Pensylvania Non Profit Laws by daj15910

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									      Center for American Indian Economic
                  Development
                          Grant Alert
                    Issue 36–week of 6/20/05
       Courtesy of Center for American Indian Economic
                     Development (CAIED)
   If applicable, we will be happy to support your grant effort with a letter of support

FY 2005 Discretionary Grants for the Family Violence Prevention
and Services Program - Demonstration of Enhanced Services to
Children and Youth Who Have Been Exposed to Domestic Violence
General Information

      Current Due Date for Applications:    Jul 25, 2005
                                            Received By
      Expected Number of Awards:            5
      Estimated Total Program Funding:      $650,000.00
      Award Ceiling:                        $130,000.00
      Award Floor:                          $0.00
      CFDA Number:                          93.592 -- Family Violence Prevention and
                                            Services/Grants for Battered Women's
                                            Shelters_Discretionary Grants
      Cost Sharing or Matching Requirement: No

Eligible Applicants
      State governments
      Native American tribal governments (Federally recognized)
      Nonprofits having a 501(c)(3) status with the IRS, other than institutions of higher
      education

Agency Name

      Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families

Description

      Demonstration of Enhanced Services to Children and Youth Who Have Been Exposed to
      Domestic Violence. The Administration for Children and Families (ACF) announces this
      funding opportunity to offer awards for the demonstration of enhanced services for
      children and youth who have been exposed to domestic violence.

Link to Full Announcement

      http://www.acf.hhs.gov/grants/open/HHS-2005-ACF-ACYF-EV-0031.html



Demonstration Projects That Improve Child Well-Being by
Fostering Healthy Marriages within Underserved Communities
General Information

      Current Due Date for Applications:    Aug 08, 2005
      Expected Number of Awards:            10
      Estimated Total Program Funding:      $1,500,000.00
      Award Ceiling:                        $150,000.00
      Award Floor:                          $0.00
      CFDA Number:                          93.670 -- Child Abuse and Neglect Discretionary
                                            Activities
      Cost Sharing or Matching Requirement: No

Eligible Applicants

      State governments
      County governments
      City or township governments
      Special district governments
      Independent school districts
      Nonprofits having a 501(c)(3) status with the IRS, other than institutions of higher
      education
      Nonprofits that do not have a 501(c)(3) status with the IRS, other than institutions of
      higher education
      Additional Information on Eligibility:
      Applicants, and their partner organizations (if any), must have experience and
      background in working with children and families in the targeted minority community.
      Applicants or their partner organizations should have the experience and capability to
      provide healthy marriage services. Applicants must either be engaged in child welfare
      activities, or have a partnership with their local public child welfare agency, or they must
      be engaged in child welfare research. Applicants must have a demonstrated capacity to
      engage children and families in the targeted minority community who are at risk of
      entering, or are already in the child welfare system. Collaborative efforts are acceptable,
      but applications should identify a primary applicant responsible for administering the
      grant. Applicants must be engaged in research or child welfare activities. Faith-based
      and community organizations that meet all eligibility requirements are eligible to apply.

Agency Name

      Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families

Description

      This funding announcement seeks proposals that improve child well-being by removing
      barriers to and strengthening family formation and healthy marriage in underserved
      communities. The Children's Bureau believes that by designing strategies to target
      funding for healthy marriage activities to community-based agencies in underserved
      communities where high rates of child protection and foster care resources are used, child
      well-being may be improved and the rate of children of color in foster care could be
      reduced. Projects will explore and remove barriers to forming lasting families and healthy
      marriages as a means to promote the well-being of children and families who are at risk
      of entering, or are already in the child welfare system. Projects will also explore what
      particular services, delivery, and outreach efforts designed to support the formation and
      stability of healthy marriages are most effective at helping children and families in
      targeted communities. Grantees must comply with applicable laws, including those that
      prohibit discrimination on the basis of race, color, national origin, disability, and age in
      their programs.

