Pengertian Knowledge Management

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					E portofolio

Pengertian     : Aplikasi yang memuat potret diri dari mahasiswa bersangkutan mulai
                 masuk kuliah hingga saat terkini yang dapat diakses secara online.

Tujuan         : Sebagai sarana untuk memperkenalkan pencapaian mahasiswa terkait
Subjek         : Mahasiswa terkait
Objek          : Data kegiatan akademik dannon akademik
Sasaran        : Individu dan instansi berkepentingan atas data mahasiswa bersangkutan

Fitur :
    1. Menciptakan rencana studi
    2. Memelihara resume yang dinamis berkaitan dengan studi, pengalaman kerja
        lapangan, kegiatan ekstrakurikular dan aktivitas social serta ketrampilan
        tambahan yang dimiliki
    3. Dapat memuat bukti pencapaian dan kegiatan dalam bentuk dokumen, foto,
        grafik, halaman web, powerpoint dan dokumen excel (.csv)
    4. Dapat memuat komentar dan pernyataan (testimonial) dari individu terkait seperti
        atasan lama (referensi), dosen pembimbing, pembimbing praktek kerja lapangan
        dan pimpinan unit/organisasi terkait
    5. Media yang dapat diakses dan dilihat oleh pihak lain yang berkepentingan seperti
        calon perusahaan, keluarga, dosen pembimbing dan institusi donor
    6. Menjadi sarana online untuk berbagi pengalaman dan ilmu dengan dosen dan
        mahasiswa lainnya

Dapat dikatakan sebagai sistem informasi berbasis data yang atraktif yang memuat
pencapaian akademik dan prestasi non akademik mahasiswa terkait, dan dapat diakses
oleh pihak berkepentingan dengan akses khusus.

                                       e-Portfolio Gallery
About e-Portfolios
What is an e-Portfolio?
Today the term portfolio is being used to describe many things. This service promotes the
development of e-Portfolios that are personalized, web-based collections that include:

      selected evidence from coursework,
      artifacts from extra-curricular activities, and
      reflective annotations and commentary related to these experiences.

Some programs of study at Penn State require that students publish on-line Program
portfolios before graduating. Many faculty require students to publish course work on-
line in Course portfolios. Students may choose to link to any or all of this evidence in a
comprehensive Penn State e-Portfolio.

Why create e-Portfolios?
The e-Portfolio development process encourages all students to become more actively
involved in planning, and more responsible for achieving, their own educational goals.
Students also benefit by:

      sharing examples of their work with advisors, faculty, mentors or potential
       employers,
      mastering valuable information technology skills, and
      demonstrating knowledge, skills and attributes gained beyond the classroom.

As a result of engaging in the e-Portfolio development process, for example, "Looking
Back, Looking Around, and Looking Ahead", students must reflect upon and articulate
current accomplishments and goals for the future. This reflection also directs attention
towards the collection of evidence that directly demonstrates what they know, what they
can do and what they value.

Having this information in electronic format simply allows students to take advantage of
networking possibilities that previously have not been as readily available. If someone
were to compose an email recommending you for a lucrative opportunity, would they be
able to add the line, "by the way...here is a link to their e-portfolio"? Now, every Penn
State student can take advantage of this powerful opportunity!

Who can create an e-Portfolio?
Penn State University's Information Technology Services provides every Penn State
student, regardless of program or campus location, with the resources necessary to create
an e-Portfolio. Every student is allocated up to 1 GB of online storage space (PASS).
Students can apply for a web folder within this storage space. This is offered at no charge
by ITS. Digital files copied into this web folder are accessible by any internet web
browser.

About portfolio.psu.edu
This portfolio.psu.edu is a centrally maintained web service for all e-Portfolio developers
at Penn State. In this web site you will find:

      information and advice regarding the collection, selection and reflection upon
       your evidence,
      the basic skills necessary to design and create web pages, and
      Penn State resources to help you with all aspects of developing your e-portfolio.

This service is a collaborative effort of Penn State's Information Technology Services, the
Division of Student Affairs, and the EMS e-Education Institute.

