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					DLA Leader Development Guides
          Appendix
                      DLA Leader Development Guide Appendix
Table of Contents

Focus of DLA ........................................................................................................................... 2
  Introduction ........................................................................................................................... 2
Definitions and Descriptions .................................................................................................... 3
  Terms ................................................................................................................................... 3
Leadership Competencies ....................................................................................................... 5
  How to Develop .................................................................................................................... 5
  Categories of Leadership Skills ............................................................................................ 7
Enterprise Leader Development Program (ELDP) Components ............................................. 9
  Non-Supervisors (Tier IA) and Team Leads (Tier IB) ........................................................... 9
  New Supervisors (Tier II) ...................................................................................................... 9
  Supervisors with 2 to 10 years Experience (Tier III) ............................................................. 9
  Supervisors with more than 10 years experience and all Managers (Tier IV) .................... 10
  SES and Managers of Managers (Tier V) ........................................................................... 10
Where to Enroll ...................................................................................................................... 11
Role of the Lead Versus the Supervisor ................................................................................ 12
Information for Supervisors.................................................................................................... 13
  Resources for Supervisors ................................................................................................. 13
  Human Resource Issues .................................................................................................... 16
  General Schedule Classification: Supervisor ..................................................................... 19




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                 DLA Leader Development Guide Appendix

                                    Focus of DLA
Introduction
Mission

To provide best value logistics support to America's Armed Forces, in peace and war. . .
around the clock, around the world.‖ http://www.dla.mil/corpHeadQuartersMain.asp

DLA provides worldwide logistics support for the missions of the Military Departments and
the Unified Combatant Commands under conditions of peace and war. It also provides
logistics support to other Department of Defense (DoD) Components and certain Federal
agencies, foreign governments, international organizations, and others as authorized. DLA
must continue helping our customers maintain readiness at reduced cost and sustain
current and future deployed operations. That is our challenge, and that is what we will do.

Vision

Right Item, Right Time, Right Place, Right Price. Every Time . . . best Value Solutions for
America’s Warfighters

Goals

Consistently provide responsive best value supplies and services to our customers
Reduce costs—improve efficiency—increase effectiveness
Ensure our workforce is enabled to deliver and sustain world class performance

Values

                       People—Service—Excellence—Integrity—Innovation
                                   One Team—One Focus

Strategic Plan

The DLA Strategic Plan 2002–2007 sets forth the values, goals, and objectives that are
being used to steer mission accomplishment. DLA continues to refine its ability to respond
quickly and effectively to the needs of its military customers.

Web links

As a leader in DLA (and everyone can be a leader), you must understand the organization,
where it is, and where it is going. Here are three sources of up-to-date information.

   DLA Home page: http://www.dla.mil/
   DLA Today and Tomorrow: https://today.dla.mil/
   eWorkplace: https://dla1.dla.mil/SAPPortal
   Strategic Plan: http://www.dla.mil/corpHeadQuartersMain.asp

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                  DLA Leader Development Guide Appendix

                         Definitions and Descriptions

Terms

You will find these terms throughout the Guide:

          Term                                         Description
Assessment tools for     These tools help people who aspire to a 1st line supervisor position
1st line supervisor      and selecting officials determine competency for the position.
selection
Behavior Based           Behavior Based Interviewing means that during the selection
Interviewing (BBI)       process, the interviewer will ask specific questions about
                         competencies needed and interviewees will offer specific examples of
                         how they have demonstrated those competencies. BBI is a selection
                         tool.
Coach                    One-on-one Coach: A person who assists the new supervisor in the
                         leadership transitioning process, setting and attaining developmental
                         goals.
                         Peer Coach: A person involved in a structured activity designed to
                         build feedback and relationship skills. DLA Training Center (DTC)
                         assigns new supervisors to small groups. They learn coaching skills
                         from a professional coach. Then they engage in informal peer
                         coaching in person, through teleconferencing, and/or through video
                         teleconferencing.
Competency               A measurable pattern of knowledge, skills, abilities, behaviors and
                         other characteristics that an individual needs in order to perform work
                         roles or occupational functions successfully.
Continuous Learning      A 40-hour biennial requirement for all supervisors and managers
Requirement              (including mentoring, public speaking, developmental assignments
                         and classes).
eWorkplace               Leader Community of Practice (COP) at
                         https://dla1.dla.mil/SAPPortal offers links to

