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LESSON PLAN FACE POTS Picasso

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					SOUTHERN FACE JUGS – grades 3-5
by Sonia McDowell, art teacher @ Buck Lake Elementary in Tallahassee, Florida
mcdowells@mail.leon.k12.fl.us website: http://teacherweb.com/FL/BuckLakeElementarySchool/Art/

UNIT OVERVIEW:
Students will gain an understanding and appreciation for the sculptural art of face jug, a tradition
originally begun by slave potters. Art can be both realistic and abstract. Students will improve their
ceramic skills and create their own face jug~ a container with human facial features on it. After
constructing a jug with a neck, students will add the human features to their pots. The features
should be distorted/ exaggerated in a similar style to the ones observed in the PowerPoint
presentation. Their will be a class display for students to evaluate, judge, discuss the artworks of their
peers based on personal preference, craftsmanship, and creative. We will finish with an opening night
exhibit to share the face jugs with family and friends.

OBJECTIVES:
The student will create a jug with distorted and exaggerated facial features using their imagination.
VAA121
The student will use hand-building techniques to create their pot: pinching and coil techniques.
VAA121
The student will use relief techniques (additive) to create their face jug. VAA121
The student will use the tools and materials properly. VAA122
The student will use good craftsmanship. VAA124
The student will demonstrate an understanding of balance and proportion in their sculpture. VAA123
The student will identify and explain his/her intentions in their sculpture. VAB123
The student will demonstrate and communicate an understanding of how the elements and principles
of design are used effectively/ ineffectively in the sculpture to communicate an emotion or idea.
VAA123; VAB122; VAB124
The student will compare and contrast various face jugs. VAB121; VAC121; VAD123; VAE121; VAE122

Sunshine State Standards (Art):
VAA121; VAA122; VAA123; VAA124
VAB121; VAB122; VAB123; VAB124
VAC121; VAC122
VAD121; VAD122 VAD123
VAE121; VAE122; VAE123




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MATERIALS:
   Arts & Activities Magazine: February 2006~ Face Vessels: Original African-American Folk
       Art
      PowerPoint presentation of southern face pots; printed images of show for display
      Video clip of PBS Antique Road Show- Antique Face Jug
      Websites/ Visuals/ PowerPoint of Southern & African American slave face pots
      Tokens – paper die cuts of hearts and blue ribbons for critique of student face pots
      Plenty of Georgia red ceramic clay & White ceramic clay
      Kiln
      Index Cards (cut in half) for name tags for clay
      Permanent markers for writing names on cards
      Clay tools: large paper clips- straighten on one end, popsicle sticks, forks, pencils
      18x24 Manilla paper for placemats/ table covers to roll clay on
      Slip, water, and small containers for water & slip – cups from one serving applesauce or cups
       used for ketchup in fast food restaurants
      Towels for cleanup
      Spray bottle of water
      Large plastic bags or old shower curtains & clothes pins to cover pots between classes and keep
       them moist
      Bread trays to store clay on carts
      Glazes – blues, greens, browns, clear
      Paintbrushes for glazing

DAILY PROCEDURES:

Day 1: Critique/ Discussion of Southern Face Jugs
   Watch video clip of PBS Antique Road Show - a critique of a face jug
        o Discuss her first response “ugly”; what she paid for the jug and what the jug‟s estimated
             value was; how any item can still be worth a lot even though it may be damaged; age
             sometimes increases the value of artworks
        o Why are jugs worth so much money?
   Students will observe a PowerPoint presentation of sculptures of African-American slave face
     jugs, and other face jugs made in the southern tradition.
        o Give students questions ahead before reading written information:
              What were the face jugs used for? What did the face jugs hold?
              What parts were made with white clay?
        o Discuss slavery and the connection between slavery and the making of face pots by
             slaves. Discuss answers to questions.
        o Observe various face jugs. Compare and contrast the various styles of face jugs.
              What are the noticeable exaggerated features on the face jugs? Identify distorted/
                 exaggerated facial features. How are the features different from realistic facial
                 proportions? Are the features symmetrical?


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                What kind of expression do some of face jugs show? Are the face jugs funny, scary?
                 Compare and contrast various face jugs
    Students were informed that they would create a jug with distorted/ exaggerated facial features
     in a similar manner. The jug should express an emotion or evoke an emotional response from
     the viewer. The jug should have 2 eyes, 1 nose, and 1 mouth. The features should reflect or
     give the impression of human features rather than animal or alien (no devil/ vampire like
     creatures).
    After being inspired and given the objectives, students sketched a design or idea for their
     ceramic face jug. Drawings of jugs should have a neck and have a face with distorted/
     exaggerated facial features.
    Next week, teacher will demonstrate how to create a ceramic jug and the week following
     students will practice making their own jug.