For more information about what you can do with e-Portfolios at Penn State, contact
Project Manager, Glenn Johnson at portfolio@psu.edu.




e-Portfolio Systems

Instructionally portfolios have recently enjoyed renewed attention in electronic form. E-
Portfolios are rapidly gathering interest and support becoming more commonly
implemented in the United States, Europe and Australia. To support these efforts
institutions and software companies are developing complex system-wide applications
designed to support the collection, organization and presentation of this evidence of
student learning.
Beyond open web space, e-portfolio systems provide administrators with a 'back end' that
allows for the review, aggregation and reporting of student activity within this system.
This might be thought of as analogous to course management systems that provide
students and instructors with tools related course activity. However, rather than only
existing for the 15 week semester period, accounts within an e-portfolio system would be
carried by students' throughout the length of their Penn State experience.

e-Portfolio systems also provide users with tools that can introduce awareness or
reinforce the importance of evidence of learning that takes place across a program of
study. This includes important attributes such as leadership, critical thinking, the ability
to problem solve, strategic awareness, appreciation of diversity, insight and creativity to
mention a few. These are characteristics that all programs aspire their graduates to
demonstrate at some level yet develop - not one course as a time - but across the
experiences of an entire program of study. (see Penn State's Cocurricular Learning
Outcomes)

Requirements Document

During the Spring and Summer of 2006, a committee, charged by the Vice President and
Dean of Undergraduate Education along with the chair of the University Assessment
Committee, examined the requirements and need for an e-portfolio system at Penn State.

"An eportfolio system was one way that the university could respond to the Middle
States’ recommendation that Penn State should strengthen its efforts to assess learning
outcomes both within individual courses and in academic majors and minors. In addition,
an e-portfolio system could also help some of the 206 academic programs that require
external accreditation or program review by producing institutionally relevant data,
including samples of student learning. Just as important, an e-portfolio system could
support the efforts of Student Affairs to heighten students’ awareness of cocurricular
learning and perhaps help students with career development and job hunting. Finally, an
e-portfolio system could help Penn State understand the trajectory of student
development, a topic of keen interest to the research community throughout higher
education in the US and Europe. "

The committee gathered information related to how programs gather, assess and interpret
evidence of student learning. The report identifies five features that should be central to
the selection of an eportfolio system. These features deal with the collection of artifacts
that demonstrate students’ learning; the selection and display of these artifacts; the
students’ reflections on learning; the interactions with others about the students’ learning;
and the incorporation of these artifacts in program and institutional assessment.

Program Focused Roll-out

Students, faculty and staff have demonstrated wonderful successes using the current
information technology infrastructure in publishing individual, course or program related
evidence of learning, i.e., using personal Web space to plan, reflect upon, and publish
what has been learned at Penn State. Comparatively, e-Portfolio systems provide what
open web space can not, administrative efficiencies for faculty and administrators. It is
for these reasons that it is recommended that e-portfolio system solutions be rolled out on
a program by program basis.


2.1 Definition and Value of e-Portfolios
The concept of an e-portfolio has several dimensions. A report from David
DiBiase and
others (2002) defines three types of e-portfolios:
Student learning portfolios are purposeful collections of examples of student work
annotated (ideally) with students‟ reflective commentary. Examples may be
drawn
from assignments associated with a single course, or from curricular and
cocurricular
activities spanning a student‟s entire academic career. Students may also
assemble portfolios as a way to earn academic credit for learning accomplished
outside the classroom (Linn and Gronlund 2000, Yancey 2001a).
Teaching portfolios consist of course syllabi, assignments, student work, and
other
artifacts, collected by practicing or aspiring teachers with the intent of fostering
selfreflection
and peer review of teaching. Like learning portfolios, teaching portfolios
may be comprehensive or they may focus upon individual courses (Hutchings
1998).
Institutional portfolios “contain examples of [an] institution‟s activities, programs,
and
initiatives, each expressing an element of reflection and self-assessment.
Through
its portfolio, an institution documents how it is achieving its stated mission by
examples that speak to the interests of various audiences” (Ketcheson 2001, p.
84).
Penn State already offers all faculty, students, and staff up to one gigabyte of
free Web
space (www.eportfolio.psu.edu) which, through basic Web publishing,
accommodates
the learning and teaching portfolios just described. This report focuses on the
potential expansions of these capabilities and the addition of the institutional
portfolio by
providing access to a university-wide enterprise e-portfolio system.