Link to Full Announcement

      http://www.acf.hhs.gov/grants/open/HHS-2005-ACF-ACYF-CA-0089.html



Tobacco Policy Change - Round Two
Sponsor:      Woodruff (Robert W.) Foundation
SYNOPSIS:
 A national initiative of the sponsor that provides resources and technical assistance for local,
regional, and nationally based organizations and tribal groups interested in implementing
effective tobacco prevention and cessation policy initiatives.


Deadline(s):    08/01/2005

Contact:       Beverly J. Alston, Program Team Coordinator

Address:        Route 1 and College Road East
                P.O. Box 2316
                Princeton, NJ 08543-2316
E-mail:        tobaccopolicychange@rwjf.org

Program URL: http://www.rwjf.org/applications/program/cfp.jsp?ID=19324
Tel:         888-795-3636
Deadline Ind: Receipt
Funding Limit: $150,000 MAXIMUM
Indirect Costs: Unspecified
Cost Sharing: Yes

OBJECTIVES:
 The program seeks to engage diverse organizations and professionals in sustainable tobacco-
control activities to decrease the prevalence of tobacco use in the United States. Toward that
end, the goals of the program are to: support innovative projects designed to positively change
tobacco policy through partnerships with or collaboration among groups that are most affected
by tobacco use; maintain tobacco policy gains and momentum in communities, states, and
regions; and strengthen and sustain the state and national tobacco policy change infrastructure
(policy research, advocacy, and communications).

 This initiative provides resources for local and statewide tobacco control advocacy to address
tobacco-related health challenges, with a particular emphasis on people in communities most
affected by tobacco-related disease and exposure. Examples of communities of people
disproportionately affected include those with low-socioeconomic status, communities of color
(people of African, Asian/Pacific Islander, Latino/Hispanic, and/or Native American/Alaska
Native/Indigenous descent), and other groups that suffer disproportionately from tobacco-related
diseases (e.g., blue-collar workers, Lesbian, Gay, Bi-sexual and Transgender groups).


ELIGIBILITY
 To be eligible, applicant organizations must be tax-exempt under Section 501(c)(3) of the
Internal Revenue Code or a federally recognized tribal group; have demonstrated success in
policy advocacy and grassroots organizing (particular attention will be given to applicants
working in communities or states most affected by tobacco-related disease and exposure); not
currently accepting funds or other support from tobacco companies or have any tobacco industry
employees or board members involved in decision-making positions within the organization;
and be able to provide proof of hard-cash matching-fund commitments for grants over $50,000.

FUNDING
 Grant awards will be up to $150,000. Grants above $50,000 up to $150,000 will require a 1:1
match in hard cash. Applicants are expected to secure these matching funds from sources other
than the sponsor and its grantees. Grants for $50,000 will not require matching funds unless the
applicant was awarded funds in Round One.



Green Communities Initiative
Sponsor:        Enterprise Foundation

SYNOPSIS:
 The sponsor provides funding to help cover the costs of planning and implementing green
components of affordable housing projects, as well as tracking their costs and benefits.

Contact:       Dana Bourland, Senior Program Director

Address:       10227 Wincopin Circle
               Suite 500
               Columbia, MD 21044
E-mail:        Grants@GreenCommunitiesOnline.org

Program URL: http://www.enterprisefoundation.org/resources/green/about-essentials-grants.asp
Tel:         410-772-2516
Deadline Ind: Receipt
Funding Limit: $50,000 SEE BELOW
Indirect Costs: Unspecified
Cost Sharing: No

OBJECTIVES:
 Funding is provided to help cover the costs of planning and implementing green components of
affordable housing projects, as well as tracking their costs and benefits.

ELIGIBILITY
 Eligible applicants are 501(c)(3) nonprofits; public housing authorities; tribally designated
housing entities; for-profit entities; and for-profit entities participating through joint ventures
with qualified organizations.

FUNDING
 In general, grant amounts will not exceed $1,000 times the number of low-income units in a
project, plus $3,000 (not to exceed maximum grant amount) as an allowance toward the costs of
reporting project data that will help this Initiative and the affordable housing industry learn more
about the implementation of the Green Communities Criteria. In general, the maximum grant
amount will be $50,000. The grant funds may be used in ways that benefit the entire project,
including homes and apartments that are not low-income. The portion of the grant to be used for
planning costs may not exceed $25,000, or $500 times the number of low-income homes
whichever is less.