                         
                       competencies
                      developmental guides
                      developmental suggestions
                      lists of resources, and
                      online discussions.
Leader Award Program This program recognizes DLA leaders and one ―rising star‖ per year.
                     Rewards include the following:

                           Desk plaques
                           On-the-spot awards
                          Shadowing a Corporate Board member
Leader Forum             This 1-day meeting focuses on leader competency. It is DLA leader-
                         led at each DLA site.
Leader Off-site          This 2-day annual meeting is DLA led and focuses on a customized
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               DLA Leader Development Guide Appendix
        Term                                           Description
                         content consistent with Agency priorities. The purpose is to allow
                         DLA leaders the opportunity to teach the next generation of leaders.
Leadership               The process of influencing the activities of an individual or a group in
                         efforts toward goal achievement. In given situations, they influence,
                         inspire, guide, and motivate.
Leadership Page in       This offers a central electronic page where DLA leaders can share
DLA Today and            leader lessons, coaching tips, and interviews.
Tomorrow
Leadership Reading    Online self-development tool through e-Portal:
List                  https://dla1.dla.mil/SAPPortal
Leadership/supervisoryThis recruitment and selection tool requires that important
competencies in job   supervisory/leadership competencies be included in job
announcements         announcements for supervisors. These competencies are being
                      added because technical competence is not enough for supervisors
                      in DLA.
Management            A set of processes that can keep a complicated system of people and
                      technology running smoothly. Important aspects of management
                      include planning, budgeting, organizing, staffing, and controlling.
Mentoring             Mentoring is a developmental partnership in which two individuals
                      invest time, know-how, and effort to enhance leader skills, growth,
                      and organizational knowledge. The partnership involves the mentor
                      (who gives guidance and feedback) to the protégé (who is working to
                      enhance his or her leader growth).
Mentoring Handbook    A guide for being/getting a mentor; designed for informal mentoring.
Mentoring site        A DLA Mentoring site located on the Leadership e-portal. It includes
                      a handbook explaining the informal mentoring process; guidance on
                      starting, communicating in, and continuing a successful mentoring
                      relationship.
Mentoring workshop    Workshops on being and/or finding a mentor include a Mentoring
                      Handbook for informal mentoring
Multi-Source Feedback This developmental tool currently used by DLA is the Denison 360-
                      degree assessment instrument that provides a person with
                      confidential feedback from his or her manager, direct-line reports,
                      and peers.
New Supervisor        This is a mandatory 2-year training and development period for new
Certification         supervisors at DLA. It applies only to supervisors assigned to a
                      supervisory probationary period beginning April 1, 2004. It focuses
                      on supervisory and leadership competencies and provides additional
                      support to help individuals successfully transition into a formal
                      leadership role.
Sponsor               During the second year of the Certification Program (Tier II), each
                      new supervisor will serve as a temporary sponsor to a newly
                      appointed probationary supervisor. The purpose of the relationship is
                      to provide general information on the Certification Program and be an
                      informal source of support to the probationary supervisor as he or
                      she transitions into a leadership role.

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                  DLA Leader Development Guide Appendix

                            Leadership Competencies

How to Develop

Introduction

Developing leader competencies involves acquiring knowledge and building skills.
Attending a training course is not always the best or only method. Consider the following
approaches in determining your individual development plan (IDP).