 To date, there are many software companies that have developed products to
support
e-portfolio development. (See Appendix 2 – List of e-Portfolio Systems) Notably,
however, in 2003 the Open Source Portfolio Initiative (OSPI) began
collaboratively
developing an e-portfolio enterprise application based on the University of
Minnesota‟s
electronic portfolio software. In 2004 the Mellon Foundation matched funds with
Indiana
University and The rSmart group to develop OSP 2. As of March, 2006 this group
had
released version 2.1 which operates in conjunction with the Sakai platform.
In 2005 the IMS Global Learning Consortium (IMS) released its first set of
technical
specifications for the interoperability of e-Portfolio supporting the transfer of
learner
artifacts, materials and records between e-portfolio systems and organizations.
These
specifications are intended to facilitate student transport of e-portfolio activity
from one
institutional e-portfolio system to another, for example moving from secondary
into
higher education, transferring from one college to another, or moving from the
university
to the workplace.
3.1 Range of e-Portfolio Purposes
There is a range of different purposes to which e-portfolios can be applied.
Essentially,
students have a pool of evidence of their knowledge, skills and attributes from
which
they can select for display depending on the purpose for this display and the
intended
audience as the graphic below implies:
IMS Specifications delineate four different types of portfolios which their
interoperability
specifications aim to support. These include:
Assessment e-portfolios: are used to demonstrate competency or achievement
to
some authority by linking artifacts of student work to standards of performance
defined
by the authority. Example at Penn State: Students in the Elementary
Professional
Development Schools program upload artifacts that demonstrate the competency
standards defined by NCATE (National Council for Accreditation of Teacher
Education).
Presentation e-portfolios: are used to represent to an audience evidence of
knowledge, skills and attributes of an individual. The purpose here in most cases
is to
prepare a message that can be used to take advantage of potential academic,
cocurricular,
or work-related opportunities as they arise. Example at Penn State:
Students enrolled in EMSC 300: Building a Professional e-Portfolio, or ENG
202D:
Business Writing develop e-portfolios that are used to help market themselves for
internship or professional employment.
Learning e-portfolios: are used to provide faculty and advisors with evidence of
student work and involvement that can be used to help guide, advise, challenge
and
advance learning over time. Example at Penn State: Students in the Music
Education
and the Art Education programs develop e-portfolios as an integral part of their
program
of study. Beginning this activity as they enter the program, students‟ e-portfolios
change over time. They show the development of knowledge, skills and the
ownership
of essential attributes that have been acquired over time.
Personal Development e-portfolios: are used to record learning and
achievements
over time that can be reflected on. Personal goals and objectives play a
important role
in this personal development activity. Example at Penn State: Paula Hay is a
returning adult student in the College of Communications. Although not required,
she
developed an e-portfolio to gather and list her accomplishments to date. In her
narrative she reflects upon what these accomplishments mean to her and
articulates a
list of personal goals that she would like to focus on.
Please note that while the target audience of this report focuses on students, the
principles of learning underlying these types of e-portfolios and the requirements
specified below are applicable to the needs of other groups. Both faculty and
staff could
also take advantage of these same opportunities in terms of focused continuing
professional development (e.g., teaching portfolios or staff development plans).
3.2 Current Penn State Support for e-Portfolios
Penn State currently provides a generous amount of online storage for students,
faculty,
and staff. Students may apply for a portion of this space to become public, that
is,
accessible throughout the world To make effective use of this open Web space,
students must master basic web publishing skills, a requirement that popular
“social
computing” sites like Facebook or MySpace do not make. While this “blank”
design
space provides students with unlimited options for creatively presenting
information
about themselves electronically, this variety also confounds efficiencies in
assessing or
evaluating evidence of learning which requires consistency in the type and
location of
specific information.
Let us summarize the current status of the e-Portfolio features discussed below:
• Current information technology infrastructure allows for a 1 Gb storage of digital
files related to a student‟s program of study and experiences at Penn State.
Students may elect to share these digital files in an open web space environment
using common web publishing tools. There are few boundaries associated with
the way in which this information may be shared. However, students must
master the web publishing skills required to display this information. In doing so,
however, students learn valuable transferable web publishing skills.
• Currently, there are no tools that allow students to review evidence related to
their Penn State experience other than the standard directory file listing options.
Currently, there are no tools that easily allow students to assign permissions to
parts or all of the digital information within their PASS space. The default setting
for this space is public or accessible to the world. (Note: a small committee within
ITS has been charged to change this default and to make PASS space easier to
use. We expect to have a new feature set in the spring semester, 2007.)
• Currently, there are no tools for directly connecting reflective narrative to the
files
or groups of files within a student‟s storage space.
• Currently, there are no tools for communicating about the files or groups of files
with others that are directly connected to those files or groups of files within a
student‟s storage space.
• Currently, there are no tools that track specific student learning outcomes for
individual, faculty or program review purposes.
We describe the current tools not to be critical of what Penn State has done but
to
highlight the gap between our current environment and what we believe is
needed in
an e-portfolio system.
3.3 Required e-Portfolio Features
The following five e-portfolio features are viewed as essential for the
comprehensive
system envisioned for Penn State.




