exxon converted

Document Sample
exxon  converted Powered By Docstoc
					Exxon




        1
                   Exxon Destroy Records




                                       . . . Our lawyers say, “twenty
                                       years from now I wish you
                                       didn’t have it.” So we threw it
                                       away.




                                                                  2
2/21/84 Sworn testimony Fred Venable
                            Exxon Priorities




This item has been down for repair periods and has been XXXED out of the
repair list. Should we try and have it done again or continue to treat for cuts and
bruises from slips and falls on the catwalk??

                                                                                  3
1937 Exxon Asbestos Knowledge




                                5
1948 Exxon Worker Protection 
   Knowledge Confidential




                                6
1949 Exxon Asbestos Knowledge 
         Confidential




                                 7
           Insulation Removal
• 1937 Bonsib, “Dust Producing Operations in the 
  Production of Petroleum Products and Associated 
  Activities”, Standard Oil Co., (N.J.), p 28, 29.  
  (Unpublished Study)
• Usually more dusty than installation.  Konimeter
  readings.  Chop up and pull off insulation ‐ 6.89 
  mppcf.  4" tar line ‐ 2.32 mppcf.  Breaking scrap 
  (85% magnesia) to be crushed for re‐use ‐ 10.2 
  mppcf.  Feeding scrap crusher ‐ 14.8 mppcf.  Area 
  near scrap crusher hopper ‐ 27.5 mppcf. 

                                                   8
           Insulation Removal
• January, 1963‐Balzer, "Industrial Hygiene for 
  Insulation Workers", Journal of Occupational 
  Medicine, Vol 10, No 1, p 28
• Mean exposure for tearing out 5.5 mppcf ‐
  range 3 to 9.5 mppcf




                                                   9
     1964 Knowledge of Exposure  
         Insulation Removal
• May‐June, 1964 Marr, "Asbestos Exposure During Naval 
  Vessel Overhaul", AIHA Journal, Vol 25, 265
• Exposure during removal (sum 2 to 10 micron particle 
  sizes) –
• Amosite blanket 3‐5 mppcf, 
• Magnesia block and pipe insulation 1.5 ‐ 12 mppcf, 
• calcium silicate block and pipe insulation 0.8 to 2.6 
  mppcf, 
• 100% chrysotile filler and binder 0.8 ‐ 6.5, 15% 
  chrysotile and 85% rock wool filler and binder 1.5 to 
  6.4 mppcf,
• 80 ‐ 95% chrysotile cloth 0.7 ‐ 4.8.

                                                      10
          Insulation Removal
• May‐June, 1968 ‐ Balzer and Cooper, "The 
  Work Environment of Insulating Workers", 
  AIHA Journal, 1968, p226
• Tearing out insulation –
• Mean 5.2 mppcf (range 2.5 ‐ 8.6).  
• Mean 8.9 f/cc (range 0.2 ‐ 26.3).



                                              11
           Insulation Removal
• 1971 ‐ Harries, "Asbestos Dust Concentrations in 
  Ship Repairing:  A Practical Approach to 
  Improving Asbestos Hygiene in Naval Dockyards", 
  Annals of Occupational Hygiene, Vol 14, p243
• Pipe insulation removal (Calcium silicate, 90% 
  amosite, 15% asbestos, cloth, cement)‐
• boiler rooms mean 97 f/cc (25‐220),
• Engine rooms 91 f/cc (2‐490), 
• Accumulator room (area samples) 257 f/cc (9‐
  592). 

                                                  12
           Insulation Removal
• 1971 ‐ Ferris, "Prevalence of Chronic 
  Respiratory Disease:  Asbestosis in Ship Repair 
  Workers", Archives of Environmental Health 
  232:220‐225.
• Tear‐out of insulation on ships ‐ 29.2 mppcf




                                                 13
           Insulation Removal
• 1972 Barboo, "Recent Developments in 
  Asbestos Control Measures in United States 
  Naval Shipyards", Safety and Health in 
  Shipbuilding and Ship Repairing, Geneva, 
  International Labour Office, Occupational 
  Safety and Health Ser. No. 27, 1972, p85‐92.
• Rip‐out exposure 9 ‐ 81 mppcf, and 
• 0.85 ‐ 51 mppcf (various materials).

                                                 14
  I972 Shipyard insulation removal
• 1972 ‐ Cross, "Recent Developments in Asbestos 
  Control Measures in United States Naval 
  Shipyards", Safety and Health in Shipbuilding and 
  Ship Repairing, Geneva, International Labour
  Office, Occupational Safety and Health Ser. No. 
  27, 1972, p93‐101.
• Rip‐out exposures for 3 operations (mean values) 
  ‐ 159‐353 f/cc, 
• adjacent exposures 83 f/cc.  
• Maximum value was 3815 f/cc for sweeping and 
  bagging debris.
                                                   15
           Insulation Removal
• 1972 ‐ National Institute for Occupational Safety 
  and Health, "Criteria for a Recommended 
  Standard:  Occupational Exposure to Asbestos", 
  Table XIII.
• Tearing out insulation (arithmetic mean 
  concentrations) –
• marine construction repair 31.5 f/cc, 
• Light and heavy industrial construction 12.8 f/cc.

                                                16
             Insulation Removal
• 8/12/1974 ‐ Department of Navy, "Asbestos Dust 
  Counts During Shipboard Asbestos Operations"  
  Unpublished memo
• Insulation removal ‐ steam line and valve 26.2 f/cc, 
  block and cement from high pressure turbine 55.6, 
  boiler steam lines 0.5 (special procedures used), 
  molded section and cloth from steam lines 327 and 
  230, steam line elbow (special procedures used) 1.3, 
  five inch steam line 94.4.  Asbestos pad removal 0.0, 
  Magnesia elbow 6.2, bagging waste 291, amosite from 
  turbines 133, cloth and insulation 4.2 (special 
  precautions used), collecting waste 151.