Day 2: Teacher Demonstration- Construction of jug with 2 pinch pots
   Teacher demonstrates how to make a jug with two pinch pots:
         Roll 2 spheres (balls) of equal size
         Create 2 pinch pots: poke your thumb into the center of the sphere and with fingers
           around the outside pinch and turn, begin by pinching the bottom spiraling around the
           pot upward; form the pot by pulling up instead of out, pay special attention to the
           bottom and inside corners; the thickness should be about the width of your palm;
           repeat directions for the second pinch pot
         Attach 2 pinch pots together: place one pot on top of the other; make sure both pots
           fit together well without a large dent- gently widen top of pot so they fit smoothly
           together; using 2 fingers, apply water along the top ridge of the pot; place one pot on
           top of the other
         SCRATCH over the seam of the two pots;
         SMOOTH the seam with fingers
         Roll the pot on the placemat to further smooth the pot and REFORM (reshape) the
           pot
         Cut hole at the top of the pot with a straighten paper clip about the size of your finger;
           insert finger into opening curl finger and pinch up top when it is too thick and smooth
           opening
         Add neck to jug- using practice clay, roll fat coil (about size of cocktail dog); flatten
           slightly and wrap around finger; make a clay ring; rub seams together; check size by
           placing the ring to the opening; add 2 finger water to the top of the opening and attach
           clay ring/ neck by SCRATCHING with popsicle stick and SMOOTHING with fingers-
           rub the seams away; S&S the outside of the neck and the inside of neck; REFORM neck
           by pinching, if necessary
         ADDING A HANDLE- using practice clay, roll a larger fat coil (about size of the hot
           dog) and longer length; flatten slightly and form the handle in the way you would like;
           scratch with fork where the handle will be attached at the bottom and top; add slip/
           water and reattach handle; SCRATCH with popsicle stick and SMOOTHING with
           fingers- rub the seams away; S&S inside the handle and underneath; add additional

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             coils around the attachments and blend in completely to give the handle additional
             support
                   <<Remind students that they will not be adding handles until their face on their
                      jug in complete>>
      Teacher stress important rules:
           Paperclips are used for cutting clay only- NO PLAYING around with them
           Water- do not use too much or too little
           Do not LEAN pot back when working on it; will round off the bottom edge and the
             pot will rock instead being stable
           Stress the importance of smoothing and proper attachment

Day 3: Jug Construction- student practice (two days, if needed)
   Teacher will review and write down steps for making a jug; asking students how & what the
     steps are (refer to day 2)
   Review important rules (refer above)
   Students will practice making their own jug with 2 pinch pots as demonstrated last week; using
     practice clay
   CLEAN UP: Put all clay in clay recycle tub; teams organize and group supplies for pick up by
     helpers; quiet teams will clean hands in clay rinse/ wash (5 second rinse/ 2 paper towels)

Day 4: Teacher Demonstration- adding distorted facial features
   Teacher demonstration ~ shows students how to make exaggerated human-like features using
     the face jug made during the last teacher demonstration of the face jug;
   Making a nose (DISTRTED/ EXAGGERATED)
          create a nose from a small flat slab of clay (pre-cut); cut into a large triangle; folding it
             over your finger like a taco –pointed at one end and fatter at the other end; decide on
             placement on jug- nose can be tilted/angled, remembering to leave room for mouth &
             optional-chin/ beard; if nose look like bird beak, you have placed the nose onto pot
             incorrectly, place on other side of the triangle; remove, scratch surface of jug where
             nose will be attached with fork (SCORING); add water or slip/attach nose; SCRATCH
             with popsicle stick around the outside of nose; SMOOTH seams/scratching with fingers;
             to seal inside the nose, use q-tip and rub the seams inside the nose- should make a
             “gross & disgusting sound”; REFORM nose to desired shape; do not close nose
          OPTIONAL: nostrils- make 2 small balls of clay dip in water and add to the side of
             nose, SSR to the bottom side of the nose; bend the nose by adding finger inside nose
             and bending the nose on the outside
   Adding eye sockets- by pressing thumbs into clay jug in the place where you are going to put
     the eyes later; DISTORTION/EXAGGERATION; they can be uneven (one high/ one low), too
     close to nose, too far from nose one can be vertical/ one horizontal; eyes should not be lower
     than the nose so there is room for the mouth;
   Making lips; tongue
          Make a medium with/ length coil; pinch ends together into „teardrop‟ shape; then
             pinch other end to make mouth; decide on placement on jug and check for size; pinch
             shorter, if needed; scratch surface of jug where the mouth will be attached with fork
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           (SCORING); add water or slip/attach; SCRATCH with popsicle stick around the outside
           of mouth; SMOOTH seams/scratching with fingers; use q-tip and rub the seams inside
           the mouth; REFORM into the desired shape of lips- pinching them out to make the lips
           fuller or adding more clay; pressing/ blending more of the lips into the jug to make
           smaller/narrow lips
          OPTIONAL: Tongue should be added before teeth- roll fat coil; flatten and form into
           tongue shape; flatten & pinch back of the tongue; dip in slip and attach between lips;
           use q-tip to blend seams around the tongue; REFORM shape and direction of tongue

