vwl einfuehrung in die volkswirtschaftslehre fs by sanmelody

VIEWS: 164 PAGES: 75

									Contents
5 Elasticity and its Application .............................................................................................................. 12
The Elasticity of Demand ...................................................................................................................... 12
   The Price Elasticity of Demand and Its Determinants ...................................................................... 12
       Availability of Close Substitutes .................................................................................................... 12
       Necessities Versus Luxuries .......................................................................................................... 12
       Definition of the Market ............................................................................................................... 12
       Time Horizon ................................................................................................................................. 12
   Computing the Price Elasticity of Demand ....................................................................................... 13
   The Midpoint Method....................................................................................................................... 13
   The Variety of Demand Curves ......................................................................................................... 13
   Total Revenue and the Price Elasticity of Demand ........................................................................... 13
   Elasticity and Total Revenue along a Linear Demand Curve ............................................................. 13
   Other Demand Elasticities................................................................................................................. 14
       The Income Elasticity of Demand ................................................................................................. 14
       The Cross-Price Elasticity of Demand............................................................................................ 14
The Elasticity of Supply ......................................................................................................................... 14
   The Price Elasticity of Supply and Its Determinants ......................................................................... 14
   Computing the Price Elasticity of Supply .......................................................................................... 15
   The Variety of Supply Curves ............................................................................................................ 15
Three Applications of Supply, Demand and Elasticity .......................................................................... 15
   Can Good News for Farming Be Bad News for Farmers? ................................................................. 15
   Why Did OPEC Fail to Keep the Price of Oil High? ............................................................................ 15
   Does Drug Prohibition Increase or Decrease Drug-Related Crime? ................................................. 15
6 Supply, Demand and Government Policies ........................................................................................ 16
Controls on Prices ................................................................................................................................. 16
   How Price Ceilings Affect Market Outcomes .................................................................................... 16
   How Price Floors Affetc Market Outcomes ...................................................................................... 17
   Evaluating Price Controls .................................................................................................................. 17
Taxes ..................................................................................................................................................... 18
   How Taxes on Buyers Affect Market Outcomes ............................................................................... 18
   How Taxes on Sellers Affect Market Outcomes................................................................................ 18
   Elasticity and Tax Incidence .............................................................................................................. 18
7 Consumers, Producers and the Efficiency of Markets ....................................................................... 19
Consumer Surplus ................................................................................................................................. 19
   Willingness to Pay ............................................................................................................................. 19
   Using the Demand Curve to Measure Consumer Surplus ................................................................ 19
   How a Lower Price Raises Consumer Surplus ................................................................................... 19
   What Does Consumer Surplus Measure? ......................................................................................... 19
Producer Surplus ................................................................................................................................... 19
   Cost and the Willingness to Sell ........................................................................................................ 19
   Using the Supply Curve to Measure Producer Surplus ..................................................................... 20
   How a Higher Price Measures Producer Surplus .............................................................................. 20
Market Efficiency .................................................................................................................................. 20
   The Benevolent Social Planner ......................................................................................................... 20
   Evaluating the Market Equilibrium ................................................................................................... 21
Conclusion: Market Efficiency and Market Failure ............................................................................... 21
8 Application: The Costs of Taxation..................................................................................................... 22
The Deadweight Loss of Taxation ......................................................................................................... 22
   How a Tax Affects Market Participants............................................................................................. 22
       Welfare Without a Tax .................................................................................................................. 22
       Welfare With a Tax ....................................................................................................................... 22
       Changes in Welfare ....................................................................................................................... 22
   Deadweight Losses and the Gains From Trade ................................................................................. 22
The Determinants of the Deadweight Loss........................................................................................... 22
Deadweight Loss and Tax Revenue As Taxes Vary................................................................................ 23
Application: International Trade ........................................................................................................... 23
The Determinants of Trade ................................................................................................................... 23
   The Equilibrium without Trade ......................................................................................................... 23
   The World Price and Comparative Advantage .................................................................................. 24
The Winners and Losers From Trade .................................................................................................... 24
   The Gains and Losses of an Exporting Country ................................................................................. 24
   The Gains and Losses of an Importing Country ................................................................................ 24
   The Effects of a Tariff ........................................................................................................................ 24
   The Effects of an Import Quota ........................................................................................................ 24
   The Lessons for Trade Policy ............................................................................................................. 25
The Arguments for Restricting Trade .................................................................................................... 25
   The Jobs Argument ........................................................................................................................... 25
   The National Security Argument....................................................................................................... 25
   The Infant Industry Argument .......................................................................................................... 25
   The Unfair Competition Argument ................................................................................................... 26
   The Protection as a Bargaining Chip Argument ................................................................................ 26
Conclusion ............................................................................................................................................. 26
10 Externalities ..................................................................................................................................... 26
Externalities and Market Inefficiency ................................................................................................... 27
   Negative Externalities ....................................................................................................................... 27
   Positive Externalities ......................................................................................................................... 27
Private Solutions to Externalities .......................................................................................................... 28
   The Types of Private Solutions. ......................................................................................................... 28
   The Coase Theorem .......................................................................................................................... 28
   Why Private Solutions Don Not Always Work .................................................................................. 28
Public Policies Towards Externalities .................................................................................................... 29
   Regulation ......................................................................................................................................... 29
   Pigovian Taxes and Subsidies ............................................................................................................ 29
   Tradable Pollution Permits ............................................................................................................... 30
   Objections to the Economic Analysis of Pollution ............................................................................ 30
Conclusion ............................................................................................................................................. 30
11 Public Goods and Common Ressources ........................................................................................... 30
The Different Kinds of Goods ................................................................................................................ 30
Public Goods ......................................................................................................................................... 31
   The Free Rider Problem .................................................................................................................... 31
   Some Important Public Goods .......................................................................................................... 31
   The Difficult Job of Cost-Benefit Analysis. ........................................................................................ 32
Common Ressources............................................................................................................................. 32
   The Tragedy of the Commons ........................................................................................................... 32
Conclusion: The Importance of Property Rights ................................................................................... 32
13 The Costs of Production ................................................................................................................... 33
What are Costs? .................................................................................................................................... 33
   Total Revenue, Total Cost and Profit ................................................................................................ 33
   Costs as Opportunity Costs ............................................................................................................... 33
   The Cost of Capital as an Opportunity Cost ...................................................................................... 33
   Economic Profit Versus Accounting Profit. ....................................................................................... 34
Production and Costs ............................................................................................................................ 34
   From the Production Function to the Total Cost Curve .................................................................... 34
The Various Measures of Cost .............................................................................................................. 34
   Fixed and Variable Costs ................................................................................................................... 34
   Average and Marginal Kost ............................................................................................................... 34
   Cost Curves and their Shapes ........................................................................................................... 34
       Rising Marginal Cost...................................................................................................................... 34
       U-Shaped Average Total Cost ....................................................................................................... 35
       The Relationship between Marginal Cost and Average Total Cost ............................................... 35
   Typical Cost Curves ........................................................................................................................... 35
Costs in the Short Run and in the Long Run.......................................................................................... 35
   The Relationship between Short-Run and Long-Run Average Total Cost ........................................ 35
   Economies and Diseconomies of Scale ............................................................................................. 35
14 Firms in Competitive Markets .......................................................................................................... 36
What is a Competitive Market? ............................................................................................................ 36
   The Meaning of Competition ............................................................................................................ 36
   The Revenue of a Competitive Firm ................................................................................................. 36
Profit Maximization and the Competitive Firm’s Supply Curve ............................................................ 36
   A Simple Example of Profit Maximization......................................................................................... 36
   The Marginal Cost Curve and the Firm’s Supply Decision ................................................................ 36
   The Firm’s Short Run Decision to Shut Down ................................................................................... 36
   Spilt Milk and Other Sunk Costs ........................................................................................................ 36
   The Firm’s Long-Run Decision to Exit or enter a Market .................................................................. 37
15 Monopoly ......................................................................................................................................... 37
Why Monopolies Arise .......................................................................................................................... 37
   Monopoly Ressources ....................................................................................................................... 37
   Government-Created Monopolies .................................................................................................... 37
   Natural Monopolies .......................................................................................................................... 37
How Monopolies Make Production and Pricing Decisions ................................................................... 38
   .Monopoly Versus Competition ........................................................................................................ 38
   A Monopoly’s Revenue ..................................................................................................................... 38
   Profit Maximization........................................................................................................................... 38
   A Monopoly’s Profit. ......................................................................................................................... 39
The Wellfare Cost of Monopoly ............................................................................................................ 39
   The Deadweight Loss ........................................................................................................................ 39
   The Monopoly’s Profit: A Social Cost? .............................................................................................. 39
Public Policy Towards Monopolies ....................................................................................................... 39
   Increasing Competition ..................................................................................................................... 40
   Regulation ......................................................................................................................................... 40
   Public Ownership .............................................................................................................................. 40
   Doing Nothing ................................................................................................................................... 40
Price Discrimination .............................................................................................................................. 40
   A Parable about Pricing ..................................................................................................................... 41
18 The Markets for the Factors of Production...................................................................................... 41
The Demand for Labour ........................................................................................................................ 41
   The Production Function and the Marginal Product of Labour ........................................................ 41
   The Value of the Marginal Product and the Demand for Labour ..................................................... 41
   What causes the Labour Demand Curve to Shift? ............................................................................ 41
       The Output Price ........................................................................................................................... 41
       Technological Change ................................................................................................................... 42
       The Supply of Other Factors ......................................................................................................... 42
The Supply of Labour ............................................................................................................................ 42
   The Trade-Off between work and Leisure ........................................................................................ 42
   What Causes the Labour Supply Curve to Shift? .............................................................................. 42
       Changes in Tastes .......................................................................................................................... 42
       Changes in Alternative Opportunities........................................................................................... 42
       Immigration................................................................................................................................... 42
Equilibrium in the Labour Market ......................................................................................................... 42
   Shifts in Labour Supply ...................................................................................................................... 43
   Shifts in Labour Demand ................................................................................................................... 43
The Other Factors of Production: Land and Capital.............................................................................. 43
   Equilibrium in the Markets for Land and Capital .............................................................................. 43
   Linkages Amongst the Factors of Production ................................................................................... 43
Conclusion ............................................................................................................................................. 44
22 Frontiers of Microeconomics ........................................................................................................... 44
Asymmetric Information ....................................................................................................................... 44
   Hidden Actions: Principals, Agents and Moral Hazard ..................................................................... 44
   Hidden Characteristics: Adverse Selection and the Lemons Problem .............................................. 44
   Signalling to Convey Private Information ......................................................................................... 45
   Screening to induce Information Revelation. ................................................................................... 45
   Asymmetric Information and Public Policy ....................................................................................... 45
23 Measuring a Nation’s Income .......................................................................................................... 46
The Economy’s Income and Expenditure.............................................................................................. 46
The Measurement of Gross Domestic Product..................................................................................... 46
   „GDP is the Market Value…” ............................................................................................................. 46
   „…Of All…“ ......................................................................................................................................... 46
   „…Final…“ .......................................................................................................................................... 46
   „…Goods and Services…“ .................................................................................................................. 46
   “…Produced…” .................................................................................................................................. 46
   “…Within a Country…” ...................................................................................................................... 46
   „…In a Given Period of Time…“ ......................................................................................................... 46
The Components of GDP ....................................................................................................................... 47
   Consumption ..................................................................................................................................... 47
   Investment ........................................................................................................................................ 47
   Government Purchases ..................................................................................................................... 47
   Net Exports ....................................................................................................................................... 47
Real Versus Nominal GDP ..................................................................................................................... 47
   The GDP Deflator .............................................................................................................................. 47
GDP and Economic Well-Being ............................................................................................................. 48
24 Measuring the Cost of Living............................................................................................................ 48
The Consumer Price Index .................................................................................................................... 48
   How the Consumer Price Index is Calculated ................................................................................... 48
   Problems in Measuring the Cost of Living ........................................................................................ 48
   The CPI, the Harmonized Index of Consumer Prices and the Retail Price Index .............................. 49
   The GDP Deflator Versus the Consumer Price Index ........................................................................ 49
Correcting Economic Variables for the Effects of Inflation ................................................................... 49
   Money Figures From Different Times ............................................................................................... 49
   Indexation ......................................................................................................................................... 50
   Real and Nominal Interest Rates ...................................................................................................... 50
Conclusion ............................................................................................................................................. 50
25 Production and Growth ................................................................................................................... 50
Economic Growth Around the World ................................................................................................... 50
Productivity: Its Role and Determinants ............................................................................................... 50
   Why Productivity is so important ..................................................................................................... 50
   How Productivity is determined ....................................................................................................... 51
       Physical Capital ............................................................................................................................. 51
       Human Capital............................................................................................................................... 51
       Natural Resources ......................................................................................................................... 51
       Technological Knowledge ............................................................................................................. 51
Economic Growth and Public Policy ..................................................................................................... 51
   The Importance of Saving and Investment. ...................................................................................... 52
   Diminishing Returns and the Catch-Up Effect .................................................................................. 52
   Investment from Abroad .................................................................................................................. 52
   Education .......................................................................................................................................... 52
   Property Rights and Political Stability ............................................................................................... 53
   Free Trade ......................................................................................................................................... 53
   Research and Development .............................................................................................................. 53
   Population Growth............................................................................................................................ 53
   Stretching Natural Resources ........................................................................................................... 53
       Stretching Natural Resources. ...................................................................................................... 53
       Diluting the Capital Stock .............................................................................................................. 54
       Promoting Technological Progress ............................................................................................... 54
Conlusion: The Importance of Long-Run Growth ................................................................................. 54
The Monetary Systems ......................................................................................................................... 54
The Meaning of Money ......................................................................................................................... 54
   The Functions of Money ................................................................................................................... 54
   The Kinds of Money .......................................................................................................................... 55
   Money in the Economy ..................................................................................................................... 55
The Role of Central Banks ..................................................................................................................... 55
The European Central Bank and the Eurosystem ................................................................................. 55
The Bank of England ............................................................................................................................. 55
The Federal Reserve System ................................................................................................................. 56
Banks and the Money Supply................................................................................................................ 56
   The Simple Case of 100 Per Cent Reserve Banking ........................................................................... 56
   Money Creation With Fractional-Reserve Banking........................................................................... 56
   The Money Multiplier ....................................................................................................................... 56
   The Central Bank’s Tools of Monetary Control ................................................................................. 56
       Open-Market Operations .............................................................................................................. 56
       The Refinancing Rate .................................................................................................................... 56
       Reserve Requirements .................................................................................................................. 57
   Problems in Controlling the Money Supply ...................................................................................... 57
30 Money Growth and Inflation ........................................................................................................... 58
The Classical Theory of Inflation ........................................................................................................... 58
   The Level of Prices and the Value of Money..................................................................................... 58
   Money Supply, Money Demand and Monetary Equilibrium ............................................................ 58
   The Effects of a Monetary Injection.................................................................................................. 58
   A Brief Look at the Adjustment Process ........................................................................................... 58
   The Classical Dichotomy and Monetary Neutrality .......................................................................... 58
   Velocity and the Quantity Equation .................................................................................................. 59
   The Inflation Tax ............................................................................................................................... 59
   The Fisher Effect ............................................................................................................................... 59
The Costs of Inflation ............................................................................................................................ 60
   A Fall in Purchasing Power? The Inflation Fallacy ............................................................................. 60
   Shoeleather Costs ............................................................................................................................. 60
   Menu Costs ....................................................................................................................................... 60
   Relative Price Variability and the Misallocation of Resources.......................................................... 60
   Inflation-Induced Tax Distortions ..................................................................................................... 60
   Confusion and Inconvenience ........................................................................................................... 60
   A Special Cost of Unexpected Inflation: Arbitrary Redistribution of Wealth ................................... 60
   The Price of Ice Cream ...................................................................................................................... 61
33 Aggregate Demand and Aggregate Supply ...................................................................................... 61
Three Key Facts About Economic Fluctuations ..................................................................................... 61
   Fact 1: Economic Fluctuations Are Irregular and Unpredictable ...................................................... 61
   Fact 2: Most Macroeconomic Quantities Fluctuate Together .......................................................... 61
   Fact 3: As Output Falls, Unemployment Rises .................................................................................. 61
Explaining Short-Run Economic Fluctuations ....................................................................................... 61
   How the Short Run Differs From the Long Run................................................................................. 61
   The Basic Model of Economic Fluctuations ...................................................................................... 62
The Aggregate Demand Curve .............................................................................................................. 62
   Why the Aggregate Demand Curve slopes Downward..................................................................... 62
      The Price Level and Consumption: The Wealth Effect .................................................................. 62
      The Price Level and Investment: The Interets Rate Effect ............................................................ 62
      The Price Level and Net Exports: The Exchange Rate Effect ......................................................... 63
      Summary ....................................................................................................................................... 63
   Why the Aggregate Demand Curve Might Shift ............................................................................... 63
      Shifts Arising From Consumption.................................................................................................. 63
      Shifts Arising From Investment ..................................................................................................... 63
      Shifts Arising From Net exports .................................................................................................... 63
      Summary ....................................................................................................................................... 64
The Aggregate Supply Curve ................................................................................................................. 64
   Why the Aggregate Supply Curve is Vertical in the Long Run .......................................................... 64
   Why the Long-Run Aggregate Supply Curve Might Shift .................................................................. 64
      Shifts Arising From Labour ............................................................................................................ 64
      Shifts Arising from Capital ............................................................................................................. 64
      Shifts Arising from Natural Resources .......................................................................................... 65
      Shifts Arising From Technological Knowlegde .............................................................................. 65
   A New Way to Depict Long-Run Growth and Inflation ..................................................................... 65
   Why the Aggregate Supply Curve Slopes Upward in the Short Run ................................................. 65
      The Sticky Wage Theory ................................................................................................................ 65
      The Sticky Price Theory ................................................................................................................. 65
      The Misperception Theory ............................................................................................................ 65
      Summary ....................................................................................................................................... 66
   Why the Short-Run Aggregate Supply Curve Might Shift ................................................................. 66
Two Causes of Economic Fluctuations .................................................................................................. 66
   The Effects of a Shift in Aggregate Demand ..................................................................................... 66
   The Effects of a Shift in Aggregate Supply ........................................................................................ 67
34 The Influence of Monetary And Fiscal Policy on Aggregate Demand .............................................. 67
How Monetary Policy Influences Aggregate Demand .......................................................................... 67
   The Theory of Liquidity Preference................................................................................................... 68
      Money Supply ............................................................................................................................... 68
      Money Demand ............................................................................................................................ 68
      Equilibrium in the Money Market ................................................................................................. 68
   The Downward Slope of the aggregate Demand Curve ................................................................... 68
   Changes in the Money Supply........................................................................................................... 68
   The Role of Interest Rates ................................................................................................................. 68
How Fiscal Policy Influences Aggregate Demand ................................................................................. 69
   Changes in Government Purchases .................................................................................................. 69
   The Multiplier Effect ......................................................................................................................... 69
   A Formula for the Spending Multiplier ............................................................................................. 69
   Other Applications of the Multiplier Effect ...................................................................................... 69
   The Crowding-Out Effect .................................................................................................................. 69
   Changes in Taxes ............................................................................................................................... 70
Using Policy to Stabilize the Economy .................................................................................................. 70
   The Case for an Active Stabilization Policy ....................................................................................... 70
   The Case against an Active Stabilization Policy ................................................................................ 70
   Automatic Stabilizers ........................................................................................................................ 70
28 Unemployment ................................................................................................................................ 70
Identifying Unemployment ................................................................................................................... 70
   What is unemployment .................................................................................................................... 70
   How Is Unemployment Measured? .................................................................................................. 70
       The Claimant Count....................................................................................................................... 70
       Labour Force Surveys .................................................................................................................... 71
   How long are the Unemployed Without Work? ............................................................................... 71
   Why Are There Always Some People Unemployed? ........................................................................ 71
Job Search ............................................................................................................................................. 72
   Why Some Frictional unemployment Is Inevitable ........................................................................... 72
   Public Policy and Job Search ............................................................................................................. 72
   Unemployment Insurance ................................................................................................................ 72
Minimum Wage Laws............................................................................................................................ 72
Unions and Collective Bargaining ......................................................................................................... 72
   The Economics of Unions .................................................................................................................. 72
   Are Unions Good or Bad For the Economy? ..................................................................................... 73
The Theory of Efficient Wages .............................................................................................................. 73
   Worker Health................................................................................................................................... 73
   Worker Turnover............................................................................................................................... 73
   Worker Effort .................................................................................................................................... 73
   Worker Quality.................................................................................................................................. 73
The Short-Run Trade-Off Between Inflation and Unemployment ........................................................ 73
The Phillips Curve .................................................................................................................................. 73
   Origins of the Phillips Curve .............................................................................................................. 74
   Aggregate Demand, Aggregate Supply and the Phillips Curve ......................................................... 74
Shifts in the Phillips Curve: The Role of Expectations ........................................................................... 74
   The Long-Run Phillips Curve.............................................................................................................. 74
   Expectations and the Short-Run Phillips Curve................................................................................. 74
   The Unemployment-Inflation Trade-Off ........................................................................................... 75
       Natural-rate hypothesis: ............................................................................................................... 75
The Long-Run Vertical Phillips Curve As an Argument For Central Bank Independence...................... 75
5 Elasticity and its Application