   Diabetes Grants Program
        Establish Date                    Follow Up Date                  Review Date
           6/14/2005                          7/1/2006                     6/14/2005
  Sponsor Information
  Sponsor:         LifeScan, Inc.
  Sponsor Type:       Miscellaneous Non-Federal
  Contact:
                      1000 Gibraltar Drive

  Address:
                     Milpitas,CA 95035
                     U.S.A.
  Tel:                408-263-9789
  Fax:                408-946-6070
  Email:              CustomerService@LifeScan.com
  Program URL:        http://www.lifescan.com/company/about/community
        Deadline(s)                  Deadline Ind                    Deadline Open
         9/30/2005
                                         Receipt                            No
         3/30/2006
  Program Information
     Cost Sharing        CFDA Number           Funding Limit       Indirect Costs Duration
          No                                  5000 MAXIMUM           Unspecified     0
     Cost Sharing       Sponsor Program             Proposal       Indirect Costs
      Percentage            Number                 Restrictions         Cap
           0                                           No                 0
  Applicant Type(s):             Non-Profit
                                 Tax-exempt
                                 Organizations--Community/Soc. Serv.
                                 Organizations--Health/Medical
                                          Synopsis
  The sponsor provides funding to non-profit organizations to improve the quality of life for
  people with diabetes. Grant requests up to $5,000 will be considered.
                                           Objectives
  The primary goal for the program is to increase awareness of diabetes as a serious illness,
  educate people with diabetes and their families, and promote awareness that diabetes
  complications can be reduced with proper diabetes management.
                                         Eligibility
  Organizations must have tax-exempt status to apply.
                                            Funding
  Funding up to $5,000 will be provided.




Native American Library Services
Sponsor:       Institute of Museum & Library Services

SYNOPSIS:
 The sponsor's Native American Library Services offers basic grants with educational/assessment
option, as well as enhancement grants.

Deadline(s):   03/01/2006
               05/01/2006

Contact:       Alison Freese, Senior Program Officer

Address:       1100 Pensylvania Avenue, NW
               Washington, DC 20506
E-mail:       afreese@imls.gov
Web Site: http://www.imls.gov/grants/library/lib_nat.asp#appl
Program URL: http://www.imls.gov/grants/library/pdf/2005NAG.pdf
Tel:        202-653-4665
Deadline Ind: Receipt

DEADLINE NOTE
The deadline for basic grants with educational/assessment option is March 1, 2006. The deadline
for enhancement grants is May 1, 2006.


Cost Sharing: No
CFDA#:        45.311

OBJECTIVES:
 Basic Grants with Educational/Assessment Option -- These noncompetitive grants are
distributed in equal amounts among eligible applicants. Basic Grants are available to support
existing library operations and to maintain core library services. The Education/ Assessment
Option is supplemental to the Basic Grant. It is also noncompetitive and must be requested. The
purpose of the Education/Assessment Option is to provide funding for library staff to attend
continuing education courses and/or training workshops on- or offsite; for library staff to attend
or give presentations at conferences related to library services; and/or to hire a consultant for an
onsite professional library assessment.

 Enhancement Grants -- Enhancement grants support projects to enhance existing library services
or implement new library services, particularly projects to: establish or enhance electronic links
among or between libraries; link libraries electronically with educational, social or information
services; help libraries access information through electronic networks; encourage libraries in
various communities and different types of libraries to establish consortia and share resources;
pay costs for libraries to acquire or share computer systems and telecommunications
technologies; and target library and information services to persons who have difficulty using
library and to underserved urban and rural communities.

ELIGIBILITY
 Indian tribes and Alaska Native villages or corporations recognized by the Department of the
Interior are eligible to apply. Indian tribes and Alaska Native villages are eligible to apply for an
Enhancement grant only if they have applied for a Basic Library Services grant in the same fiscal
year.


FUNDING
 Amount of the grant is as follows: Basic Grants with Educational/Assessment Option -- varies;
and Enhancement Grants -- up to $150,000. Grant periods are one year for Basic Grants with
Educational/Assessment Option, and up to two years for Enhancement Grants.