                                                       17
1974 Exxon refinery insulation removal
Removing Insulation from 8” pipe by Exxon employees              15 f/cc
Removing Insulation from 8” pipe by Exxon employees              78 f/cc
Removing insulation from 8” pipe by Exxon employees              58 f/cc
Contractor employees removing insulation from exterior of tank   255 f/cc
Contractor employees removing insulation from exterior of tank   203 f/cc




October 8, 9, 1974

                                                                            18
1974 asbestos removal levels

                    1974 asbestos removal levels




                                            19
            Gasket Removal
• 7/27/82 – Newport News Shipyard Gasket 
  Removal Study – done after wetting the gasket 
  and using exhaust ventilation during removal 
  with needle gun then angle grinder with wire 
  brush.
• 5.8 f/cc
• 29 f/cc
• 9.6 f/cc

                                              20
            Gasket Removal
• 2/20/85 – Shell Oil gasket removal study.  
  Removal with power grinder with wire brush.
• 28.4 f/cc
• 16.10 f/cc




                                                21
             Gasket Removal
• 2/18/87 – Dow Chemical gasket removal 
  study, using chisel and hammer, scraper and 
  power wire brush.
• Chisel process, 0.121 f/cc
• Power brush, 18.14 f/cc




                                                 22
             Gasket Removal
• 2002, Longo et al, Fiber release during the 
  removal of asbestos containing gaskets: a 
  work practice simulation.  Applied Occ and 
  Env Hygiene, 17(1):55‐62.
• Scraping, hand wire brushing, power wire 
  brushing.
• 2.1 – 31 f/cc >5m. 


                                                 23
1950 Marine Regulations

                                              1950
Ship’s master is responsible for safety of 
the vessel “and all persons legally on 
board.”




                                                     24
       1950 Marine Regulations
        Ship’s master’s authority and status




1950




                                               25
       1950 Marine Regulations
       Ship’s master duty and authority in the repair yard
       Chief engineer responsibility and authority supervising outside 
       repairs 


1950




                                                                     26
             1950 Marine Regulations

       Chief engineer responsibility



1950




                                       27
               1950 Marine Regulations

       Engineer on watch shall rigidly enforce all safety regulations
       Engineer on watch shall exercise general supervision over repair work 
       and be present when any machinery is closed up and be responsible 
1950   for correct assembly of such machinery.




                                                                         28
                   1950 Marine Regulations




       Welding equipment may not be brought onto ship with specific 
       permission, and a licensed engineer officer shall supervise the work 
1950   and ensure that necessary safety precautions are observed.




                                                                          29
                   1950 Marine Regulations




1950   Daily conferences with repair inspector to be familiar with repairs 
       and to render assistance. 




                                                                              30
               1950 Marine Regulations




1950   Department heads shall keep in close touch with the progress of 
       all repairs being accomplished . . . by outside contractors.




                                                                      31
                  1950 Marine Regulations




1950
       “…Responsibility of all licensed officers to be particularly on the 
       alert to observe any infractions of safety and fire precautions by the 
       vessel’s crew and the shipyard workers.”




                                                                          32
       1973 Vessel repair manual


1973




                For use by personnel responsible for . . .


                Conveying management’s policies . . .

                . . . Carrying out prime responsibilities.



                General guide for repair superintendents . . .
                                                             33
       1973 Vessel repair manual

                             •Save Money
1973                         •Utilize ship’s crew for repairs
                             •Use Company products
                             •Regular Master and engineer 
                             on board




                                                        34
       1973 Vessel repair manual

        Responsibilities and authorities


1973




                                           35
       1973 Vessel repair manual




1973




                                   36
       1973 Vessel repair manual


1973




                                   37
       1973 Vessel repair manual


1973




                                   38
       1973 Vessel repair manual


1973




                              Repair superintendent to 
                              give instruction to 
                              shipyard workers.



                                                     39
           1973 Vessel repair manual

•
    1973




                             Inefficient activies (such as 
                             asbestos safety procedures, 
                             which add expense?)




                                                              40
       1973 Vessel repair manual


1973

                            Specs detailed but not too 
                            detailed. 



                            Standard specs are encouraged.




                                                          41
       1973 Vessel repair manual


1973




                     Exxon supplies material.



                     Exxon does final review of specs for 
                     completeness and accuracy. 



                     It is more profitable for Exxon to describe 
                     more repairs than are needed, then 
                     cancel.                                 42
                1973 Vessel repair manual


1973




 Exxon specifies supplier of equipment




                                            43
            1973 Vessel repair manual


1973



       It is more advantageous for Exxon to include more 
       repairs than necessary then cancel the work later on.




                                                               44
       1973 Vessel repair manual
                               Exxon has the final word in 
                               any dispute with the 
                               shipyard.
1973

                                   Shipyard shall not depart 
                                   from the requirements 
                                   of the specifications.




                                   Shipyard has clean up 
                                   responsibility.
                                                        45
       1973 Vessel repair manual


1973



       Contractor may not substitute without owner’s 
       specific permission.




                                                        46
       1973 Vessel repair manual


1973




         Exxon repair manual directs that  the shipyard will have 
         standards equivalent to the highest in standards in the 
         shipyard’s country.