The Elasticity of Demand

Elastizität ein Mass, das angibt, wie eine abhängige Grösse auf eine Änderung einer ihrer
Einflussgrössen reagiert.

The Price Elasticity of Demand and Its Determinants
Die Nachfrage nach einem Gut wird elastisch genannt, wenn die nachgefragte Menge stark auf eine
Preisänderung reagiert.

Die Nachfrage nach einem gut heisst unelastisch, wenn die nachgefragte Menge nur schwach auf
eine Preisänderung reagiert

Die Preiselastizität der Nachfrage gibt also an, wie gewillt die Konsumenten sind, ein Produkt
aufzugeben, wenn sein Preis steigt.

Availability of Close Substitutes

Güter mit guten Substituten haben eine grössere Elastizität in der Nachfrage, weil es für die
Konsumenten einfacher ist zu einem anderen Produkt zu wechseln.

Necessities Versus Luxuries

Gebrauchsgüter haben eine preisunelastische Nachfrage, während Luxusgüter eine elastische
Nachfrage haben.

Definition of the Market

Die Elastizität eines Marktes hängt davon ab, wie eng dieser definiert ist. So hat zum Beispiel Essen
eine viel geringere Elastizität als Glacé; weil es einfacher ist, ein Substitut für Glacé als für Essen
allgemein zu finden.

Time Horizon

Die Elastizität von Gütern ist über eine längere Zeit grösser. Steigt der Ölpreis, sinkt die eingekaufte
Menge in den ersten paar Monaten nur gering. Betrachtet man aber die Nachfrage nach Öl über
mehrere Jahre, so wird man feststellen, dass sie drastisch sinkt, da die Leute auf andere
Energieformen umgestiegen sind. Das Selbe gilt für Strom: Die Konsumenten werden nicht von
heute auf morgen Ihre Elektrogeräte entsorgen. Über eine Längere Zeitspanne werden sie es sich
aber überlegen, auf eine andere Energie zurückzugreifen.
Computing the Price Elasticity of Demand




The Midpoint Method




The Variety of Demand Curves
Die Nachfrage gilt als elastisch, wenn die Elastizität grösser als 1 ist. Das heisst: Die Nachfrage ändert
sich proportional mehr als der Preis

Die Nachfrage gilt als proportional Elastisch, wenn die Elastizität gleich 1 ist.

Die Nachfrage gilt als unelastisch, wenn die Elastizität kleiner als 1 ist. Das heisst: Die Nachfrage
ändert sich proportional weniger als der Preis.

Je flacher die Nachfragekurve an einem bestimmten Punkt ist, um so grösser ist die Preiselastizität
der Nachfrage. Je steiler die Nachfragekurve an einem bestimmten Punkt ist, um so kleiner ist die
Preiselastizität der Nachfrage.

Total Revenue and the Price Elasticity of Demand
In jedem Markt gilt: Umsatz = Preis × Menge.

Wie sich der Umsatz entlang der Nachfragekurve verhält, hängt von der Preiselastizität der
Nachfrage ab. Ist die Nachfrage unelastisch, bringt eine Preisehöhung auch eine Umsatzerhöhung
mit sich. Eine Preiserhöhung erhöht Preis × Menge, weil die Reduktion der Menge kleiner als die
Erhöhung des Preises ist.

Bei einer elastischen Nachfrage passiert genau das Gegenteil: Der Umsatz sinkt, weil die Reduktion
der Menge grösser ist als die Erhöhung des Preises.

       Ist die Nachfrage unelastisch, bewegen sich Preis und Umsatz in die selbe Richtung
       Ist die Nachfrage elastisch, bewegen sich Preis und Umsatz in die entgegengesetzte Richtung
       Ist die Nachfrage proportional elastisch, bleibt der Umsatz bei geändertem Preis konstant.

Elasticity and Total Revenue along a Linear Demand Curve
Obwohl die Steigung entlang einer linearen Nachfragekurve gleich bleibt, ändert sich die Elastizität.
Der Grund dafür ist, dass P und Q bei der Steigung als Zahl ausgedrückt werden und bei der
Elastizität als ein Prozentsatz.

An Punkten mit hohem Preis und kleiner Menge ist die Nachfragekurve elastisch. An Stellen mit
tiefem Preis und hoher Nachfrage ist die Kurve unelastisch.
Other Demand Elasticities

The Income Elasticity of Demand

Die Einkommenselastizität der Nachfrage misst, wie die Nachfrage auf Einkommensveränderungen
reagiert.




Normale Güter: Höheres Einkommen erhöht die Nachfrage.

Inferiore Güter: Höheres Einkommen senkt die Nachfrage.

The Cross-Price Elasticity of Demand

Die Kreuzpreiselastizität misst, wie die nachgefragte Menge eines Gutes die nachgefragte Menge
eines anderen Gutes beeinflusst.




Ob die Kreuzpreiselastizität positiv oder negativ ist, hängt davon ab, ob die beiden Güter Substitute
oder Komplemente sind.


The Elasticity of Supply

The Price Elasticity of Supply and Its Determinants
Die Preiselastizität des Angebots gibt an, wie sehr die Angebotene Menge auf Preisänderungen
reagiert.

Das Angebot eines Gutes wird elastisch genannt, wenn die angebotene Menge stark auf
Preisschwankungen reagiert.

Das Angebot eines Gutes heisst unelastisch, wenn die Angebotene Menge wenig auf
Preisänderungen reagiert.



Die Preiselastizität des Angebots hängt von der Flexibilität der Anbieter ab, die Menge der
produzierten Waren zu ändern.

Bsp: Ufergrundstücke haben ein sehr Preisunelastisches Angebot, denn sie sind sehr schwer zu
produzieren. Im Gegensatz: Bücher Autos, Fernseher.

Die Preiselastizität des Angebots ist stark abhängig vom Zeitfaktor. Firmen können in sehr kurzer Zeit
schlechter Anpassungen vornehmen als über einen längeren Zeitraum hinweg. Auch können über
einen längeren Zeitraum neue Firmen in den Mark einsteigen.
Computing the Price Elasticity of Supply




The Variety of Supply Curves
In einigen Märkten ist die Preiselastizität des Angebots nicht konstant, sondern variiert entlang der
Angebotskurve. Für tiefe angebotene Mengen, ist die Preiselastizität des Angebots hoch, da die
Firmen noch Kapazität haben. Steigt dann aber die Angebotene Menge, stossen die Firmen an die
Grenzen ihrer Kapazität, sie müssen z.B. neue Fabriken bauen um diesen Aufwand lohnend zu
machen, muss der Preis aber schon recht steigen. Das Angebot ist also unelastisch.


Three Applications of Supply, Demand and Elasticity

Can Good News for Farming Be Bad News for Farmers?
Ein neuer Weizenhybrid wird entwickelt, der produktiver als bisherige ist.

1.Verschieben sich die Angebots-und Nachfragekurven?

2.In welche Richtung?

3.Diagramm um zu sehen wie sich das Marktgleichgewicht verschiebt.

Das Angebot stiegt, da alle Bauern mehr Weizen anbauen können. Die Nachfragekurve bleibt gleich,
da für die Konsumenten alles beim Alten bleibt.

Farmer-Umsatz=P×Q       P sinkt stark und Q steigt schwach

Die Nachfrage nach Weizen ist unelastisch  Der Umsatz sinkt.