3.31 Feature 1 - Information Storage – Collection of Artifacts
An e-portfolio should serve as a location for students to gather a variety of
information
sources about themselves and their learning and involvement at Penn State. A
list of
examples of these types of information to include:
• Digital products of learning, (projects, lesson plans, design drawings,
performance videos, etc.)
• Appropriate contact information about the owner
• Curricular and co-curricular competencies of the owner
• Long- and short-term goals
• Activities undertaken or planned
• Curricular and co-curricular achievements
• Interests and values
• Reflections on curricular and co-curricular experiences
• Dynamically-constructed views and presentations for various audiences
Current Penn State Status: Upon enrollment, all students regardless of campus
location or program of study are allocated 500 Mb of general purpose online
storage
space that can be expanded to 1 Gb. This is called their Penn State Access
account Storage Space (PASS). 6 months after graduation these access
accounts are deactivated.
We note the expiration of the Access account because it affects the needs of
some schools and colleges to track students‟ development after graduation.
3.32 Feature 2 - Information Management – Selection of Evidence
An e-portfolio should serve as a location for students to conveniently and
efficiently
review, highlight and select those examples of work, experiences or particular
skills
which play an important role in their own personal development.
An e-portfolio should provide or promote opportunities for making connections
between:
• what is learned across different courses,
• what is learned in coursework and experiences outside of the classroom,
• what is learned across various experiences, and
• what is learned at the university and what takes place in „real world‟ experience.
Current Penn State Status: Students‟ PASS space provides typical directory
structure
access such that digital files are stored in folders and the files within these
folders may
be listed alphabetically, by file type, date last modified, etc., depending on the
method of
access used. This mechanism, while well suited to file storage, does not facilitate
a
student‟s ability to annotate or link their digital files or parts of digital files to
learning
outcomes, experiences or reflections of these experiences outside of common
directory
structures.
Also, recent reports indicate that approximately 65,000 students at Penn State
have at
least one course in the ANGEL course management system. While ANGEL
course
space facilitates the production of student artifacts, these course instances only
exist for
15 weeks. There are no mechanisms in place for students to selectively gather
evidence of their learning across course experiences.
3.33 Feature 3 - Information Connections and Personal Development –
Reflection
An e-portfolio should serve as a location that facilitates students‟ thinking about,
commenting, and reflecting upon, evidence of their learning, experiences and
goals
while at Penn State.
This feature would necessarily include tools for journaling, blogging or in some
way
attach personal narrative description and reflection to specific artifacts or groups
of
artifacts within an e-portfolio.
This feature would necessarily provide prompts or visual clues that would
promote
connection making across courses, learning and experiences.