         Exxon never complained to NNS about safety and health 
         standards.

                                                                     47
       1973 Vessel repair manual


1973




                    Exxon anticipates that the ship’s crew will 
                    perform and assist in performing repairs 
                    while in the shipyard. 



                                                             48
       1973 Vessel repair manual



1973


                   Captain is responsible for all general activity 
                   both by shipyard and crew on deck. 


                   Chief officer is responsible for all . . .  work 
                   undertaken by the ship’s crew. . . Material 
                   supplied by Exxon to the shipyard for repair 
                   items.


                    Chief engineer is responsible for all activity in 
                    the engine room by both crew and shipyard.  


                                                                 49
       1973 Vessel repair manual


1973


                   The assigned responsibilities include 
                   “safety procedures.”




                   Ship’s force will issue spare parts to the 
                   shipyard from the vessel’s stock.




                                                                 50
       Guide line for the superintendent in conducting repairs
           1973 Vessel repair manual
                                              General recommended 
                                              procedures
1973
                                              Recommended repair 
                                              methods




                                              Correct incorrect work

                                              Avoid inefficient activity 
                                              on wasted man hours.




                                                                     51
       1973 Vessel repair manual


1973




                       Report safety hazards
                       Exxon never reported any re: asbestos




                                                        52
       1973 Vessel repair manual


1973




                     Repair superintendent supervises detail of 
                     painting.




                                                           53
                 1973 Vessel repair manual


1973




Repair superintendent has the last word on this work and his authority 
will prevail in ALL disputes with the contractor.

                                                                          54
       1973 Vessel repair manual


1973




                     Repair superintendent oversees shipyard’s 
                     work in the shops 




                                                          55
       1973 Vessel repair manual


1973




                   Crew assigned to repair valves




                                                    56
       1973 Vessel repair manual


1973




                    Repair superintendent responsible for 
                    making certain that the work actually has 
                    been performed in a satisfactory manner. 


                                                           57
       1973 Vessel repair manual


1973




                   Repair superintendent personally 
                   supervises all repairs … 
                                                       58
       1973 Vessel repair manual


1973




                    Repair superintendent personally 
                    responsible for proper completion of 
                    refractory repairs



                                                            59
       1973 Vessel repair manual


1973




                     Repair superintendent personally 
                     responsible. 




                                                         60
       1973 Vessel repair manual


1973




                    Repair superintendent shall personally witness




                                                            61
       1973 Vessel repair manual


1973




                      Ship’s crew can do pump repairs.




                      Repair superintendent instructs the shop 
                      foreman.

                      Repair superintendent will personally 
                      witness the shop test of the pumps.

                                                          62
       1973 Vessel repair manual


1973




                     Repair superintendent responsible for 
                     making sure that gaskets are correctly cut 
                     and of correct size and placement, and 
                     are of the correct thickness.




                                                            63
       1973 Vessel repair manual


1973




                      Repair superintendent shall witness . . . 




                                                             64
       1973 Vessel repair manual
                                   Repair superintendent 
                                   responsibility for 
                                   shipyard and crew 
1973                               complying with safety  
                                   requirements.




                                   Warning signs

                                   Eye protection

                                   Walkways and ladders clear

                                                        65
       1973 Vessel repair manual


1973

                   Use of appropriate respirators


                   Good housekeeping shall be maintained




                   The manner of removing bolts/studs is 
                   prescribed. 
                                                            66
       1973 Vessel repair manual   Exxon gives detailed 
                                   instruction for  welding.



1973




                                                         67
1974 Shipyard procedures




                           68
                              Marine Engineering Log, July 1967      
1967 Marine Engineering log




                                                             69
Exxon’s First Shipboard Asbestos 
  Handling Procedures ‐ 1981




                                    70
 1972 Exxon Says no 
    New Asbestos 
 Insulation on Ships
•1972 Exxon directs no use of new 
asbestos insulation.  

•No procedures or safeguards for 
asbestos materials already in place.

•No procedures or safeguards for new 
asbestos materials other than 
insulation. 

•Says only that according to OSHA 
asbestos “under certain circumstances” 
can be a health hazard, but does not 
disclose what those circumstances are.


                                     71
But,1978 Exxon Specs asbestos 
      insulation at NNS




                                 72
1977 Specs call for replacing insulation 
   “as original”, not asbestos free




                                       73
1979 what Exxon does:  Specifies asbestos removal 
          without precautions at NNS




                                                     74
1972 Exxon Refinery Asbestos 
    Handling Guidelines




                                75
1972 Exxon Refinery Asbestos 
    Handling Guidelines




                                76
1972 Asbestos handling guide, 
         refineries




                                 77
1972 Exxon asbestos handling 
      guide for refinery




                                78
1972 Exxon asbestos handling 
      guide for refinery




                                79
1972 Exxon asbestos handling guide 
           for refinery




                                      80
1973 Asbestos handling procedures, 
            refineries




                                      81
1974 Exxon OSHA compliance efforts




                                     82
1989 Hammond to Baggett




                          83
1956 Exxon is familiar with amosite 
pipecovering because it is used at 
Exxon refineries.




                                 84
1959 Asbestos Materials at Refinery




                                      85
1964 Insulation materials at refinery. 
               danger




                                      86
1965 Insulation materials used at refinery




Approximately 6 miles of amosite asbestos used in one year at Exxon refinery


                                                                               87
1972 Refinery asbestos controls
                •Installation of asbestos insulation
                •Hand sawing or cutting of asbestos insulation
                •Removal of asbestos insulation
                •Cleanup operations involving asbestos insulation
                •Handling of asbestos insulation in stores operations
                •Sawing or cutting transite or marinite cement asbestos 
                materials. 