Waste Management Grants and Funding in Indian Country (note:
While some of the deadlines may be past due, the following information
will help you with future grant planning)
To be successful, every solid waste management program needs funding. Unfortunately,
especially in an era of tightening budgets, it may be difficult to find the needed resources.
Remoteness, small community size, and lack of resources make this situation even more
acute in Indian Country. The information on this page may help you locate the funding you
need.

 Interagency Project to Clean Up Open Dumps (Fiscal Year 2005)

The Fiscal Year 2005 Tribal Open Dump Cleanup Project [Adobe Acrobat PDF File, 227KB]
(Cleanup Project) solicitation package, became available November 2004. The package also has
been mailed directly to federally recognized tribes. For general information on this interagency
project, please see "Interagency Project to Clean Up Open Dumps" below.
View or download the solicitation package [PDF File [61 KB]

Federal Register Notice [PDF File, 52 KB] || HTML

Tribal Open Dump Cleanup Project
The purpose of the Cleanup Project is to assist tribes with closure or upgrade of open dump sites.
The Project is part of a Tribal Solid Waste Interagency Workgroup which is working to
coordinate federal assistance for tribal solid waste management programs. The Cleanup Project's
specific goals include assisting tribes with 1) completing and implementing comprehensive,
integrated waste management plans; 2) developing realistic solid waste management alternatives;
3) closing or upgrading existing open dumps; and 4) developing post-closure programs.

Since 1999, federal agencies have committed $13.4 million for over 100 projects to help clean up
open dumps. Individual project selections were made by the project workgroup, which is
comprised of representatives from participating agencies. The workgroup plans to award grants
for additional projects in future years as funding becomes available.

For further information on this or other solid waste grant programs, contact Heather White,
415.972.3384.

Hazardous Waste Grant Program

The Hazardous Waste Grant Program for Indian Country provides capacity building grants to
federally recognized tribes and tribal organizations. Its goal is to encourage comprehensive
integrated hazardous waste management practices that are protective of human health and the
environment by:

      building tribal capacity for developing and implementing hazardous waste activities;
      developing tribal organizational infrastructure;
      achieving economic sustainability of tribal hazardous waste programs; and
      building partnerships among tribes, federal agencies, states and local communities.

For further information on the Hazardous Waste Grant Program or other sources of hazardous
waste program support from EPA, contact your regional hazardous waste tribal program
coordinator.

Grant and Finance Resources

Grant Resources for Solid Waste Activities in Indian Country - August, 1998
This resource guide, first published in December 1996, has been expanded to provide new and
updated federal and private grant resource information. EPA developed this grant resource guide
to help tribes, Alaska native villages, and community and nonprofit organizations identify
financial assistance opportunities for their solid waste management programs. The guide also
helps you find specific information explaining how to obtain tax-exempt status for your
organization, locating other grant resources, and preparing successful grant proposals.
Adobe Acrobat PDF File (595 KB) || ASCII Text File (208 KB) || Order Online || About...
Tribal Environmental and Natural Resource Assistance Handbook
Provides federal sources of both technical and financial assistance available to tribes for
environmental management. It discusses available assistance (technical and/or financial),
purpose of assistance, eligible recipients, application process, and contacts.

Preparing Successful Grant Proposals
This tip sheet describes procedures that tribes and Alaska native villages can follow when
applying for solid waste management grants. The tip sheet provides resources for identifying
grantors, a checklist for grant proposal writing, and a case study describing The Sitka Tribe of
Alaska's successful Jobs Through Recycling grant proposal.
Adobe Acrobat PDF File (103 KB) || ASCII Text File (10 KB) || Order Online || About...

EPA Region 5 Grant Writing Tutorial

Grant-Writing Tutorial
This interactive software tool walks users through the grant-writing process and helps them learn
to write more competitive grants. The program includes: tips on writing a grant proposal; how to
complete a grant application package; program-specific sections on three EPA grant programs: 1.
Environmental Justice, 2. Environmental Justice Through Pollution Prevention, 3. Environmental
Education; examples of good, complete grant packages; references; a glossary of terms; and
resources and contacts.

