HYDRONIC RADIANT HEATING SYS TEMS - MacDonald Supply

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					                    INSTALLATION INSTRUCTIONS
     HYDRONIC
      RADIANT
  HEATING SYSTEMS




Revised July 2005
Congratulations on the selection of Vanguard’s Vanex® PEX (cross-linked polyethylene) tubing and
components for your Hydronic Radiant Heating System installation. This installation guide is presented
to assist installers, designers and code officials in the quality installation and inspection of a Vanguard
Radiant Heating System. This installation guide relates specifically to PEX tubing and components
supplied by Vanguard Piping Systems, Inc. and is not applicable to tubing or components from other
manufacturers.

To assure the successful and quality installation of a Vanguard Hydronic Radiant Heating System, it is
important that those doing the installation read and understand this guide, fully. Since many hydronic
heating systems are literally “cast in concrete”, and must endure a very long service life, it is very
important that the PEX tubing is not damaged during installation or by further construction activity after
installation. PEX tubing is a durable product; however, nails, staples, shovels and other sharp objects
or tools can damage it. Damage that compromises the integrity of the tubing can lead to premature
failure and is costly to repair. Exercising a reasonable amount of care during the installation process and
making other trades aware of the presence of the tubing will help insure that the PEX tubing will perform
without incident for decades to come and will probably outlast the structure.

The key to the flawless performance of any radiant floor heating system relies heavily upon proper
planning. Each system must be properly designed for the particular structure and the system must be
installed in accordance with that design. A radiant floor heating system cannot cure a heating problem
in a poorly insulated or uninsulated building. Since radiant floor systems operate at relatively low
temperatures, are limited to the available floor area and are difficult to modify after installation, the
heating system must be designed to provide the required heat-load of the building or supplemental heat
must be a part of the design. This guide contains no significant heat-load design information. However,
Vanguard’s Hydronic Radiant Heating Design Software is available to assist system designers. Other,
industry accepted methods of calculating heat-load design requirements can also be employed. Do not
attempt to install a system without a proper heat-load design as it invites poor system performance and
can adversely affect the comfort level attainable by the system.

Thank you for choosing the Vanguard System.




2
                                                                                                           TABLE OF CONTENTS
SYSTEM BASICS....................................................................................................................................................................4
SYSTEM COMPONENTS ...................................................................................................................................................5
DEFINITIONS .........................................................................................................................................................................7
BEFORE YOU BEGIN ..........................................................................................................................................................8
PEX TUBING LOOPS ....................................................................................................................................................... 10
TYPES OF FLOOR CONSTRUCTION
   SLAB ................................................................................................................................................................................. 11
   OVER AN EXISTING SLAB .............................................................................................................................................. 17
   POURED UNDERLAYMENT/THIN SLAB OVER SUSPENDED FLOOR ....................................................................... 18
      POURED UNDERLAYMENT/THIN SLAB OVER SUSPENDED FLOOR WITH SLEEPERS (OR NAILERS) ................ 20
      INSTALLATION BELOW THE SUB-FLOOR ..................................................................................................................... 21
MANIFOLD LOCATION.................................................................................................................................................... 23
MANIFOLD CONNECTIONS ......................................................................................................................................... 24
SYSTEM PRESSURE TESTING ...................................................................................................................................... 27
SYSTEM FILLING AND AIR ELIMINATION ................................................................................................................ 28
SYSTEM CONTROLS ........................................................................................................................................................ 30
PIPING SCHEMATICS ...................................................................................................................................................... 31


APPENDIX
MAKING CRIMPSERT CRIMP CONNECTIONS..........................................................................................................A
CRIMP TOOL CALIBRATION ............................................................................................................................................B
ADJUSTING “HCM” TOOLS ..............................................................................................................................................C
ADJUSTING “HAR” TOOLS .............................................................................................................................................. D
ADJUSTING “HAR34ST” TOOL ....................................................................................................................................... E
VANEX REPAIR INSTRUCTIONS ...................................................................................................................................... F




                                                                                                                                                                                         3
SYSTEM BASICS
A hydronic radiant floor heating system is really quite
simple. Heated water is circulated through Vanex PEX
tubing installed in or under the floor of the building. As
the heated water warms the floor, it becomes a huge
radiant-heat radiator. Since radiant heat energy passes
through air readily and radiates in all directions, it warms
the human body and objects in the building without
relying on the conduction of heat by air as with forced
air systems. The warmth that is felt from the sun easily
describes the radiant heat of a floor heating system. Even
though the sun is millions of miles away, the radiant
(also referred to as infrared) heat waves pass through
those millions of miles of space and are readily absorbed
by the skin. Radiant heating systems offer increased
comfort levels while generally allowing for lower building
                                                                   A RADIANT FLOOR HEATING SYSTEM USES THE HEATED FLOOR
air temperatures.                                                     PANEL TO RADIATE HEAT INTO THE HOME OR BUILDING

To provide the necessary heat output from a radiant floor system, there must be a sufficient amount of tubing
installed in or under the floor and the temperature of the heated water must be within a range that will supply the
needed output without overheating the floor. A floor that’s too warm will be as much a detriment to system comfort
as one that is too cool. A properly designed system will maintain a comfortable floor temperature while supplying
the required heat output.

A minimum hydronic radiant floor heating system includes:
1. Water heating unit of sufficient size to
meet the heat-load of the building or                                  CIRCULATOR

space to be heated
                                                                                           MANIFOLDS
2. Circulation pump or pumps

3. Manifold or manifolds to distribute
the heated water to Vanex PEX tubing
loops and return the cooled water from
those loops

4. Vanex PEX tubing loops installed in               HEAT SOURCE
or under the floor
                                                                                        PANEL
                                                                                        LOOPS
5. Vanex PEX supply and return tubing           SIMPLIFIED RADIANT
from the hot-water source to the                  HEATING SYSTEM
manifold(s).                                        SCHEMATIC

6. Thermostatic control to turn water circulation on and off as required.

Generally, additional components are also needed to assure safe and efficient operation of the system and will be
covered in detail throughout this manual.
4
                                                                                                  SYSTEM COMPONENTS

VANEX PEX TUBING
The key to the Vanguard Radiant Heating System is Vanex PEX tubing. The flexibility and durability of Vanex PEX
offers ease of installation and extremely long service lifetime expectancy when properly installed and operated.

Vanex PEX is also available with an oxygen barrier layer. Oxygen barrier PEX is made available since it has been
demonstrated that hydronic heating systems that contain ferrous iron components (steel and cast iron) may
be adversely affected by the presence of too much oxygen in the water. Vanex Barrier PEX, having
a thin layer of oxygen permeation resistant material permanently applied to the exterior of the
tubing, limits the amount of oxygen that can enter the system by permeation through
the wall of PEX tubing, substantially reducing the overall aggressiveness of the
water towards ferrous iron components. For a more detailed explanation of oxygen
ingress into radiant heating systems and its affects, see the Plastics Pipe Institute
technical paper TR-4. (PPI phone 888-314-6774 or go to www.plasticpipe.org.)

All Vanex PEX and Barrier PEX is manufactured, tested and third-party listed to meet or exceed the requirements of
ASTM (American Standards for Testing and Materials) F 876 and F 877, and CSA (Canadian Standards Association)
B137.5. Additionally, both Vanex PEX and Barrier PEX are certified for potable water use and Barrier PEX meets the
requirements of German DIN Standard 4726 for oxygen permeation resistance.

                                                              TEMPERATURE &                         ASTM                                                         INCREMENTAL
   MANUFACTURER              TUBE SIZE                       PRESSURE RATINGS                   SPECIFICATIONS                           TUBING CLASS              FOOTAGE


    VANGUARD VANEX® Barrier PEX 1/2” CTS-OD OXYGEN BARRIER TUBING 100 PSI@180 F   [ NSF-pw ASTM F-876/F-877]   CAN B137.5   L23707 ICBO ES ER-5287 PEX SDR-9 .070 2/28/02 CB 298


               TRADE NAME                     TUBING TYPE                   POTABLE WATER                             ADDITIONAL THIRD                        DATE CODE
                                                                            CERTIFICATION                              PARTY LISTINGS



VANEX HYDRONIC HEATING MANIFOLDS
Vanguard offers three separate lines of supply/return manifolds for hydronic
heating systems. System size, control features and economics represent the
primary differences between the separate offerings. See the Vanguard Piping
Systems Product Catalog for a complete listing of the different manifolds and
features.
                                                                                                                                         Copper Manifolds
The size of the system and the desired
amount of control for separate zones
and/or individual loops will govern the
type of manifold and available manifold
control options. Very small systems having
only one to a few loops may not require a
manifold.



                                                                           Comap Manifolds                                               Simplex Manifolds
                                                                                                                                                                                   5
SYSTEM COMPONENTS

VANEX PEX AND COMPAX-L® PEX-ALUMINUM-PEX (PAX) TUBING FOR
SUPPLY AND RETURN PIPING
Larger size Vanex PEX and COMPAX-L PAX tubing (3/4" and 1") is used for the supply
and return piping from the water-heating unit to and from the manifolds. For maximum
control of oxygen ingress into the system, Vanex tubing is also available as Barrier
PEX with an oxygen barrier or the natural properties of the aluminum layer in PAX make
COMPAX-L PAX a good choice as well. However, with relatively short supply/return piping runs, the
advantage of oxygen barrier tubing for supply/return piping runs is limited. It should be noted however, that some
boiler manufacturers, in order to meet warranty requirements, require that all of the tubing in a system be oxygen
barrier. Consult with the water heating unit manufacturer for their recommendation.



CRIMPSERT® AND FAILSAFE™ PLUS FITTING SYSTEMS
The Vanguard CRIMPSERT and Failsafe PLUS fitting systems are used to
make transition connections at the water-heating unit and at the manifolds.
Vanguard offers an extensive line of fittings to make transition
connections to all types of water heating units as well as
directional changes when required. Consult the Vanguard
Piping Systems Product Catalog for a complete listing of
available fittings, crimp rings and crimp tools.




SYSTEM CONTROLS
Vanguard offers an extensive line of radiant heating system controls. Every radiant floor
heating system requires some form of control for comfortable and efficient operation. More
complex systems, requiring multiple water temperatures and/or remote on/off control
of manifolds or individual loops, will require additional control elements to insure that all
heated areas, regardless of heat load demand differences, are properly heated.




BOILERS, PUMPS AND OTHER SYSTEM
COMPONENTS
Vanguard does not supply boilers, circulation pumps and other system components (such as expansion tanks and
air eliminators). These components are commonly available at wholesalers that supply the hydronic heating market.
It is important in selecting components to choose those that are made specifically for hydronic heating systems and
are of the correct size for the particular system.