Acquiring knowledge

We acquire knowledge at work through the following:

   Contact with relevant people and situations
   Discussion and asking questions
   Attendance at a briefing on a situation
   Observation and listening
   Attendance at regular meetings
   Reading bulletin boards and e-mail
   Reading files, publications, legislation, books, manuals, and reference material
   Internet websites
   New work experiences
   Formal seminars, conferences, and training events
   Receiving coaching
   Working with a mentor
   Developing and using job aids
   E-learning, distance learning, classroom learning

Building skills

We build skills at work through the following:

   Observing the activity
   Practicing the activity under guidance with support
   Making mistakes
   Getting feedback
   Repeating practice until the activity is perfected




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Experience-based developmental opportunities

Consider these types of experienced-based options:

   Increasing decision making authority
   Turning around a struggling organization
   Working in new functional areas
   Working in new lines of business
   Launching new business processes and initiatives
   Increasing the number of direct reports
   Improving the quality of direct reports

Feedback and relationship-based developmental opportunities

Consider these types of feedback/relationship options:

   Creating a customized leadership development plan
   Interacting with peers
   Meeting with a coach
   Participating in formal or informal mentoring
   Receiving feedback

Education-based developmental opportunities

Consider these types of education options:

   People-management skills courses
   Off-site seminars in business skills
   Technical skills courses
   Attending business skills courses

Effective strategies

Research has shown that there are specific strategies that are most effective in building
and strengthening leadership. The greatest impact can be accomplished through the
following five developmental strategies:

   Creating a customized leadership development plan
   Receiving frequent and varied performance feedback
   Interacting with peers through networking and coaching to discuss leadership issues
   Infusing the job with increased decision-making authority
   Obtaining training in people-management skills




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Categories of Leadership Skills
Comparison chart

Corporate Leadership Council (CLC) research indicates the following skills/characteristics
as being most important for effective leadership. We have indicated the corresponding
DLA managerial competency for each skill/characteristic.

                               Category: People Management
          CLC Critical Skills/Characteristics             Corresponding DLA Competency
  Clearly Communicate Expectations                      Responsibility/Accountability
                                                        Oral/Written Communication
  Recognize and Reward Achievement                      Resource Stewardship
  Inspire Others                                        Leadership
  Put the Right People in Right Roles at Right Time     Resource Stewardship
  Persuade and Encourage Others                         Teamwork
                                                        Oral/Written Communication
  Hold People Accountable                               Responsibility/Accountability
  Strong Commitment to Staff Development                Responsibility/Accountability

                              Category: Strategic Management
          CLC Critical Skills/Characteristics             Corresponding DLA Competency
  Adapt to Changing Circumstances                       Innovation and Initiative
  Identify and Articulate Long-Term Vision              Strategic Focus
  Deep Understanding of Markets and Customers           Customer Service
  Correctly Assess Risk and Return of Decisions         Responsibility/Accountability

                               Category: Process Management
          CLC Critical Skills/Characteristics             Corresponding DLA Competency
  Encourage and Manage Innovation                       Innovation and Initiative
  Correctly Allocate Resources Across Competing         Resource Stewardship
  Priorities
  Translate a Long-Term Vision into a Step-by-Step      Strategic Focus
  Plan
  Correctly Solve Problems                              Responsibility/Accountability



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                               Category: Personal Characteristics
             Critical Skills/Characteristics                  Corresponding DLA Competency
  Honesty and Integrity                                     Professionalism
  Passion to Succeed                                        Leadership
  Accept Responsibility for Successes and Failures          Responsibility/Accountability
  Open to New Ideas                                         Innovation and Initiative

(Taken from Corporate Leadership Council, “Voice of the Leader: A Quantitative Analysis of
Leadership Effectiveness and Development Strategies,” dated 2001. Source: Corporate
Leadership Council 2001 Leadership Survey.)