Wieso steigen dann die Farmer auf den neuen Hybrid um? Weil sie sonst noch weniger verdienen
würden, da die anderen den neuen Hybrid benutzen und sie nicht. Der neue Preis wird als gegeben
angsehen.

Why Did OPEC Fail to Keep the Price of Oil High?
Um mehr zu verdienen erhöhte die OPEC den Ölpreis indem sie weniger Öl anbot. Der Preis stieg um
50%. Einige Jahre später erneut. Trotz diesen wiederholten Anpassungen sank der Ölpreis nach
einigen Jahren wieder um 10% pro Jahr. Die einzelnen Länder wurden unzufrieden und gaben auf.
Der Preis kehrte wieder auf den Ursprungspunkt zurück. Dieses Beispiel zeigt, dass sich die
Preiselastizität der Nachfrage über längere Zeit anders verhalten kann, als über kurze.

Does Drug Prohibition Increase or Decrease Drug-Related Crime?
Die Drogenbekämpfung vermindert das Angebot an Drogen. Die Nachfrage nach Drogen ist
unelastisch. Also brauchen die Süchtigen mehr Geld um an ihre Drogen zu gelangen Kriminalität
steigt. Wirksamer und sinnvoller ist es, Drogenprävention zu betreiben, da dann die Nachfrage nach
Drogen sinkt und dadurch auch deren Preis.


6 Supply, Demand and Government Policies




Controls on Prices

In einem unbeinflussten Markt spielt das Marktgleichgewicht. Die Regierung könnte nun aber
Minimal- oder Maximalpreise einführen.

How Price Ceilings Affect Market Outcomes
Wenn die Regierung nun einen Maximalpreis für Glacé einführen würde, gäbe es zwei mögliche
Folgen:

   1. Das Marktgleichgewicht liegt unter dem Maximalpreis, der Eingriff hat also keinen Effekt auf
      die verkaufte Menge.
   2. Das Marktgleichgewicht liegt über dem Maximalpreis, das Gleichgewicht wird also so
      verschoben, dass es dem Maximalpreis entspricht. Bei diesem Preis ist die angebotene
      Menge kleiner als die nachgefragte Menge. Nicht alle Leute, die Glacé kaufen wollen,
      bekommen auch welche.

Die zweite Möglichkeit sollte eigentlich den Konsumenten helfen. Das tut sie aber nur denen, die
auch Glacé kaufen können. Führt also die Regierung auf einem freien Markt Maximalpreise ein,
entsteht eine Knappheit an Gütern. Die daraus folgenden Rationierungsmechanismen sind selten
erwünscht: Lange Wartezeiten sind ineffizient, weil der Käufer Zeit verschwendet. Diskrimination
durch die Voreingenommenheit des Verkäufers ist unfair und ineffizient. Wogegen die Mechanismen
in einem freien Markt, im Marktgleichgewicht effizient und anonym sind.

CASE STUDY – Rent Control in the Short Run and Long Run

Kann man armen Leuten billigere Wohnungen bieten indem man Maximalpreise auf die Miete setzt?
Auf kurze Zeit sind Angebot und Nachfrage von Wohnungen ziemlich unelastisch. Ein Maximalpreis
auf Wohnungen bringt auf kurze Zeit billigere Mieten und eine Wohnungsknappheit.

Nach einer längeren Zeit zeichnet sich eine Reaktion beider Seiten auf die veränderte Situation ab:
Es werden keine neuen Wohnungen mehr gebaut und die bestehenden Gebäude werden nicht mehr
richtig gepflegt. Auf der Nachfrageseite wollen mehr Leute eine eigene Wohnung. Angebot und
Nachfrage sind elastischer geworden.

Dies führt wieder zu Rationalisierungsmassnahmen Seitens der Anbieter: Es gibt Diskriminierung und
Bestechung.
Leute reagieren auf Anreize: In einem freien Markt halten die Vermieter ihre Objekte in gutem
Zustand, dass sie diese zu einem hohen Preis anbieten können. Es gibt aber keinen Grund ein Objekt
zu Pflegen, wenn es so oder so eine Warteliste gibt.

Es bräuchte Gesetze, die die Instandhaltung regeln und die gegen Diskriminierung zielen. Solche
Gesetzte durchzusetzen ist aber schwer und teuer.

How Price Floors Affetc Market Outcomes
Auch beim Minimalpreis gibt es zwei mögliche Effekte:

    1. Der Minimalpreis liegt unter dem aktuellen Martgleichgewicht, er hat also keinen Einfluss
       und ist nicht bindend.
    2. Der Minimalpreis liegt über dem aktuellen Preis. Somit entspricht der Preis dem
       Minimalpreis. Es besteht ein Überangebot. Nicht mehr alle Anbieter können ihr Produkt
       verkaufen.

Verkäufer, die besser an die Käufer herankommen – z.B. durch Rassen- oder Familienzugehörigkeit –
haben beim verkauf einen Vorteil. Im freien Markt können die Verkäufer jedoch zum
Marktgleichgewichtspreis alles verkaufen, was sie wollen.

CASE STUDY – The Minimum Wage

Um den Effekt von Mindestlöhnen zu untersuchen, müssen wir den Arbeitsmarkt in Betracht ziehen.
Der Lohn ergibt sich normalerweise aus dem Marktgleichgewicht. Liegt der gegebene Mindestlohn
nun über dem aktuellen Gleichgewicht, besteht ein Überangebot an Arbeit. Daraus resultiert
Arbeitslosigkeit. Der Mindestlohn erhöht also die Löhne derer, die einen Job haben und senkt den,
den der Leute, die keinen haben. Diese Annahmen treffen auf die Arbeiter zu, die eine eher
schlechte Ausbildung haben. Für die oberen Lohnschichten sind die Minimallöhne ja nicht bindend.
Die Menge der entstehenden Arbeitslosigkeit hängt von der Elastizität von Angebot und Nachfrage
ab. Eine grössere Elastizität bringt mehr Arbeitslosigkeit mit sich. Es wird oft argumentiert, dass die
Nachfrage nach ungebildeten Arbeitskräften sehr elastisch sei, weil der Preis der Produkte die sie
herstellen auch sehr elastisch ist. Das trifft aber nur zu, wenn man die Firma als einzelnes betrachtet.
Erhöhen alle Firmen gleichzeitig die Preise werden sie einen viel kleineren Umsatzrückgang
verzeichnen müssen. Eine Firma kann also den Preis der Arbeit erhöhen ohne die Nachfrage zu
senken, indem sie den Preis ihrer Produkte erhöht. Befürworter erachten Minimallöhne als ein en
Weg um das Einkommen der Working-Poor zu erhöhen. Gegner sagen, dass es nicht der beste Weg
sei um Armut zu bekämpfen, da es nur das Einkommen derer beinflusst, die einen Job haben. Nicht
jeder, der einen Job hat ist Erstverdiener. Alles in Allem ist es ein sehr komplexes Thema.

Evaluating Price Controls
Wenn Politiker Preise mit Gesetzten festlegen, dann verdunkeln sie Die Signale, die normalerweise
Ressourcen innerhalb einer Gesellschaft verteilen.Preiskontrollen schaden meistens denen, denen
sie eigentlich helfen sollten. Es gibt andere Möglichkeiten als Preiskontrollen. Z.B Subventionen.
Diese kosten den Staat aber Geld und erfordern so höhere Steuern.
Taxes

Steuern bescheren dem Staat Einkommen, dass er für öffentliche Zwecke verwenden kann. Wer
trägt die Last von Steuern?

How Taxes on Buyers Affect Market Outcomes
Bsp: Die Regierung verlangt von den Käufern €0.50 Steuern pro gekauftem Cornet. Die Nachfrage
nach Glacé nimmt also ab. Die Nachfrage sinkt um €0.50. Da die Nachfrage gesunken ist sinkt nun
auch die verkaufte Menge an Cornets. Am Schluss stehen beide schlechter da: Der Käufer zahlt mehr
für seine Glace aufgrund der Steuern und der Verkäufer erhält weniger für seine Glacé, weil die
Nachfrage gesunken ist.

    1. Steuern reduzieren die Marktaktivität. Wird ein Gut besteuert sinkt die verkaufte Menge.
    2. Käufer und Verkäufer teilen die Steuerlast.

How Taxes on Sellers Affect Market Outcomes
Nun erhebt die Regierung eine Steuer auf jedes Cornet, das die Hersteller verkaufen. Die Nachfrage
bleibt gleich. Die Angebotskurve verschiebt sich um €0.50 nach links. Die Hersteller bieten nun eine
Menge an, die einem Preis von €1.50 statt €2.00 entspricht. Wiederum reduziert die Steuer die
Grösse des Markts und wiederum teilen sich beide die Last.

CASE STUDY – Can Governments Distribute the Burden of a Payroll Tax?

Ist die Last von Sozialabgaben fair zwischen Arbeitnehmer und Arbeitgeber verteilt? Hat die
Regierung einen Einfluss darauf, auf wen die Last gelegt wird? Auch hier gilt: Egal auf wen die Last
ursprünglich gezielt ist, am Schluss teilen sich beide Parteien die Steuer.

Elasticity and Tax Incidence
Wenn eine Steuer auf ein Gut erhoben wird teilen sich die Käufer und Verkäufer die Last der Steuer.
Aber in welchem Verhältnis? Hat ein Gut ein sehr elastisches Angebot und eine relativ unelastische
Nachfrage, liegt die grössere Last bei den Käufern. Hat ein Gut ein eher unelastisches Angebot und
die Nachfrage ist sehr elastisch, tragen die Verkäufer den grösseren Teil der Last.

Die Elastizität gibt an wie schnell die Käufer und Verkäufer vom Markt abspringen wenn die
Bedingungen ungemütlich werden. Eine kleine Elastizität der Nachfrage heisst, dass die Käufer keine
gute Alternative zum Produkt haben. Eine kleine Elastizität des Angebots bedeutet, dass die Käufer
keine gute Alternative zum Produzieren diese bestimmten Gutes haben. Dies Seite mit den
schlechteren Alternativen trägt die grössere Last der Steuer. Die Sozialabgaben werden also
hauptsächlich vom Arbeitnehmer getragen.

CASE STUDY – Who Pays the Luxury Tax?

S. 125 !
7 Consumers, Producers and the Efficiency of Markets


Consumer Surplus

Willingness to Pay
Ich möchte eine Platte verkaufen. 4 Leute sind daran interessiert. Jeder ist nur bereit einen
bestimmten Betrag zu bezahlen. Jeder hat seine eigene Wertschätzung. Das Album wird versteigert
und der, dem es am meisten Wert ist erhält es. Er hat es für €80 erstanden und wäre bereit gewesen
€100 dafür zu bezahlen. Seine Konsumentenrente beträgt €20.

In einem zweiten Beispiel möchte ich 2 Alben verkaufe. Beide Alben zum selben Preis und jeder
Käufer kauft nur ein Album: Der Preis Steigt auf €70, bis nur noch zwei Bieter übrig sind. Der eine
wäre bereit gewesen €100 und der zweite €80 zu bezahlen. Das ergibt Konsumentenrenten von €30
und €10 die gesamte Konsumentenrente des Marktes ist €40

Using the Demand Curve to Measure Consumer Surplus
Die Konsumentenrente eines Produktes ist in engem Zusammenhang mit der Nachfragekurve. Je
höher der Preis ist, um so weniger Käufer finden sich für ein Produkt. Die Nachfragekurve zeigt an
jedem Punkt die Wertschätzung des Käufers, der bei einem höheren Preis als Erster abspringen
würde.

Die Fläche unter der Nachfragekurve und über dem Preis misst die Konsumentenrente in einem
Markt.

How a Lower Price Raises Consumer Surplus
Weil Käufer immer weniger für Güter zahlen möchten, profitieren sie von einem tieferen Preis. Aber
wie stark steigt ihr gutes Gefühl als Reaktion auf einen tieferen Preis?

Leute, die schon bei Preis 1 bereit waren zu kaufen, profitieren am meisten, weil sie jetzt weniger
zahlen. Ihre Konsumentenrente ist um den Betrag des Preisabschlags erhöht worden. Hinzu kommen
noch einige neue Käufer, die nun bereit sind den Preis 2 zu bezahlen.

What Does Consumer Surplus Measure?
Unser Ziel bei der Entwicklung des Konsumentenrentenprinzips ist, objektive Aussagen über die
Erwünschtheit verschiedener Marktereignisse zu machen. Die Konsumentenrente misst, den Nutzen
den der Käufer von einem Gut erhält so wie er es selbst wahrnimmt. Daher ist die
Konsumentenrente ein guter Indikator für die wirtschaftliche Wohlfahrt, wenn man die Vorlieben
der Käufer respektiert. Bei Drogensüchtigen sollte man die Vorlieben z.B. nicht respektieren.


Producer Surplus

Cost and the Willingness to Sell
Die Kosten geben an, wieviel ein Verkäufer aufgeben muss, um das Produkt zu produzieren oder um
die Dienstleistung anbieten zu können. Der Verkäufer ist nur bereit zu verkaufen, wenn der Preis
seine Kosten übersteigt Die Produzentenrente ist der Betrag, der dem Verkäufer bezahlt wird minus
die Produktionskosten.

Using the Supply Curve to Measure Producer Surplus
Auch die Produzentenrente ist stark von der Nachfragekurve abhängig. Je günstiger die Anbieter ihr
Gut verkaufen, um so mehr Käufer finden sich. Die Angebotskurve gibt an jedem Punkt den Preis an,
bei dem der Verkäufer gerade noch seine Dienste anbieten würde. Sänke der Preis, würde er
abspringen.

Die Fläche unter dem Preis und über der Angebotskurve entspricht der Produzentenrente eines
Marktes.

How a Higher Price Measures Producer Surplus
Wie gross steigt die Wohlfahrt der Verkäufer in Reaktion auf einen höheren Preis? Bei einer
Preiserhöhung profitieren die Verkäufer am meisten, die schon beim ersten Preis verkauft haben.
Weiter kommen noch einige neue Verkäufer hinzu, denen der Preis nun hoch genug ist um zu
verkaufen.

Wir benutzen die Produzentenrente als Mittel, um die Wohlfahrt der Verkäufer anzugeben. Da sich
Produzenten und Konsumentenrente sehr ähneln benütz man sie zusammen.