6
                                                                                 DEFINITIONS
These are terms used throughout this manual that are specific to hydronic radiant floor heating systems.

Circulator - A pump designed to circulate fluid through a hydronic heating system. These pumps
are generally fractional horsepower and low pressure but large-scale systems may require pumps of
considerable size and output.

Downward Loss - The amount of heat energy transmitted downward from a radiant floor that is not
available to heat the living space.

Edge Insulation - Insulation covering the thickness of the slab edges that are exposed or nearest the
outside wall and extending into the ground and preferably to at least the prevailing frost line.

EVOH - ethylene vinyl alcohol - This barrier is used in the outer layer of Vanex barrier PEX to minimize
the oxygen transfer into a heating system, reducing the corrosion in boilers and other accessory items.

Expansion Tank - A tank having a flexible, internal bladder that can be charged with compressed air
to compensate for volumetric changes of the fluid in a radiant heating system due to expansion and
contraction caused by temperature fluctuations of the water.

Head Loss - The pressure, expressed as feet of head, lost to friction as the result of flowing water
(or water/antifreeze mix) through system components. The total head loss for a zone is additive of
the losses through each component in the flow stream based on the amount of flow through each
component. Multiple loops on a common manifold are not additive. Only the loss through the longest
loop is used.

Injection Mixing - A method of providing temperature-controlled supply water by injecting high-
temperature water from the water-heating unit into the cooled, return water from the heating zones.

Loop - A single, continuous loop of tubing in a radiant panel.

Oxygen Permeation - The transfer of oxygen into a closed loop heating system

PAX - PEX-Aluminum-PEX (COMPAX-L) SDR9 tubing is a multilayer tubing consisting of a layer of
aluminum sandwiched between two layers of PEX and is intended for hot and cold potable water
distribution systems and hydronic radiant heating systems. The aluminum acts as a barrier for oxygen
transfer into a heating system, reducing the corrosion in boilers and other accessory items.

PEX - Cross-linked Polyethylene (VANEX) SDR9 tubing intended for hot and cold potable water
distribution systems and hydronic radiant heating systems.

Perimeter Insulation - Insulation placed under a slab around its perimeter from the edge of the slab 4
feet in towards its center.

Radiant Floor Panel - A heated area of floor used as a radiant heat source.

Thermostatic Mixing Valve (TMV)- A valve that mixes high-temperature water from the water heating
unit with cooled, return water from the heating zones to provide a set supply water temperature. A TMV
can be manually set or automatically controlled.

Zone - a loop or group of loops controlled by a single thermostat.

                                                                                                           7
BEFORE YOU BEGIN
         BEFORE STARTING INSTALLATION OF A VANGUARD HYDRONIC RADIANT
         HEATING SYSTEM, READ, UNDERSTAND AND FOLLOW THESE CAUTIONS:

◆ Vanex PEX or Barrier PEX must not be exposed to direct sunlight for long
  periods of time. If the tubing is to be stored outdoors, it must be covered
  to protect it from direct sunlight. For cast-in-slab systems where the
  tubing will not be protected from direct sunlight during installation, PEX or
  Barrier PEX tubing must be covered with concrete shortly after laying the
  loops. The tubing must be covered within 2 weeks or it must otherwise
  be protected from sunlight exposure. Tubing tails left out of the slab for
  connection to manifolds must also be protected from sunlight exposure.
  Too much exposure to direct sunlight will cause tubing embrittlement, loss
  of long-term stabilization and will lead to premature failure.


◆ Pressure test the system before pouring the concrete or other
  topping material. The PEX tubing loops must be pressure
  tested before being permanently cast into the floor material.
  Also, leave a lower pressure on the loops while pouring to
  expose any leaks that might happen during the pour. (See
  page 28 for further information on system testing.)


◆ DO NOT use tubing that is damaged. DO NOT connect shorter
  lengths of tubing together to make longer loops. Unless damaged during topping pour, there should
  be no joints in the floor loops. It must always be the policy to use only continuous lengths of PEX
  tubing for floor loops. (See appendix F for repair of loops damaged during the pour.)

◆ Inform the other trades working on the same structure of the
  floor loops. Common damage to PEX tubing loops is from
  staples, nails, screws, or other sharp fasteners. Informing the
  other trades of the presence of the loops may help prevent
  damage.

◆ Follow the guidelines for attaching the PEX tubing.
  Fasteners that are too tight or that have sharp edges can
  cause damage to the tubing over time and can lead to
  premature failure.




8
                                                               BEFORE YOU BEGIN
◆ DO NOT fill the system with water if there is any possibility
  that freezing conditions might occur. If the system is filled with
  plain water (no antifreeze), and freezing temperatures are
  encountered, the tubing will likely burst at expansion joints                         SYSTEM MUST
  or at naturally occurring voids in the concrete. While PEX                           BE PROTECTED IF
                                                                                 32°F     FREEZING
  tubing out of the slab is not prone to freeze damage, tubing
                                                                                 (0°C) TEMPERATURES
  encased in concrete will likely burst from the expansion of the
  water as it turns to ice. The resulting pressure increase inside                      ARE POSSIBLE
  the tubing will seek a point of least resistance and burst the
  tubing at that point. Substantial slab damage can also result.




ADDITIONAL CONSIDERATIONS BEFORE STARTING

◆ Do you have details for loop spacing and lengths for each room or zone? For the system to operate
  properly, an accurate room-by-room heat-loss must be done to calculate loop spacing, loop lengths
  and water temperature(s). Installing a system without first performing a heat-loss evaluation of the
  structure is an invitation to poor and/or inefficient system operation.

◆ All floor coverings must be considered for the system to operate properly. It must be understood
  that certain changes in the floor covering can adversely affect system function and efficiency. Carpet
  pad type and thickness, carpet type and pile height, the thickness of coverings such as stone or
  marble can all affect system output and may require closer loop spacing or higher delivered water
  temperature. The system designer must be made aware of any changes to floor coverings before
  placing PEX loop tubing.

◆ Laying of PEX tubing loops and pouring of regular or thin slab should be coordinated with the other
  trades working in the same structure. Once you start laying out potentially thousands of feet of PEX
  tubing in a structure it is important that other trades are not walking on and working over the tubes.
  This is an invitation for damage and may result in leaks if the damage is not found and repaired prior
  to covering the tubing. The placement and covering of radiant loops must be coordinated with other
  trades to minimize, to the greatest extent possible, damage to the tubing prior to and after the slab
  pour.

◆ When considering thin-slab, it is important to locate an applicator. Since thin-slab is a relatively new
  and specialized application, there are generally only a few, if any, applicators in various regions of the
  country. Therefore, we recommend you locate an applicator prior to placing PEX loop tubing.

◆ Since radiant systems use a substantial amount of Vanex PEX tubing, it is important to arrange with
  the wholesaler to have the required amount of tubing on hand when you need it. Wholesalers that
  don’t generally serve the hydronic heating industry may not have the type, size and quantity of Vanex
  PEX on hand when you’re ready to starting laying out loops. It is important to plan the number and
  size of tubing coils as well as manifolds, fittings, ties, and tools and to convey those needs to the
  wholesaler in advance so that the materials will be available. Vanguard’s Hydronic Heating Software
  will prepare a list of materials complete with part numbers.
                                                                                                       9
PEX TUBING LOOPS

LAYOUT BASICS
Each radiant floor panel will contain one or more loops of Vanex
PEX tubing through which the heated water is circulated. To ensure
proper heat output from the panel the loops must be laid out in a
specific pattern and attached at specific intervals. Also, the length
of individual loops must not be too long. The system design will
specify the number, length and spacing of loops. Loops that are
too long will experience higher than necessary head-loss and
temperature drop and will lead to poor system performance.

For panels with more than one loop, the length of individual loops
within the panel should be within 10% to prevent inconsistent
heat output. Even though individual loops connected to the same
manifold can be adjusted at the manifold with built-in balancing
valves, it is better to have consistent loop lengths as balancing
individual loops can be a tedious trial and error task unless individual
flow meters are used on each loop increasing system cost.

Maximum loop lengths for the different sizes of PEX tubing are
shown in the chart on the right, however, the panel design should
dictate the actual lengths used for any particular radiant panel.

Typical loop spacing is 4" to 15" and is dependent on the location of
the loops within the room and the required heat output of the radiant panel. Loops spaced too far apart
will lead to cold spots between the loops and can also require higher supply water temperatures and
will lower panel output.
           85°            83°          85°                         105°         80°               105°

              120°              120°                                  140°                 140°

                      RIGHT                                                    WRONG
                 LOOPS SPACED TOO FAR APART LEAD TO HOT AND COLD SPOTS AND POOR PERFORMANCE.
                          THE SPACING DICTATED BY THE SYSTEM DESIGN MUST BE FOLLOWED.

Each size of Vanex PEX used in radiant floor loops has a minimum bend radius dimension. When the
loops are spaced closer together than the minimum bend radius X 2, then 180° turns in the tubing
need to be swept out to the minimum dimension as shown below.

                                             X                      Dimension X
                                                           Tubing Size     With the Coil
                                                               3
                                                                /8"             8"
                                                               1
                                                               /2"              10"
                                                               5
                                                               /8"              12"
                                                               3
                      X                                        /4"              14"
                 FOR LOOP SPACING LESS THAN “X”, SWEEP         1"               18"
                        THE TUBING AS SHOWN
10
                                                               PEX TUBING LOOPS
To minimize waste, select coil lengths based on the required loop lengths. Vanguard makes Vanex PEX
tubing available in numerous coil lengths and, while there may not be a coil length that matches each
required loop length, a longer coil can be cut into several loops as needed. A little planning before
ordering loop tubing can result in substantially reduced tubing waste.

The Vanguard Radiant Heating Design Software automatically selects the best coil lengths for each
system layout.

Always mark both ends of each tubing loop during placement. The
marking must indicate which end is the send and which is return and it
should also be marked with some form of loop number or other identifier
when numerous loops are connected to the same manifold. A permanent
marker (such as Sharpie® or Marks-a-lot®) is usually sufficient or a flag
of tape can be attached to the portion that will be trimmed off when
connected to the manifold. This is an important step and is critical if the
manifolds will not be placed immediately.

Alternately, the loops can be connected to the manifold immediately but
the loops must still be identified as to manifold position for balancing and
other adjustments.

Individual Vanex PEX tubing loops must always be run in a continuous              ALL PEX TUBING LOOPS
                                                                                 MUST BE IDENTIFIED FOR
length from the manifold, through the layout and back to the manifold.           CONNECTION, PURGING
This is especially important for systems where the tubing will be cast into          AND BALANCING
concrete or other material. DO NOT connect shorter lengths of tubing
together to make up needed loop lengths. Some connections are
allowed in systems where the tubing is not “cast-in”, however, fittings
in the loops must be kept to a minimum.