EPA Region 8 Grant Resources Guide

A Guide to Federal Grant Resources for Community Organizations, Tribal Organizations,
and Tribal Governments
This guide identifies 44 federal environmental protection grant programs for entities including
tribal governments and organizations. For each grant, it provides objectives, financial
information, eligibility requirements, contact points, and more. Additional sections advise
applicants on preparation of grant proposals, budgeting for projects, and completing standard
forms.

For more information or to obtain a copy of the guide, contact Region 8 at 800 227-8917 .

General Services Administration Grant Resources Catalog

Catalog of Federal Domestic Assistance
The catalog describes over 1,000 domestic assistance programs administered by the federal
government. The catalog is updated by the U.S. General Services Administration twice a year in
June and December. As a basic reference source for federal programs, the catalog helps users
identify programs that meet their objectives and obtain information on federal assistance
programs. In addition, the catalog is intended to improve coordination and communication
between the federal government and state, local, and tribal governments.

Other Funding Resources:
Indian General Assistance Program (GAP) provides an opportunity for tribes to build capacity
and management capability to implement environmental programs administered by the U.S.
EPA. Under the Program, tribes can tailor capacity-building through an integrated plan that may
include financial assistance complemented and/or supplemented with additional assistance
through project and program-specific grants.

The Environmental Finance Program (EFP) page and EFP's Environmental Financial Tools page
offer an extensive collection of information and links concerning funding sources across all EPA
offices.

Grant and Fellowship Information is available from various agency departments. The page has
links to grant resources, research and study fellowship information, and other sources of
financial assistance.

OECA's State and Tribal Grant (STAG) Program page describes many grant programs available
to tribes and lists EPA regional and headquarters personnel who tribes can contact for grant
information.




Domestic Violence Resources
The following documents and hyperlinks should be of assistance to tribal court personnel, tribal
law enforcement personnel, domestic violence victim service agency personnel, social services
personnel, and others in handling domestic violence cases and issues. Moreover, it should be of
assistance in enforcing the Violence Against Women Act.

      Tribal Domestic Violence Case Law: Annotations for Selected Tribal Cases Related to
Domestic Violence          is designed to assist tribal judicial officers in understanding how some
tribal governments have handled certain legal issues within the context of domestic violence
cases. While a great deal of research has been done on case law in the state systems, little to no
analysis has been done on the tribal judicial approach to domestic violence. This compendium,
developed as part of an overall code-writing workshop curriculum for tribal governments, will
assist tribal legislators as well. Understanding how laws are interpreted by the court systems may
impact the development of laws that provide safety to tribal citizens.

Native American Circle has developed a handbook, "Domestic Violence, Sexual Assault, and
Stalking: Prevention and Intervention Programs in Native American Communities", that is
available as a free download, either as An Entire Handbook       or Section By Section. The
handbook has been approved by the Office on Violence Against Women (OVW), Office of
Justice Programs, U.S. Department of Justice, for distribution to OVW-funded grantees.
Raising Public Awareness on Domestic Violence in Indian Country       is published in
collaboration with the South Dakota Coalition Against Domestic Violence and Sexual Assault,
its member organizations and Native American advocates throughout the state, Cangleska, Inc.,
the violence against women intervention and shelter program on the Pine Ridge Indian
Reservation in South Dakota, developed domestic violence public awareness materials focusing
specifically on rural and Native American communities.

Domestic Violence and Tribal Protection of Indigenous Women in the United States, by Gloria
Valencia-Weber and Christine P. Zuni
The essential Navajo value is that while men and women are distinct, they relate as
complementary equals. That kind of relationship creates, or should create, an environment that
views violence toward women as deviant behavior. Under Navajo common law, violence toward
women, or mistreatment of them in any way, is illegal ...

Victim Rights in Indian Country - an Assistant United States Attorney Perspective      by US
Attorney Christopher Chaney (United States Attorneys' Bulletin sponsored by the Department of
Justice) provides an excellent overview of issues facing federal prosecutors working with victims
of crime in Indian Country.