Market Efficiency

Konsumenten- und Produzentenrente sind die grundlegenden Werkzeuge, die Ökonomen benutzen,
um die Wohlfahrt von Käufern und Verkäufern eines Marktes zu studieren. Sie helfen uns
fundamentale Fragen zu klären. Wie z.B.: Ist die Verteilung von Ressourcen durch einen freien Markt
in jedem Fall wünschenswert?

The Benevolent Social Planner
Um Marktsituationen analysieren zu können brauchen wir den BSP. Er möchte die ökonomische
Wohlfahrt eines Jeden in der Gesellschaft erhöhen. Wie soll er vorgehen?

Dazu benötigt er die totale Rente einer Gesellschaft.

Total Surplus= Value to buyers – Cost to sellers

Wenn eine Ressourcenverteilung die totale Rente maximiert, dann drückt sie Effizienz aus. Ist eine
Verteilung ineffizient, dann werden nicht alle Gewinne des Handels unter Käufer und Verkäufer
wahrgenommen.

Bsp: Eine Verteilung ist ineffizient, wenn ein Gut nicht vom Hersteller mit den geringsten Kosten
produziert wird. Würde das Produkt billiger produziert, könnte man die totale Rente erhöhen.
Gleichermassen wäre es ineffizient Produkte nicht an den Höchstbietenden zu verkaufen. In diesem
Fall wird eine Gesellschaft den grössten Nutzen aus seinen knappen Ressourcen machen, wenn es
sie so verteilt, dass eine maximale Rente dabei herausschaut.
Zusätlich zur Effizienz könnte sich der BSP auch um Gleichheit – die Fähigkeit ökonomisches
Fortschritte fair unter den Mitgliedern der Gesellschaft zu verteilen – kümmern. Alle Teilnehmer des
Marktes sollten gleichermassen vom Kuchen der Gewinne des Handels profitieren.

Evaluating the Market Equilibrium
    1. Freie Märkte verteilen das Angebot der Güter an die Käufer, die sie am meisten schätzen.,
       ausgedrückt durch ihre Wertschätzung.
    2. Freie Märkte verteilen die Nachfrage nach Gütern an die Verkäufer, welche die Güter am
       günstigsten herstellen können.
    3. Freie Märkte produzieren die Menge an Gütern welche die Summe aus Konsumenten- und
       Produzentenrente maximieren.

    Diese drei Aussagen über Marktsituationen zeigen uns, dass das Gleichgewicht zwischen
    Angebot und Nachfrage die totale Rente maximieren. Die Gleichgewichtssituation ist eine
    effiziente Verteilung von Ressourcen. Der BSP kann also den Markt lassen wie er ist.

CASE STUDY – Should There Be a Market in Human Organs?

Organhandel ist verboten. Auf dem Markt für Organe besteht also ein Maximumpreis von €0. Daraus
resultier eine Knappheit. Würde man Organhandel erlauben, würde der Preis steigen, um Angebot
und Nachfrage auszugleichen, die Knappheit würde verschwinden. Es wäre eine effiziente Verteilug
der Ressourcen. Experten sagen aber dieser Markt sei unfair, weil er die Reichen gegenüber den
Armen bevorteilen würde. Andererseits stellt sich die Frage ob es fair ist, dass manche Menschen
ihre zweite Niere nicht brauchen und andere sterben, weil ihre nicht mehr funktioniert. Ist es fair
dass Leute nach Afrika gehen, um sich dort eine Niere zu holen?


Conclusion: Market Efficiency and Market Failure

Die Kräfte von Angebot und Nachfrage verteilen Ressourcen effizient. Obwohl jeder Käufer und
Verkäufer nur auf sein eigenes Wohl schaut. Das dadurch entstandene Gleichgewicht führt alle zur
maximalen totalen Rente.

Nun gibt es in der Realität aber Faktoren, die unser Modell beeinflussen können. Wir nahmen an,
dass der Markt komplett dem Wettbewerb ausgesetzt ist. In einigen Märkten ist dies aber
überhaupt nicht der Fall Manche Käufer oder Verkäufer (oder kleine Gruppen) können in der Lage
sein Preise zu beeinflussen. Dies führt zu Ineffizienz des Marktes weil es Preis und Menge vom
Gleichgewicht des Angebots und der Nachfrage hält. Unsere Annahmen gingen auch davon aus, dass
die Marktsituation nur für Käufer und Verkäufer von Bedeutung ist. In der echten Welt jedoch trifft
es manchmal Leute, die absolut nichts mit dem Markt zu tun haben. Ein Beispiel dafür ist die
Umweltverschmutzung. In diesem Fall ist die Wohlfahrt eines Marktes mehr als nur der Wert für den
Verkäufer und die Kosten der Verkäufer. Weil Käufer und Verkäufer solche Nebeneffekte nicht in
Betracht ziehen, wenn sie entscheiden wieviel zu kaufen und zu verkaufen, kann das
Marktgleichgewicht aus der Sicht der ganzen Gesellschaft ineffizient seint.
8 Application: The Costs of Taxation


The Deadweight Loss of Taxation

Wenn eine Steuer auf die Käufer erhoben wird, verschiebt sich die Nachfragekurve um die Höhe der
Steuer nach unten. Wird sie auf die Verkäufer erhoben verschiebt sich die Angebotskurve um die
Höhe der Steuer nach oben. Auf beide weise erhöht eine Steuer den Preis, den die Käufer zahlen
müssen und senkt den Preis, den die Verkäufer erhalten. Eine Steuer auf ein Gut verkleinert den
Markt des Gutes.

How a Tax Affects Market Participants
Wenn wir die Gewinne und Verluste einer Steuer auf ein Gut bestimmen möchten, müssen wir
beachten, wie sich die Steuer auf die Käufer, Verkäufer und die Regierung auswirkt. Den Nutzen von
Käufer und Verkäufer ist aus der Konsumenten- bzw. Produzentenrente ersichtlich. Die
Regierungseinnahmen setzten sich aus Steuer × Verkaufte Güter zusammen.

Welfare Without a Tax

Die Gesamte Rente in einem Markt ohne Steuer ist im Dreieck zwischen Angebots- und
Nachfragekurve bis zum Marktgleichgewicht vertreten.

Welfare With a Tax

Die Konsumenten- sowie Produzentenrente sinkt, da die Regierung das Rechteck T×Q einsackt.

Changes in Welfare

Die Steuer stellt die Käufer und Verkäufer schlechter und die Regierung besser. Das Dreieck zwischen
dem T×Q Quadrat und den Kurven geht verloren. Die Verluste der Käufer und Verkäufer
überschreiten die Gewinne der Regierung. Die Reduktion der totalen Rente nach der Einführung
einer Steuer nennt sich Deadweight Loss. Eine Steuer gibt den Käufern den Anreiz weniger zu kaufen
und den Verkäufern weniger zu produzieren. Die Grösse des Marktes sinkt unter ihr Optimum. Dies
weil die Steuern die Anreize verzerrt und dies zu einer ineffizienten Ressourcenverteilung führt.

Deadweight Losses and the Gains From Trade
Bsp: Seite 153f wichtig!

Das Deadweight Loss ist die Rente, die verloren geht nach der Einführung einer Steuer. Der
gegenseitige Handel macht dort nicht mehr Sinn, da die die Vorteile des Handels durch die Steuer
aufgehoben werden.


The Determinants of the Deadweight Loss

Je elastischer die Nachfrage und das Angebot eines gutes sind, umso grösser ist das Deadweight
Loss, das eine Steuer verursacht.
CASE STUDY – The Deadweight Loss Debate

Die Grösse des Regierungssektors bestimmt die Höhe der Steuern und somit wie gross das
Deadweight Loss ist. In einigen modernen europäischen Ländern betragen die Einkommenssteuern
über 33%. Die Regierungen streiten sich darüber, wie hoch das Deadweight Loss ist, da sie von
unterschiedlichen Elastizitäten des Arbeitskräfte-Angebots ausgehen. Es gibt Ökonomen, die sagen,
dass die Leute unabhängig von der Lohnhöhe immer gleichviel arbeiten. Andere Ökonomen sagen,
das einige ihre Arbeit unelastisch anbieten, ein Grossteil aber, reagiert auf Anreize.

Bsp:

   1.   Überstunden
   2.   Zweitverdiener
   3.   Pensionsalter
   4.   Ausweichen auf einen illegalen Zweig


Deadweight Loss and Tax Revenue As Taxes Vary

Was passiert, wenn Steuern erhöht oder gesenkt werden?

Die Steuereinnahmen folgen der Laffer-Kurve. Ab einer bestimmten Höhe sinken die Einnahmen,
weil der Markt dermassen schrumpft. Während sich die Steuereinnahmen um einen Faktor von 4
vergrössern, nimmt das Deadweight Loss um den Faktor 9 zu.


Application: International Trade

Wie beeinflusst der internationale Handel die ökonomische Wohlfahrt? Wie stehen die Gewinne zu
den Verlusten?

Nach dem Prinzip des relativen Vorteils, können alle Länder von gegenseitigem Handel profitieren.
Aber das ist nicht alles, was es zu beachten gilt.


The Determinants of Trade

Der Stahlmarkt ist ein guter Markt für unsere Betrachtungen, da in vielen verschiedenen Ländern
Stahl hergestellt wird. Auf dem Stahlmarkt wird oft darüber diskutiert Handelsbeschränkungen
einzuführen, um die eigenen Stahlproduzenten von ausländischen Konkurrenten zu schützen.

The Equilibrium without Trade
In unserem Beispielland ist kein Import oder Export erlaubt. Der Markt besteht nur aus inländischen
Käufern und Verkäufern. Es stellt sich ein Marktgleichgewicht ein. Die totale Rente wird nur durch
die Konsumentenrente und die Produzentenrente bestimmt. Nun wird beschlossen den Markt zu
öffnen.
The World Price and Comparative Advantage
Zuerst muss bestimmt werden, ob das Land ein Importeur oder rein Exporteur wird. Zu diesem
Zweck wird der inländische Preis mit dem Weltmarktpreis verglichen. Ist der Weltmarktpreis höher,
wird exportiert, ist er tiefer, wird importiert. Der Preisvergleich zeigt uns, ob wir einen komparativen
Vorteil gegenüber den anderen Ländern haben. Der Inlandpreis spiegelt die Opportunitätskosten
wider. Ist der Inlandpreis tief, haben wir einen komparativen Vorteil gegenüber dem Ausland und
vice versa. Der Handel beruht auf dem komparativen Vorteil. Handel bringt nur nutzen, weil er
Nationen erlaubt, das zu tun, was sie am besten können.


The Winners and Losers From Trade

Unser Beispielland ist ein kleines Land und Änderungen im Verhalten beeinflussen den Weltmarkt
nicht. Die Einwohner sind price takers.

The Gains and Losses of an Exporting Country
Der Weltpreis ist höher als unser Inlandpreis. Es entsteht ein Angebotsüberschuss. Der Überschuss
wird ins Ausland verkauft. Das Gleichgewicht wird sozusagen durch den dritten Marktteilnehmer
gewahrt. Wir können soviel Stahl verkaufen, wie wir wollen, da die Weltmarktnachfrage total
elastisch ist.

Die inländischen Käufer verlieren, da sie nun den Stahl zum Weltmarktpreis kaufen müssen. Die
Verkäufer hingegen gewinnen, da sie mehr Geld für ihren Stahl erhalten.

    1. Lässt ein Land den internationalen Handel zu und wird zum Exporteur, sind die inländischen
       Produzenten besser bedient und die inländischen Käufer schlechter.
    2. Der Handel erhöht die ökonomische Wohlfahrt einer Nation, da die Gewinne der Verkäufer
       die Verluste der Verkäufer übersteigen.

The Gains and Losses of an Importing Country
    1. Erlaubt ein Land den internationalen Handel und wird Importeur eines Gutes, dann sind die
       Käufer die Gewinner und die Verkäufer die Verlierer.
    2. Der Handel erhöht die ökonomische Wohlfahrt einer Nation, da die Gewinne der Käufer die
       Verluste der Verkäufer übersteigen.

The Effects of a Tariff
Man vergleicht die Wohlfahrt vor und nach der Einführung eines Zolles. Der Zoll erhöht den Preis
von inländischem und ausländischem Stahl im Land. Daraus folgt, das mehr Stahl angeboten und
weniger gekauft wird. Durch den eingeführten Zoll entsteht ein DWL, durch das die Totale Rente des
Marktes verringert wird. Ein Zoll ist eine Art steuer. Wie eine Steuer verzerrt er den Markt, wodurch
sich die Verteilung der knappen Ressourcen vom Optimum entfernt.

The Effects of an Import Quota
Nun wird darüber nachgedacht ein Einfuhrkontingent einzuführen. Die Regierung verteilt eine
beschränkte Anzahl an Importlizenzen. Weil das Kontingent die Leute daran hindert, soviel Stahl im
Ausland einzukaufen wie sie möchten, ist das Angebot am Weltpreis nicht mehr absolut elastisch.
Stattdessen wird einfach soviel Stahl importiert, wie erlaubt ist, solange der Stahlpreis im Land höher
ist als im Ausland. Weil die Quote den Inlandpreis über den Weltpreis hebt, sind inländische
Verkäufer besser dran und inländische Käufer schlechter. Zusätzlich profitieren die Lizenzhalter von
günstigem Einkaufspreis und höherem Inlandpreis. Der Stahlpreis liegt aber immer noch unter dem
Preis ohne Handel mit dem Ausland. Auch in diesem Fall entsteht ein Deadweigh Loss und die totale
Rente des Marktes sinkt. Würde die Regierung die Gewinne der Lizenzhalter für sich beanspruchen,
käme die Importquote einem Zoll gleich.

Die Steuer, wie auch die Quote erhöhen Preise, beschränken den Markt und verursachen ein
Deadweight Loss. Aber wenigstens generiert ein Zoll noch Einkommen für die eigene Regierung. Eine
Einfuhrquote kann ein höheres DWL verursachen als ein Zoll, wenn man die Lobbyingkosten der
Unternehmen für die Lizenzvergabe miteinbezieht.

The Lessons for Trade Policy
Summary, S.177


The Arguments for Restricting Trade

Die Stahlproduzenten des Landes sind also gegen die Einführung internationalen Handels. Sie haben
dafür verschiedene Argumente.