If the manifolds have not been placed prior to installation of the
loops, the ends of the loops can be connected together temporarily
to facilitate pressure testing. The figure to the right shows one
method of connection the loops so that they can be pressure tested
together. When doing this, ensure that there is sufficient tubing to
                                                                         PEX TUBING LOOPS MUST BE PRESSURE
make manifold connections after the temporary fittings are cut out.      TESTED BEFORE POURING SLAB. A LOWER
                                                                       PRESSURE SHOULD BE MAINTAINED ON THE
                                                                              SYSTEM DURING THE POUR.


                   WARNING! Excessive sunlight exposure will damage
                   PEX tubing! If the loop ends protruding from the slab
                   will not be shielded from direct sunlight within 2 weeks
        of tubing installation they must be protected from sunlight
        exposure. Wrap the tubing with black plastic or otherwise cover
        it to completely shield the tubing from sunlight. Failure to do
        this will result in premature tubing failure.

                                                                                                          11
PEX TUBING LOOPS
             SINGLE SERPENTINE                                             DOUBLE SERPENTINE
                     Outside Wall                                              Outside Wall




                                                                                                   Outside Wall
           SINGLE SERPENTINE
        WITH PERIMETER BANDING                                             TRIPLE SERPENTINE
                     Outside Wall                                              Outside Wall
                                                            Outside Wall




                                                                                                 Outside Wall
Each radiant panel requires a layout that is specific to the
space being heated. The illustrations below show the most
common loop layouts but these may need to be modified
for some rooms.

The rule is that the supply side of each loop (with the
hottest water) is installed towards the exterior wall or walls
and the cooler part of the loop (as it is returning to the
manifold), is installed towards the room’s center or interior
walls. The design may also require closer spacing near
the outside walls, commonly called perimeter banding, to
account for higher heat loss.

For rooms with no exterior wall, it is recommended to use
the counter-flow spiral pattern to provide the most even heating.

At high radiant panel heat-loads, loop lengths, loop spacing and layout become more critical. Please
remember that modifying a layout once the floor covering has been placed is nearly impossible without
completely destroying the floor and starting over. It is better to plan ahead to prevent potential problems.
12
                                    TYPES OF FLOOR CONSTRUCTION

SLAB
Slab construction is well suited to radiant floor heating since the
warmed concrete becomes a huge thermal mass. For most
slab applications, the tubing is tied to the re-mesh or re-bar
reinforcement with zip-ties (Vanguard part #HRCT) or re-bar
twist ties. When using re-bar twist ties they must not be twisted
too tight possibly damaging the PEX tubing. Once the concrete
is poured over the tubing, the ties no longer serve an anchoring
function so they need not be installed overly tight.

                                                 Tie the tubing to the re-bar or re-mesh every                3-4 feet
                                                 along straight runs. At 90° turns, tie the tubing within 12" on each
                                                 side of the turn. For turns greater than 90°, tie the tubing within 12"
                                                 on each side of the turn and in the middle of the arc to prevent the
                                                 tubing from moving or floating to the top during the concrete pour.
                                                 (See figure at left.)

                                                 Keep the PEX tubing at least 6" away from slab penetrations, block-
                                                 outs or other similar structural embedments. Unless local building
                                                 code does not allow it, a vapor barrier (such as 6 mil polyethylene
                                                 sheeting or equivalent) should be installed under the entire slab.
LOOP TUBES ARE ATTACHED TO RE-MESH (SEE TEXT)

Install only continuous loops of tubing into the slab. Starting at the manifold location and leaving sufficient tubing
to make the manifold connections, run each loop continuously through the loop layout and back to the manifold
location. DO NOT connect several shorter lengths of tubing together the make a complete loop. Vanguard supplies
Vanex PEX in numerous coil lengths to minimize waste. To provide for a cost-effective installation, order coil lengths
that are either close to the required loop lengths or that can be cut into lengths that will minimize the length of
“tails” to be cut off.

                                        Run continuous lengths of Vanex pex through the loop layout and
                                       back to the manifold location. Use HRSL3 or HRSL4 plastic elbows
                                       or HRCSL3 or HRCSL4 corrugated sleeving where the tubing enters
                                           the slab. Elbows or sleeving can be tied to re-bar supports as
                                                  shown. Cut re-bar off flush with concrete when cured.

                                                                                      Elbows or sleeving may
                                                                                      be tied on alternate sides
                                                                                      of support to provide
                                                                                      better line-up with mani-
                                                                                      folds.




                                                                                                                     13
TYPES OF FLOOR CONSTRUCTION
Ideally, the PEX tubing loops should be placed about 2 inches below the top
surface of the slab. This is usually accomplished by installing risers that hold the
re-bar or re-mesh at a constant height, or during the concrete pour, by hand
pulling the reinforcement (with PEX tubing attached) to the desired level.

NOTE: All fill material below a radiant slab must be free of sharp objects that can
damage the Vanex PEX tubing. If gravel is specified for under-slab fill, it must not have sharp edges.
Smooth pea gravel is recommended.



                     CAUTION! DO NOT drill into or drive fasteners into the slab
                     as you can puncture the PEX tubing causing a leak. Make
                     the other construction trades aware of the presence of the
         tubing to minimize the risk of this type of damage as it is difficult and
         costly to repair. If the slab must be penetrated, the tubing loops must
         be accurately located to prevent damage.



INSULATION
Exposed slab edges must be insulated for efficient system operation. The most common edge insulation
is 1 to 2 inch in thick, closed-cell Styrofoam extending down to at least the prevailing frost line. The
system design should specify the type and thickness of edge insulation.

If edge insulation to the prevailing frost line is impossible or impractical, at the very least, edge insulation
should fully cover the exposed slab edge and extend into the ground at least a few inches. Remember
if the design specifies edge insulation to the frost line and that recommendation is not followed, the
slab will experience higher edge heat loss, may not perform properly and system efficiency will suffer.
In extreme cases, failure to install edge insulation where the system
design calls for it could result in enough additional heat loss to overrun
the boiler output.

When attaching insulation to the slab forms prior to pouring, adjust
the form position outward the
thickness of the insulation so
that the outer wall does not sit
partially on the insulation.




14
                                    TYPES OF FLOOR CONSTRUCTION
When setting insulation prior
to pouring a mono-pour slab/
foundation, adjust the width of
the trench and the placement
of the forms to accommodate
the additional thickness of the
insulation so that the outer wall
does not sit on the insulation.

Perimeter insulation is also                                                     TO FROST
recommended to promote                                                             LINE
efficient operation and to
minimize heat loss. Perimeter
insulation should extend a
minimum of 4 feet inward from
the outside slab edges and be
                                                                    ADJUST FOR
installed around the entire outside                                 INSULATION
perimeter of the slab.                                               THICKNESS

Edge and perimeter insulation will
minimize the majority of heat loss;
however, certain conditions may
require full under-slab insulation
to further minimize downward
heat loss. Those conditions
include high water table, high
slab heat-load, and high R-value
floor coverings. If there is a
question as to the need for full                                                 TO FROST
under-slab insulation, consult the                                                 LINE
system design and/or the system
engineer.                                            4 FT. OR PER
                                                       DESIGN




                                        The top of exposed edge
                                        insulation should be
                                        angled to provide water
                                        run-off and should be
                                        covered with flashing
                                        or other metal trim to
                                        prevent degradation of
                                        the foam.


                                                                                            15
TYPES OF FLOOR CONSTRUCTION
When using full underslab insulation and securing the PEX loop
tubing directly to the foam insulation, the R-value of the cover-
ing over the tubing increases and system response and required                                          FOR
water temperature will be affected. An increase in the thickness                                       COVER
of covering over loop tubing results in higher required water                                           > 2”
temperature and can cause sluggish system response to chang-
ing heat loads. The system control type or control parameters
may require adjustment to accommodate the delay in system                    COVERING THICKNESS > 2” OVER LOOP TUBING
response time.                                                               RESULTS IN HIGHER WATER TEMPERATURES AND
                                                                                   CAN CAUSE SLUGGISH RESPONSE

If fastening the PEX tubing directly to the foam insulation, see
Over an Existing Slab for fastening instructions.

In some rare instances, the PEX tubing must be placed in the
sand backfill below the slab. Use caution with this method
as system response time and required water temperature is
significantly affected. Also, water temperature must not exceed
                                                                             DO NOT PLACE PEX TUBING LOOPS IN THE
140° F to prevent crystallization of the sand which leads to very
                                                                             SAND BED BELOW A SLAB UNLESS THE DE-
poor heat transfer. Do not place the tubing in the sand below                          SIGN SPECIFIES IT
the slab unless the system design specifies it directly.


     PEX tubing must be sleeved at all expansion joints and every point where it enters, exits or
     penetrates the slab. For expansion joints that are to be cut, the tubing must be dipped below the
     slab to prevent damage.
                                                                                        Plastic Turnout:
                               HRCSL3 OR HRCSL4                                               HRSL3 or HRSL4
                                                                                        Plastic Snap-on Sleeve:
                                                                                              HRCSL3 or HRCSL4




           SLEEVE PEX TUBING AT ALL EXPANSION JOINTS WITH HRCSL3 OR HRCSL4




                                                                                           SLEEVE EVERY POINT
                                                                                          WHERE THE PEX TUBING
                                                                                          ENTERS OR EXITS CON-
                                                                                           CRETE. USE HRSL3 OR
                                                                                         HRSL4 ELBOWS OR HRCSL3
                                                                                           OR HRCSL4 SLEEVING



     FOR CUT EXPANSION JOINTS, DIP THE TUBING BELOW THE SLAB TO A SAFE DISTANCE AT
                                     THE CUT LINES


16
                                   TYPES OF FLOOR CONSTRUCTION

OVER AN EXISTING SLAB
For existing or new applications, a new slab can be installed
over an existing one to provide for a radiant heating panel.
Insulation should be installed between the new and
existing slabs (1” minimum recommended) that helps drive
the heat upwards and insures that the system reacts properly
to changes in the temperature of the living space. This is very
important when coverings such as carpet and pad are used
over the new slab. If insulation between the slabs is omitted,
the thermal mass increases substantially and the system will be
sluggish in responding to changes in room temperture.
                                                                       NOTE: Omission of insulation between
                                                                       the new slab and the old slab will sub-
For the most part, a slab over slab is installed like a Slab system    stantially increase the thermal mass,
except that the new slab, since itis generally only about 2 inches     making response times very sluggish.
thick, may not contain steel reinforcement and the tubing loops
may be attached directly to the insulation with the methods
described in this section. Please note, if the thickness of the            Pour a
new slab over the tubing will be substantially more than 2”, the           minimum 3/4"
system design must be consulted. Too much slab thickness                   of 3/4” slab
over the tubing will cause sluggish response to changes in room            thickness
temperature.                                                               over the
                                                                           loop tubing. (See text)
When installing the tubing in a poured slab over an existing slab,
the tubing can be anchored by:

                                                                                              WHEN USING STAP1 OR
1. Attaching to re-mesh or re-bar laid over the existing
                                                                                              STAP2 STAPLES, DOUBLE
   slab as described in the Slab installation section.                                        STAPLE ON BOTH SIDES
                                                                                                OF EACH TURN AND
                                                                                               SINGLE STAPLE IN THE
                                                                                                MIDDLE OF THE ARC
2. Attaching directly to the insulation with staples                                           FOR TURNS GREATER
   (Vanguard Part No. STAP1 and STAP2) or screw-in clips                                            THAN 90°.
   (Vanguard Part No. CLC3).
.
3. Attaching Snap-Trak (Vanguard Part No. CLMR3 or CLMR4) to the insulation
   with fasteners or adhesive and snapping the Vanex PEX tubing into the
   provided slots as shown in the illustration to the right.