A Tribal Court Bench Book for Domestic Violence Cases           was produced by the Northwest
Tribal Court Judges Association under a grant from the Office on Violence Against Women of
the U.S. Department of Justice. The Tribal Court Bench Book is a general guideline with
recommendations to help tribal courts deal with domestic violence cases. It is arranged into three
sections: Pre-Trial, Trial, and Post-Trial. The Bench Book is the result of a year-long process to
which tribal judges devoted many hours of personal time. That effort has created a unique legal
guide on domestic violence by tribal court judges for tribal court judges.

The Southwest Center for Law and Policy is a non-profit organization providing legal education
and technical assistance on domestic violence, sexual assault, elder abuse, child abuse, abuse of
disabled persons, and stalking in tribal communities. The center is located in Tucson, Arizona
and travel the nation training law enforcement, attorneys, judges, victim advocates, tribal lay
legal advocates, health care professionals, and community members. The center has also posted
the following articles:

      Keeping Native Women Safe from Gun Violence: Firearms Laws and Tribal Courts
      Sexual Assault Against Native Women: A Brief Overview for Tribal Court Judges by Sarah Deer, Staff
       Attorney, Tribal Law and Policy Institute
      Stalking in Indian Country
      Elder Abuse in Tribal Communities
      Overview for Judges on the Indian Child Welfare Act and Domestic Violence
      Testifying About the Dynamics of Domestic Violence
      Testifying About the Effects of Domestic Violence Against Children
      Testifying About the Predominant Aggressors and Self-Defense
      Testifying About Lethality Risk Factors.

Clan Star was created to provide consultant services on program and policy development to
strengthen tribal justice systems. Particular focus is on advocacy for Indigenous Peoples with
particular emphasis on reclaiming the sovereignty of Indigenous women including gender based
crimes such as domestic violence, sexual assault and stalking. Clan Star’s mission is dedicated to
“improving justice to reclaim the sovereignty of Indigenous women.”

The Women's' Rural Advocacy Programs collected an extensive amount of information about
domestic violence from a variety of sources: training materials, handouts, pamphlets, articles,
etc.. They also have information about domestic violence specifically for Native American
women.

The Indian Health Service (IHS), an agency within the Department of Health and Human
Services (HHS), has made available a compendium of research entitled "Family Violence and
American Indians and Alaska Natives: A Report to the Indian Health Service."    The
compendium includes current research and articles on family violence in American Indian and
Alaska Native communities and articles on domestic violence and sexual abuse.

The Michigan Judicial Institute (MJI) recently announced its "Sexual Assault Benchbook" is
available online. MJI creates resources, including benchbooks with the latest information on
procedures and the state of the law, and directs training programs for judges and court personnel
to enhance their professional skills. The Sexual Assault Benchbook is a comprehensive
sourcebook for information on the impact of the crime on victims, Michigan's sexual assault
related statutes, including applicable defenses, special courtroom procedures that protect the
rights of victims, witnesses, and defendants, scientific evidence, post-conviction and sentencing
matters, and bond and discovery.

Mending the Sacred Hoop is a Native American program whose mission is to assist Native
Sovereign Nations to improve their response to Indian women who are victimized by domestic
violence and sexual assault and to restore safety and integrity to them.

The Justice Department's Office on Violence Against Women provides extensive resources on
their site, including up-to-date information on interventions to stop violence against women for
Criminal Justice Practitioners, advocates, and social service professionals with the latest in
Research and Promising Practices regarding issues of Domestic Violence, Stalking, Batterer
Intervention Programs, Child Custody & Protection, Sexual Assault, and Welfare Reform.