               Respirators and dust filters


               Isolate dusty work 


                                                                   88
1983 Should Make Contractors 
           Aware




                                89
1948 Cancer prevention rules of the 
              road




                                       90
Dr. Weaver Rules of the Road for cancer 
             prevention.




  Sworn testimony June 17, 1980
                                     91
Roggli mesothelioma cases by industry

                          Shipbuilding is most
                          frequent source of
                          mesothelioma cases




                                                 92
Former Exxon Medical Director Agrees that Shipbuilding work is notorious for causing 
                                 mesothelioma
                            Neill Weaver Testimony 6/17/08

•   1 Q And the employment in the shipbuilding
•   2 industry is notorious for having cases of
•   3 mesothelioma; is that true?
•   4 A I read reports that indicated that was the
•   5 case.
•   6 Q And you've previously testified that prior
•   7 work in the shipbuilding industry is notorious for
•   8 having cases of mesothelioma later on?
•   9 A Yes.
•   10 Q One of the reasons that shipbuilding is
•   11 notorious for causing mesothelioma is that the people
•   12 tend to be or can be in confined spaces as compared to
•   13 the more open spaces of a refinery?
•   14 A Yes.


                                                                                   93
Exxon former ass’t medical director 
aware of shipyard dangers in 1950s

                       Sworn testimony of Neill
                       Weaver, M.D. 4/3/98, p. 129




                                              94
 Exxon selectively protected its own 
   vessel workers (except at NNS)




Sworn testimony of Dr. George Cvejanovich, May 15, 1996, p. 42-43
[Exxon industrial hygienist, 1948 - 1979
                                                                    95
       Asbestos causes mesothelioma 
        generally accepted by 1964
Neill Weaver, M.D., former Ass’t Exxon Medical Director, sworn testimony, pg. 2184/7/04




 [Exxon was aware of the mesothelioma danger no later than 1962, according to
 Exxon Industrial Hygienist, James Hammond.]
                                                                                      96
1937 Bonsib




              97
1937 Bonsib




              98
1937 Bonsib




              99
1937 Bonsib




              100
1937 Bonsib




              101
1937 Bonsib




              102
1937 Bonsib




              103
1937 Bonsib




              104
1937 Bonsib




              105
1937 Bonsib




              106
1937 Bonsib




              107
1937 Bonsib




              108
1937 Bonsib




              109
           1937 Importance of Education of 
                      worker




p. 70‐80                                 110
1937 Danger of visible & invisible dust




                                          111
1937 Bonsib




              112
1964 Exxon at State of Art Conference 
        on Asbestos Dangers




                                    113
1964 Exxon Knowledge NYAS




                            114
1964 NYAS Knowledge




                      115
Asbestos control proposal met with a 
         thundering silence




                                    116
           Knowledge, response
“In the first third of this century the control measures 
   with regard to hazardous dusts were that of isolation of 
   the exposure to the material, exhausting the dust away 
   from the breathing atmosphere, capturing the dust by 
   filtration or removal, by wetting the dust‐generating 
   material so that the dust wouldn't be generated, 
   housekeeping or housecleaning by using the vacuum 
   hoses or vacuum cleaners, and educating the 
   employees in methods for producing the least amount 
   of dust in their work. I believe that there are many 
   different procedures, and they were all being used in 
   some degree by 1940 in Humble and Esso generally.”
• Hammond letter to Siegel,  1994 08 17, page 2
                                                         117
           Response, TLV, Controls
“We took the attitude that if there was a substantial chance of a 
  hazardous dust potential," then we would not wait until they got 
  above 5 million particles per cubic foot or even 1 million particles 
  before we would require dust control measures and” respiratory 
  protection. This was on a case by case basis, based on the judgment 
  of the industrial hygienist and the safety people. For example, we 
  had not been requiring men who handled asbestos insulation 
  packages in the warehouse to wear respirators and respiratory 
  protection unless there were broken sacks because many times 
  those sacks came in on pallets and we removed them out of the 
  boxcars into the room and they never were disturbed and that 
  required nothing more than just care to make sure they didn't break 
  them. But if they broke them, they had to wear respirators because 
  there was no way to take care or clean up that spill without 
  potential dust exposure.”
• Hammond letter to Siegel,  1994 08 17, page 5

                                                                    118
                 Response
• To clean up a spill wherein we had a broken 
  sack of asbestos, we put respirators on the 
  men. Temporarily in cleaning it up we may 
  have had more than the 5 million particles per 
  cubic foot. But this was not of concern to us 
  because the men cleaning up the spill were 
  protected.
• Hammond letter to Siegel,  1994 08 17, page 6

                                               119
        Response, TLV, Controls
• And since the maximum allowable 
  concentration values that the A.C.G.I.H. 
  published in 1947 spoke to the particles of 
  asbestos per cubic foot of air at Exxon we 
  were stricter than that standard. Also, we did 
  not use any of the disposable paper‐type 
  masks: We used a Comfo M.S.A., filter mask 
  approved by U. S. Bureau of Mines standard.
• Hammond letter to Siegel,  1994 08 17, page 6

                                               120
Knowledge, Response, Visible dust
• It is also important to note that we never 
  permitted asbestos dust to create visible 
  concentration in the air. We put respirators on 
  workers before they entered that level. 
  Whenever that possibility could occur, we had 
  respirators on the workers.
• Hammond letter to Siegel,  1994 08 17, page 6