The remaining instructions for a slab over an existing slab follow those for a Slab installation on pages 13
through 16. However since insulation between the new and existing slabs is recommended, and the new
slab will likely be only about 2” thick, then the tubing can be fastened directly to insulation laid over the entire
surface of the existing slab. Attach the tubing to the insulation with foam staples (Vanguard Part No. STAP1 or
STAP2), screw-in tubing clips (Vanguard Part No. CLC3 for 1/2” only) or install CLMR3 or CLMR4 Snap-Trak to
the insulation and snap the tubing into the supplied slots. The distance between tubing fasteners shall be the
same as shown in the Slab installation section.
                                                                                                                 17
TYPES OF FLOOR CONSTRUCTION

POURED UNDERLAYMENT/THIN SLAB OVER SUSPENDED FLOOR
                                                    When installing a poured floor underlayment/thin
                                                    slab over a suspended wood floor, attach the Vanex
                                                    PEX tubing directly to the wood sub-floor with staples
      Thin Slab                                     or clamps every 2 to 3 feet along straight runs. At
                                                    turns, attach within 12" on both sides of each turn
                                                    and also in the middle of the arc for turns greater
                                                    than 90°. When using staples, do not use staples
                                                    with sharp edges and do not drive them to a depth
                                                    that deforms or crushes the PEX tubing. Clamps must
                                                    also be free of sharp edges that could cut or damage
                                                    the tubing.

                             Insulation             Install only continuous loops of tubing into the
                                                    poured underlayment/thin slab. Starting at the
                  Subfloor                           manifold location and leaving sufficient tubing to
                                                    make the manifold connections run each loop
                                                    continuously through the loop layout and back to the
                            WHEN USING STAP1 OR
                            STAP2 STAPLES, DOUBLE
                                                    manifold location. DO NOT connect several shorter
                            STAPLE ON BOTH SIDES    lengths of tubing together the make a complete
                              OF EACH TURN AND      loop. Vanguard supplies Vanex PEX in numerous coil
                             SINGLE STAPLE IN THE
                              MIDDLE OF THE ARC
                                                    lengths to minimize waste. To provide for a cost-
                             FOR TURNS GREATER      effective installation, order coil lengths that are either
                                  THAN 90°.         close to the required loop lengths or that can be cut
                                                    into lengths that will minimize the length of “tails” to
                                                    be cut off.



     There must be at least 3/4" of poured underlayment/thin                   3/4"
     slab over the top of the tubing.




              Do not drill or
              drive fasteners
              into the poured
              floor as you can
              puncture the tubing
 causing a leak. Inform the                                                  CORRECT INCORRECT
 other construction trades of                                            STAPLES MUST NOT BE DRIVEN TOO
 the presence of the tubing to                                          DEEP AND DEFORM THE TUBE. THERE
                                                                         WILL BE A SLIGHT AMOUNT OF PLAY
 minimize the risk of damage                                              BETWEEN THE TUBING AND THE
 during further construction.                                             STAPLE WHEN PROPERLY DRIVEN.

18
                                TYPES OF FLOOR CONSTRUCTION
If interior walls are to be set on the poured
underlayment/thin slab, keep the PEX tubing at least 3"
away from wall locations. Before laying out the tubing
loops, mark out the wall locations on the sub-floor to
insure accurate placement.

The joist spaces below the heated floor must be                        3”
insulated. If the floor is over an unheated space, install a
minimum R19 insulation. Foil faced insulation is preferred
and the foil face is installed towards the heated side.              MARK WALL LOCATIONS ON THE SUBFLOOR AND
If the space below is heated, install a minimum R11                 KEEP PEX TUBING LOOPS AT LEAST 3 INCHES AWAY
                                                                                    FROM THEM.
insulation. As a general rule, the R-value of insulation
below a suspended panel should be at least 4 times the
R-value of the material covering the tubing (including the
poured material and any floor coverings).



 NOTE! Insulating below a radiant floor
 panel is important even when the space
 below it is heated. The insulation “drives”
 the heat upwards since radiant heat emits
                                                                                                FOIL FACING OR
 from both sides of the heated panel. If no                                                    RADIANT BARRIER
 insulation is installed, the panel will emit
 radiant energy equally in both directions                                                    INSULATION - R11
                                                                                              TO R19 (SEE TEXT)
 and the space above the floor will not be
 heated properly. Foil faced insulation or a
 separate radiant barrier can significantly
 improve insulation performance since it reflects
 infrared waves directly.




                                                              NOTE! Install plastic elbows (HRSL3 or
                                                              HRSL4) or sleeving (HRCSL3 or
                                                              HRCSL4) to direct the tubing loops
                                                              up to the manifolds. A 1x4 installed
                                                              between studs provides a surface to
                                                              clamp to. Staple or clamp tubing to
                                                              sub-floor every 3-4 feet along straight
                                                              runs and within 12 inches on each side
                                                              of turns and in the middle of the arc for
                                                              turns greater than 90°.



                                                                                                             19
TYPES OF FLOOR CONSTRUCTION

POURED UNDERLAYMENT/THIN SLAB OVER SUSPENDED FLOOR
WITH SLEEPERS (OR NAILERS)         Thin Slab
When the finished floor over the heated panel requires
nailing (such as hardwood), 2x2 sleepers are installed          Sleeper
between the tubing runs and the underlayment/thin slab is
poured over the tubing and screed level with the sleepers.

Other than the attachment of sleepers to the sub-floor,
installation of this type of panel is identical to the Poured
Underlayment/Thin Slab Over Suspended Floor.
                                                                                              Insulation
                                                                               Subfloor




                 Leave sufficient space between sleeper ends to make turns and
                           supply/return runs to and from manifolds




            Insulation of a thin-slab with
            sleepers floor is identical to                                  FOIL FACING OR
                                                                          RADIANT BARRIER
            thin/slab without sleepers.
            (See page 19 for details.)                                    INSULATION - R11
                                                                          TO R19 (SEE TEXT)




20
                                 TYPES OF FLOOR CONSTRUCTION

INSTALLATION BELOW THE SUB-FLOOR                                                Subfloor

                                                                Heat Emission
Vanex PEX tubing is installed under the sub-floor using          Plates
the Vanguard Part No. HRTP3 Heat Emission Plate.
Normally, two tubes will be installed into each joist
space but check the system design, as some will only
require one. The heat emission plates are used to
fasten the tubing against the underside of the sub-floor
and help distribute the heat more evenly.

                                                                                          Insulation




The illustration above shows the most common method of pulling
the PEX tubing through holes drilled through the joists and into the
joist spaces. After sufficient tubing has been pulled into all of the joist
spaces, attach the tubing by nailing, stapling or screwing the heat
emission plates to the underside of the sub-floor with shingle nails,
staples or screws. Fasten each plate every 4-6 inches along each side
of tubing-groove placing fasteners about 1/2” away from each side of
the groove as shown in the figure at right.

                                                                                                       21
TYPES OF FLOOR CONSTRUCTION

                                          Holes through joists for tubing bundles must be sufficiently sized
                                          to allow free movement of the tubing. Single tubes or a bundle
                                          must NOT fit tight in holes through joists or noise may occur
                                          during expansion and contraction. Holes must not be so large as
                                          to compromise the strength of the joist. Check the building code
                                          for allowable hole size. It may be necessary to have more, smaller
                                          bundles if required hole size exceeds that allowable. Bundle PEX
                                          tubes with only nylon cable ties (zip-ties) such as Vanguard Part
                                          No. HB14120. DO NOT bundle tightly. Leave the ties slightly loose
                                          to allow the tubes to freely expand and contract. DO NOT use tape
                                          to bundle.
            BUNDLE TUBES WITH ZIP-TIES.
                DO NOT USE TAPE.



                  CAUTION! The fasteners must
                  not be too long as they can
                  protrude through the finished
                  floor. Be aware of the thickness
     of the flooring and use the appropriate               WRONG                           RIGHT
     length fasteners.


                                                                             FOIL FACE OR RADIANT BARRIER
Install insulation in the joist cavity below the PEX loops leaving
a 1 to 2 inch air gap. A foil faced insulation or a separate radi-    1-2”
ant barrier will improve heat flow towards the heated space.
For floors over unheated spaces, install as much insulation as         AIR
practical but at least R19. Insulate even if the floor is over a       GAP
heated space with R11 to drive the heat upwards.

                                                                              R11 MINIMUM OVER HEATED
                                                                              SPACE, R19 MINIMUM OVER
                                                                                   UNHEATED SPACE




22
                                                             MANIFOLD LOCATION
Since most whole-house radiant heating systems will require numerous
tubing loops and at least one radiant manifold, consideration must be
given to the location of the manifold or manifolds in relation to the water
heating unit and the heating zones served by each. Some systems also
require more than one delivered water temperature and may also require
remote on/off control of one or more manifolds or even of individual
loops.

For systems requiring more than one delivered water temperature,
separate manifolds are required for each water temperature. Of course,
with very large residential or commercial systems there may be multiple
manifolds for each delivered water temperature.

It is not required to install manifolds in a dedicated space such as the
mechanical room. While that arrangement may work for some systems,
there are many times when the manifold(s) will be installed throughout              RADIANT MANIFOLDS CAN BE
the structure in accessible but unobtrusive locations such as in a closet,       MOUNTED WITHIN A 2X6 WALL CAV-
                                                                                  ITY BEHIND A DOOR OR REMOV-
a wall or under a cabinet. Manifolds can be covered with a simple duct                     ABLE COVER.
grate or more elaborate cover. They must, however, remain accessible
and must not be permanently concealed behind Sheetrock or plaster.