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                    DLA Leader Development Guide Appendix

    Enterprise Leader Development Program (ELDP) Components

Non-Supervisors (Tier IA) and Team Leads (Tier IB)

Components for Non-Supervisors and Team Leads include the following:

    Leader Development Guide
    Course: So You Want to Be a Supervisor1 (October 2005)
    Mentoring Handbook (September 2005)
    Work with informal mentor

New Supervisors (Tier II)
This mandatory 2-year developmental program is for all probationary supervisors appointed
after April 1, 2004:

    Leader Development Guide
    Leadership Education & Development (LEAD) (40 hours)
    Certification Orientation (2 hours)
    New Supervisor & Manager Partnering Agreement
    New Supervisor’s Toolkit
    DLA Online HRM Training (12 hours)
    Applied Human Resources Management for Supervisors (40 hours)
    One-on-One Coaching (Available March 2005)
    New Supervisor Sponsor (1st year) (Available April 2005)
    Peer Coaching (Available September 2005)
    Multi-Source Feedback
    Ninth House Network (NHN)
    Individualized Electives (24 hours) (Available April 2005)

Supervisors with 2 to 10 years Experience (Tier III)

This also includes those supervisors with less than 2 years experience who are not
included in Tier II Certification.

Components include:

    Leader Development Guide
    Competency based courses and activities
    Developmental assignments
    Contribute leader articles to DLA Today and Tomorrow
    Leader Forum speaker
    LEAD2 1-week course (Available January 2005)
    Advanced Course3 (Available July 2006)

1
    Classroom, Online, distance learning TBD
2
    LEAD will be available for experienced supervisors who have not had the course previously.
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                    DLA Leader Development Guide Appendix
    Peer Coaching (Available January 2006)
    Multi-Source Feedback (Available to GS 13 and above) TBD
    Mentoring Handbook September (Available 2005)
    Serve as informal mentor

Supervisors with more than 10 years experience and all Managers (Tier
IV)
(Managers are supervisors of supervisors)

Components include:

    Leader Development Guide
    Leader Forum speaker
    Contribute leader articles to DLA Today and Tomorrow
    Organizational Leadership for Executives (OLE) (Available April 2006)
    Advanced Organizational and Strategic Leadership Course (Available January 2007)
    Peer Coaching (Available January 2006)
    Multi-Source Feedback (Available to GS 13 and above) (Available TBD)
    Mentoring Handbook (Available September 2005)
    Serve as informal mentor
    Transition to Management Course (Available TBD)

SES and Managers of Managers (Tier V)
Components include:

    Leader Developmental Guide (Available January 2005)
    Contribute leader articles to DLA Today and Tomorrow
    Leader off-site and Leader Forum speaker
    Serve as Sponsor for Executive Development Program
    Menu/Catalog of Executive Development Program courses
    Specialized course DLA Orientation for Executives (Available October 2005)
    Multi-Source Feedback
    Serve as formal mentor for Developing Leaders Program (Available 2006)
    Senior Leaders Coaching Initiatives (SES, Flag and GO)




3
    LEAD (Advanced) will be developed for future experienced supervisors based on a needs assessment.
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                DLA Leader Development Guide Appendix

                                  Where to Enroll
DLA Applied HRM registration

The DLA Training Center offers this course with preregistration. Note that probationary
supervisors and military will be provided with first priority for course attendance. Any
remaining spaces will be offered to seasoned supervisors who have never had formal HRM
training, or who need a refresher. Session locations will be rotated between various DLA
activities, to include OCONUS sites. All classes are open to any DLA new supervisor and
neither targeted nor limited to students who are geographically located where the class is
conducted (except OCONUS sessions, which are open only to OCONUS DLA employees).

Prerequisite for attendance at DLA Applied HRM for Supervisors is completion of all DLA
Online HRM Modules. DLA Applied HRM for Supervisors is not a prerequisite for the
Leadership & Education Development (LEAD) course; however, the Applied HRM course
should be taken prior to LEAD, if possible.

DLA Resources

   On-Line Human Resource Management Modules at https://today.dla.mil/j-1/supervisory/
   Ninth House Network
   Multi-Source Feedback: POC Jacqueline Williams J–12

Office of Personnel Management (OPM), Federal Government’s Human Resources
Agency

OPM online courses:

   http://www.golearn.gov/coursecatalog/index.cfm?cattype=Free&catlist=14

   The Federal Executive Institute and Management Development Centers:
    http://www.leadership.opm.gov/courselist.cfm

United States Department of Agriculture Graduate School

http://www.grad.usda.gov/cgi-
bin/sb/nav.cgi/aip=4071eUsdGEDZz0hXQqtskg8gJpE1wVcneBLD.?nav=100455




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                     Role of the Lead Versus the Supervisor
Reference

For a detailed explanation of Lead positions, review the Office of Personnel Management
(OPM) General Schedule Leader Grade Evaluation Guide at the following link:
http://www.opm.gov/fedclass/gslead.pdf.