                                                121
     Response, Educate Workers
“We had the experience of finding that workers will 
  comply fully with our insistence on using 
  respirators if we first showed them that we did 
  everything reasonable ‐ such as wet methods ‐ to 
  control the dust before we required a respirator. 
  But where they did need respirators, then they 
  were convinced that we had done our job and 
  they needed to cooperate and they were 
  required to do so. We furnished only the most 
  comfortable approved type of protection.”
• Hammond letter to Siegel,  1994 08 17, page 7

                                                  122
 Knowledge, Response, Mesothelioma
“We decided that if that was a potential 
  mesothelioma problem and mesothelioma was 
  being brought about by unknown quantities of 
  asbestos, we did not have a practical goal to 
  shoot for except zero. This concerned me 
  because of my insistence that I did not want 
  anyone working with any of the products that I 
  would not feel completely safe working with over 
  a 40‐year career.”
• Hammond letter to Siegel,  1994 08 17, page 10

                                                 123
    Knowledge Response Mesothelioma
“After we were alerted to the theory that mesothelioma may not be associated with 
    any levels of exposure, such as asbestosis would be, we decided that we would 
    start research to develop suitable insulating materials that would permit us to use 
    materials other than asbestos, and we started active research by 1967 with the 
    idea that we would like to get rid of asbestos where and when we could. It took 
    several years to develop that because you have very high temperatures in some 
    refineries where the lines are really red hot; and not many materials will withstand 
    that type of heat over a long period of time. The asbestos was perfect in that 
    respect, and it was a binding agent that was used with magnesium oxide, as you 
    know. About 85 percent was magnesium oxide, which had 15 percent of binder 
    which was asbestos fiber.

•   I did not believe in 1967 when we began an aggressive search for asbestos‐free 
    insulation products that we were putting or allowing carcinogenic fibers to be in 
    the air where the workmen could breathe an abnormal danger to themselves. 
    Nevertheless through an abundance of caution we tightened up on our safe 
    respiratory program. “
•   Hammond letter to Siegel,  1994 08 17, page 11


                                                                                         124
  Knowledge, Response, Maritime
“I should additionally note that we implemented the 
   program described above in the Company's maritime 
   operations. I have ridden on our tankers and barges 
   myself, and in later years my assistants continued to do 
   so, to monitor the potential for shipboard exposures to 
   asbestos and other hazards. Our maritime workers, like 
   our refinery and chemical plant workers, were given 
   physicals at least annually, monitored closely for 
   potential exposures, and regularly trained in safety 
   meetings.”
• Hammond letter to Siegel,  1994 08 17, page 12

                                                          125
                Response, OSHA
“All in all, OSHA had little more than a technical impact 
  and an extra layer of authority over the programs of 
  control and monitoring that we had been maintaining 
  and improving upon since the 1930's. You will find, in 
  fact, that Roy S. Bonsib's program from 1937 is one of 
  the primary resource documents referenced by NIOSH 
  precisely because the program he outlined is based on 
  good industrial hygiene practices and is still valid today, 
  with allowance for improvements in technology and 
  some advances in medical knowledge.’
• Hammond letter to Siegel,  1994 08 17, page 13

                                                           126
         Response, TLV, Monitor
“..Necessary to make dust measurements to know if you 
   were below the TLV.  Use your experiences and other’s 
   experience to know if particular operations were 
   potentially exceeding the TLV.  You would immediately 
   evaluate exposures and you would make sure that you 
   took precautions that would be reasonable, whether 
   wet methods or some other procedure. And make sure 
   that the workers are supervised so they stayed in line 
   with the practices you recommended, and your safety 
   inspectors did that.”
• Hammond Depo 7/6/90 pp 372‐4

                                                        127
          Response, Monitor, TLV
Exxon’s approach to exposure limits was a different 
   approach than trying to achieve the 5 million particles.  
   “We reduced it to the lowest level we could under the 
   conditions that were practical.  We didn’t tolerate 5 
   mppcf if we could get it lower than that. We lowered 
   them to the lowest practical value that we could arrive 
   at.” (455, 456)
“If it was a more temporary operation where the levels 
   could not be reduced far enough, we put respirators on 
   our people so they would be exposed to none.” (457)
• Hammond Depo, 7/7/90, pp 452‐53

                                                          128
     Knowledge, TLV inadequate
• in 1946 when the ACGIH made is 5 mppcf 
  proposal it was at least 10 years behind the 
  state of art in the industry with dust control.
• Hammond Depo, 7/7/90, pp 488




                                                    129
     Knowledge, TLV Inadequate
• Hammond saw the Hemeon report and it 
  contained nothing new re: asbestos.  “Not 
  anything new.”  Hammond cannot say why 
  Hemeon was never published. 
• Hammond Depo, 7/11/90, pp 651




                                               130
        Response, Contractors
• Exxon’s contractors (Brown and Root) worked 
  under the supervision of Exxon’s safety 
  inspectors. 
• Hammond Depo, 7/11/90, pp 652.