 NOTE: Mounting the manifolds near the area they are intended to serve will more accurately heat
 those areas and be a more efficient use of the tubing. It also reduces the risk of unintentionally over
 heating a supply and return tubing pathway from the manifold to the area it is serving, such as a
 hallway leading to several remote rooms.




                                                                                                  RADIANT
                                                                                                 MANIFOLD
                                                                                                 LOCATIONS




         SOME SYSTEMS REQUIRE THAT RADIANT MANIFOLDS BE INSTALLED IN SEPARATE LOCATIONS.
         3/4” OR 1” VANEX PEX IS USED AS SUPPLY/RETURN TUBING TO THE REMOTE MANIFOLD(S).
                                                                                                            23
MANIFOLD CONNECTIONS

RADIANT MANIFOLDS
Vanguard offers several lines of send/return manifolds specifically for hydronic radiant heating systems.
While each manifold type serves the same essential function, there are distinctions that make them
more or less applicable to some applications.

COMAP MANIFOLDS
                                                                                 Air Vent   Manifold Con-
The Comap line of radiant manifolds is a modular                                            nection with        Manifold Isola-
                                                                                            Temperature         tion Valve with
system that consists of an end connection kit, a                                                                1” FPT Connec-
                                                                                               Gauge
balancing module, a actuator module and the loop                                Wireform                              tion
fitting. The manifold is field assembled by connecting                            Module
                                                                                Connector
the required number of balancing and actuator modules
with an end connection kit. Any manifold from 2
to 12 ports can be constructed from the modular
components. Changes to the number of loops can be
done quickly simply by inserting or removing balancing/
actuator modules.                                                                                    Send and Return Module
                                                                                                     (Black Knob - Balancing)
                                                            Termination Module with                  (Orange Knob - Actuator)
The end connection kit features manifold isolation          Fill Purge Connection
valves, air vents and thermometers and includes
mounting brackets to attach the manifolds. The main
inlet/outlet connection to manifold supply tubing is 1"
female NPT.
                                                             Wireform                                       Return Module
The balancing and actuator modules look identical            Module                                         with Flow Meter
but are distinguished by the color of the adjustment         Connector
knob. The balancing (or supply) module (HRCMSM)
has a black adjustment knob and the actuator module                                                             Euro Style
(HRCMRM) has an orange adjustment knob. Also                                                                    Compression
available is a return module with a built-in flow meter       Crimpsert Loop Fitting                             Fitting
                                                             (requires crimp ring)
(HRCMFLM) so that adjustments in the flow of
individual loops can be visually monitored.

Loop connections are available in Euro-compression
(1/2" and 5/8") that require only a wrench to connect
and CRIMPSERT (1/2" and 3/4") that use the standard
PEX black-copper crimp rings and crimping tools.
                                                                                                            HRLA24V Mounted
For systems requiring on/off control of individual loops,                                                   on Return Module
                                                                                                            for Individual Loop
the HRLA24V loop actuator mounts directly on the                                                            Actuation
actuator module and also provides an end switch to
                                                              Wireform
activate other system control functions. For each loop        Module
using a loop actuator, balancing is done through the          Connector
built-in valve on the supply module.
24
                                                MANIFOLD CONNECTIONS

SIMPLEX MANIFOLDS
The Simplex line of radiant manifolds is a
modular system that consists of an end
connection kit, a balancing module, a actuator
                                                                                        Optional Air Vent
module and the loop fitting. The manifold is                                             (HRSMAV)
                                                             Manifold Connector
field assembled by connecting the required                   with 1” FPT Connection
number of balancing and actuator modules with                                           Recommended Mani-
an end connection kit. Any manifold from 2 to                                            fold Isolation Valve
                                                                                         (not included with
12 ports can be constructed from the modular          Termination Module with                 manifold)
components. Changes to the number of loops            Fill Purge Connection
can be done quickly simply by inserting or
removing balancing/actuator modules.

The end connection kit features a 1" female NPT
for manifold balancing connections, port to install
the optional air vent (HRSMAV), fill/drain port                                            Actuator Module
and includes mounting brackets to attach the                                              (Black Plastic Cap)

manifolds.
                                                         Lock Ring
The balancing and actuator modules look
similar but are distinguished by the fact that the                                        Balancing Module
balancing module (HRSMSM) has a brass cover                                               (Brass Cap)
over the isolation valve and the actuator module
(HRSMRM) has a black plastic adjustment knob.
Also available is a return module with a built-
in flow meter (HRSMFLM) so that adjustments                                           Return Module with
                                                                                     Flow Meter
in the flow of individual loops can be visually
monitored.

Loop connections are available in Euro-
compression (1/2" and 5/8") that require only                                              Euro Style Com-
a wrench to connect and Crimpsert (1/2" and                                                pression Fitting
                                                       Crimpsert Loop Fitting
3/4") that use the standard PEX black-copper           (requires crimp ring)
crimp rings and crimping tools.

For systems requiring on/off control of individual
loops, the HRLA24V loop actuator mounts
directly on the actuator module and also provides
an end switch to activate other system control
                                                                                             HRLA24V Mounted
functions. For each loop using an actuator,                                                  on Return Module
balancing is done through the built-in valve on                                              for Individual Loop
the balancing module for that loop.                                                          Actuation




                                                                                                                25
MANIFOLD CONNECTIONS

COPPER MANIFOLDS
The copper manifold line is available for those systems that require a minimum of zone and/or loop control.
They are offered with Crimpsert connections on the inlet/outlet and loop connections for systems that require
no loop isolation or balancing function and as buildup models that require the installer to join the manifold
body, inlet/outlet fittings and loop valves by sweat soldering the components together.

The Crimpsert copper manifolds are best used where all of the loops connected to a manifold pair are
identical in length (maximum 10% variation) and will provide the most equal
loop-to-loop flow-rate when connected in a reverse-return configuration (first in is
last out and last in is first out). This method yields the most consistent pressure
drop through all loops connected to the same manifold pair. No more than 12
loop tubes should be connected to a single manifold pair.

The buildup models feature isolation valves and balancing valves for individual
loop balancing control. Loop balancing is required when the length of loops con-
nected to a single manifold pair vary by more than 10% and/or one or more
loops connected to a manifold pair are used to heat non-contiguous areas. Loop
balancing is also required for rooms with higher heat loads at outside walls (due
to a large window area or outside door(s)), or when more than one room is
served by a manifold pair, especially when each room has a significantly different
heat load requirement.
                                   Crimpsert Copper Manifolds
Loop isolation and
balancing valves are                     Closed-end Model
available with either
Crimpsert loop connec-
tions (assembled with
black copper crimp rings
                                       Flow-through Model
and crimp tools) or with
compression fittings that
require only a wrench to
connect.

                       Buildup Manifolds                                 Crimp rings
                                                                         required for
                                                                          Crimpsert
                                                                         Connections

      Crimpsert
      Transition                                   Crimpsert
        Fitting                                  Isolation and
                                                Balancing Valves

                                                                                         Copper Manifolds
                                                                                        Shown Mounted in
 Euro Compression                                   Crimp rings required for
                                                                                           2x6 Wall with
   Isolation and                                    Crimpsert Connections                Mounting Brackets
  Balancing Valves                                                                       (HRM5 or HRM7)
26
                                                     SYSTEM PRESSURE TESTING
The system must be pressure tested before the
loops are embedded in the slab or otherwise
covered. As a minimum, the internal system pressure
should be raised to 100 psig and held for at least 30
minutes. If it is a warm day and the sun has warmed
the PEX tubing loops, there will be a slow expansion
of the tubing that will show as a pressure decrease in
the system. Depending on the ambient temperature,
the pressure decrease could be significant and may
require re-pressurizing the system back to 100 psig
and maintaining for longer than 30 minutes. As long
as the temperature remains relatively constant, the
pressure will stabilize if the system is leak-free.

If, after 2 hours test time the pressure cannot be stabilized, then there is probably a leak. Find and repair
the leak and retest. It is paramount to system integrity that the loops are leak-free before covering. If a
loop tube has been damaged during installation it is recommended to replace the entire loop and not
install a repair coupling. Repair couplings are intended as a “last resort” repair during the pour when it is
impossible to replace a damaged loop.

When pouring the floor covering, pressurize the system with 30 to 50 psig of air so that any damage
occurring during the pour will immediately be evident and a repair can be made. Use only a Vanguard
Crimpsert repair coupling of the correct size with heat shrink sleeve covering for loop repair. The crimps
must be checked with a Go/No-Go gauge and the system must be re-pressurized and the repair
checked for leaks before shrinking the heat-shrink tubing over the coupling and crimp rings and burying
the repair in the slab.



               CAUTION! Overnight testing is not recommended as it results in erroneous test
               results. Large swings in ambient temperature will show dramatic changes in test
               pressure as the loop tubes expand and contract with temperature. Even the air
               inside the loops expands and contracts with temperature and will lead to erroneous
   readings that could be indicative of a leak when no leak exists. Always start the test when the
   ambient temperature will remain relatively constant for the test duration.


                 CAUTION! If water is used for system pressure testing it must be protected from
                 freezing if there is even a remote possibility that the ambient temperature will drop
                 to freezing or below before the structure is completed and the system is operating.
                 The antifreeze must be of sufficient concentration to protect the system at least to the
   lowest expected temperature. Antifreeze and water must be mixed well before filling the system.
   Failure to protect the system from freezing will result in ruptured tubing loops within the slab and at
   expansion joints and can crack the slab severely. Repair is very costly and must be avoided.



                                                                                                             27
SYSTEM FILLING AND AIR ELIMINATION
After all of the loops have been connected to the manifolds, that portion of the system can be filled and
purged of air. Alternately, the system can be pressurized with compressed air for leak detection and to main-
tain pressure on the system during the slab pour (see page 27) and the entire system (including transfer pip-
ing and the hot-water source) can be filled and purged at one time. Whether done in one or several stages,
purging is a critical step since air entrapped in the system will inhibit or prevent fluid flow through some or
possibly all of the loops, zone piping or transfer piping.

The system must have at least one air vent device (Vanguard part# HRSMAV) and, for large-scale systems,
there may be several air vents at key points in the system. The primary air-vent should be located between
the water heating device and the circulator pump. This should be the point of lowest pressure in the system.
Open the vent to the atmosphere while filling/purging the system to allow free escape of air. When fluid be-
gins to escape from the air vent, close it and continue filling/purging the system

It is recommended that the system be filled only with a water/antifreeze mixture of sufficient concentration to
protect the system from freezing down to at least the lowest expected temperature. Please realize that con-
struction schedules can change and a poured slab may sit for some indeterminate amount of time before the
building is erected and an unprotected system can freeze resulting in catastrophic damage to the PEX tubing
loops, manifolds and the slab.