For a detailed explanation of Supervisor positions, review the General Schedule
Supervisory Guide at the following link: http://www.opm.gov/fedclass/gssg.pdf.

Comparison

The chart below lists examples of some of the more significant differences between team
leaders and supervisors; however, these examples are not intended to be all-inclusive4:

                 Team Leaders                                      Supervisors
    Explain team goals and objectives to          Set team goals, select team leaders, assign
    assigned team members and assist              team members. Administratively and
    team in organizing to accomplish work.        technically direct the work of subordinates.
    Coach, facilitate, solve work problems        Plan, assign, review, accept, amend, or
    and participate in the work of the team.      reject work done by teams and
                                                  subordinates.
    Provide information to the supervisor on      Assign performance ratings, approve
    performance of the team and                   awards, and take performance-based
    individuals.                                  corrective actions.
    Communicate assignments, milestones,          Make work assignments, set or negotiate
    and deadlines to the team and                 deadlines, and completion dates.
    individuals based on the supervisor’s
    instructions.
    Observe and relay training needs and          Schedule and approve funding for the team
    requests to the supervisor.                   and individual training.
    Inform supervisor of attendance and           Counsel employees on behavior and initiate
    behavioral problems.                          disciplinary actions, if required.
    Relay requests for resources and              Allocate resources to teams.
    supplies.




4
    From the General Schedule Leader Grade Evaluation Guide, OPM, June 1998, pg. 12

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                     DLA Leader Development Guide Appendix

                                Information for Supervisors5
Resources for Supervisors
New Supervisor’s Toolkit

The DLA Training Center sends this package only to the new supervisor upon appointment
to a supervisor probationary period. It includes a number of resources to help jumpstart the
new supervisor’s transition into a leadership role:

    DLA Strategic Plan
    DLA Enterprise-wide Communication Plan
    The New Supervisor (A Crisp Fifty-Minute Book)
    DLA Supervisor’s Handbook
    Getting Results Through Learning
    Master Labor Agreement
    Performance Management Guide for Supervisors and Managers

These documents are an excellent source of information if you have not already studied
them.

DLA On-Line HRM Modules

These online modules present basic concepts and regulatory information on Federal
civilian Human Resources Management (HRM). Currently there are 13 modules in the
course, ranging in duration from 15 minutes to 1-hour each, that address the following
subject matter areas:

     Attendance and Leave                                 Incentive Awards and Motivation
     Career Planning and Development                      Injury Compensation
     Classification                                       Merit Promotion
     Conduct and Discipline                               Merit Systems Principles
     Workplace Violence Prevention                        Performance Management
     Drug Testing                                         Reduction in Force
     Fair Labors Standards Act

Important note

This training is free online at http://www.hr.dla.mil/ (see ―Training‖ section, click on ―DLA
On-Line HRM Training‖). Completion of all modules is required as a prerequisite for the
DLA Applied HRM for Supervisors Course.




5
    This section is for non-supervisors and team leads considering moving into supervision.
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                  DLA Leader Development Guide Appendix
DLA Applied HRM for Supervisors Course (40 hours)

This 5-day classroom course builds upon and expands the basic Federal civilian HRM
concepts and information introduced in the DLA On-Line HRM modules. Through
individual and group exercises, case studies, role-playing and other experiential activities,
supervisors understand their roles and responsibilities in managing human resources.
Students apply HRM concepts in the problem solving and resolution of real world HRM
challenges and issues. Course content and individual activities focus on all human
resources management functional areas.

Leadership & Education Development (LEAD) Course and Assessments (40 hours)

This 5-day, highly experiential course develops and hones fundamental leadership skills of
supervisors. Through individual and group exercises, case studies, role-playing, leadership
assessment instruments, and other experiential activities.