Access to narrative would by default be private unless permissions are changed
by the
author so that this narrative is made public.
Current Penn State Status: There are no mechanisms currently in place that
automatically connect narrative directly with artifacts stored in a student‟s PASS
space.
Students have used other tools to indirectly link artifacts to one another by using
strategies such as readme files, or have linked to outside commercial or open
source
tools such as blogger.com.
3.34 Feature 4 - Connections and Networking for Feedback, Mentoring,
Assessment
An e-portfolio should serve as a location from which students can conveniently
and
efficiently share work, and get feedback from:
• faculty,
• advisors
• working professionals,
• employers
• alumni mentors,
• curriculum or program reviewers, or others
on selected reflections upon evidence of their learning, experiences and goals
while at
Penn State.
This feature would involve a tool that would facilitate and maintain
communication
between advisors and advisees that is connected to specifically identified
artifacts or
groups of artifacts within a student‟s e-portfolio. This feature would most likely
involve
posting and replying to comments. Access to feedback comments would by
default be
private unless permissions are changed by the author so that these comments
are
made public.
Current Penn State Status: There are no mechanisms currently in place that
directly
connect communication between advisors and advisees to specific artifacts
stored
online by a student. Communication connected with specific artifacts would have
to
take place using common communication tools such as email and both parties
would be
responsible for tracking this communication.
3.35 Feature 5 – Opportunities for Program Evaluation and Accreditation
An e-portfolio should serve as a location that facilitates the tracking of student
completion of required learning outcomes within a program of study.
This feature would allow students to upload and keep track of completion of the
learning
outcomes required by their program of study.
Access to narrative would by default be private unless permissions are changed
by the
author so that this narrative is made public.
Current Penn State Status: There are no mechanisms currently in place that
automatically connect narrative directly with artifacts stored in a student‟s PASS
space.
Students have used other tools to indirectly link artifacts to one another by using
strategies such as readme files, or have linked to outside commercial or open
source
tools such as blogger.com.
3.34 Feature 4 - Connections and Networking for Feedback, Mentoring,
Assessment
An e-portfolio should serve as a location from which students can conveniently
and
efficiently share work, and get feedback from:
• faculty,
• advisors
• working professionals,
• employers
• alumni mentors,
• curriculum or program reviewers, or others
on selected reflections upon evidence of their learning, experiences and goals
while at
Penn State.
This feature would involve a tool that would facilitate and maintain
communication
between advisors and advisees that is connected to specifically identified
artifacts or
groups of artifacts within a student‟s e-portfolio. This feature would most likely
involve
posting and replying to comments. Access to feedback comments would by
default be
private unless permissions are changed by the author so that these comments
are
made public.
Current Penn State Status: There are no mechanisms currently in place that
directly
connect communication between advisors and advisees to specific artifacts
stored
online by a student. Communication connected with specific artifacts would have
to
take place using common communication tools such as email and both parties
would be
responsible for tracking this communication.
3.35 Feature 5 – Opportunities for Program Evaluation and Accreditation
An e-portfolio should serve as a location that facilitates the tracking of student
completion of required learning outcomes within a program of study.
This feature would allow students to upload and keep track of completion of the
learning
outcomes required by their program of study.

A draft of the University Assessment Plan for Student Learning provides a working definition for
the cocurriculum
at Penn State:
"The co-curriculum at Penn State involves formal and informal out-of classroom experiences and
interventions that provide students with learning opportunities. These include involvement in clubs
and
student organizations, educational workshops, lectures, debates, and cultural events. Also
included are
leadership experiences, service learning, internships and co-ops, interaction with faculty and
peers, and
study abroad."
CO-CURRICULAR LEARNING OUTCOMES
Knowledge Acquisition/Application
Students will:
• Develop an understanding of knowledge from a range of disciplines/areas
• Demonstrate the ability to integrate and apply ideas and themes across the curriculum and
Co-curriculum
Cognitive Competency
Students will:
• Acquire learning skills to assist in their academic success
• Develop critical and reflective thinking abilities
• Apply effective reasoning skills
Live Skills and Self-Knowledge
Students will:
• Determine their career interests and acquire career management skills
• Develop the ability to manage and resolve interpersonal conflicts
• Cultivate a propensity for lifelong learning
• Improve self-understanding and awareness and develop an integrated personal identity
(including sex,
gender, sexual orientation, race, ethnicity, culture and spiritual)
• Exhibit responsible decision-making and personal accountability
Intercultural Development
Students will:
• Possess multicultural awareness and knowledge
• Develop sensitivity to and appreciation of human differences
• Exhibit the ability to work effectively with others in diverse groups and with those different from
themselves
• Demonstrate a commitment to social justice
Leadership and Active Citizenship
Students will:
• Effectively communicate with others both verbally and in writing
• Demonstrate an understanding of group dynamics and effective teamwork
• Understand leadership theory and styles and identify their own style in working with others
• Develop a range of leadership skills and abilities such as effectively leading change, resolving
conflict,
and motivating others
• Assume a sense of civic responsibility and a commitment to public life
Personal Integrity and Values
Students will:
• Acquire ethical reasoning skills
• Effectively manage their emotions
• Develop a sense of personal integrity and clarify their personal values
• Appreciate expression and aesthetics
• Demonstrate compassion and empathy for others