The Jobs Argument
Einige Arbeiter der Stahlindustrie würden ihren Job verlieren, da der Inlandpreis für Stahl sinken
würde und somit weniger Stahl produziert würde. Gleichzeitig, jedoch würde der freie Handel neue
stellen schaffen. Kauft das eigene Land Stahl im Ausland, erhalten diese Länder die Ressourcen um
Güter aus unserem Land zu kaufen. Es würde neue Jobs in den Industrien geben, in denen unser
Land einen komparativen Vorteil hat. Da die Gewinne aus Handel auf dem komparativen Vorteil und
nicht auf dem absoluten Vorteil basieren, gilt das Argument, man könne im Ausland alles billiger
produzieren, nicht.

The National Security Argument
Freier Handel würde das Land abhängig von anderen Ländern machen. Im Falle einse Krieges wäre
das Land nicht fähig genug Stahl für Waffen zu produzieren. Das Argument ist berechtigt, wird aber
zeitweise zu Produzentenzwecken missbraucht.

The Infant Industry Argument
Neue Industrien fordern temporäre Handelsbeschränkungen um starten zu können. Nach einer Zeit
argumentieren sie für die Aufrechterhaltung damit sie sich entwickeln und mit ausländischen
Betrieben mithalten oder sich neuen Konditionen anpassen können.

In der Praxis ist das für Ökonomen schwer anzuwenden. Um die Industrien erfolgreich zu schützen,
müsste die Regierung voraussehen welche Industrien profitabel würden und ob der Nutzen diese zu
schützen grösser wäre als die Kosten für die Konsumenten. Politik spielt auch eine starke Rolle. Es ist
schwierig einer politisch mächtigen Industrie den Schutz wieder zu entziehen.
Das Infant Industry Argument ist grundsätzlich fraglich, da die Besitzer neuer Firmen eigentlich
gewillt sein sollten am Anfang Verluste wegszustecken um dann später Gewinne einfahren zu
können.

The Unfair Competition Argument
Freier Handel sollte nur erwünscht sein, wenn alle Länder nach den selben Regeln spielen. Dem
Argument nach ist es unfair, wenn verschiedene Firmen, die nach verschiedenen Rechtssystemen
funktionieren, gegeneinander antreten zu lassen. Ein Land könnte z.B. seiner Stahlindustrie
Steuerreduktionen gewähren. Würde es einem Land schaden, Stahl von einem Land zu kaufen,
welches subventioniert wird? Sicher würden die Stahlproduzenten verlieren aber die Konsumenten
würden profitieren und am Schluss würden die Gewinne die Verluste überschreiten. Es sind die
Steuerzahler des Nachbarlandes, die die Last tragen müssen.

The Protection as a Bargaining Chip Argument
Ein anderes Argument für Handelsbeschränkungen betrifft die Strategie des gegenseitigen
Verhandelns. Viele Politiker behaupten sie unterstützten freien Handel aber man könne
Handelsbeschränkungen nützen, um Druck in Verhandlungen mit Nachbarländern zu machen. So
könne man zum Beispiel ein Nachbarland dazu bringen, eine Handelsbeschränkung aufzuheben.

Funktioniert diese Drohung nicht, kann man trotz allem die Handelsbeschränkung einführen und hat
einen Wohlfahrtsverlust oder man krebst zurück und verliert an Glaubwürdigkeit.


Conclusion

Generell sind Ökonomen eher für den freien Handel, während die Öffentlichkeit
Handelsbeschränkungen zum Schutz der heimischen Industrie sehen will.


10 Externalities

Markets do many things well, but they do not do everything well. An externality arises when a
person engages in an activity that influences the well-being of a bystander and yet neither pays nor
receives any compensation for that effect.

Es gibt negative und positive Externalitäten. Märkte bleiben nicht nur für sich isoliert, sie
verursachen auch Dinge und Effekte über ihre Grenzen hinaus, die unbeteiligte Personen betreffen
können. Die Abgabe von Dioxin an die Umwelt bei der Papierherstellung ist ein Beispiel. Wenn
Käufer und Verkäufer die Externalitäten bei ihren Kaufs- und Verkaufsberechnung nicht
miteinbeziehen, ist das Marktgleichgewicht nicht effizient. Das Marktgleichgewicht scheitert, der
Gesellschaft als Ganzes zu nutzen. Die Papierfabrik beachtet die Kosten ihrer Verschmutzung nicht,
solange die Regierung sie nicht davon abhält oder sie dafür bezahlen lässt.

Beispiele für Externalitäten:

    1. Autoabgase
    2. Restaurierte historische Bauten
    3. Bellende Hunde
    4. Erforschung neuer Technologien

In all diesen Beispielen verursacht der Entscheidungsträger durch sein Verhalten Nebeneffekte, die
er nicht kontrollieren kann. Die Regierung versucht das Verhalten so zu beeinflussen, dass
unbeteiligte geschützt werden.


Externalities and Market Inefficiency

Wir analysieren, wie Externalitäten die Wohlfahrt beeinflussen.

Negative Externalities
Aluminiumfabriken verursachen Rauch: Für jede Einheit Aluminium, die produziert wird, geht ein
bestimmter Betrag an Rauch in die Atmosphäre. Weil dieser Rauch ein Gesundheitsrisiko für
unbeteiligte darstellt, handelt es sich hier um eine negative Externalität.

Diese Externalität beeinflusst das Marktergebnis. Die Kosten der Gesellschaft, Aluminium zu
produzieren sind grösser, als die eigentlichen Kosten der Produzenten. Für jede Einheit Aluminium
setzten sich die sozialen Kosten aus den privaten Kosten der Aluminiumproduzenten plus die Kosten
für die Unbeteiligten zusammen. Wieviel Aluminium sollte nun produziert werden? Die beste Lösung
wäre das Gleichgewicht aus der Kurve der Sozialen Kosten und der Nachfrage zu nehmen.

Das würde bedeuten, dass weniger Aluminium verkauft und produziert würde, da das Aluminium
faktisch teurer wäre. Um das optimale Ergebnis zu erhalten, könnte man eine Steuer einführen. Die
Steuer würde die Angebotskurve um die Höhe der Steuer nach oben verschieben. Im neuen
Marktgleichgewicht würde die Aluminium Produzenten die sozial optimale Menge an Aluminium
produzieren. Der Gebrauch einer solchen Steuer nennt sich Externalitäten internalisieren. Sie gibt
den Käufern und Verkäufern einen Anreiz für die Nebeneffekte ihres Marktes aufzukommen.

Positive Externalities
Manche Aktivitäten verursachen auch positive Nebeneffekte. Die Analyse von positiven
Externalitäten ist der der negativen sehr ähnlich. Weil der soziale Wert eines Gutes grösser ist als
sein eigentlicher Wert verschiebt sich die Nachfragekurve nach rechts. Dort wo sich die
Angebotskurve und die soziale Nachfragekurve schneiden, liegt das Optimum. Die sozial optimale
Menge ist also grösser als die optimale Menge des Marktes. Um dies zu fördern sind wieder Anreize
der Regierung nötig. Dies geschieht durch Subventionen. Das ist mit ein Grund, warum die Regierung
die Bildung stark fördert.

Zusammenfassend:

    -   Negative Externalitäten lassen den Markt mehr produzieren als sozial angebracht werden.
    -   Positive Externalitäten lassen den Markt weniger produzieren, als sozial erwünscht wäre.

CASE STUDY – Technology Spillovers and Industrial Policy

Bsp: Ein neuer Roboter wird entwickelt. Die Chancen stehen gut, dass dabei ein neues und besseres
Design entsteht. Davon profitiert die ganze Gesellschaft. Um diesen positiven Nebeneffekt in den
Markt einzubauen, könnte die Regierung Subventionen für jeden gebauten Roboter einführen. So
würde die Gleichgewichtsmenge erhöht und dem sozialen Optimum angepasst. Die Subvention
müsste dem technology spillover entsprechen. Eine weiter Option wäre, der Erfinderfirma das
Patentrecht zu gewähren, so dass diese eine Zeit lang die ökonomischen Vorteile für sich hätte. Das
erhöht auch den Anreiz, neue Technologien zu finden und zu entwickeln.


Private Solutions to Externalities



The Types of Private Solutions.
Auch wenn Externalitäten dazu neigen Märkte ineffizient zu machen, ist ein Eingriff der Regierung
nicht immer nötig. Manchmal werden Externalitäten durch Moralvorstellungen oder Soziale Ächtung
gelöst. So schmeisst man nicht Abfall auf den Boden, weil es verpönt ist. „ Behandle andere, wie du
möchtest, dass sie dich behandeln.“ Dieser Grundsatz gebietet uns die Externalitäten zu
internalisieren. Eine weitere private Lösung sind Wohltätigkeitsorganisiationen. Die meisten
beschäftigen sich mit Externalitäten ( Greenpeace, WWF, etc.). Universitäten erhalten manchmal
Schenkungen und Spenden von ehemaligen Studenten oder Firmen, weil diese wissen, dass Bildung
einen positiven Effekt für die Gesellschaft hat.

Der private Markt kann meistens auf die egoistischen Ziele der einzelnen Parteien zählen. Auch
Marktübergreifend können die einzelnen Interessen einander unterstützen. So zum Beispiel ein
Apfelbauer und ein Bienenzüchter. Die beiden interessieren sich eigentlich nicht für einander aber
trotzdem profitieren sie gegenseitig. Das Gleichgewicht mag nicht optimal sein. Deshalb wäre es am
gescheitesten, sie würden sich in einer Firma vereinen. Die Externalitäten könnten via optimaler
Anzahl Bienen und Apfelbäume internalisiert werden.

Auch eine Option um mit externalen Effekten umzugehen ist, dass die beteiligten Parteien einen
Vertrag schliessen. So könnten der Apfelbauer und der Bienenzüchter die Anzahl Bäume und Bienen
vertraglich festsetzen. Der Vertrag könnte die Ineffizienz lösen und so beide besser stellen.

The Coase Theorem
Das Coase Theorem besagt, dass wenn zwei private Parteien ohne Kosten über die Verteilung von
Ressourcen verhandeln können, können sie das Problem der Externalitäten selbst lösen.

Why Private Solutions Don Not Always Work
Das Coase-Theorem funktioniert nur, wenn beide Parteien kein Problem haben eine Einigung zu
erzielen. Aber Verhandeln funktioniert nicht immer auch wenn ein nützliches Ergebnis für beide
Parteien möglich wäre. Manchmal scheitern die Verhandlungen an den Transaktionskosten. Das
sind die Kosten, welche die einzelnen Parteien bezahlen müssen, um auf eine Verhandlung
einzugehen und sie abzuschliessen. So könnte zum Beispiel ein Übersetzter oder einen Rechtsanwalt
nötig sein. Ist der Übersetzter teurer als der aus der Verhandlung gewonnene Nutzen, ist man
versucht das Problem ungelöst zu lassen. Vielleicht werden die Verhandlungen auch einfach
abgebrochen. Wegen Kriegsausbruch oder Streik zum Beispiel. Das Problem ist meistens, dass jede
Partei den besseren Deal machen will. Je grösser die Anzahl beteiligter Parteien ist, um so
schwieriger und teurer wird die Verhandlung. In so einem Falle könnte die Regierung einspringen.


Public Policies Towards Externalities

Für die Regierung gibt es zwei Möglichkeiten,auf durch Externalitäten ineffiziente Märkte zu
reagieren:

    1. Das Verhalten der Parteien durch command-and-controll policies zu beeinflussen.
    2. Anreize durch Market-based policies zu schaffen. So dass private Entscheidungsträger das
       Problem unter sich lösen.

Regulation
Eine Regierung kann eine Externalität beheben, indem sie bestimmtes Verhalten verbietet oder zur
Pflicht macht. Bsp: Umweltverschmutzung und CO2-Lizenzen.



Pigovian Taxes and Subsidies
Anstatt Verhalten in Reaktion auf eine Externalität zu beeinflussen, kann die Regierung market-
based policies einführen um private Anreize mit sozialer Effizienz anzugleichen. Wie schon oben
gesehen, kann die Regierung Externalitäten in den Markt einbauen, indem sie Aktivitäten mit
negativen Externalitäten besteuert und solche mit positiven Auswirkungen subventioniert. Steuern,
die den negativen Externalitäten entgegenwirken, heissen Pigovian Taxes. Ökonomen bervorzugen
pigovische Steuern gegenüber Regulationen bei der Bekämpfung von Umweltverschmutzung. Eine
Verordnung ist nicht gleich effizient wie eine Steuer. Die Kosten zur Vermeidung von Vershcmutzung
ist nicht für alle gleich hoch. Eine pigovische Steuer gibt den Preis für das Recht zu verschmutzen.
Eine solche Steuer verteilt die Verschmutzung an diese, die bereit sind am Meisten dafür zu
bezahlen. Eine Regulation ist nur bis zu einem bestimmten Punkt definiert. Darunter gibt es für die
Betriebe keinen Anreiz mehr die Verschmutzung weiter zu reduzieren. Pigovische Steuern
korrigieren Anreize wenn Externalitäten vorhanden sind und lenken so die Verteilung von
Ressourcen näher zum sozialen Optimum. Dies, während sie Einkommen für die Regierung erhöhen.
Sie erhöhen also auch die ökonomische Effizienz.

CASE STUDY – Why Is Petrol Taxed So Heavily?

Die Benzinsteuer ist eine pigovische Steuer und wirkt den folgenden Externalitäten entgegen:

    1. Stau
    2. Unfällen
    3. Umweltverschmutzung

Die Benzinsteuer verursacht also kein DWL, sondern fördert die Wirtschaft.
Tradable Pollution Permits
Aus einem ökonomischen Standpunkt gesehen ist der Handel von Verschmutzungrechten eine Gute
Handhabung. Beide Firmen profitieren von einem solchen Handel und die Externalitäten bleiben die
selben. Es könnte ein Markt von Verschmutzungsrechten entstehen auf dem die am meisten
bezahlen, denen die Verschmutzung am meisten Wert ist. Solange ein freier Markt besteht,
profitieren beide Parteien nach dem Coase-Theorem.