Loop and zone valves are important for purging as it allows individual control of purge flow to develop the
needed fluid velocity to force out air.
                                                                       Connect the supply and return
To affect the most efficient purging, each zone and loop should
                                                                     lines from the filling/purging sys-
be purged individually. The key to purging is to create a high-
                                                                      tem to the built-in fill/drain con-
velocity flow through the tubing to force air out of the system.
                                                                         nections on the manifolds.
Circulation pumps are generally low flow and may not provide
the needed velocity. Purging is best accomplished with a purge          SIMPLEX                 COMAP
cart. A purge cart is basically a container for mixing the water/
antifreeze solution and a pump capable of developing a mini-
mum velocity of 5 feet/second in the piping being purged. The
fluid is pumped into the system and is returned back to the
mixing container until the return fluid is essentially free of air
bubbles line. Enough fluid must be kept in the mixing container
at all times during purging to prevent re-introduction of air into                    Fill/Purge
the system. Absolute air removal at the purging stage may not                        Garden Hose
always be practical but removing as much air as possible during                        Fittings

this step will help to ensure a properly operating system.

The Comap and Simplex manifolds have built in fill/purge
connections to fit a standard garden hose fitting. Other mani-
fold types will need to be filled/purged through a different type
of connection. For purposes of filling/purging, a flexible hose
can be connected with a Crimpsert fitting using ordinary hose             Fill/Purge Garden Hose Fittings
clamps. Connect the pressure side of the purge pump to the              Other manifold types require
supply manifold and another line that returns to the mixing            separate fittings to connect the
container to the return manifold. Close all of the loop isolation          filling/purging system.
28
                      SYSTEM FILLING AND AIR ELIMINATION
valves on both manifolds and start the purge pump. Working one loop at a time, open the isolation valves on
the supply and return manifolds and watch the return water flow back into the mixing container. Continue to
pump fluid until there is little, if any air bubbles in the return fluid stream. Close both isolation valves for that
loop and open the valves for the next one. Continue this process for each loop on each zone.

When all manifolds and loops have been purged, the system can then be pressurized for leak tightness test-
ing (see page 27) and then a lower pressure can be held on the system during the pour so that any inciden-
tal loop damage can be located immediately and repaired.

If when the pour is complete and some time will pass before the supply/return piping is connected, depres-
surize the system and close all loop isolation valves and all zone isolation valves. When the remainder of the
system is connected, filling and purging is done in exactly the same fashion as above but the zone isolation
valves will be used to purge individual parts of the system instead of loop isolation valves. When filling/
purging supply/return piping, leave all of the loop isolation valves closed to concentrate the fluid flow through
the supply/return piping and manifolds. After all of the zones have been filled and purged, the loop isolation
valves can then be opened.

If filling/purging will be done only after all of the piping is in place, follow the same procedure as outlined
above but work one loop on one zone at a time using the isolation valves. When system purging is complete,
the purge pump can be used to pressurize the system to 15-20 psig.

Small amounts of air remaining in the system will eventually vent, however; too much air can congregate into
a larger bubble and stop pumping action altogether. Also, some boilers can be damaged by excessive air in
the system.

A flow meter in the transfer tubing is a good
diagnostic tool and will show not only that fluid is
flowing but will also show air bubbles (for clear
meters) in the system. Remember that air in the
system should be eliminated to the greatest ex-
tent possible before startup to prevent operational
problems later.

Each system must have an expansion tank to pro-
vide for expansion and contraction of the fluid as
it is heated and cooled. Open expansion tanks are
not recommended since they will introduce air into
the system continually. Use a tank with a flexible
bladder that separates the air-charge from the fluid.
Charge the air side of the tank 2 to 3 psig below
the system charge pressure.


                                                            A simple fill/purge system consists of a container for mixing
                                                           the water and antifreeze, a motor-driven pump and hoses to
                                                                           connect to the radiant system.

                                                                                                                           29
SYSTEM CONTROLS
Even the simplest system requires some form of control to sense the temperature of a room or rooms
and turn the circulation pump on and off as required to maintain the proper temperature. All of the
Vanguard control systems operate on low voltage 24 volt AC current.

The number and location of thermostats, zone or loop valves, temperature sensors, etc. must be known
so that the necessary wiring can be installed throughout the structure prior to the wall finishing being
applied. Typical control wiring is 18 AWG solid wire but the local electrical code may have different
requirements. Control wiring must not be run parallel with telephone or AC lines or other sources of
electromagnetic noise as this can affect the signal and may result in faulty operation. Twisted-pair or
shielded cable, or running the wiring through grounded metal electrical conduit are options to prevent
interference.

Due to size of some systems or necessity of control features, there can be a substantial number of
control wires routed back to the mechanical room or other control location. Each wire (or pair as the
case may be) must be marked as to the function that it serves. A mass of unmarked wires coming from
different parts of a structure is a nightmare to sort out. Always mark each wire run as it is being installed
to prevent unneeded problems.

One key to system comfort in large structures is providing sufficient controls to provide on/off operation
of not only the entire system but also of individual zones and even individual loops. South facing rooms
with ample glass may require a separate thermostat to turn off the zone (or zones) when radiant gain
from the sun is high. This on/off action can be provided by zone valves (or loop actuators) or individual
circulation pumps.

Since each system is different, there are potentially thousands of control schemes and it is impossible
to illustrate them all within the scope of this installation guide. Instead, we recommend that you contact
Vanguard or the control system supplier for a detailed guide for the control unit(s) being utilized. The
wiring schematics for the particular control being used must be consulted to ensure the proper wiring is
installed.
                          Outdoor             Whole House
                          Sensor                Control
                                                                                                    Zone or Room
                                                                                                     Thermostats




                       Boiler
                       Sensor                       Circulators
                                                      and/or
                                                    Motorized
                                                   Zone Valves



Simplified control schematic illlustrates how multiple Zone or Room thermostats and outdoor and boiler temperature sensors provide feedback
for automatic control of circulator(s) and/or Motorized Zone Valve(s). While not all systems will require this level of feedback and control, even
simple systems need some form of thermostatic control to turn the system on and off.
30
                                                                        PIPING SCHEMATICS
While there are any number of ways to pipe a radiant floor heating supply/return system, and it would
be impossible to illustrate every potential configuration, the schematics on the following pages represent
several ideas that can be used "as is" or modified to suit individual system needs. Also, there are some
basic guidelines that should be followed to prevent operational problems with modified piping layouts.

1) Each system or isolated part of a system needs an expansion tank. As the fluid in the system is heat-
   ed and cooled, and during the off-season, there is a volume differential in the system that is best
   accommodated with a bladder expansion tank. The charge pressure in the air-side of each expansion
   tank should be a few psig below the static system pressure.
2) Expansion tanks are best placed upstream of circulators.
3) An air vent or, preferably, an air separator, should be installed at a point in the system or each iso-
   lated part of a system where the pressure is the lowest (upstream of circulator) and the fluid temp is
   the highest (just downstream of the water heating unit). This provides the most efficient air removal.
4) Isolation valves at each circulator and manifold will facilitate filling and purging and simplify replace-
   ment of a failed or worn-out component.
5) Zone circulators are preferred to motorized zone valves in multiple-zone systems. Installing a circu-
   lator on each zone provides for partial system operation in the event of a single circulator failure.
6) Using a single circulator and motorized zone valves on a large multiple-zone system may require a
   pressure activated bypass loop to prevent excessive head-pressure during single zone operation.
7) Never connect the system to the potable water system with an auto-fill valve. This is especially im-
   portant for snow-melt systems. Unknowingly filling a leaky system with plain water can dilute the an-
   tifreeze concentration to a dangerously low level and can result in a system freeze-up. If an auto-fill
   is required, use a separate pressure tank with a water/antifreeze mixture of sufficient concentration.
   Charge the tank above the static system pressure and connect it through a pressure-reducing valve
   (PRV).
8) Non-condensing boilers may require the addition of a manually or automatically controlled bypass
   loop to maintain return water temperature above the boiler manufacture’s recommendations to pre-
   vent condensation of flue gases and acid production.
9) Size the circulator(s) for the portion of the system it (they) will be supplying. The primary circulator
   in a primary/secondary-circulator system must be sized for the total demand it must supply through
   the total length of piping in the primary piping circuit.


Schematics Legend
The illustrations below are used throughout the schematics section to define system components.
                                                                                                    Manifolds and
                          Air                     Flow                  Motorized                   Radiant Panel
                      Elimination                Check                  Zone Valve                     Loops
                         Device                  Valve




                                                         Isolation or                   3-Way
          Expansion                 Circulator
                                                          Balancing                  Thermostatic
            Tank                     Pump
                                                            Valve                    Mixing Valve
                                                                                                                    31
PIPING SCHEMATICS

Single Zone Simple System
For small, single-zone systems using a condensing boiler, water heater, or when supplied from the
domestic hot-water supply, the system can be piped similar to the schematic below. The floor panel
supply water tempering is through a manually-set, 3-way thermostatic mixing valve. System on-off
control can be accomplished through a single thermostat or may also incorporate outdoor and floor
temperature sensors to offer more even room temperature.

When the radiant panel is supplied from the domestic hot-water system (when allowed by code), the
expansion tank and air elimination device may be omitted. Some systems will require a balancing valve
in the loop return to provide for return-side flow resistance to assure adequate return supply to the
thermostatic mixing valve..




                         When supplying the radiant system
                         from the domestic hot water system,
                         expansion tank and air elimination
                         device may be omitted.




                                                       Hot
                                                               Mixed


                                                       Cold


                                 Balancing valve is
     Condensing Boiler           optional but may be
     Water Heater or             required to provide
     Supply from the             return-side flow
     Domestic Hot                resistance
     Water System




32
                                                                   PIPING SCHEMATICS

Single Zone Using Simply Radiant (HRZCP1) Control Box
The HRZCP1 Control Box simplifies installations for single-zone systems up to 30,000 BTU. The zone
pump, mixing valve and temperature control are all housed within the Control Box. The provided wall
thermostat connects to the control box and provides on/off control by sensing room air and floor
temperatures. The control also provides for high/low floor temperature limits.

When the system is supplied from the domestic hot-water system (when allowed by code), the
expansion tank and air elimination device may be omitted. Some systems will require a balancing valve
in the loop return to provide for return side flow resistance to assure adequate return supply to the
thermostatic mixing valve.




                  When supplying the radiant system                             Supplied Wall Thermostat Senses
                  from the domestic hot water system,                           Room Air Temperature and Floor
                  expansion tank and air elimination                            Temperature
                  device may be omitted.