Step

Required Software
You will need two applications – a web browser and a web editor. Use the applications
that you feel most comfortable with. A recent version of a browser such as Internet
Explorer, Netscape, Mozilla, Firefox or Safari will do. The most popular web editors on
campus are Microsoft FrontPage and Macromedia's Dreamweaver. Most Penn State
computer labs have this software installed. Consult the Computer Store for purchasing
your copy.



Publishing Web Pages at Penn State in 50 minutes!

  Jump To
Apply for Web Space
If you are a Penn State student, faculty or staff you have a Penn State Access Account
assigned to you.

You can't publish anything online at Penn State unless you have activated your Personal
Web Space privileges. In other words, you must request that ITS create a "www" folder
for you.

How to Apply
Go to the web site http://www.personal.psu.edu/ and review the FAQ's on policies and
procedures. Then, click on the "Apply for Web Space" link. Answer a 5 question quiz. If
you answer 4 of the questions correctly, your request for a "www" folder on the Personal
Web Server will be approved and within 3 business days you will be notified via Penn
State email that your web space has been created!




Need Help?



                        VIEW - Apply for Web Space - MOVIE

OK, I've got the space... How do I use it?



Publishing Web Pages at Penn State in 50 minutes!

 Jump To


Connecting to PASS
ITS allocates 500 MB* of online storage space for electronic files for all Penn State
students, faculty and staff regardless of campus location. Everyone should become
familiar with how to connect to and use this valuable resource.
This online storage space is called PASS (Penn State Access Account Storage Space).
You can connect to PASS from any computer on the internet.

There are three ways to connect to your PASS:

1. Mapping a drive on your computer to PASS
2. SSH
3. PASS Explorer on the Penn State Portal

SSH and PASS Explorer on the Penn State Portal can be used from any computer,
anytime, even if you are not "within" the Penn State Network.

If you are "within" the Penn State network (shaded area in figure), such as in an ITS lab,
a dorm room, a Penn State office, or dialling up using Penn State telephone numbers,
your 'connection of choice' might be to Map PASS directly to your machine.

In case you are connecting from "outside" the Penn State network (such as using a cable
modem or a service such as AOL), you can still MAP a drive to your PASS space. But
first a Virtual Private Network must be established.

* Oh, by the way, you can double the amount of storage of your PASS space - up to 1 GB
- for free ! Go to: https://www.work.psu.edu and click on "Add More Space (Quota
Manager)". Remember, this is probably the safest place for you to store your digital files
while you are at Penn State. This space is maintained 24/7 by ITS.

Online Publishing
For those that have activated their web space, both a "www_protected" and a "www"
folder are created in your PASS. Once connected, you can publish digital files online
using one of these two strategies.

   1. Use "www-protected" and the Access Control Manager Wizard to restrict access
      so that only those individuals you choose will have access to your files, or
   2. Use "www" so that anyone on the Internet can gain access to it. Publishing in this
      public web space is as simple as pasting a copy your file into your "www" folder.

These movies will walk you through how to use either folder.




                 The Files in Your
                                               Using the Access Control
                   PASS Space
                                                   Manager Wizard
                  A Guided Tour

Alright, let's get to work making web pages...

