Shakespeare Sonnets (PowerPoint) by nikeborome

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									Shakespeare Sonnets

      English
      Year 9



                      1
William Shakespeare




                      2
                  What is a sonnet?
• A sonnet is a fourteen-line         Iambic what?

  poem in iambic                      Oh dear, this is
                                       going to be a
  pentameter.                         weird lesson!




                                                         3
            Iambic Pentameter
• Iambic Pentameter is the rhythm and metre in
  which poets and playwrights wrote in Elizabethan
  England. It is a metre that Shakespeare uses.




                                                     4
Heartbeat.
     • Quite simply, it sounds
       like this: dee DUM, dee
       DUM, dee DUM, dee
       DUM, dee DUM. It
       consists of a line of five
       iambic feet, ten syllables
       with five unstressed and
       five stressed syllables. It
       is the first and last sound
       we ever hear, it is the
       rhythm of the human
       heart beat.
                                 5
                  Pentameter?
• Well an „iamb‟ is „dee Dum‟ – it is the heart beat.

• Penta is from the Greek for five.
• Meter is really the pattern

•     So, there are five iambs per line!

•       (Iambic penta meter )
                                                        6
• It is percussive and
  attractive to the ear and
  has an effect on the
  listener's central nervous
  system. An Example of
  Pentameter from
  Shakespeare: but SOFT
  what LIGHT through
  YONder WINdow
  BREAKS

                               7
                    Syllables
• What is a syllable?

• Well, there are three syllables (separate sounds) in
  the word syllable!

• “But soft, what light through yonder window
  breaks.”
• How many syllables are there in that quotation?
                                                     8
• “But soft, what light through yonder window
  breaks.”
• Write this down and underline the stressed words.
  If you cannot remember, go back to slide 5.

•   This rhythm is iambic pentameter!
•                 Well done!


                                                  9
               Back to sonnets.
• Well, it is a poetic form.

• But it has a certain structure as well as a rhyming
  pattern.




                                                        10
             Rhyming patterns
• The Shakespearean sonnet has three quatrains
  followed by a couplet, the scheme being: abab
  cdcd efef gg.

•      More head scratching?




                                                  11
                   Quatrain?
• Quatrains are four line stanzas of any kind

• I have divided the following sonnet into the three
  quatrains.
•      You will also see the rhyming pattern
•       marked out for you.



                                                       12
                           Sonnet 116
•
     Let me not to the marriage of true minds (a)
    Admit impediments. Love is not love (b)
    Which alters when it alteration finds,(a)
    Or bends with the remover to remove:(b)
    O, no! it is an ever-fixed mark,(c)
    That looks on tempests and is never shaken;(d)            SHIFT
•   It is the star to every wandering bark,(c)
    Whose worth's unknown, although his height be taken.(d)
•   Love's not Time's fool, though rosy lips and cheeks(e)
    Within his bending sickle's compass come;(f)
    Love alters not with his brief hours and weeks,(e)
•   But bears it out even to the edge of doom.(f)
    If this be error and upon me proved,(g)
    I never writ, nor no man ever loved.(g)



                                                                      13
Shall I compare thee to a summer‟s day
                  Sonnet 18


          Shall I compare thee to a summer's day?
         Thou are more lovely and more temperate:
     Rough winds do shake the darling buds of May,
     And summer's lease hath all too short a date:
        Sometime too hot the eye of heaven shines,
         And often is his gold complexion dimm'd;
       And every fair from fair sometime declines,
    By chance or nature's changing course untrimm'd
           But thy eternal summer shall not fade
      Nor lose possession of that fair thou owest;
   Nor shall Death brag thou wander'st in his shade,
  When in eternal lines to time thou growest:
       So long as men can breathe or eyes can see,
     So long lives this and this gives life to thee
Shall I compare thee to a summer‟s day
                  Sonnet 18


Shall I compare thee to a summer's day?     a
Thou are more lovely and more temperate:    b
Rough winds do shake the darling buds of May,     a
And summer's lease hath all too short a date:     b
Sometime too hot the eye of heaven shines,        c
And often is his gold complexion dimm'd;    d
And every fair from fair sometime declines,     SHIFT
                                                  c
By chance or nature's changing course untrimm'd d
But thy eternal summer shall not fade             e
Nor lose possession of that fair thou owest;      f
Nor shall Death brag thou wander'st in his shade, e
When in eternal lines to time thou growest:       f
So long as men can breathe or eyes can see,       g
So long lives this and this gives life to thee    g
 Shall I compare thee to a summer's day?                   a
 Thou are more lovely and more temperate:                  b
 Rough winds do shake the darling buds of May,             a
 And summer's lease hath all too short a date:             b



Should I compare you to a summer‟s day?
You are more lovely and more moderate (easy going as in attitude)
May is characterized by rough winds that will ruin the flowers
And summer does not last long enough

Imagery



                                                                    16
Sometime too hot the eye of heaven shines,               c
And often is his gold complexion dimm'd;                 d
And every fair from fair sometime declines,              c
By chance or nature's changing course untrimm'd          d



     Sometimes the sun is too hot and sometimes its not bright
     enough. And even beauty is subject to nature‟s changes




       personification



                                                                 17
But thy eternal summer shall not fade e
Nor lose possession of that fair thou owest;    f
Nor shall Death brag thou wander'st in his shade, e
When in eternal lines to time thou growest:     f




But your beauty will never fade , and even after you die, death
will not brag about taking your beauty away

Personification



                                                                  18
                    Your Turn
•   Dissect the Sonnet 130
•   1. Complete the rhyme scheme (pattern)
•   2. What is the subject?
•   3. Paraphrase Sonnet 130 (First 2 quatrains)
•   Identify poetic elements
•   4. Draw a picture with of the woman described in
    the sonnet


                                                   19
Sonnet 130
My mistress' eyes are nothing like the sun,
Coral is far more red, than her lips red,
If snow be white, why then her breasts are dun:
If hairs be wires, black wires grow on her head:
I have seen roses damasked, red and white,
But no such roses see I in her cheeks,
And in some perfumes is there more delight,
Than in the breath that from my mistress reeks.
I love to hear her speak, yet well I know,
That music hath a far more pleasing sound:
I grant I never saw a goddess go,
My mistress when she walks treads on the ground.
And yet by heaven I think my love as rare,
As any she belied with false compare.
                                                   20

								
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