Topics include:

    Leadership Defined                         Conflict Management
    Situational Leadership                     Group Development Theory
    Motivation                                 Team Building
    Communication                              Problem-Solving and Decision-Making
    Counseling Skills                          Values and Ethics

Ninth House Network (NHN)

The following 10 programs are suggested for all supervisors. Other NHN programs may
also be completed.

    Situational Leadership (6 hours)                   Navigating Change (1½ hours)
    High Impact Hiring (2 hours)                       Forging Breakthroughs (3 hours)
    Resolving Interpersonal Issues (2½ hours)          Partnering for Results (2 hours)
    Building Community (2½ hours)                      Optimizing Team Performance (2½
    Reframing Change (¾ hour)                           hours)
    Managing Change (1½ hours)

Peer Coaching

Peer coaching is voluntary, with hours contributing to the Individualized Self-Development.
The DLA Training Center will solicit interest. Interested supervisors will be assigned to
small groups to learn coaching skills from a professional coach.

Group members will then engage in informal peer coaching with other supervisors.
Coaching may be accomplished in-person, through teleconferencing, and/or through video
teleconferencing. This will further networking opportunities and peer support.



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Multi-Source Feedback Assessment

Supervisors participate in a Multi-Source Feedback Assessment. This developmental tool is
a 360-degree assessment instrument that provides the supervisor with confidential
feedback from his or her manager, direct-line reports, and peers.

Feedback obtained from the Multi-Source Assessment can form the basis for your next
IDP.

Point of Contact: Jacqueline Williams, J–12 POC




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Human Resource Issues
Introduction

The supervisor is more than a technical expert. When you enter into supervision, you must
learn about many personnel management regulations, procedures, and issues that may not
be familiar topics. The following personnel management issues are part of the role as a
supervisor.

Employee Relations

The Employee Relations Specialist, Employee Assistance Program counselor, Drug
Testing Coordinator, and DLA Chaplain can help with employee relations issues:

Employee Assistance Program
Drug Testing
Injury Compensation
Serious illness, Injury, or Death of Employees
Workplace Violence

Labor-Management Relations

Fair and effective labor-management relations are essential in ensuring effective personnel
management within the Agency. Supervisors need to be aware of the professional working
relationship that must exist between you and the local union in protecting the rights of the
employees.

Equal Employment Opportunity (EEO)

EEO is sound personnel management. Supervisors should seek to minimize the risk of
EEO complaints by treating employees fairly. They must ensure that all employees and
applicants for employment are provided equal opportunities in employment, regardless of
race, color, sex, age, religion, national origin, disability, and or participation in an activity
protected by Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, as amended.

Recruiting and Staffing

One of the most important jobs as a supervisor is finding and selecting people with the right
skills and abilities for the job. Supervisors need to approach this challenging job in a
planned, systematic manner. The Human Resource office can help with developing a
recruiting strategy, but the supervisors must provide the specific work requirements and
related skills and abilities you need.




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                DLA Leader Development Guide Appendix
Employee Development

Employee development involves accurately identifying the developmental needs of
employees and strategies that can meet those needs. To be successful individuals must
be able to complete their development plans. Supervisors must allow employees the time
necessary to complete courses, on-the-job training, and assignments.

Employee Recognition

Employee recognition is one of the most powerful ways of motivating your employees.
DLA’s policy is to recognize and reward exceptional performance of individuals and of
groups. Recognition is an honest and direct way of thanking your employees for a job well
done.

Leave Administration

The supervisor must ensure that employee absences do not jeopardize the
accomplishment of the organization’s mission. At the same time, supervisors need to fairly
address the personal needs and desires of the employee.