Work Locally, Publish Later
While you are working, where will the files you create be stored? Determine this location
before you get started. Keeping track of which files are where is half the battle. This
working folder may be a folder on your local hard drive, or it may be a folder in your
PASS (but not in the "www" folder.)

A First Simple Web Page

Open your web editor application so that it displays a blank page.

Type a single line.

If this is your first save, use the File >>> Save as... command to save this file in your
working folder. You have just created a web page.

Setting up an Entire Web Site
FrontPage and Dreamweaver both have tools for efficiently setting up and maintaining
entire web sites. Web sites created using these tools make it easy to include features such
as navigation structures and styles. To learn more on this topic review the "Getting
Started with Frontpage" or "Getting Started with Dreamweaver" ITS seminar handouts.

Filenames
"index.html" or "index.htm" are filenames used for home pages. If web servers find a file
by this name within a folder it will be displayed automatically. In general, choose a
filename that helps to describe what is in the file. Try to eliminate the use of spaces in
your file names.
What does my page look like in a real browser?
Under File >>> Preview in Browser.




                          VIEW - Create an e-Portfolio - Movie

OK? Now it is time to make some changes to your webpage...

Modifying Text
Modifying the text that you have typed on your page is very similar to the way you would
do this in any word processor.

Revise your page......Save the changes......Refresh your Browser

This is pretty much the routine. Make your changes to the content. Save these changes
and then preview to see what your webpage looks like. And so on.... until your are happy
with the results and the page is ready to share!

FrontPage Users
Modifying Text

   1. Highlight your text before making any formatting changes.
   2. Change SIZE, font, style, and color using the formatting tool bar.




Saving your Web Pages
File Save (if you have already saved the file) or File Save As (if it is your first save)

   1. In Page view, click Save As on the File menu.
   2. Navigate to the location in the file system where you want to save the page.
   3. In the File name box, type the name of the file.
   4. Select Change to modify the Page Title. This text will be the text that someone
      navigating the Internet will see on the Web Browser's Title bar as well as the
      name give to the page when it is book marked.
   5. Click Save.

Previewing a Page in a Web browser
If you have installed Microsoft Internet Explorer on your computer, you can quickly
preview the current page by clicking the Preview tab in Page view.

DreamWeaver Users
Modifying Text

   1. Highlight your text before making any formatting changes.
   2. Change SIZE, font, style, and color using the Property Inspector.




Saving your Web Pages
File Save (if you have already saved the file) or File Save As (if it is your first save)

   1.   Click Save As on the File menu.
   2.   Navigate to the location in the file system where you want to save the page.
   3.   In the File name box, type the name of the file.
   4.   Click Save.

Previewing a Page in a Web browser
If you have installed Microsoft Internet Explorer on your computer, you can quickly
preview the current page by clicking the Preview button or press F12.



A Word about Fonts
Frontpage gives you the ability to format text to any of the fonts currently loaded on the
machine you are working on. Cool! DreamWeaver, on the other hand, only gives you 5
options of fonts that are most commonly found on any computer today.
RULE OF THUMB: Use only those common fonts you know your audience will be able
to see. When a distant computer does not have the font you have requested it reverts to
the default font of that computer. This might not be what you want.

Now it is time to make some changes to the appearance of the page...

Formatting Pages
Changing the look and feel of a web page is easy to do. Here are two commonly used
options that can help present and organize your message.

Changing Background Color
Make sure the there is enough contrast between the color of the text and the color of the
background so that your text can be easily read.

FrontPage Users
   1. Go to Format Background
   2. In the Background box, select a background color.




DreamWeaver Users

   1. In the Property Inspector, click the Page Properties... button
   2. In the Appearance dialog box, select a background color.



Adding Horizontal Lines
             People add horizontal lines to their web pages to organize information or to
             separate one part of the web page from another. This can be very effective
and is easy to do.

FrontPage Users
      Place your cursor on the page where you think you would like the line to go.
      Locate and select the "Insert" menu item
      Locate and select the "Horizontal Line" or "Horizontal Rule" option
      It's there!

DreamWeaver Users
      Place your cursor on the page where you think you would like the line to go.
      Locate and select the "Insert" menu item
      Locate and select the "Horizontal Rule" option
      It's there!

				
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