The equivalence of Pigovian Taxes and pollution permits. S 201

Objections to the Economic Analysis of Pollution
Umweltschützer sagen, es sei falsch jemandem zu erlauben die Umwelt zu verschmutzen. Saubere
Luft und sauberes Wasser haben Kosten: Die opportunitätskosten. Verschmutzung ganz abstellen ist
unmöglich. Eine saubere Umwelt ist wie ein normales Gut: es hat eine positive Einkomenselastizität.
Reichere Länder können sich eine sauberere Umwelt leisten als arme. Ausserdem folgt das Gut
„saubere Umwelt“ den Regeln von Angebot und Nachfrage. Je tiefer der Preis für eine saubere
Umwelt, um so mehr will die Öffentlichkeit davon. Pigovische Steuern reduzierendie Kosten des
Umweltschutzes und sollten daher die Nachfrage der Öffentlichkeit nach einer sauberen Umwelt
erhöhen.


Conclusion

Die unischtbare Hand ist stark aber nicht allmächtig. Im Falle von Externalitäten ist die unsichtbare
Hand machtlos. Sie scheitert die Ressourcen effizient zu verteilen. In manchen Fällen sind die Leute
fähig ihre Probleme selbst zu lösen (Coase-Theorem). Wenn die Leute das Problem nicht privat
lösen können, kann die Regierung entweder regulierend oder lenkend einschreiten. Die Kräfte des
Marktes richtig gelenkt, ist meistens die beste Lösung von Marktversagen.


11 Public Goods and Common Ressources

Bei Produkten, die keinen Preis haben, wirken die Marktkräfte, die normalerweise die Ressourcen
verteilen nicht. Hat ein Gut keinen Preis, können private Märkte nicht dafür sorgen, dass das Gut in
ausreichenden Massen produziert und konsumiert wird. In diesen Fällen kann die Regierung dieses
Marktscheitern regeln und die Wohlfahrt erhöhen.


The Different Kinds of Goods

Märkte funktionieren gut, wenn das Produkt Glacé ist. Märkte funktionieren weniger gut, wenn es
sich beim Produkt um frische Luft handelt.

Es bietet sich an Güter in zwei verschiedene Kategorien zu gruppieren:

    -   Ist das Gut einschränkbar? Können Leute daran gehindert werden das Gut zu nützen?
    -   Gibt es Konkurrenz um das Produkt?
Daraus ergeben sich vier Kategorien:

   1. Private Güter – sind einschränkbar und es gibt Konkurrenz darum (Bsp Cornet)
   2. Öffentliche Güter – sind weder einschränkbar noch gibt es Konkurrenz darum (Bsp Das
      Verteidigungssystem eines Landes)
   3. Allgemeine Ressourcen – es gibt Konkurrenz darum, aber sie sind nicht einschränkbar( Bsp
      Fisch).
   4. Natürliche Monopole – sind einschränkbar aber es gibt keine Konkurrenz darum (Bsp: Die
      Feuerwehr).

Wir betrachten nun die öffentlichen Güter und die allgemeinen Ressourcen. Die Benutzung von
Gütern, die nicht einschränkbar sind, verursacht immer externale Effekte weil etwas, das von Nutzen
ist kein Preisschild hat. Müsste eine Person ein nationales Verteidigungssystem errichten, würden
viele Leute davon profitieren, ohne dass sie etwas dafür bezahlen müssten. Wenn jemand im Ozean
fischt, sind andere benachteiligt. Aufgrund dieser externalen Effekte können private Entscheidungen
über Konsumation und Produktion zu einer ineffizienten Verteilung von Ressourcen kommen.
Regierungsentscheidungen können die Wohlfahrt erhöhen.


Public Goods

Ein Feuerwerk ist nicht beschränkbar und es besteht auch keine Konkurrenz zu anderen Zuschauern.

The Free Rider Problem
Ein Free Rider ist eine Person, die den Nutzen aus einem Gut ziehen kann, aber nicht dafür bezahlt
(Bsp: Privates Feuerwerk). Weil öffentliche Güter nicht einschränkbar sind, hindet das Free Rider
Problem den privaten Markt daran, die Güter anzubieten. Die Regierung hat das Zeug dazu, das
Problem zu beheben. Entscheided die Regierung, dass der totale Nutzen die Kosten übersteigt, kann
es das öffentliche Gut zur Verfügung stellen und mit dem Steuereinkommen dafür aufkommen. So
stehen alle besser da.

Some Important Public Goods
Nationale Sicherheit

Grundlagenforschung

Armutsbekämpfung

CASE STUDY – Are Lighthouses Public Goods?

Leuchttürme sind ein öfentliches Gut und kein Schiffskapitän kann von der Benutzung eines
Leuchtturmes ausgeschlossen werden. Deshalb sind die meisten Leuchttürme heute in
Regierungsbesitz. Früher verlangten die Leuchtturmbetreiber jedoch Geld von den nahe gelegenen
Häfen. Zahlten diese nicht, wurde der Leuchtturm abgstellt und die Schiffe begannen den Hafen zu
meiden. Bei der Bestimmung, ob ein Gut öffentlich ist, muss darauf geachtet werden, wie viele Leute
daraus Nutzen ziehen und ob sie von der Benutzung ausgeschlossen werden können. Es entsteht
dann ein Free Rider Problem, wenn die Zahl der Nutzniesser gross ist und der Ausschluss eines
einzelnen unmöglich ist. Nutz ein Leuchtturm vielen Kapitänen, ist es ein öffentliches Gut. Nutz es
jedoch hauptsächlich einem Hafen, ist es ein privates Gut.

The Difficult Job of Cost-Benefit Analysis.
Die Regierung muss also die öffentlichen Güter zur Verfügung stellen. Zum Beispiel zieht die
Regierung in Betracht eine Autobahn zu bauen. Um zu entscheiden, ob sie die Autobahn bauen soll,
muss sie den Nutzen all derer, die die Autobahn nutzen würden, mit den Kosten des Baus und des
Unterhalts vergleichen. Es ist eine Kosten-Nutzen-Analyse nötig, die die totalen Kosten und Nutzen
für die Gesellschaft errechnet. Dies ist ein sehr schwieriges Unterfangen, da die Autobahnbenutzung
nichts kosten wird, besteht kein Preis, an dem man den Wert messen könnte. Bei Umfragen würden
die Leute keinen grossen Anreiz haben, die Wahrheit zu sagen. In einem privaten Markt zeigt jeder,
wieviel Wert ein Gut für ihn hat. Die Ergebnisse einer Kosten-Nutzen-Analyse sind jedoch im besten
Fall eine grobe Schätzung.

CASE-STUDY How Much is a Life Worth?

€10 Million


Common Ressources

Allgemeine Ressourcen sind, wie öffentliche Güter nicht einschränkbar. Allerdings sind die
allgemeinen Ressourcen der Konkurrenz ausgesetzt. Ist das Gut einmal vorhanden, müssen sich die
Gesetzesmacher darum kümmern, wie oft dieses Gut benutzt wird.

The Tragedy of the Commons
Benützt eine Person ein allgemeines Gut, vermindert er den Nutzen der anderen. Aufgrund dieser
negativen Externalität, neigen die allgemeinen Ressourcen dazu, stark ausgebeutet zu werden. Die
Regierung kann dem mit Regulationen oder Steuern entgegentreten. Ausserdem könnte sie
versuchen das öffentliche Gut in ein privates Gut umzuwandeln. „What is common to many is taken
less care of, for all men have greater regard for what is their own than for what they possess in
common with others.

Einige wichtige allgemeine Ressourcen:

Saubere Luft und sauberes Wasser

Verstopfte Strassen

Fische, Wale und andere Wildtiere.


Conclusion: The Importance of Property Rights

Wir haben gesehen, dass es Güter gibt, die der Markt nicht ausreichend anbietet. Der Markt
scheitert an den Besitzrechten. Dieses Problem kann von der Regierung gelöst werden. Das kann zu
einer Erhöhung der Wohlfahrt führen.
13 The Costs of Production


What are Costs?

Um eine Pizzeria zu betreiben sind verschieden Aufwendungen nötig. Der Betreiber muss die
Zutaten und Maschinen kaufen. Er muss Personal einstellen. Viele Probleme die hier vorkommen,
gibt es auch bei grösseren Firmen.

Total Revenue, Total Cost and Profit
Um zu verstehen, was für Entscheidungen eine Firma triff, müssen wir verstehen, was ihr Ziel ist.
Ökonomen nehmen normalerweise an, dass das Ziel einer Firma ist, den Profit zu maximieren. Der
Profit einer Firma setzt sich zusammen aus ihrem Umsatz minus den Kosten, die sie hat um zu
produzieren.

Profit= Total Revenue – Total Cost

Die Aufgabe der Firma ist es, den Profit so gross wie möglich zu machen. Den Umsatz zu bestimmen
ist einfach: Die Anzahl verkaufte Güter multipliziert mit dem Preis. Die Kosten zu bestimmen ist
etwas schwerer.

Costs as Opportunity Costs
Wenn Ökonomen von den Produktionskosten einer Firma sprechen, beinhaltet das alle
Opportunitästkosten, die sie beim Output der Güter und Dienstleistungen haben. Manchmal sind die
Opportunitätskosten offensichtlich: Um Mehl im Wert von €1000 zu kaufen, muss der Besitzer
€1000 aufgeben. Wenn der Besitzer aber Arbeiter einstellt, sind die Löhne ein Teil der Firmenkosten.
Weil die Firma für diese KostenGeld Auszahlen muss, heissen diese Kosten explizite Kosten. Im
Gegenteil dazu, benötigen einige Opportunitätskosten , die impliziten Kosten, keine Auszahlung.
Könnte der Besitzer in der Zeit für €100 pro Stunde als Programmierer arbeiten, gibt er für jede
Stunde in der er in der Pizzeria arbeitet €100 auf. Dieses aufgegebene Einkommen, ist auch Teil
seiner Kosten.

Die Unterscheidung zwischen expliziten und impliziten Kosten zeigt einen wichtigen Unterschied
zwischen der Art wie Ökonomen und Buchhalter Geschäfte analysieren. Buchhalter haben den Job,
Geldflüsse zu verfolgen, die in und aus der Firma fliessen. Ökonomen dagegen interessieren sich für
beide Arten von Kosten, da diese wichtig für die Produktions- und Preisgestaltung sind.

The Cost of Capital as an Opportunity Cost
Eine wichtge implizite Kost, ist das Kapital, das in eine Firma investiert wurde. Der Besitzer musste
für seine Pizzeria dem Vorgänger €300’000 bezahlen. Hätte er das Geld bei einem Zinssatz von 5%
auf die Bank legen können, so hätte er im Jahr €15'000 verdienen können. Hätte er €200'000 selbst
bezahlt und 100'000 von der Bank besorgt, wären die Opportunitätskosten immer noch €15'000. Der
Buchhalter aber wird sich nur für die expliziten Kosten von €10'000 Zinsen des Kredites
interessieren.
Economic Profit Versus Accounting Profit.
Ökonomen geben den ökonomischen Profit einer Firma an, als den Umsatz einer Firma minus deren
Opportunitätskosten. Der Buchhalter gibt den buchhalterischen Profit an, als den Umsatz der Firma
minus deren explizite Kosten. Der Buchhalterische Profit ist normalerweise grösser, als der
ökonomische Profit. Um als Firma von einem ökonomischen Standpunkt aus profitabel zu sein, muss
der Umsatz alle Opportunitätskosten decken ( implizite und explizite).


Production and Costs

People think at the margin. Das marginale Produkt eines Inputfaktors der Produktion ist die
Erhöhung des Outputs, die man durch die Erhöhung des Inputfaktors um eine Einheit, erhält. Je
mehr man den Inputfaktor erhöht, um so kleiner wird das marginale Produkt. Dies nennt man das
sich verkleinernde marginale Produkt. Beispiel: Arbeiter in der Pizzeria müssen sich Platz und
Maschinen teilen, dadurch verlieren sie an Effizienz. Das diminishing marginal product ist in der
Produktionskurve an der sich verkleinernden Steigung der Kurve zu erkennen.

From the Production Function to the Total Cost Curve
Werden also mehr Arbeiter eingestellt, steigt zwar der Umsatz, aber auch die Kosten. Für jeden
zusätzlichen Arbeiter ergeben sich neue Totalkosten. Daraus lässt sich eine Kurve der totalen Kosten
bilden, deren Steigung mit der Anzahl Arbeiter zunimmt.


The Various Measures of Cost

Fixed and Variable Costs
Die Totalen Kosten können in zwei verschiedene Typen eingeteilt werden. Die fixen Kosten
verändern sich nicht mit der produzierten Quantität. Sie fallen auch an, wenn die Firma nicht
produziert (Bsp: Miete, Verkaufspersonal). Die variablen Kosten ändern sich mit der Änderung der
produzierten Menge. Es sind Kosten für die Rohstoffe, Zutaten, zusätzliche Arbeiter usw.. Wird
nichts produziert, sind die variablen Kosten gleich null. Die totalen Kosten einer Firma sind die
fixen Kosten plus die variablen Kosten.

Average and Marginal Kost
Average Total Cost = Total Cost/Quantity

Marginal Cost = Change in Total Cost/ Change in Quantity

Cost Curves and their Shapes

Rising Marginal Cost

Die Marginalen Kosten stiegen mit der produzierten Menge. Dies basiert auf dem sich verringernden
marginalen Produkt.
U-Shaped Average Total Cost

Die durchschnittlichen Fixkosten sinken mit jeder zusätzlich produzierten Einheit. Die
durchschnittlichen variablen Kosten steigen mit jeder produzierten Einheit (diminishing marginal
product). Der Tiefpunkt der Kurve nennt sich efficient Scale. Es ist die produzierte Menge, welche
die durchschnittlichen totalen Kosten minimiert.

The Relationship between Marginal Cost and Average Total Cost

Immer wenn die marginal costs höher als die average total costs sind, steigen die average total costs.

Warum?: Wir erhöhen die Produktion um eine Einheit: Sind die Kosten dieser Einheit höher als die
average cost bis zu diesem Punkt, wird das die average cost in die Höhe ziehen. Kostet die neue
Einheit weniger, wird es die average cost nach unten ziehen. Das heisst: Sind die marginalen Kosten
tiefer als die Durchschnittskosten, werden die Durchschnittskosten fallen und umgekehrt.

Die Kurve der marginalen Kosten wird die ATC-Kurve immer in ihrem Tiefpunkt schneiden.