                                             131
Knowledge, Response, Monitor. Visible 
               Dust
“Assuming that you are dealing with a toxic material 
  such as asbestos and silica, the amount that you 
  see would only indicate that you probably had 
  many, many fold greater than reasonable 
  exposure levels for that type of material.  There  
  would be no way to see the material unless it was 
  far in excess of the amount you were concerned 
  about.”  
You have to rely on actual measurements.
• Hammond Depo, 7/7/90, p 414
                                                   132
        Knowledge, Visible Dust
• To put a worker in a situation were there was 
  enough dust in  the air for him to see would 
  be a rather cruel situation to put him in.  “We 
  could have a lethal dose of asbestos . . . there 
  would be no way of us knowing.  We couldn’t 
  feel it by senses or detect it by odor.”  Don’t 
  depend on your senses with these materials. 
• Hammond Depo, 7/7/90, pp 418‐19

                                                  133
  Response, Education of Workers
“I cannot over emphasize the educational part 
   of it to get the employees to understand what 
   to do and how to do it and why you’re asking 
   them to do it, and in that manner I had very 
   little resistance on the part of the employees 
   to do whatever I requested of them.”
• Hammond depo 7/5/90, p 102


                                                134
Knowledge, Response, safety program
“The Exxon program as it relates to asbestos.  
  There was a guide in effect in 1947 when 
  Hammond arrived at Humble. It was a 
  cooperative venture on the part of the 
  medical department and the department of 
  safety.  The basis of the program was the 
  Bonsib guidelines.”
• Hammond Depo 7/11/90 p 633

                                                  135
Knowledge, Response, Mesothelioma
• When Hammond learned of the connection 
  between asbestos exposure and 
  mesothelioma in 1962, and became convinced 
  of the connection in 1962, he freely discussed 
  it with his superiors at Exxon. 
• Hammond Depo 7/11/90 p 679.



                                               136
         Knowledge of cancer
• Hammond was aware of the connection 
  between asbestos and lung cancer as far back 
  as 1942, in cases where people had 
  asbestosis. 
• Hammond Depo 7/11/90 p 682




                                              137
 Knowledge of cancer, contractors
• It was Exxon/Humble company policy to tell 
  contractors of a hazard such as the 
  asbestosis/lung cancer hazard. “Yes. The 
  company policy was to do whatever necessary 
  to prevent asbestosis and, therefore, asbestos 
  exposure.”
• Hammond Depo 7/11/90 p 683


                                               138
Response, Contractors, Monitoring
“Dust counts for asbestos were done at the 
  Humble refinery contractor’s work sites  
  during Hammond’s 30 years with the 
  company.  They would be around them as 
  quickly as around our employees.”
• Hammond Depo 7/7/90 p 465



                                              139
         Response, Contractors
• Regarding contractor employees, there were 
  definite policies  dealing with these matters 
  from the safety department, and they strictly 
  enforced them for every worker in the plant.  
  The safety inspectors had the power to make 
  the contractor’s employees comply with 
  Exxon/Humble safety regulations. 
• Hammond Depo 7/7/90 p 555

                                               140
Knowledge of contractors about asbestos is irrelevant 
   to requiring them to comply with Exxon’s rules

• Contractors like Brown & Root had their own 
  safety departments “when I came and later” ‐
  they were aware of hazards of asbestos and 
  other toxic substances [and despite that 
  awareness, Exxon still required contractors to 
  comply with Exxon safety rules].
• Hammond Depo 7/11/90 p 602


                                                    141
Response, Contractors are supervised 
     by Exxon Safety Inspectors
“The Brown & Root supervisors were daily 
  supervised by our safety inspectors, and if 
  they were not keeping in line or keeping up 
  with our requirements, they were informed 
  immediately, even to have them stop work 
  and get adjusted to the right practices or the 
  right equipment that they would need to do 
  the work.”
• Hammond Depo 7/11/90 p 641

                                                    142
  Without exception Exxon’s contractors are 
required to comply with Exxon’s Asbestos Rules
“Exxon safety personnel told any other 
  contractors that came into the plant that they 
  were to follow your standards.  We made no 
  exceptions.  This included telling the 
  contractors about asbestos problems with any 
  job that the contractors were doing.”
• Hammond Depo 7/11/90 p 654, 670, 671


                                               143
 Exxon tells its refinery contractors 
      about cancer dangers
• The connection between asbestos, asbestosis 
  and lung cancer was discussed with the 
  contractor’s foremen as to why they must not 
  have any exposure.   This was done early in 
  Hammond’s career.
• Hammond Depo 7/11/90 p 681‐82.



                                              144
If Exxon refinery contractor does not follow asbestos rules the 
       job can be shut down or the contractor removed

“If a contractor’s employee was violating an 
   asbestos safety rule, not wearing a respirator, 
   the Exxon safety inspector could close down 
   the job or they could have the employee fired 
   or have the contractors remove him from the 
   job.”
• Hammond Depo 7/11/90 p 686


                                                              145
   Exxon’s main Industrial Hygienist Knows of 
      Asbestos Cancer Connection by 1943
• Q.And it was then, wasn't it, that you first became aware of 
  the connection between asbestos and lung cancer?
• A.Let's say that it was then that I became aware that I had 
  to protect the employees that were under my supervision 
  or my plants that did not get asbestosis because in addition 
  to asbestosis they would then become potentially exposed,
• would become potentially liable to develop cancer.
• Q. Okay you had that knowledge in 1943?
• A.‘43
• Q.Okay
• A. No. Let's see. Yeah. Yeah. 1943, yes, sir.
• Hammond Depo 7/6/90 p 250

                                                             146
By 1943 Exxon knows that to prevent asbestos cancer 
      you have to prevent asbestos exposure

• Q. Professor Hammond, you understood, then, in 
  1943 when you learned about the asbestos/lung 
  cancer/asbestosis connection from Dr. Lynch that 
  if you could prevent a man from getting 
  asbestosis you would prevent the lung cancer 
  How would you prevent a worker from getting 
  asbestosis?
• A. It's ‐‐ obviously, you prevent his exposure to 
  asbestos dust in such concentration as to produce 
  this disease
• Hammond Depo 7/6/90 p 301