                                                                    HRZCP1
                                                                    Zone Con-
                                                                    trol




  Condensing Boiler
  Water Heater or
  Supply from the
  Domestic Hot
  Water System




                                       Balancing valve is optional but
                                       may be required to provide
                                       return-side flow resistance




                                                                                                                  33
PIPING SCHEMATICS

Multiple Zones Using Simply Radiant (HRZCP1) Control Boxes
For larger systems with multiple zones, several HRZCP1 Simply Radiant Control Boxes can be supplied
from a primary circulation loop off the hot water source. Each zone served by a Control Box then has its
own floor and air temperature sensors to provide space temperature control. Please note, the diagram
shown is not suitable for a noncondensing boiler. (See the diagram on page 40 for non-condensing
boiler primary loop piping.)

When supplying secondary loops from the primary loop, the supply/return tees for each secondary loop
must be spaced no further than 6 inches apart. This is necessary to prevent unwanted circulation in the
secondary loops when the primary circulation pump is in operation. Additional secondary loops can be
supplied from the primary loop. Please note that the hot water source must be capable of supplying
the needed heat output and that the primary piping loop must be sized according to the total system
demand of all secondary loops.

Some points to remember when installing this type of system
- Check valves must be installed on the supply side of each secondary loop and optionally on each
  return side
- Tees for each secondary loop must be spaced closely together and there must be at least 8 x pipe dia.
  of clear pipe upstream of the supply tee and 4 x pipe dia. downstream of the return tee. This applies
  to each secondary loop.



                                  HRZCP1
                              Zone Control



                               Secondary
                               Loop




                                                6”        4 x pipe dia.
                                               max.
                               8 x pipe                       min.                          Supplied Wall
                               dia. min.                                                    Thermostat
                                                                                            Senses Room
  Hot Water                                                                                 Air Temperature
  Source                                                                                    and Floor Tem-
  (if boiler,       Primary Loop                                                            perature
  must be
  condensing
  type)
                                             Secondary
                                             Loop


                                               HRZCP1
                                           Zone Control
34
                                                                       PIPING SCHEMATICS

Multiple Zone Single-Temperature System Using Motorized
Zone Valves Installation
Multiple heating zones requiring a single zone supply temperature using motorized zone valves in place
of zone circulators can be piped similar to the schematic below. By using a 3-way thermostatic mixing
valve on the primary boiler loop and then adding secondary zone loops as needed, the system can
provide a single supply temperature to all connected secondary loops. Zone valve systems should be
piped with supply and return manifolds on the primary loop to insure proper circulation in the secondary
loops. Please note that by relying on a single circulator pump only on the primary loop, that partial
system operation in the event of a pump failure is not possible.

For even pressure balancing between secondary loops, the connection of the secondary supply and
return lines to the primary manifolds should be piped in a first-out/last-in fashion where the first
secondary loop on the supply manifold (closest to the supply pipe) is the last loop on the return
manifold (furthest from the return pipe).

Additional zones can be added provided the heat source and the main circulator are properly sized for
the entire demand. However, as the primary circulator size is increased, the need may arise to install
a bypass loop in the primary circuit to prevent excessive pressure when only some of the secondary
circuits are in operation.

The system shown below can also be piped to supply different temperatures to each secondary loop.
By removing the thermostatic mixing valve from the primary loop and installing one on each secondary
loop as required.




 NOTE! Large systems with numberous                  Service Valves
 zones may require pressure controlled                (Optional)
 primary bypass loop to prevent exces-
 sive pressure.




                     Hot     Mixed


 Condensing          Cold                   Supply
 Boiler Water
 Heater or Sup-                                               Return
 ply from the                   Balancing valve is optional
 Domestic Hot                   but may be required to
 Water System                   provide return-side flow
                                resistance
                                                                                                     35
PIPING SCHEMATICS

Multiple Zone Single-Temperature System Installation
Multiple heating zones requiring a single zone supply temperature can be piped similar to the schematic
below. By using a 3-way thermostatic mixing valve on the primary boiler loop and then adding secondary
zone loops as needed, the system can provide a single supply temperature to all connected secondary
loops.

When supplying secondary loops from the primary loop, the supply/return tees for each secondary loop
must be spaced no further than 6 inches apart. This is necessary to prevent unwanted circulation in the
secondary loops when the primary circulation pump is in operation. Additional secondary loops can be
supplied from the primary loop. Please note that the hot water source must be capable of supplying
the needed heat output and that the primary piping loop must be sized according to the total system
demand of all secondary loops.

Some points to remember when installing this type of system
- Check valves must be installed on the supply side of each secondary loop and optionally on each
  return side
- Tees for each secondary loop must be spaced closely together and there must be at least 8 x pipe dia.
  of clear pipe upstream of the supply tee and 4 x pipe dia. downstream of the return tee. This applies
  to each secondary loop.




                                Secondary
                                Loop

                                   8 x pipe
                                   dia. min.


                                 Hot

                                         Mixed
                                                  6”
                                                 max.
                                                         4x
                                                        pipe
                                                        dia.
                                                        min.

   Condensing                          Cold
   Boiler Water
    Heater or
   Supply from
  the Domestic                                                 Secondary
    Hot Water                          Primary Loop            Loop
     System

                        Balancing valve is optional but may be required
                        to provide return-side flow resistance

36
                                                                    PIPING SCHEMATICS

Multiple Zone Multi-Temperature System Installation
Multiple heating zones requiring multiple zone supply temperatures can be piped similar to the
schematic below. By using a primary boiler loop and then adding secondary zone loops as needed, the
system can provide two or more zone temperatures by installing a 3-way thermostatic tempering valve
on each secondary loop that requires a different temperature than the primary loop.

When supplying secondary loops from the primary loop, the supply/return tees for each secondary loop
must be spaced no further than 6 inches apart. This is necessary to prevent unwanted circulation in the
secondary loops when the primary circulation pump is in operation. Additional secondary loops can be
supplied from the primary loop. Please note that the hot water source must be capable of supplying
the needed heat output and that the primary piping loop must be sized according to the total system
demand of all secondary loops.

Some points to remember when installing this type of system
- Check valves must be installed on the supply side of each secondary loop and optionally on each
  return side
- Tees for each secondary loop must be spaced closely together and there must be at least 8 x pipe dia.
  of clear pipe upstream of the supply tee and 4 x pipe dia. downstream of the return tee. This applies
  to each secondary loop.


                                                     Hot    Mixed
    Multiple supply water temperatures
    are achieved with 3-way thermo-                  Cold
    static mixing valves as needed for
    different supply temperatures.




                            Secondary
                            Loop



                                               6”
                                              max.
                                                      4x
                                  8 x pipe           pipe
                                  dia. min.          dia.
                                                     min.
                      Primary Loop
 Condensing Boiler
  Water Heater or
  Supply from the
   Domestic Hot
   Water System

                                                             Secondary
                                                             Loop


                                                                                                     37
PIPING SCHEMATICS

4-Way Mixing Valve Installation
A motorized 4-way mixing valve provides automatic control of both loop supply water temperature and
return boiler water temperature and is best suited to a non-condensing boiler but can also be used on
condensing boilers. By sensing the temperatures of the loop supply and boiler return, the control ad-
justs the position of the 4-way valve through the 4-way valve motor. Loop supply and boiler return are
constantly adjusted to maintain the correct temperatures. The 4-way valve must be connected to the
primary circulation loop through closely spaced tees not more than 6” apart.

The control may also be equipped with an outdoor sensor to provide anticipation control based on out-
door temperatures.




                                                         Outdoor Sensor
                                                           (if equipped)



                                                                    Heated Loop
                                                                      Supply                 Supply Sensor



                                                                                               Control



                                                                                       Valve Motor


                                                                                       Cooled Loop
                                                                                       Return



          Condensing
            Boiler                                                            4-Way Valve




                                             Boiler Return Sensor




38
                                                               PIPING SCHEMATICS

Variable Speed Injection Pump Installation
A Variable Speed Injection Pump is another method of providing tempered water from higher tempera-
ture boiler water. Injection mixing can be used to temper an entire single temperature primary loop by
connecting it to a circulating boiler loop, or can be used to temper a secondary loop when connected to
a primary loop.

The injection pump is controlled by a temperature sensor on the tempered loop and the speed of the
pump is varied to inject enough higher temperature water into the cooled return water to achieve the
desired mix.

A flow restriction valve is generally required on the injection return line to increase headloss in the circuit
to match the pump’s output curve.




                                                                        Loop or
                                         Temperature Sensor
                                                                        Zone Sup-
                                                                        ply

                               Variable Speed
                               Injection Pump



                            Heated
                            Supply




                                                                        Primary or
                         Primary or
                                                                        Secondary
                        Boiler Loop
                                                                        Loop




                                                                        Loop or
                                                  Flow
                             Boiler                                     Zone
                                                Restriction
                            Return                                      Return
                                                  Valve




                                                                                                           39
PIPING SCHEMATICS

Non-Condensing Boiler Installation
Conventional, non-condensing boilers need protection of the return water temperature to prevent flue-
gas condensation that can result in corrosion and lead to premature boiler failure. For non-condensing
boilers, a 3-way thermostatic mixing valve can be piped as shown above. The mixing valve can be set
to provide a tempered return water to the boiler to prevent flue-gas condensation from too cold return
water. Consult the boiler manufacturers recommendations to set the mixing valve.

The remainder of the simple or primary/secondary system is piped the same as shown on the pro-
ceeding schematics.




                                                                                  Heated primary
                                                                                  loop supply

                                                              Hot         Cold
                                                                                   Cooled primary
                                                                                   loop supply

                                                                        Mixed




        Non-condensing Boiler




40
                                                            PIPING SCHEMATICS

Thermal Trap Installation
While not required, flow-check valves on the return side of secondary loops will further prevent un-
wanted circulation of the secondary loop during off-times even though the primary loop is operating. As
an alternative to a flow check on the return side only, a thermal trap as shown below can be installed.
The leg must dip at least 18 inches below the primary loop line to be effective.

Whether a thermal loop is used or not, the same close spacing of secondary loop supply/return tees
must be followed (maximum 6 inches). Also, a drain fitting may be fitted to the bottom of the thermal
trap to facilitate draining.




     Heated primary
     loop supply

                          18”                       Thermal traps can replace flow-check
                          Min.                      valves on secondary loop return lines.




                                                                                                     41
APPENDIX A

MAKING CRIMPSERT CRIMP CONNECTIONS
Follow these instructions carefully to ensure proper crimp connections.
 1.
                                                     2.                                         4.