Typical Cost Curves
In vielen Firmen tritt das diminishing marginal product nicht gleich nach der Einstellung des ersten
zusätzlichen Arbeiters auf. Je nach Produktionsprozess kann der zweite oder dritte Arbeiter ein
höheres marginal product als der erste haben, da sie sich die Arbeit untereinander teilen können
und produktiver arbeiten als einer alleine.


Costs in the Short Run and in the Long Run

The Relationship between Short-Run and Long-Run Average Total Cost
Die Kategorisierung von fixen und variable Kosten einer Firma kann sich über längere Zeit ändern.
Auf kurze Zeit kann die Firma ihren Output nur mit Einstellung von neuen Mitarbeitern erhöhen.
Über längere Zeit jedoch können neue Produktionshallen gebaut werden. Dies sind eigentlich fixe
Kosten aber über längere Zeit werden sie zu variablen Kosten. Viele Entscheidungen sind fix über
kurze Zeit aber über lange Zeit sind sie variabel. Die Kostenkurven für kurze und lange Zeit weichen
also voneinander ab.

Economies and Diseconomies of Scale
Economies of scale entstehen bei der Erhöhung der Produktion z.B. durch Spezialisierung der
einzelnen Arbeiter. Wenn die totalen Durchschnittskosten bei Erhöhung der produzierten Menge
gleich bleiben redet man von costant returns to scale. Steigen die Durchschnittskosten bei Erhöhung
der Menge an, spricht man von diseconomies of scale. Diese entstehen z.B. durch
Koordinationsschwierigkeiten.
14 Firms in Competitive Markets


What is a Competitive Market?

The Meaning of Competition
-Es gibt viele Käufer und viele Verkäufer im Markt.

-Die angebotenen Güter sind grösstenteils die Selben.

Aufgrund dieser Zustände sind Aktionen eines Einzelnen unwichtig. Der Marktpreis ist gegeben. Die
Leute sind price takers.

-Firmen können den Markt frei betreten oder verlassen.

The Revenue of a Competitive Firm
Umsatz einer Firma = P mal Q wobei P fix ist.

Durchschnittlicher Umsatz = totaler Umsatz/ Q

Grenzumsatz = Änderung Umsatz/ Änderung Q

Für alle Firmen gilt: Der durchschnittliche Umsatz ist gleich dem Preis des Gutes.

Und: Der Grenzumsatz ist gleich dem Preis des Gutes.


Profit Maximization and the Competitive Firm’s Supply Curve

A Simple Example of Profit Maximization
Solange die Grenzkosten kleiner sind als der Grenzertrag, sollte die Produktionsmenge erhöht
werden.

The Marginal Cost Curve and the Firm’s Supply Decision
Regel zur Profitmaximierung:Sind Grenzumsatz und Grenzkosten gleich hoch, ist der Profit maximal.

The Firm’s Short Run Decision to Shut Down
    -   Shutdown = short run
    -   Exit = long run

Die meisten Firmen können ihre Fixkosten über kurze Zeit nicht abstellen, über längere Zeit jedoch
schon.

        Shutdown if TR < VC      Shutdown if P < AVC

Spilt Milk and Other Sunk Costs
Ökonomen nennen Kosten Sunk Costs, wenn sie schon getätigt worden sind und nicht mehr
rückgängig gemacht werden können. Weil man nichts mehr an den Sunk Costs ändern kann, sollte
man sie beim Treffen von Entscheidungen am besten ausser Acht lassen. Fixe Kosten sind auf kurze
Frist Sunk Costs. Deshalb werden bei der Entscheidung das Restaurant/ die Produktion am laufen zu
halten nür die variablen Kosten in betracht gezogen.

The Firm’s Long-Run Decision to Exit or enter a Market
Exit if P < ATC

Enter if P > ATC


15 Monopoly

Eine Monopolfirma ist ein price maker.


Why Monopolies Arise

Eine Firma ist ein Monopolist, wenn sie der einzige Verkäufer ihres Produkts ist und wenn es keine
naheliegenden Substitute zu ihrem Produkt gibt. Der Monopolist bleibt der einzige Verkäufer in
einem Markt, weil kein anderer sich am Markt beteiligen kann.

Es gibt drei Gründe, dass keine andere Firma am Markt teilnehmen kann:

    1. Die benötigte Ressource gehört einer einzigen Firma
    2. Die Regierung gibt einer einzelnen Firma das Recht ein Gut oder eine Dienstleistung
       anzubieten.
    3. Die Produktionskosten machen einen Produzenten effizienter als eine grosse Anzahl an
       Produzenten.

Monopoly Ressources
Einziger Wasserhändler in einer Stadt. Er wird das Wasser sicher zu einem höheren Preis als nur die
Grenzkosten pro Liter verkaufen.

In der Realität gibt es nur wenige Firmen, die eine Ressource besitzen für die es kein Substitut gibt.

(DeBeers)

Government-Created Monopolies
Alkoholverkauf in Schweden. Patentrechte und Copyright-Rechte  Die Qualität von beispielsweise
Bücher oder Medikamenten steigt.

Natural Monopolies
Ein natürliches Monopol besteht, wenn eine Firma ein Gut zu tieferen Preisen auf dem Markt
anbieten kann als zwei oder mehr Firmen. Beispiel Wasserversorgung: Eine Firma hat tiefere
Durchschnittskosten, als wenn zwei Firmen ein Leitungsnetzwerk aufbauen müssen und sich so
grössere Fixkosten ergeben.
Eine Brücke mit besteuertem Übergang ist auch ein natürliches Monopol: Je mehr Übergänge
stattfinden umso kleiner werden die Kosten pro Übergang.

Expandiert ein Markt, so kann ein natürliches Monopol zu einem freien Wettbewerb werden ( Ist die
Brücke zu klein, braucht es eine zweite.)


How Monopolies Make Production and Pricing Decisions

.Monopoly Versus Competition
Ein Monopolist kann den Preis seines Outputs beeinflussen. Eine Firma im Wettbewerb nimmt den
Preis des Outputs von den Marktkonditionen als gegeben. Der Monopolist kann den Preis seines
Gutes verändern, indem er die angebotene Menge variiert.



Die Nachfragekurve einer Firma im perfekten Wettbewerb ist horizontal (komplett elastisch), da ihre
Mittbewerber genau das selbe Produkt verkaufen. Da der Monopolist der einzige Verkäufer im
Markt ist, ist seine Nachfragekurve, die Marktnachfragekurve. Der Monopolist kann also nicht den
Preis frei bestimmen, er muss sich nach der Nachfragekurve richten. Indem er die produzierte
Menge oder den Preis verändert, kann er sich auf der Nachfragekurve bewegen. Er kann aber keinen
Punkt ausserhalb der Kurve wählen.

A Monopoly’s Revenue
Auch bei einem Monopolisten gilt: AR=P. Für einen Monopolisten ist der Grenzumsatz immer kleiner
als der Preis weil er einer fallenden Nachfragekurve ausgesetzt ist. Um die verkaufte Menge zu
erhöhen, muss eine Monopolfirma den Prei senken. Der Grenzumsatz einer Monopolfirma
unterscheidet sich stark von dem einer normalen Firma. Erhöht die Firma die verkaufte Menge gibt
es zwei Effekte:          (Umsatz=P×Q)

    1. Mehr Output wird verkauf, also steigt Q
    2. Der Preis fällt, also sinkt P

Für eine kompetitive Firma, gibt es den Preiseffekt nicht, sie kann zu einem gegebenen Preis so viel
verkaufen wie sie will. Der Grenzumsatz einer normalen Firma entspricht dem Preis einer Einheit des
Gutes. Will ein Monopolist bei einem bestimmten Preis eine Einheit mehr verkaufen, muss er den
Preis seiner bereits angebotenen Einheiten senken. Daraus folgt, dass der Grenzumsatz eines
Monopolisten kleiner ist, als der Preis.

Profit Maximization
QMax: Marginal Cost = Marginal Revenue Dort wo sich die Grenzumsatz und Grenzkostenkurve
schneiden.

Competitive Firm: P = MR = MC
Monopoly Firm: P > MR = MC
Die Nachfragekurve zeigt an, wie viel die Käufer bereit sind bei der jeweilgen Menge zu bezahlen.
Daher wählt der Monopolist die Menge, welche mit dem Kreuzungspunkt von MR und MC
übereinstimmt.

A Monopoly’s Profit.
Profit= Umsatz – Kosten =Umsatz/Menge – Kosten/Menge= (Preis – Durschnittliche Kosten) × Menge

Ist dieselbe Gleichung wie für den totalen Wettbewerb.

CASE STUDY – Monopoly Drugs Versus Generic Drugs

Das Patent für ein Medikament läuft aus. Was passiert mit dem Preis?

Während das Patent noch läuft, verkauft der Monopolist zu einem Preis über seinen Grenzkosten..
Läuft das Patent aus, dann steigen neue Firmen in den Markt ein und der Preis wird sich bei den
Grenzkosten einpendeln.


The Wellfare Cost of Monopoly

Monopolisten verlangen einen höheren Preis als kompetitive Firmen.

The Deadweight Loss
Der Social planer würde eine Outputmenge bestimmen, wo sich die Nachfragekurve und
Grenzkostenkurve schneiden. Der Monopolist würde den Schnittpunkt von Grenzkosten- und
Grenzumsatzkurve wählen. Die Käufer, welche bereit wären für das Gut mehr als die Grenzkosten
aber weniger als der Monopolist vorgibt bereit wären zu bezahlen, springen nun ab. Es wäre für sie
ineffizient, weil der Preis höher als ihr Nutzen wäre.. Daher verhindert das Monopol einige
gegenseitige Geschäfte. Es entsteh dort ein DWL. Ein Monopolist ist wie ein privater
Steuereintreiber.

The Monopoly’s Profit: A Social Cost?
Ein Monopolist macht also einen höheren Gewinn Dank seiner market power. Das Monopol
beeinflusst die totale Rente nicht. Der Euro, der dem Konsumenten fehlt, geht zum Produzenten, ist
also nicht verloren. Das Problem besteht darin, dass in einem monopolisierter Markt, die Rente
kleiner ist, als in einem freien Markt. Die Verkleinerung entspricht gerade dem DWL. Die verkaufte
Menge ist ineffizient klein.

Falls eine Firma aber Geld aufwenden muss, um das Monopol aufrecht zu erhalten, dann sinkt die
totale Rente und es entstehen soziale Kosten.


Public Policy Towards Monopolies

Als Lösung auf dieses Marktversagen von Monopolen kann die Regierung folgende Schritte einleiten:

    1. Monopolisierte Industrien versuchen wettbewerbsfähiger zu machen.
    2. Das Verhalten von Monopolisten regulieren.
    3. Private Monopolfirmen verstaatlichen (service public)
    4. Gar nichts tun und abwarten.

Increasing Competition
Alle industrialisierten Länder haben Gesetze, um Fimenfusionen, die gegen das öffentliche Interesse
verstossen zu verbieten ( Bsp: Microsoft und Intuit, AT&T). Diese Gesetzte sind sinnvoll, denn die
Manager dieser Firmen sind dazu angestellt, den Gewinn zu maximieren und nicht auf das
öffentliche Wohl bedacht zu sein. Auf der anderen Seite, sind Fusionen manchmal auch förderlich,
wenn sie Synergien schaffen. Die Regierung muss in der Lage sein zu erkennen, ob der Nutzen der
neu geschaffenen Synergien grösser ist als der soziale Schaden, die bei einer Fusion entstehen.

Regulation
Firmen, die über natürliche Monopole verfügen, wie zum Beispiel Wasser, Gas oder Strom, dürfen
ihre Preise meist nicht nach ihrem freien Willen gestalten. Die Regierung gibt ihnen den Preis vor.
Aber welchen Preis soll man nun vorgeben? Manche argumentieren, dass der beste Preis den
Grenzkosten entsprechen würde und so die angebotene Menge sozial effizient wäre. Dabei ergeben
sich aber die folgenden Probleme:

Natürliche Monopole haben eine fallende Nachfragekurve. Setzten die Regulatoren den Preis auf
Höhe der Grenzkosten (sehr klein bei natürlichen Monopolen), so sind die Durchschnittskosten der
Firma grösser als der Preis und die Firma wird Geld verlieren. Auf diese Problem könnte die
Regierung reagieren, indem sie den monopolisten subventioniert. Doch dadurch müsste die
Regierung Geld durch Steuern einnehmen, was wiederum zu einem DWL führen würde. Die
Regierung könnte dem Monopolisten auch erlauben, einen höheren Preis als die Grenzkosten zu
verlangen. Entspricht der Preis genau den Durchschnittskosten, dann führt das zu keinem
ökonomischen Gewinn. Das würde wieder zu einem DWL führen, da der Anbieter einen zu hohen
Preis verlangt. Das entspricht einer Steuer. Ein weiteres Problem beim Durchschnittskostenpreis, ist,
dass es für die Firma keine Anreize gibt, den Preis tief zu halten. Normalerweise bedeuten weniger
Kosten einen höheren Gewinn. In der Praxis wird Firmen erlaubt einen Teil der gesparten Kosten zu
behalten.

Public Ownership
Bei einer Verstaatlichung, wird die Monopolfirma vom Staat selbst geleitet. Ökonomen ziehen den
Privaten Besitz einer Firma dem staatlichen vor, da für Private der Anreiz Kosten zu reduzieren
grösser ist (solange sie einen Teil davon ernten). „ Um sicher zu gehen, dass eine Firma gut geführt
wird, ist das Wahllokal weniger verlässlich als das Motiv eines höheren Gewinnes.

Doing Nothing
Manche ökonomen sagen, dass es am besten sei, nicht in Monopolsituationen einzugreifen. (Stiegler
S.307)


Price Discrimination

Monopolisten verkaufen ihre Güter zu unterschiedlichen Preisen an unterschiedliche Käufer.
A Parable about Pricing




18 The Markets for the Factors of Production


The Demand for Labour

Firmen im freien Wettbewerb haben keinen Einfluss auf den Preis der Güter und den Preis von
Arbeitskräften. Sie bestimmt nur wieviel Güter sie verkauft und wie viele Arbeitskräfte sie anstellt.
Für die Firma geht es nur darum den maximalen Profit aus den gegebenen Bedingungen zu schlagen.