                                                  147
     Exxon bosses know of asbestos 
   mesothelioma danger by early 1960s
• Q. What was the response of your superiors 
  when you were freely discussing the 
  mesothelioma and asbestos risk with them in 
  the early 60s?
• A. The complete ‐ complete agreement to do 
  whatever we needed to do to eliminate any 
  risk.
• Hammond Depo 7/11/90 p 680

                                             148
       Response, Mesothelioma
• Q. After you perceived the mesothelioma risk 
  associated with asbestos exposure, did you 
  tell anyone at Exxon that the contractors 
  needed to be told of that risk as well?
• A. It again goes back to the fact that we said 
  we will have to be sure that no one has any 
  exposure to asbestos, period; and that was a 
  topic and the basic of our program.
• Hammond Depo 7/11/90 p 683

                                                149
By 1937 Exxon is using all the basic 
      controls for asbestos.
• Q. Are you saying, then, that the controls, the 
  measures for reduction of the dust hazard that 
  Roy Bonsib prescribed in 1937 were being 
  used in 1947 when you joined the company?
• A. They had been in use for 10 years. 
• Hammond Depo 7/5/90 p 77



                                                150
In its refinery any place Exxon could not control 
          the dust it required respirators
“In 1947, Humble was already well established with 
  the program and knew, based on repeated 
  routine sampling, what the potential levels of 
  dust were in the areas where we could not 
  completely control the dust and all workers 
  would have to use respirators. So we had the 
  knowledge to require workers to wear respirators 
  when there was any potential exposures, and the 
  safety inspectors on the job daily, who would be 
  observing, would make sure they did.”
• 1994, Hammond to Siegel, p. 4

                                                 151
   Exxon carefully supervised refinery 
  workers to prevent asbestos exposure
“This monitoring allowed you to evaluate the 
  workers potential exposure and take any 
  precautions that would be necessary, whether it 
  be wet methods of operation or some other 
  procedure, you would also make sure that these 
  people were supervised to stay in line with what 
  practices you recommended. And our safety 
  inspectors did that. They patrolled all units and 
  work areas daily.”
• 1994, Hammond to Siegel, p. 4

                                                   152
         Response, Supervision
“The safety inspectors would know when a 
  particular job was going to potentially expose 
  the men, based on past experience, they had 
  the men wear respirators. The men were 
  under constant supervision of the safety 
  inspectors who enforced the use of protective 
  equipment.”
• 1994, Hammond to Siegel, p. 6

                                               153
  Knowledge, Response, Education 
         and Supervision
“Education of employees began with employees being introduced into 
   operations where asbestos might be. They were educated or were 
   trained in the precautions that were required to work with these 
   materials. The Safety Department made sure that the equipment 
   that might be needed in the way of personal protective equipment 
   was in stock. The operating supervisor understood how to go about 
   controlling the dust from a practical standpoint on the job. And they 
   would strictly enforce those procedures for all employees. And the 
   old employees were already indoctrinated, and they felt a sense of 
   responsibility to the new ones and made sure that they continued 
   to practice all of those features of the program. And they were 
   supervised by the safety inspectors who patrolled constantly and 
   observed and enforced these safety regulations. Jobs could be 
   stopped immediately if not in line with our safety guidelines.”
• 1994, Hammond to Siegle, p. 7


                                                                      154
 Knowledge, Response, Contractors
“Before contractors began to work, we drew it to the attention of the contractors that they would be required to 
     maintain and to comply with all of our safety and health regulations in doing the work. And then, we also took on 
     the supervisors as a group ‐ if there were more than one ‐ and taught him or them the principles that we expected  
     to have enforced among employees that he might have under his command.

For example, we required that they also wear the equivalent type of approved respirator wherever our people were 
     wearing respirators or needed to wear respirators or we thought that they might need to wear respirators. They 
     were required to have those; if they didn't have them. we would in a neighborly way lend them the respirators to 
     do the job if it was short term. If they were going to be rather permanently contracted by us in that type 
     operation, we expected them and required them to furnish their own personal protective equipment These same 
     supervisors were watched by our safety inspectors; and if they were not keeping in line or keeping up with our 
     requirements, they were informed immediately. even to have them stop work and get adjusted to the right 
     practices or the right equipment that they would need to do the work. Safety inspectors had the authority to close 
     down the job or have the contractors removed from the job 

As a result of all the above, during my 31 years with Exxon the contractors supervisors who worked in our facilities were 
     educated by our safety personnel of the hazards associated with the jobs they were going to be doing, including 
     any potential exposures to asbestos dust, where that might have occurred. So, for example, to the extent that the 
     job might involve tearing off asbestos insulation, our safety people routinely would advise them of the hazards 
     that would be associated with that and what they needed to do about it They would make no exception regardless 
     of what job they were going to do They'd tell them about all of the problems that were associated with any job 
     they were going to do.”
•    1994, Hammond to Siegel, p. 9




                                                                                                                      155
Knowledge, Response, Contractors
“Regarding contractor employees, there were 
  definite policies  dealing with these matters 
  from the safety department, and they strictly 
  enforced them for every worker in the plant.  
  The safety inspectors had the power to make 
  the contractor’s employees comply with 
  Exxon/Humble safety regulations.”
• Hammond Depo 7/7/90 p 555