Under a grant from the Office on Violence Against Women of the U.S. Department of Justice,
the National American Indian Court Judges (NAICJA), in conjunction with a broad based Project
Advisory Committee, has collected and analyzed resources concerning the development of
Violence Against Indian Women tribal codes. The Project Advisory Committee found that none
of the forty existing tribal codes we reviewed met all of the standards established for evaluating
Violence Against Indian Women codes. The Project Advisory Committee, however, found that
five of the existing tribal codes that were analyzed were good examples since they met many of
the established criteria. These five codes are as follows:

      Jicarilla Apache Tribal Domestic Violence Code
      White Mountain Apache Domestic Violence Code
      Northern Cheyenne Domestic Violence Ordinance
      Confederated Tribes of Siletz Indians Domestic and Family Violence Ordinance
      Sample Domestic Violence Code - developed by Cangleska, Inc.
To provide concrete guidance to communities, policy leaders, and individuals engaged in
activities to end violence against women, the National Advisory Council on Violence Against
Women developed the Toolkit to End Violence Against Women. The recommendations
contained in the Toolkit were reviewed by numerous experts in the fields of sexual assault,
domestic violence, and stalking. Each Toolkit Chapter focuses on a particular audience or
environment and includes recommendations for strengthening prevention efforts and improving
services and advocacy for victims. Of particular interest is the chapter on Native Women.

Violence Against Women Resources is an extensive site maintained by the University of Minnesota under a grant
from the Office on Violence Against Women of the U.S. Department of Justice. This site provides law, criminal
justice, advocacy, and social services professionals with up-to-date information on interventions to stop violence
against women. It includes documents developed for the Battered Women's Justice Project, VAWnet - the National
Electronic Network on Violence Against Women, and the Minnesota Center Against Violence and Abuse Electronic
Clearinghouse (MINCAVA).

The site includes an extensive Document Library containing information about a variety of
issues pertaining to violence against women, including:

       Full Faith and Credit to Protection Orders
       Model Programs
       Model Legislation
       Information for Criminal Justice Professionals
       Domestic Violence
       Stalking
       Sexual Assault
       Batterer Intervention Programs
       Children
       Research and Evaluation
       Welfare Reform.

The American Judges Association has developed an online handbook for judges handling
domestic violence cases entitled Domestic Violence & the Courtroom: Understanding the
Problem ... Knowing the Victim. This guidebook covers the following topics:

       How Judges Can Help
       Do Not Blame The Victim
       No One Is Immune / Everyone Suffers
       Recognizing the Violence
       Forms of Emotional Battering
       Battered Woman Syndrome
       Other Forms of Violence
       American Judges Association/American Judges Foundation
       Acknowledgements.

Violence Against Women Resources is an extensive site maintained by the University of
Minnesota under a grant with the Justice Department. Documents available on this site reflect the
variety of issues that intervention in violence against women raises. These include provisions of
the Violence Against Women Act (VAWA), passed in 1994, that require states, territories, and
tribes to give Full Faith and Credit to protection orders for victims of violence across their
jurisdictional boundaries. To see a complete list of the documents available on this site, a
Document Library is available where you will find information about a variety of issues
pertaining to violence against women, such as Model Programs, Model Legislation, and
information for Criminal Justice Professionals, about Domestic Violence, Stalking, Batterer
Intervention Programs, Child Custody & Protection, Research and Evaluation, Sexual Assault,
and Welfare Reform. Included are documents developed for the Battered Women's Justice
Project, for VAWnet - the National Electronic Network on Violence Against Women - and for
the MINCAVA website.

The Commission on Domestic Violence of the American Bar Association has links to:

      Are You Being Abused?
      Important Domestic Violence Phone Numbers
      If You Want Legal Assistance But Cannot Afford a Lawyer
      Safety Planning
      How an Abuser Can Discover Your Internet Activities
      Cyberstalking Facts
      Who is Most Likely To Be Affected by Domestic Violence
      Statistics
      Myths and Facts.

Domestic and Family Violence

The National Criminal Justice Reference Service has a detailed catalog of publications in its
Victims of Crime section, including:

      United States Code: Indian Child Protection and Family Violence Prevention
      Batterer Intervention: Program Approaches and Criminal Justice Strategies - ASCII Text File and Adobe
       Acrobat File
      Batterer Programs: What Criminal Justice Agencies Need to Know - ASCII Text File and Adobe Acrobat
       File
      Civil Protection Orders: Victims' Views on Effectiveness - ASCII Text File and Adobe Acrobat File
      Child Victimizers: Violent Offenders and Their Victims
      Child Witness to Domestic Violence
      Childhood Victimization and Risk for Alcohol and Drug Arrests ASCII Text File and Adobe Acrobat File
      A Community Checklist: Important Steps to End Violence Against Women
      A Coordinated Approach to Reducing Family Violence: Conference Highlights ASCII Text File and Adobe
       Acrobat File
      The Criminalization of Domestic Violence: Promises and Limits ASCII Text File and Adobe Acrobat File
      The Cycle of Violence Revisited ASCII Text File and Adobe Acrobat File
      Domestic and Sexual Violence Data Collection: A Report to Congress under the Violence Against Women
       Act - ASCII Text File and Adobe Acrobat File
      Domestic Violence and Homelessness
      Domestic Violence Hotline Resource List
      Drugs, Alcohol, and Domestic Violence in Memphis ASCII Text File and Adobe Acrobat File
      Evaluation of a Protocol to Identify Battered Women During Investigations of Child Abuse and Neglect
      Evaluation of Family Violence Training Programs ASCII Text File and Adobe Acrobat File
      Evaluation Guidebook: Projects Funded by S.T.O.P. Formula Grants under the Violence Against Women
       Act
      Female Victims of Violent Crime
      Initiatives to Combat Violence Against Women
      Legal Interventions in Family Violence: Research Findings and Policy Implications ASCII Text File and
       Adobe Acrobat File
      OJP Family Violence Working Group Report
      Stalking and Domestic Violence: The Third Annual Report to Congress under the Violence Against
       Women Act ASCII Text File and HTML File
      Threat Assessment: An Approach to Prevent Targeted Violence ASCII Text File and Adobe Acrobat File
      The Violence Against Women Act of 1994: Evaluation of the STOP Block Grants to Combat Violence
       Against Women
      Violence Against Women :Estimates from the Redesigned Survey
      Violence Between Intimates: Domestic Violence
      When will they ever learn? Educating to End Domestic Violence: A Law School Report
      Violence by Intimates: Analysis of Data on Crimes by Current or Former Spouses, Boyfriends, and
       Girlfriends.

Domestic violence crosses ethnic, racial, age, national origin, sexual orientation, religious and
socioeconomic lines.

      By the most conservative estimate, each year 1 million women suffer nonfatal violence by an intimate.
       (Bureau of Justice Statistics Special Report: Violence Against Women: Estimates from the Redesigned
       Survey (NCJ-154348), August 1995, p. 3.)
      By other estimates, 4 million American women experience a serious assault by an intimate partner during
       an average 12-month period.
       (American Psychl. Ass'n, Violence and the Family: Report of the American Psychological Association
       Presidential Task Force on Violence and the Family (1996), p. 10.)
      28% of all annual violence against women is perpetrated by intimates.
       (Bureau of Justice Statistics Special Report: National Crime Victimization Survey, Violence Against
       Women (NCJ-145325), January 1994.)
      5% of all annual violence against men is perpetrated by intimates.
       (Bureau of Justice Statistics Special Report: National Crime Victimization Survey, Violence Against
       Women (NCJ-145325), January 1994.)
      Domestic violence is statistically consistent across racial and ethnic boundaries.
       (Bureau of Justice Statistics Special Report: Violence Against Women: Estimates from the Redesigned
       Survey (NCJ-154348), August 1995, p. 3.)
      Each year, an estimated 3.3 million children are exposed to violence by family members against their
       mothers or female caretakers.
       (American Psychl. Ass'n, Violence and the Family: Report of the American Psychological Association
       Presidential Task Force on Violence and the Family (1996), p. 11.)
      In homes where partner abuse occurs, children are 1,500 times more likely to be abused.
       (Department of Justice, Bureau of Justice Assistance, Family Violence: Interventions for the Justice
       System, 1993.)
      40-60% of men who abuse women also abuse children.
       (American Psychl. Ass'n, Violence and the Family: Report of the American Psychological Association
       Presidential Task Force on Violence and the Family (1996), p. 80.)
      47% of men who beat their wives do so at least 3 times per year.
       (AMA Diagnostic & Treatment Guidelines on Domestic Violence, SEC: 94-677:3M:9/94 (1994).)

								
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