   Remind students that one of the most important things to do on your jug is SMOOTHING
   WHITE CLAY- WASH HANDS FIRST so that you keep the white and brown clay from mixing
   Adding teeth with white clay
       Choose pieces of bone dried pre-made slabs of white clay for teeth; use pieces as is or
          take the pieces outside and sand on the sidewalk in a designated area (marked w/ blue
          tape on the sidewalk outside the back door of the art room)- watch not to scrap you
          fingers and use broom to sweep clay dust onto the grass/ dirt; decide on placement of
          teeth inside mouth; remove teeth and dip top of each tooth into slip and replace
          between lips; gently press lips on to teeth slightly to further support teeth
   Making eyeballs with white clay; eyelids with brown clay; eyebrows
       Eye balls- Get small amount of soft white clay and small white clay placemat; roll 2
          small balls of clay for eyeballs-do not have to be of equal size (distortion); slightly
          point the ball so it can be easily dipped into slip and pressed into the eye sockets on the
          jug; gently press into socket but do not flatten; return white clay placemat and extra
          white clay so it does not get brown clay on it;
       DO NOT SCRATCH & SMOOTH the WHITE CLAY EYEBALLS
       Eyelids- USE BROWN CLAY; make small coils; dip into water and surround the
          eyeballs; blend clay coil away from the eyeballs just like the skin of our eyes go away
          from the eyes all around the eyes; coils can be shaped all around the eyes to keep the
          eyes round or can be shaped into a football shape similar the shape of realistic eyes;
          SCRATCH coil with popsicle stick AWAY from the eyes; SMOOTH seams/scratching
          with fingers; use q-tip and rub the seams that are in tight corners; REFORM into the
          desired shape- thick eye lids can be gently pressed but not blended toward to eyes;
          smooth well
       Eye brows- add a lot expression depending on their direction and placement; make
          coils for eye brows; uni-brow or 2 eye brows; SCRATCH with popsicle stick or q-tip
          depending on the size/ shape of brow; SMOOTH using fingers or q-tips
   Making other features: ears and other details
       Ears- roll 2 balls, may be different sizes (distortion); flatten like a thick cookie; tap one
          side of clay „cookie‟ to create a flat side to attach to jug; decide on placement on the
          jug; remove, scratch pot with fork; dip into slip and attach to jug; SCRATCH back and
          front of the ear; SMOOTH seams of the ear: REFORM the ear into desired shape
       Demonstrate other features at student request
       Discuss other suggestions for additional details and additions

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            Stress the importance of smoothing
      This is the time to add handle instead of earlier as teacher demonstrated
      Use of sponge on a stick for smoothing inside & some areas outside the jug; put sponge in
       water; squeeze out all water; stick handle into jug opening to see if it easily fits, if so then
       gently twist the sponge into the inside of the jug and smooth the inside- rubbing up & down
       and around; gently twist out of the jug; sponge the outside of the jug only the brown clay
       areas; DO NOT sponge over the white clay areas; exception- to make dirty teeth
      Use pencil to gently press into the center of the eyeballs for pupils; placement will determine
       direction the eyes are looking- cross-eyed, looking up, down, side to side
      Pencil or other tools can be used to create textures for hair and/or other details
      Use pencil to write first name and code on the bottom of the jug to finish face jug