                                                      Slide the correct
                                                      size crimp ring
                                                      over the tubing end.
  The tubing should be cut squarely and evenly
  without burrs. Uneven, jagged or irregular cuts
  will produce unsatisfactory connections.                                                                              90°
                                                                             1
                                                                                 /8 to 1/4”
                                                      3.
     CORRECT
                                                                                                4. The ring must be attached
                                                                                                straight. Center the crimping tool
                                                      Insert the fitting into the pipe to the    jaws exactly over the ring. Keep
                                                      shoulder or tube stop. Position the       the tool at 90° and close the
                                                      ring 1/8” to 1/4” from the end of the     handles completely.
                               INCORRECT              tubing.                                   DO NOT CRIMP TWICE.



 5.                                                                 6.                             You have a good crimp if the
                                                                                                   GO gauge fits the ring and the
 When checking crimps with a                                                                       NO GO does not.
 GO/NO GO gauge, push the
 gauge STRAIGHT DOWN over the                                                                      You have a bad crimp if the
 crimped ring. NEVER slide the                                                                     GO gauge does not fit the ring
 gauge in from the side. Do not                                                                    or the NO GO gauge does fit.
 attempt to gauge the crimp at the
 jaw overlap area. The overlap area                                  Bad crimps must be cut out of the tubing and replaced.
 is indicated by a slight removal of
                                                                     If you check the crimps with a micrometer or caliper, use the
 the blackening treatment.                                           dimensions shown below.


                                              CRIMP DIAMETER DIMENSIONS
                                  Crimp outside diameters should fall within these dimensions
                                        when measured with a micrometer or caliper.

                                       RING SIZE           MINIMUM                   MAXIMUM
                                          3/8”              0.580”                    0.595”
                                          1/2”              0.700”                    0.715”
                                          5/8"              0.815"                    0.830"
                                          3/4”              0.945”                    0.960”
                                           1”               1.175”                    1.190”
                                         1 1/4”             1.431                     1.445
42
                                                                           APPENDIX B

                                                 DAILY TOOL CALIBRATION CHECK
Check tool calibration at least twice daily.
Vanguard recommends at least the first and           1.
last crimp of the day.

Accurately adjusted crimping tools are critical
to the success of this fitting system. If the
crimped rings do not gauge properly, the tool
needs adjustment. The method for checking            Assemble and
the crimping tool for proper calibration is:         crimp a fitting (see page 5).



  2.                  Slide the correct size        3.   If the “GO” side of the gauge fails
                      “GO” side of the crimp             to slide over the ring, the crimp tool
                      gauge over the crimp               requires calibration (ring is under
                      ring in at least FOUR              crimped).
                      places. DO NOT gauge
                      the crimp at the jaw               REMEMBER: A crimp tool which has
                      overlap area.                      worn parts may not calibrate. Return
                                                         worn tools for repair or replacement.




                    If the “GO” side slides over    5.   If the “NO GO” side of the gauge
  4.                the crimp ring, attempt to           slides over the crimp ring, the crimp
                    slide the correct size “NO           tool requires calibration (ring is over-
                    GO” side of the gauge over           crimped).
                    the crimp ring in at least
                    four places.                         REMEMBER: A crimp tool which
                                                         requires frequent calibration may
                    DO NOT gauge
                                                         require repair or replacement.
                    the crimp at the jaw over-
                    lap area.




                                                                                                    43
APPENDIX C

ADJUSTING “HCM” TOOLS
The HCM compact crimp tools are generally not capable of over-crimping (the “NO GO” gauge fits
over the crimped ring). However, normal wear may cause the crimp size to increase to above the
maximum allowed (the “GO” gauge does NOT fit). Tools manufactured prior to December 1996 must
be returned for calibration if they do not crimp to the dimensions shown on page 5. Tools manufac-
tured after that date have an adjustment feature built in and are easily identified by a hex head on the
back-pin, see Figure 1. These tools may be adjusted to decrease the crimp diameter up to five times.

When an HCM crimp tool requires adjustment to a smaller crimp dimension, note the
number to which the line on the hex head of the back pin points. (See Figure 1)
                                                                                       Remove
Carefully remove the retaining clip by inserting a small flat
                                                               Figure 1    Back Pin Retaining Clip
blade screwdriver in the loop of the clip and turning the
screwdriver.

From the clip end of the back pin, push it towards the tool
body until the hex head on the other end of the pin just
clears the body.


          CAUTION! The retaining clip is made from spring
          steel and may fly off of the pin if not removed carefully,
          possibly causing eye damage and loss of the clip.


Rotate the pin until the line on the hex head points to the next higher number on the frame. Push the
pin back into the frame and replace the retaining clip.




                To reduce crimp size, rotate Back Pin to Next Higher Number

Crimp a test joint and check the crimped ring for proper sizing with a GO/NO GO gauge or by mea-
surement (see page 5). Severely worn tools may require further adjustment. As the tool continues to
wear with use, simply repeat these instructions as required.




44
                                                                              APPENDIX D

                                                                 ADJUSTING “HAR” TOOLS
An accurately adjusted crimping tool is critical to the
success of this fitting system. If the crimped rings do
not gauge properly, the tool needs adjustment.                                                    HAR TOOL


The method for adjusting the HAR tool is:


   1.                                                     2.
  Open the                                                Note the position of
  tool handles.                                           the notched head of
                                                          the adjustment cam
                                                          in relation to the
                                                          Phillips-head
                                                          retaining screw.
                                                                                         Retaining
                                                                                          Screw

                                                                                 Adjustment Cam




  3.                                                      4.   Test the tool by crimping a joint and
  Carefully remove the                                         checking the crimped ring with the
  retaining screw and                                          “GO” gauge. If the “GO” gauge slides
  rotate the cam coun-                                         over the ring then no further adjust-
  ter-clockwise slightly                                       ment is needed. If the “GO” gauge
  until the retaining                                          will not slide over the crimped ring,
  screw can be in-                                             then repeat the adjustment by rotat-
  stalled in the other                                         ing the adjustment screw counter-
  threaded hole. This                                          clockwise an additional 1/2 notch
                         Reinstall Retaining
  provides about 1/2           Screw                           and reinstalling the retaining screw
  notch of adjustment.                                         in the other threaded hole.

              A tool adjusted to the middle of the crimp diameter range
                      may reduce the frequency of calibrations.




                                                                                                        45
APPENDIX E

ADJUSTING “HAR34ST” TOOL
An accurately adjusted crimping
tool is critical to the success of
an insert fitting system. If the                                                  HAR34ST TOOL
crimped rings do not gauge
properly, the tools need adjustment.

The method for adjusting the HAR34ST tool is:


 1.                           Open the han-         2.        If the “NO GO” gauge slides over
                              dles and loosen                 the ring (crimp is too small) or if
                              the BOTTOM ad-                  the crimp measures smaller than
                              justment screw                  the minimum dimension (page
                              with the correct                 5), loosen the TOP adjustment
                              size hex key                      screw 1/4 turn. Then tighten the
                              wrench.                                      BOTTOM
                                                                           adjustment screw.




 3.   If the “GO” portion of the gauge will not     4.   Crimp a new joint after each ad-
      slide over the ring (crimp is too large) or        justment. Repeat the adjustment
                 the crimp measures larger than          as necessary to calibrate the tool.
                 the maximum dimension (page             The “GO” gauge shall slide over
                 5), tighten the TOP adjustment          the crimped ring, the “NO GO”
                 screw 1/4 turn. Then tighten the        shall not slide over the crimped
                            BOTTOM adjustment            ring, or the crimp measures
                            screw.                       within the dimensions shown on
                                                         page 5.


             A tool adjusted to the middle of the crimp diameter range
                     may reduce the frequency of calibrations.




46
                                                                                                APPENDIX F

                                                                   VANEX SERIES PEX REPAIR KIT
The Vanguard XLHRK3 (1/2”) and XLHRK4 (3/4”) field                        connection. Recheck the crimps with the GO/NO-
repair kits are for Vanex series PEX tubing in slab-on-grade             GO gauge. Do not proceed until both of the crimps
installations. While the best policy is to use only continu-             pass the gauging test.
ous lengths of tubing for plumbing lines, extenuating
circumstances may dictate that a line be repaired due to a           4) Pressurize the repaired loop and check for leaks.
kink, puncture or other damage. If the line is damaged in               We recommend a pressure of 100 psig and a mini-
more than one location, we strongly recommend that the                  mum time of 15 minutes. If the joint passes both
entire line be replaced. Undamaged lengths of the re-                   a gauging and a pressure test proceed to the next
placed line can be further utilized by cutting out the dam-             step. If the connection fails either test, cut out the
aged section and using the remaining length(s) for other,               connection, make any necessary tool adjustment
shorter line(s). Please read and understand these instruc-              and remake the connection.
tions before attempting a repair. Failure to follow these
guidelines may result in leakage or failure of the repair. It is     5) Slide the length of heat-shrink tubing over the re-
the responsibility of the user to read and understand these             pair joint so that it is approximately centered. See
instructions in their entirety prior to attempting a repair.            Figure 2

    1) Make a clean cut on both sides of the damaged                 Figure 2
       area. Cut the tubing cleanly and square.
                                                                     6) Using a heat-gun on the low setting, apply heat
    2)    Slide the provided, 1” heat shrink tubing onto                to the shrink tube evenly with a constant motion.
         one end of the cut PEX and back a few inches.                  Never use an open flame! Continue heating until
                                                                        the shrink tube conforms to the shape of the joint
         Slide the provided crimp rings onto each end of                and pulls down snugly around the tubing. See
         the cut PEX and insert the fitting into both tubes              Figure 3.
         until the ends contact the tube stop on the fitting.
         Position each crimp ring 1/8” to 1/4” from the              Figure 3
         end of the tubing. See Figure 1
                                                                     7) The repair should be allowed to cool for a few
    Figure 1                                                            minutes before final placement of tubing.

    3) Using the correct size PEX crimping tool, crimp
       each ring while holding the tool at a 90° angle to
       the tube with the jaws of the tool centered over
       the ring. After completing both crimps, check
       each one using the GO/NO-GO gauge (HAC34),.
       The GO portion of the gauge must slide over the
       crimped ring (except at the jaw overlap area) and
       the NO-GO portion of the gauge must not slide
       over the ring. If either or both of the completed
       crimps fail to pass a GO/NO-GO gauging, the con-
       nection must be cut out completely and replaced.
       Use a new fitting and crimp rings and trim back
       the PEX tubing on both sides to eliminate the
       previously crimped portions. Make any necessary
       adjustments to the crimp tool and remake the
                                                                                                                               47
          CONTINENTAL UNITED STATES

        1-800-775-5039
            OUTSIDE UNITED STATES

         888-747-3739
                    FAX
        1-800-775-4068
     www.vanguardpipe.com




         901 N. Vanguard Street
         McPherson, KS 67460




                                      QHMN02VS 7.05
48