion in our Learning Commons space 
because it encourages the users of the space to begin to define it not only in terms of limited resources 
(e.g., tables and chairs, laptop ports, writing tutors, math and stats helpers, etc.), which are susceptible 
to depletion, but more importantly, in terms of a limitless good (e.g., collaborative learning and the 
mutual creation of knowledge).  Furthermore, setting up the Learning Commons environment in such a 
way that multidisciplinary discussion and debate becomes a norm, helps to establish a new, more 
inclusive kind of academic community. 
 
Multidisciplinary Panels 
 
The grand opening of the new Learning Commons at the U of S included the first multidisciplinary panel 
discussion. Our inaugural panel featured a wide range of perspectives (the Architect of the space; the 
Provost, who is an Historian and professor from the College of Arts and Science; a Professor from the 
College of Education, who studies Aboriginal Knowledge; a Librarian; and a Student Peer Mentor). Each 
offered their unique perspectives on how our values moderate the use of a common space, and how our 
notions of collaboration and sustainability contribute to the creation of common spaces. The event was 
aimed at guiding the ways in which our new space might be perceived and defined. But it also set a 
precedent for the use of our Learning Commons as a venue for multidisciplinary discussion and debate.  
Attendants reflected the same breadth of diversity as our panelists, and interestingly, participation in 
the discussion was remarkably inclusive; pausing peripheral conversations, closing textbooks, and 
drawing iPod ear buds out from nearby students’ ears. The Provost and a third year Arts and Science 
student sitting side by side, engaged in discussion, seemed to even drown out the sound of frothing milk 
from the café at the other end of the commons. The goods acquired at this inaugural panel discussion 
were intangible, diverse, and a benefit to all. 
 
I’d like to highlight some of the insights from this discussion, and tie them back to our main objective, 
namely, to nurture the belief that collaborative learning yields unlimited goods.  
 
Brett Fairbairn, our Provost, VP academic, and member of the Department of History, began the 
discussion with some reflection on the values of a commons. He pointed out that in order to avert 
tragedy, short term behavior must converge with the common purpose or good. The commons is a place 
where people come together as equals for the purpose of their interaction, and in a learning commons, 
that interaction is learning. Both his comments and his presence at the event indicated that, unlike the 
                                                        3 

 
stratified commons of his Oxford Alma Mater where equal formal status contributes to one’s purpose, 
our Learning Commons ought to embody a spirit of mutual respect, as our common purpose unites a 
wide diversity of people as equals. The Provost’s words seemed aimed at tearing down traditional 
hierarchical barriers, deeply entrenched in the university. He mentioned the importance of the student 
voice in administrative affairs, and underscored the value of collaboration over coercive structures of 
control. 
 
Isaac Bond, a third year English major, commented on how the design of the new space has unsaturated 
the use of it. From a student’s perspective, the ways in which studying and interaction can occur have 
expanded. His main worry for the future of the space, however, had to do with its capacity during peak 
times of the year.  His perspective on the panel shed light on the work that still needs to be done. 
Encouraging students to see the Learning Commons in a different light requires much more than selling 
coffee and snacks in what used to be a no food or drink zone. Sure, the café helps to inspire boisterous 
conversation, and the study rooms help facilitate collaborative study, but we have yet to make the case 
to students that the wider communal gatherings can extend the physical study space into a social 
learning space. 
 
Jim Siemens, Architect, pointed out that the way our Learning Commons is used will go a long way to 
preserving the importance of the University of Saskatchewan, in light of the movement from a book‐
centric to a people‐centric world. Though the ecological impact of creating our new people‐centric space 
was minimized by no additions to the building (among other green efforts), the expense was to digitize 
and/or relocate a floor of books, and move library staff offices to a space that was originally designed as 
a closed stack. This was a challenge on many fronts (in fact I recall faculty bemoaning the fact that the 
good old book is becoming obsolete), but each challenge faced from the perspective of the architect 
seemed counteracted by a technical solution of sorts. From the wider issue of environmental 
sustainability through material choices, to the accommodation of users of the space, we might stave off 
tragedy in the mid‐long run with a contingency plan to expand the physical space with minimal material 
use and the profit of greater energy efficiency.  
 
Geraldine Balzer, an education professor, spoke about the notion of a cultural commons. She shared an 
anecdote about an Inuit elder who was asked about the impact of the television on her community, to 
which the elder responded that the introduction of the house had a larger impact on the erosion of their 
culture, as private spaces began to replace common spaces, and generational knowledge coupled with 
communal interpretation was lost. Geraldine suggested that “the commons must be inter‐generational, 
inter‐cultural, and interpersonal in order to dismantle barriers and share, rather than enclose 
knowledge.” This perspective underscores the work that has yet to be done on campus to create a more 
inclusive spirit across cultures and formal statuses. Echoing the Provost’s sentiments, our common goal 
in the commons (vague enough to unite us) is learning. 
 
Frank Winter, a librarian and long time advocate of the creation of the new Learning Commons space, 
spoke to the shared vision required to move the proposal for the new space from administrative first 
steps through to completion. The creation of the commons was grassroots driven and supported from 
the top level and, as such, required a high degree of administrative collaboration. He added that, much 
like in what Anthropologists refer to as contact zones, the new Learning Commons has a similar task in 
creating a shared definition of ‘learning’ among the wide range of users, staff, and administrators. 
Indeed, what counts as learning, what matters most in higher education, and who the university 

                                                     4 

 
ultimately benefits, are all topics which, hopefully, will converge in the contact zone of the Learning 
Commons.  
 
The success of our inaugural panel spawned further interest in using the space for multidisciplinary 
panel discussions. However, we’ve been met with some resistance from other Learning Commons 
partners whose beliefs about the proper use of the space don’t always converge with ours. 
Nevertheless, in a spirit of compromise we’ve hosted multidisciplinary panel discussions on topics such 
as pandemics and poverty, mad pride, climate change, and artificial minds. Our invited panelists span 
the disciplines, drawing connections between our diverse faculties. The audiences are often composed 
of a wide range of students, faculty and staff. Some students tune in and out as they continue to graze 
their laptops on the fringes of the space, others make a point of clearing a spot in their busy lives to hear 
their professor, supervisor, friend, or colleague, interact in the larger academic community of the U of S. 
The Learning Commons is truly becoming a place for all, and at least some of the goods sought there are 
without limit. 
 

 




                                                      5 

 

				
DOCUMENT INFO
Shared By:
Categories:
Tags:
Stats:
views:2
posted:3/18/2011
language:English
pages:5