Day 5: Constructing a jug with a neck
   Teacher will review and write down steps for making a jug; asking students how & what the
     steps are (refer to day 2);
   Emphasis: pinch pots matching well and not curving inward, scratch using a popsicle stick not a
     fork, and roll the jug BEFORE cutting the opening
   Review important rules (refer to day 2)- safety of tools and proper use of clay
   Teacher will explain- making student name tags to keep with their jug to identify each week
   Students may practice making their own jug with 2 pinch pots or may use fresh clay and begin
     their final jug; all students will make a name tag
   CLEAN UP: Place pot with a name tag on clay tray for cleanup; put extra clay in clay recycle
     tub; organize and group supplies for pick up by helpers; clean hands in clay rinse/ wash

Day 6: adding a neck, nose, eye sockets, and mouth
   Teacher will give a quick overview review of written steps for making a jug (individual help, if
     needed); more detailed review of making neck, nose, eye sockets, and mouth - asking students
     how & what the steps are (refer to day 2 & 4);
   Teacher will emphasize these main points:
         scratch all attachments to jug using a popsicle stick not a fork;
         SCORING, scratching surface of the jug with fork to roughen the surface for better
            attachments with water or slip;
         good SMOOTHING
         neck should be thick, smaller than the jug and a good height;
         nose attachment right direction should no look like a beak
         for those making final jug, pinch pots matching well and not curving inward & roll the
            jug BEFORE cutting the opening
         careful of leaning/ rocking the jug while working on the attachments- it makes the
            bottom unsteady
   Teacher will give assistance to those that need more help especially those that are behind
   Students will complete the jug with a neck and begin adding nose, eye sockets and lips;
     blending and smoothing well


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      CLEAN UP: Place pot with a name tag on clay tray for cleanup; put extra clay in clay recycle
       tub; organize and group supplies for pick up by helpers; clean hands in clay rinse/ wash

Day 7: adding a white clay for teeth and eyeballs
   Teacher will give a quick overview review of written steps for making a jug/neck, nose, eye
     sockets and lips (individual help, if needed); more detailed review of using white clay for teeth
     and eyeballs - asking students how & what the steps are (refer to day 4);
   Teacher will emphasize these main points:
          Wash hands! Before using the white clay and after if necessary
          Where to do sidewalk sanding- marked area not on the brick walls
          NO SSR (scratching, smoothing and reforming) with white clay at all- you will mix the
             white onto the brown clay; UGH!
          If making tongue & teeth, must make tongue before teeth
          Dip white clay teeth and eyeballs into brown clay slip before attaching to jug
          Use a small white clay placemat for the eyeballs/ teeth; put away all extra white clay and
             teeth before using brown clay again
          Lips should be properly added and attached before adding the teeth- both outside and
             inside the mouth
          good SMOOTHING
          careful of leaning/ rocking the jug while working on the attachments- it makes the
             bottom unsteady
   Students continue working ~ creating and adding their facial features to their jugs; washing
     hands before adding white clay; adding teeth (optional) and eyeballs
   CLEAN UP: Place pot with a name tag on clay tray for cleanup; put extra clay in clay recycle
     tub; organize and group supplies for pick up by helpers; clean hands in clay rinse/ wash
Day 8: adding eyelids & brows and other features
   Teacher will review to make sure students have completed jug/neck, nose, eye sockets and lips
     (individual help & written steps are available, if needed); an overview of review of using white
     clay for teeth and eyeballs - asking students how & what the steps are (refer to day 4); review
     of making eyelids and brows; teacher will provide individual/ team demonstrations; review
     making ears & handles (optional); individual assistance/ demonstrations for optional features
   Teacher will emphasize these main points:
          Wash hands! Before using the white clay and after if necessary
          NO SSR (scratching, smoothing and reforming) with white clay at all- you will mix the
             white onto the brown clay; UGH!
          Eyelids maybe small or large (looking like the eye is partially closed)- lids help to hold
             the eyeballs in like the lips help to hold teeth in
          Eyebrow may 3D or may be drawn after sponge smoothing
          good SMOOTHING with FINGERS by rubbing
          remember to blend away seams of attachment
          careful of leaning/ rocking the jug while working on the attachments- it makes the
             bottom unsteady