Conduct and Discipline

Supervisors must maintain discipline. There are two goals:

   Creating and maintaining a work environment that encourages and rewards self-
    discipline, integrity and a positive attitude toward the job

   Using authority to discipline in a constructive manner and ensure the rules and
    regulations are followed properly

Performance Management

Performance management forms the core of a supervisor’s job. It encompasses most of
the functions that determine whether an organization will succeed or fail in the
accomplishment of its mission. There are three broad areas included in this job:

   Performance Plans for subordinates
   Performance counseling and appraisal
   Actions taken in cases of unacceptable performance

Position Classification

Position classification is the process by which the pay plan, series, title, and grade are
assigned to a position. Documentation in a position description (PD) identifies major
duties, knowledge and skills, responsibilities, organizational relationships, and other
pertinent information.



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                DLA Leader Development Guide Appendix
Supervisors must ensure that the PD is as precise and complete as possible. PDs should
truly reflect the actual job requirements and current responsibilities.

Employee Grievances

Supervisors play an important role in preventing the occurrence of problems which result in
dissatisfaction and grievances. If the supervisor cannot prevent a problem, he or she
should assist in solving it in a fair and equitable way.

Safety and Health Management

Supervisors play a very important role in supporting the Activity Commander in the overall
Safety and Occupational Health Program. They must ensure that

   personnel are trained to work safely
   safety and health rules are followed
   hazards are corrected, and
   mishaps are investigated.




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General Schedule Classification: Supervisor
Office of Personnel Management (OPM) Guide
       The following excerpt is taken from General Schedule Position Classification Guide;
       General Schedule Supervisory Guide (Factor 3). It is found at this Web site:
       http://www.opm.gov/fedclass/gssg.pdf

      Supervisory and Managerial Authority Exercised:

      Factor 3-2: Positions at this level meet a or b or c below:

      a. Plan and schedule ongoing production-oriented work on a quarterly and annual basis, or
      direct assignments of similar duration. Adjust staffing levels or work procedures within their
      organizational unit(s) to accommodate resource allocation decisions made at higher
      echelons. Justify the purchase of new equipment. Improve work methods and procedures
      used to produce work products. Oversee the development of technical data, estimates,
      statistics, suggestions, and other information useful to higher level managers in determining
      which goals and objectives to emphasize. Decide the methodologies to use in achieving work
      goals and objectives, and in determining other management strategies.

      b. Where work is contracted out, perform a wide range of technical input and oversight tasks
      comparable to all or nearly all of the following:

             1. Analyze benefits and costs of accomplishing work in-house versus contracting;
             recommend whether to contract;

             2. Provide technical requirements and descriptions of the work to be accomplished;

             3. Plan and establish the work schedules, deadlines, and standards for acceptable
             work;
             coordinate and integrate contractor work schedules and processes with work of
             subordinates or others;

             4. Track progress and quality of performance; arrange for subordinates to conduct
             any
             required inspections;

             5. Decide on the acceptability, rejection, or correction of work products or services,
             and
             similar matters which may affect payment to the contractor.

      c. Carry out at least three of the first four, and a total of six or more of the following 10
      authorities and responsibilities:

             1. Plan work to be accomplished by subordinates, set and adjust short-term priorities,
             and prepare schedules for completion of work;


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              DLA Leader Development Guide Appendix
            2. Assign work to subordinates based on priorities, selective consideration of the
            difficulty and requirements of assignments, and the capabilities of employees;

            3. Evaluate work performance of subordinates;

            4. Give advice, counsel, or instruction to employees on both work and administrative
            matters;

            5. Interview candidates for positions in the unit; recommend appointment, promotion,
            or reassignment to such positions;

            6. Hear and resolve complaints from employees, referring group grievances and
            more serious unresolved complaints to a higher level supervisor or manager;

            7. Effect minor disciplinary measures, such as warnings and reprimands,
            recommending other action in more serious cases;

            8. Identify developmental and training needs of employees, providing or arranging
            for needed development and training;