                                               156
           Response, Contractors
• The Exxon/Humble guidelines or requirements for 
  contractors such as Brown & Root, were “that they follow 
  the same rules that our employees in very regard as far as 
  protection from any exposure to asbestos or other 
  hazardous materials.  Before the contractors started work 
  “we had drawn it to the attention of the contractors that 
  they would be required to do this. To maintain and to 
  comply with all of our safety and health regulations in 
  doing the work.  And then we also took on the supervisors 
  as a group ‐ if there were more than one ‐ and  taught them 
  the principles that we expected him to enforce among the‐
  the employees that he might have under his command.”
• Hammond Depo 7/11/90 p 640‐41


                                                           157
        Response, Contractors
• Without reservation Exxon enforced all of the 
  safety regulations that the contractors were 
  supposed to follow in Exxon’s plant. 
• Hammond Depo 7/11/90 p 689‐90




                                               158
Knowledge, response, education & 
          supervision
“What was required by Humble/Exxon in terms of protection of the workers 
  concerning asbestos.  Primarily it began with the new employee or 
  someone being introduced into the operations where asbestos might be 
  that he was educated or he was trained in the precautions that were 
  required to work with this type of material And then, the safety 
  department made sure that the equipment that he might need in the way 
  of personal protective equipment or the operating supervisor might make 
  sure that he understood how to go about controlling the dust from an 
  engineering or from a practical standpoint on the job And they would 
  strictly enforce those procedures for the ‐‐ for all employees. And the old 
  employees were already indoctrinated and they felt a sense of ‐‐ of 
  responsibility to the new ones and made sure that they continued to 
  practice all of their ‐‐ those features And they were supervised by the 
  safety inspectors who went around constantly during work time and 
  observed and enforced these safety regulations.”
• Hammond Depo 7/11/90 p 634



                                                                            159
          Response, Cancer, Education
R. W. Pipkin, M.D. and J W Hammond, MS, Humble Oil and Refining Company.  Humble Oil & Refining 
     Company's Baytown Refinery.  The Medical Bulletin.  October, 1950.
"It was decided that the supervisors and employees alike should be informed upon the exact and true 
     nature of the potential health hazards involved." (Catalytic cracked oils and related materials).  
     Meetings held with 220 supervisors in Feb, 1949. "The scope, objectives, and control measures of 
     the program and the potential skin cancer hazard were carefully and briefly detailed."  "There were 
     no signs of hysteria or marked anxiety of any kind from the employees."  "Employees expressed 
     their appreciation for having been told of the potentialities involved and have cooperated in a very 
     excellent manner." "This program is noteworthy from the standpoint that it has established a 
     cancer consciousness among employees and plant physicians alike which did not previously exist to 
     such a marked degree. This within itself is certainly a valuable development in the field of cancer 
     control."  The company supplies protective clothing, wearing of which is required. Includes gloves, 
     aprons, boots, gas masks, rubber suits, and coveralls. When any employee's clothes are soiled with 
     these oils, the soiled clothing must be removed and, if necessary, the Company supplies coveralls.  
     Protective equipment, except coveralls, is cleaned by the safety department.  Coveralls are 
     laundered by a commercial laundry.  The customer for the oils has been repeatedly given all the 
     toxicological information available about these oils.  An offer has been made also to determine by 
     survey whether the plant is properly equipped and following through on the recommended safe 
     practices with this problem. “




                                                                                                       160
    Response, Protection Extends Beyond Job
•   James Hammond, Keeping Well at Work, The Humble Way, Vol XI No 3.  January, 
    1956
•   "Reassurance to employees that their health is being guarded as closely and 
    carefully as human skills and the best equipment will allow."
•   "A constant watchdog over employee health"
•   "The best equipment money can buy."
•   "Regular precautionary measures set up under the Company's industrial hygiene 
    program will bring the trouble quickly to bay and disarm it.”
•   "During the past decade at Humble, industrial hygiene has been increasingly 
    emphasized as a field of preventative medicine. The aim, of course, is to stay 
    ahead of trouble by preventing its outbreak.  Air, materials, and specimens are 
    scrupulously checked for possible contaminants.  “
•   Gives example of employee with elevated level of lead.  It was found that the 
    employee was using lead paint to spray farm machinery, in his home shop.  
    [Humble undertook to protect worker at home, off the job, from inhalation 
    hazard.]




                                                                                   161
Exxon Specs Asbestos For Tankers at NNS




                                          162
Exxon repairs specs contain numerous references to 
   asbestos materials but no safety precautions




                                                  163
Can’t report a rascal that you can’t 
         see, feel or smell


                                    Industrial Hygiene:
                                    1‐ anticipate
                                    2‐ recognize
                                    3‐ evaluate
                                    4 ‐ control




Esso Fleet News, November 3, 1966                         164
General Repair Specs




                       165
  Exxon crew doing work that disturbs 
insulation and other asbestos materials




                                          166
Engineroom work supervised by Exxon 
            personnel




                                  167
1979 No Precautions Specified For insulation




                                               168
Exxon had the authority to require respiratory protection and 
    Exxon exercised that authority but not for asbestos




                                                            169
1979 Specified asbestos tape gaskets




                                       170
There are high levels of asbestos in 
     Stanley Morton’s Lungs
• Two separate analyses of the amount of 
  asbestos in Stanley Morton’s lungs.
  Date       Result
  1/16/08    26x more amosite asbestos than normal
  2/12/08    34x more amosite asbestos than normal




                                                     171
1988 Exxon vessel is still contaminated 
       with amosite asbestos




                                      172
Earthquake causes exposure to high 
  levels of asbestos on Exxon ship

				
DOCUMENT INFO
Shared By:
Categories:
Stats:
views:28
posted:3/14/2011
language:English
pages:172