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    Students continue working ~ creating and adding their facial features to their jugs; washing
     hands before adding white clay; add eyelids; brows and other features; smoothing
   CLEAN UP: Place pot with a name tag on clay tray for cleanup; put extra clay in clay recycle
     tub; organize and group supplies for pick up by helpers; clean hands in clay rinse/ wash
Day 9: sponge smoothing & added textures
   Teacher will review finishing techniques: adding clay to unsteady bottoms of jugs, sponge
     smoothing, adding texture for hair, pencil pupils, name/ code on bottom (refer to day 4)
   Teacher will explain grade sheet process for individuals that finish early
   Teacher will emphasize these main points:
         Eyelids maybe small or large (looking like the eye is partially closed)- lids help to hold
            the eyeballs in like the lips help to hold teeth in
         Eyebrow may 3D or may be drawn after sponge smoothing
         good SMOOTHING with FINGERS by rubbing
         RUB AWAY SEAMS- score and slip the areas before adding your features to help them
            stay better attached
         careful of leaning/ rocking the jug while working on the attachments- it makes the
            bottom unsteady-- Add clay to the bottom of jugs that have bent outer corners- SSR
         squeeze out all the water out of sponge before using
         pencil pupils- choose direction and press pencil firmly into the white eyeballs
         when writing name/ code on the bottom- spread letters slightly apart and press firmly
   Students finish adding the final details ~ the finishing touches; smoothing
   CLEAN UP: Place pot with a name tag on clay tray for cleanup; put extra clay in clay recycle
     tub; organize and group supplies for pick up by helpers; clean hands in clay rinse/ wash

Day 9: Evaluation of Face Jug
   Teacher discussed and explained the grade sheet for students to fill out and complete using a
     point system for each item; students will do self and peer evaluation
   Teacher will discuss the drying an firing process in the kiln
         The pots must completely dry –BONE DRY
         Once pots are bone dry, they are fired in the kiln – BISQUE
         Once bisque fired, pots can be glazed
         Glazed pots are fired in the kiln a second time
   CLEAN UP: Place pot with a name on pot to dry for weeks; put extra clay in clay recycle tub;
     organize and group supplies for pick up by helpers; clean hands in clay rinse/ wash

                                        ~ After bisque fire~
Day 1o: Glazing
   Teacher will review the glazing process; limit the choice of colors available
        o Students should limit the number of colors to one or two colors on the jug; the facial
          features are lost when you add too many colors
        o For shiny colors paint 2 coats (layers) of a single color
        o To coat inside of jug- pour clear glaze inside the jug and pour out
        o Do not paint glaze on the bottom of the pot and lid– the parts that touch the table; if
          you paint these areas they will attach to the kiln shelf permanently „
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          o Cover the entire surface clay surface, if you desire a shiny colored surface; clay spots
              that are not covered with glaze will not be colored or shiny unless you paint it
          o Good painting techniques make for a well finished pot
          o Always look at the example tiles before choosing your colors; the glaze color changes
              when it is fired in the kiln; the color of the glaze in the jar is often very different from
              the color after the firing
          o Choose the right size brush for the job
      Students will glaze their face jug and use color to emphasize the facial features
      CLEAN UP: Place pot up; put glaze containers up- put like colors together; organize and
       group supplies for pick up by helpers; clean hands in clay rinse/ wash

Day 11: Critique of student work
   Opening Discussion/ Observation- compare and contrast with the face pots in the Arts &
     Activities Magazine: February 2006~ Face Vessels: Original African-American Folk Art
          o Face vessels made by seventh & eighth graders
                  Which are better crafted and creative?
   Teacher gives instructions on critiquing and judging student sculptures (Token Response)
          o All student art works (face jugs)are put out on the tables for display
          o Students are to walk around and look at all the art works (face jug sculptures)
          o Students are to choose art works (two jugs)
                  one art work (jug) that they prefer/like (preference- heart token);
                  another artwork (jug) that shows the best overall effort (judgment- blue ribbon
                     token ); students should think about the areas on their evaluation / grade sheet
                     when considering the overall best effort – like good craftsmanship, original
                     creativity, facial features, showing emotion/ evoking an emotional response; If
                     you had to select one artwork to represent the class which student artwork
                     would you chose
          o Students pick up a token of each (heart & blue ribbon) and place them next to the
             artwork (face pot) of their choice; students may choose both on the same pot or two
             different artworks (pots); their choice should not be influence by their peers and any
             pot may be chosen whether no tokens or many tokens; each student should make their
             own decision
          o Teacher asks
                  “If everyone in the class picks only one or two art works (jugs), do you think
                     every student will receive a token?” ---NO;
                  “If a student does not receive any tokens doe that mean they did not do well or
                     that no one likes their art work (jug)?” –NO
   Teacher leads and directs the discussion about individual jugs; noticing the number of hearts
     and blue ribbons; posing questions such as: who gave this token? Why?; teacher makes any
     opportunity to discuss a few that did not get any tokens and makes positive comments or asks
     if there were any jugs that you weren‟t able to give a token for but you thought they were
     unique