            9. Find ways to improve production or increase the quality of the work directed;

            10. Develop performance standards.

     Factor Level 3-3: To meet this level, positions must meet paragraph a or b below:

     a. Exercise delegated managerial authority to set a series of annual, multiyear, or similar
     types of long-range work plans and schedules for in-service or contracted work. Assure
     implementation (by lower and subordinate organizational units or others) of the goals and
     objectives for the program segment(s) or function(s) they oversee. Determine goals and
     objectives that need additional emphasis; determine the best approach or solution for
     resolving budget shortages; and plan for long range staffing needs, including such matters as
     whether to contract out work. These positions are closely involved with high level program
     officials (or comparable agency level staff personnel) in the development of overall goals
     and objectives for assigned staff function(s), program(s), or program segment(s). For
     example, they direct development of data; provision of expertise and insights; securing of
     legal opinions; preparation of position papers or legislative proposals; and execution of
     comparable activities which support development of goals and objectives related to high
     levels of program management and development or formulation.

     b. Exercise all or nearly all of the delegated supervisory authorities and responsibilities
     described at Level 3-2c of this factor and, in addition, at least 8 of the following:

            1. Using any of the following to direct, coordinate, or oversee work: supervisors,
            leaders, team chiefs, group coordinators, committee chairs, or comparable
            personnel; and/or providing similar oversight of contractors;



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              DLA Leader Development Guide Appendix
            2. Exercising significant responsibilities in dealing with officials of other units or
            organizations, or in advising management officials of higher rank;

            3. Assuring reasonable equity (among units, groups, teams, projects, etc.) of
            performance standards and rating techniques developed by subordinates or assuring
            comparable equity in the assessment by subordinates of the adequacy of contractor
            capabilities or of contractor completed work;

            4. Direction of a program or major program segment with significant resources (e.g.,
            one at a multimillion dollar level of annual resources);

            5. Making decisions on work problems presented by subordinate supervisors, team
            leaders, or similar personnel, or by contractors;

            6. Evaluating subordinate supervisors or leaders and serving as the reviewing official
            on evaluations of nonsupervisory employees rated by subordinate supervisors;

            7. Making or approving selections for subordinate nonsupervisory positions;

            8. Recommending selections for subordinate supervisory positions and for work
            leader, group leader, or project director positions responsible for coordinating the
            work of others, and similar positions;

            9. Hearing and resolving group grievances or serious employee complaints;

            10. Reviewing and approving serious disciplinary actions (e.g., suspensions)
            involving nonsupervisory subordinates;

            11. Making decisions on nonroutine, costly, or controversial training needs and
            training requests related to employees of the unit;

            12. Determining whether contractor performed work meets standards of adequacy
            necessary for authorization of payment;

            13. Approving expenses comparable to within-grade increases, extensive overtime,
            and employee travel;

            14. Recommending awards or bonuses for nonsupervisory personnel and changes in
            position classification, subject to approval by higher level officials, supervisors, or
            others;

            15. Finding and implementing ways to eliminate or reduce significant bottlenecks and
            barriers to production, promote team building, or improve business practices.

     Factor Level 3-4: In addition to delegated managerial and supervisory authorities included
     at lower levels of this factor, positions at this level meet the criteria in paragraph a or b
     below:

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              DLA Leader Development Guide Appendix
     a. Exercise delegated authority to oversee the overall planning, direction, and timely
     execution of a program, several program segments (each of which is managed through
     separate subordinate organizational units), or comparable staff functions, including
     development, assignment, and higher level clearance of goals and objectives for supervisors
     or managers of subordinate organizational units or lower organizational levels. Approve
     multiyear and longer range work plans developed by the supervisors or managers of
     subordinate organizational units and subsequently manage the overall work to enhance
     achievement of the goals and objectives. Oversee the revision of long range plans, goals and
     objectives for the work directed. Manage the development of policy changes in response to
     changes in levels of appropriations or other legislated changes. Manage organizational
     changes throughout the organization directed, or major change to the structure and content
     of the program or program segments directed. Exercise discretionary authority to approve
     the allocation and distribution of funds in the organization's budget.

     b. Exercise final authority for the full range of personnel actions and organization design
     proposals recommended by subordinate supervisors. This level may be credited even if
     formal clearance is required for a few actions, such as removals and incentive awards above
     set dollar levels.




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