                                          9 of 11                               sonia mcdowell
        o Students should differentiate between preference and judgment; for preference students
            should use phrases similar to “I like this because…”; judgment phrases would be more
            like “They did a great job…”, “She used good craftsmanship. She ….”
        o Students should make positive encouraging comments
    Teacher tries to get every student in the class the opportunity to make a positive comment
     about someone else‟s art work (jug) and tries to discuss each art work
    The art work with the most blue ribbons are often selected to represent the class in school-
     wide exhibits
    ADDITIONAL DISCUSSIONS/ ACTIVITIES
        o Students will give a price value to their face pots for their student exhibit
                 Do you think you will be able to get as much money for yours? Why? Does that
                    make it less valuable?
        o Aesethic Discussion
                 Are face jugs art or craft? Why or why not?
                 Does how much an artwork is worth have any bearing on whether it is art or
                    not?

                  ADDITIONAL TECHNOLOGY COMPONENT
African- American slave pots ~ research websites and write reflections/ impressions
    Students will be directed to check out some specific websites and also see what sites they can
       locate using specific search engines on the internet
           o Use websites from powerpoint presentation
           o Search engines include: slave face pots; face jugs, face vessels; southern effigy vessels;
              African-American slave face pots; etc.
    Students should locate/ find at least three or more face pots and then choose one or two;
       reading the contextual information about the pot(s)
    Students will import images to a PowerPoint or Word program, add some contextual
       information about the pot, and write their impressions about the slave face pot they chose –
       why they like or dislike it, how it compares to their own pot they created

TECHNOLOGY COMPONENT: (optional)
Southern face jugs ~
Research websites and write reflections/ impressions (1-2 days)
   Students will be instructed to check out some specific websites and also see what sites they can
     locate using specific search engines on the internet
         o Websites to try include: slave face pots
                 www.si.edu/resource/faq/nmah/facevess.htm
                 www.smithosianlegacies.si.edu – click on exhibit search from the left side;
                    search- face jug; should bring you to
                    www.smithosianlegacies.si.edu/objectdescription.cfm.ID=209
                 www.tfaio.com – article your looking for is “Making faces: Southern Face
                    Vessels from 1840 – 1990
                 http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/pages/roadshow/series/highlights/2002/miami/mi
                    ami_follow2.html - Antiques Roadshow in Miami: Face Jug 2002

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                    http://books.google.com/books?id=2598QQgoRP8C&pg=PA66&lpg=PA66&d
                     q=face+vessels&source=web&ots=Dt13ZjkEXs&sig=L42kkKVJybEKgPgh-
                     o7Gz1KKXTg#PPA66,M1 - Information about Edgefield Slave Face Jugs from
                     Oxford History of Art: African American Art pg.66

         o other websites of more recent artists influenced or carrying on the tradition
                 www.janesaddictions.com/jadmain.htm or www.janesaddictions.com then click
                    on southern pottery on the left
                 www.blackpotter.20f.com
                 www.mintmuseum.org/craftingnc/06-04-04.htm
                 www.annsjugs.com – click on face jugs & current inventory (check out her
                    prices)
                 www.barnwell.com/pawprintpottery/face_jugs.htm
                 www.drexelantiques.com/catawabvalleypottery.html
         o Search engines include: slave face pots; face jugs, face vessels; southern effigy vessels;
            African-American slave face pots; etc.
    Students should locate/ find at least three or more slave face pots and then choose one or two;
     reading the contextual information about the pot(s)
    Students will import images to a PowerPoint or Word program, add some contextual
     information about the pot, and write their impressions about the slave face pot they chose –
     why they like or dislike it, how it compares to their own pot they created
    Students will share information they learned from their research on the internet during class

Evening Opening class exhibit
   Students will have their face jugs on exhibit at an opening night for parents to see the class
     sculptures
   Students will have an opportunity to be docents (for parents) explaining and answering
     questions about the exhibit, Southern face jugs & slave pots, or the production process.
   Parents and students can fill out compliment/ comment forms for face jugs.
   Alternate activity- mock silent auction
         o Audience writes the amount of money they would pay for the jug
   Show the PowerPoint presentation on southern face jugs
         o If completed, display/ share the student‟s informational pages about African-American
            slave face pots & southern face jugs.
   This will also provide an opportunity for many of the face pots to be transported home safely.




SPECIAL THANK YOU to Pat Poitinger, Linda Johnson, and Robin Rodgers for their assistance and
teachings on ceramic face jugs




                                       11 of 11                            sonia mcdowell

				
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