The Production Function and the Marginal Product of Labour
Um zu sehen, wie viele Arbeiter die Firma anstellen muss, muss sie in Betracht ziehen, wie sich die
Grösser der Arbeiterschaft auf den Output auswirkt. Die Produktionsfunktion gibt das Verhältnis
von eingesetzten Inputgütern , zu dem daraus resultierenden Output an.

Marginal Product of Labour = ∆Output/ ∆Labour

Auch hier gibt es wieder das diminishing marginal product.

The Value of the Marginal Product and the Demand for Labour
Profit = Revenue – Cost  Workers contribution to revenue – worker’s wage.

Value of the marginal product (of any input) = marginal product × P(Output)

Da der Preis gegeben ist, sinkt der Wert des Grenzproduktes (wie der des Grenzproduktes selbst)
wenn sich seine Anzahl erhöht.

Die Firma erhöht die Anzahl Arbeiter also nur, solange ihr zusätzlich erarbeiteter Profit höher oder
gleich der Lohnkosten sind.

         Die Value of marginal product Kurve ist die Arbeiternachfragekurve einer kompetitiven,
          Profit-maximierenden Firma.

What causes the Labour Demand Curve to Shift?

The Output Price

Value of marginal product = marginal product × P(Output)

Steigt der Outputpreis, steigt auch der Wert des Grenzproduktes.  die Kurve verschiebt sich
entprechend.
Technological Change

Wissenschaftler finden dauernd neue Wege, Dinge schneller und besser zu tun. Das marginal
product of labour ist daher gestiegen, was zu einem höheren Wert des marginal product of labour
führt.

The Supply of Other Factors

Die verfügbare Menge eines Produktionsfaktors kann Einfluss auf die Nachfrage nach einem anderen
Faktor haben ( Bsp: Knappheit an Leitern bei Apfelpflückern  weniger Apfelpflücker werden
benötigt.).


The Supply of Labour

The Trade-Off between work and Leisure
Der Trade-Off zwischen Arbeit und Freizeit liegt hinter der Angebotskurve der Arbeit. Eine Stunde
Freizeit bedeutet eine Stunde kein Einkommen. Verdient man €15 pro Stunde, sind die
Opportunitätskosten einer Stunde Freizeit €15. Steigt der Lohn, so steigen die Opportunitätskosten.
Die Arbeits-Angebotskurve zeigt auf, wie die Leute bei verschiedenen Löhnen auf die
Opportunitätskosten reagieren. Wir nehmen an, dass die Angebotskurven steigen.

What Causes the Labour Supply Curve to Shift?
Die Labour Supply Kurve verschiebt sich immer dann, wenn Leute die Menge ihrer Arbeit bei einem
bestimmten Lohn ändern.

Changes in Tastes

Die Gesellschaft verändert sich. Heutzutage arbeiten immer mehr Frauen. Die Familie ist etwas in
den Hintergrund getreten. Das Angebot an Arbeit ist gestiegen.

Changes in Alternative Opportunities

Das Angebot eines Arbeitsmarktes hängt davon ab, wie die Alternativen eines anderen Marktes
aussehen. Verdienen Birnenpflücker plötzlich das doppelte, werden die Apfelpflücker ins
Birnenpflückgeschäft einsteigen und das Angebot an Birnenpflückern wird steigen.

Immigration


Equilibrium in the Labour Market

Zwei Fakten, wie sich Löhne in kompetitiven Märkten bestimmen lassen:

    1. Die Löhne passen sich dem Gleichgewicht von Angebot und Nachfrage nach Arbeit an.
    2. Die Löhne entsprechen dem Wert des marginal products.

Diese zwei Zustände stellen sich automatisch zusammen ein. Wenn Angebot und Nachfrage nach
Arbeit sich im Gleichgewicht befinden, haben die Firmen exakt den Betrag an Arbeit gekauft, der für
sie bei Gleichgewichtslohn profitabel ist. Das heisst: Jede Firma hat ihren Profit maximiert, sie hat
Arbeiter eingestell bis der Wert des marginal products dem Lohn entspricht. Deshalb muss der Lohn
dem marginal product entsprechen, nachdem es Angebot und Nachfrage ins Gleichgewicht gebracht
hat.

Shifts in Labour Supply
Nehmen wir an, dass Immigration das Angebot an Apfelpflückern erhöht. Die Angebotskurve
verschiebt sich nach rechts. Der Gleichgewichtslohn wird tiefer. Die Firmen stellen also mehr
Arbeiter ein. Eine steigende Anzahl Arbeiter bedeutet ein diminishing marginal product. Beide
Faktoren sind also kleiner als vor der Ankunft der neuen Arbeiter.

Shifts in Labour Demand
Steigt der Preis für Äpfel, dann bleibt das MPL für jede Anzahl von Arbeiter gleich. Das VMPL jedoch
steigt. Die Löhne der Arbeiter sind also davon abhängig, wieviel die Firma für ihr Gut bekommt.

CASE STUDY – Productivity and Wages

Die Wachstumsrate der Produktivität und die der Reallöhne, sind eng miteinander verbunden. Je
mehr Produktivitätswachstum über eine bestimmte Zeitspanne stattgefunden hat, umso mehr sind
die Reallöhne angestiegen.


The Other Factors of Production: Land and Capital

Kategorien: Labour, Land and Capital. Kapital: Die Ausrüstung und die Strukturen um Güter
herzustellen und Dienstleistungen anbieten zu können.

Equilibrium in the Markets for Land and Capital
Der Entschluss wieviel Land oder Kapital zu mieten, wird nach der selben Logik gefällt, wie bei der
Arbeit. Die Faktoren werden so lange erhöht, bis der Wert des Grenzproduktes des Faktors dem
Preis des Faktors entspricht.

Bei einer kompetitiven, profitorientierten Firma ist der „Mietpreis“ eines Faktors gleich dem VMP
des Faktors.



Wird Land oder Kapital nicht nur gemietet, sondern gekauft, bestimmt sich der Gleichgewichts-
Kaufpreis aus dem jetzigen VMPL und dem erwarteten VMP der Zukunft.

Linkages Amongst the Factors of Production
Ein Faktor im Überfluss hat ein kleines MP, einer der rar ist, ein hohes. Sinkt das Angebot eines
Faktors, steigt sein Preis.

Verändert sich das Angebot eines Faktors, sind die Auswirkungen nicht nur auf den Markt dieses
Faktors beschränkt. Meistens werden die Produktionsfaktoren so zusammen eingesetzt, dass ihre
Produktivität von der Verfügbarkeit der anderen Faktoren abhängt. Die Angebotsänderung eines
Faktors hat also Einfluss auf den Verdienst aller Faktoren.

CASE STUDY – The Economics oft he Black Death

Die Pest tötete ein Drittel der Bevölkerung. Die Löhne stiegen, das MP von Land ist gesunken 
tiefere Mieten.


Conclusion

Wieviel für ein Faktor bezahlt wird, hängt von Angebot und Nachfrage dieses Faktors ab. Die
Nachfrage hängt vom MP des Faktors ab. Im Gleichgewicht


22 Frontiers of Microeconomics


Asymmetric Information

Arbeitnehmer, Autoverkäufer

Hidden Action, Hidden Characteristics

Hidden Actions: Principals, Agents and Moral Hazard
Moral Hazard = Die Neigung einer Person, die nicht total überwacht ist,sich unehrlich oder sonstwie
ungewollt zu verhalten.

Agent= Eine Person, die für eine andere Person, den Principal eine Aufgabe ausübt.

Mögliche Lösungen gegen Moral Hazard:

    1. Bessere Überwachung
    2. Höhere Löhne
    3. Verzögerte Bezahlung

Auch Kombinationen sind machbar.

Weitere Beispiele: Ein Hausbesitzer mit Brandversicherung neigt dazu zu wenig Feuermelder zu
kaufen, da er und nicht die Versicherung dann Kosten hat. Familie am flutgefährdeten Fluss, bei
einer Flut muss die Regierung für Flutschäden aufkommen.

Hidden Characteristics: Adverse Selection and the Lemons Problem
Adverse Selections= Die Neigung, dass die Mischung der unbekannten Attribute aus der Sicht des
uninformierten Käufers unerwünscht sein könnten.

Adverse Selections kommen in Märkten vor, in denen der Verkäufer mehr über die Attribute der
Güter weiss, als der Käufer.
Bsp: Markt für gebrauchte Autos. Gebrauchte Autos in schlechtem Zustand werden wahrscheinlicher
verkauft, als gebrauchte Autos in sehr gutem Zustand. Der Käufer rechnet also damit, ein schlechtes
Auto zu erhalten und ist demnach bereit weniger zu zahlen. Dies kann erklären, wieso ein nur
wenige Wochen altes Auto so viele tausend Franken weniger wert ist, als ein neues Auto.

Beispiel: Krankenversicherung. Die Kosten der Versicherung sind für einen gesunden Menschen
eigentlich zu hoch. Aber je weniger gesund die Menschen sind umso grösser ist die
Wahrscheinlichkeit, dass sie sich eine Versicherung zulegen.

Signalling to Convey Private Information
Signalling= Die informierte Partei gibt iher Information an uninformierte weiter (Werbung,
Ausbildungsdiplome). Es geht darum, die andere Partei von der Glaubhaftigkeit zu überzeugen.

Damit das Signal glaubwürdig ist, muss es teuer sein, sonst würde jeder es nutzen. Gleichzeitig muss
das Signal für die Partei mit dem qualitativ besseren Produkt weniger Kosten, sonst hätten alle den
gleichen Anreiz das Signal zu nützen und es würde nichts aussagen.

CASE STUDY – Gifts as Signals

Private Information: Liebt er mich? Gute Geschenkwahl ist ein Signal seiner Liebe. Es kostet ( es
braucht Zeit) die aufgewendete Zeit ist höher, wenn er sie nicht liebt, als wenn er sie liebt.

Signalling Theorie: Die Leute kümmern sich am meisten um einen Brauch, wenn die Stärke der
Zuneigung am stärksten in Frage gestellt ist. ( Geschenk von Freundin, Geschenk der Eltern)

Screening to induce Information Revelation.
Screening= Eine uninformierte Partei versucht eine informierte Partei dazu zu bringen,
Informationen preiszugeben.

Bsp: Unabhänige Überprüfung des Autos vor dem Kauf. Willigt der Verkäufer ein ist das Auto eher
ok, als wenn er verweigert.

Bsp: Autoversicherung mit und ohne Selbstbehalt. Die risikoreichen Autofahrer nehmen die teurere,
vollabdeckende Verisicherung, während die vorsichtigen einen Selbstbehalt in Kauf nehmen.

Asymmetric Information and Public Policy
Drei Gründe, wieso die Regierung nicht nötigerweise in die uneffizienten Märkte mit asymmetrischer
Information eingreifen muss:

    1. Die Märkte können manchmal mit den Asymmetrien selbst umgehen, indem sie eine
       Kombination von Screening und Signalling benützen.
    2. Die Regierung hat selten mehr Wissen, als die privaten Parteien.
    3. Die Regierung selbst ist eine nicht perfekte Institution.
23 Measuring a Nation’s Income


The Economy’s Income and Expenditure

GDP gibt zwei Dinge auf einmal an: Gesamtes Einkommen der Wirtschaft und gesamte Ausgaben für
den Output der Wirtschaft. Diese beiden Dinge sind das Selbe. Für eine Wirtschaft muss gelten: Was
sie einnimmt entspricht ihren Ausgaben. Das muss so sein, weil jede Transaktion zwei Parteien hat:
einen Käufer und einen Verkäufer. David bezahlt Victoria €100, damit sie ihm den Rasen mäht. Das
GDP steigt um €100.  Circular Flow Diagramm.


The Measurement of Gross Domestic Product

Das GDP entspricht dem Marktwert aller produzierten Güter und Dienstleistungen in einem Land
innerhalb einer bestimmten Zeitperiode.

„GDP is the Market Value…”
Hier werden Äpfel mit Birnen verglichen. Der Marktwert der einzelnen Güter entspricht dem, wieviel
die Leute bereit sind zu bezahlen. Ist der Preis eines Apfels doppelt so hoch, wie der Preis einer
Orange, so tragen die Äpfel doppelt so viel zum GDP bei, wie die Orangen.

„…Of All…“
Sogar Immobilien werden mitgezählt. Auch wenn der Besitzer im eigenen Haus wohnt. Die
Regierung nimmt dann einfach an, dass er sich selbst miete zahlt. Einige Güter jedoch werden
ausgelassen, weil die Messung zu kompliziert wäre. Drogen oder hausgezogenes Gemüse z.B.

„…Final…“
Verkauft eine Papierfabrik Papier für Weihnachtskarten, dann ist das Papier nur ein
Zwischenprodukt. Die Karte ist das Endprodukt. Nur Endprodukte werden ins GDP eingerechnet.
Werden Zwischenprodukte aber zwischengelagert, um sie später zu verkaufen, werden sie zu
Endprodukten.

„…Goods and Services…“

“…Produced…”
Nur Erstverkäufe werden miteinberechnet.

“…Within a Country…”
Dinge, die in eine Land produziert werden, gehören zum GDP des jeweiligen Territoriums,
unabhängig davon, welche Nationalität die Herstellerfirma hat.

„…In a Given Period of Time…“
Die Zeitintervalle betragen üblicherweise ein Jahr oder ein Viertel-Jahr. Vierteljährliche Berichte
werden normalerweise pro Jahr (mal 4 gerechnet).und mit saisonaler Anpassung angegeben.
The Components of GDP



Y(GDP)=C + I + G + NX

C = Consumption
I= Investment
G = Government Purchases
NX = Net Exports

Consumption
Haushaltsausgaben auf Güter und Dienstleistungen mit Ausnahme von Immobilien.

Investment
Ausgaben für Kapitalausstattung, Lagerbestände und Kauf von Immobilien.

Government Purchases
Ausgaben der Regierung für Güter und Service. Beispielsweise für Beamtengehälter.

Net Exports
Inländisch produzierte Güter, die im Ausland verkauft werden minus die vom Ausland eingekauften
Güter. Exporte – Importe


Real Versus Nominal GDP

Steigt das GDP von einem zum nächsten Jahr an, so muss etwas von folgendem eingetreten sein:

    1. Die Wirtschaft produziert einen grösseren Output an Güter und Dienstleistungen.
    2. Güter und Dienstleistungen werden zu einem höheren Preis verkauft.

Wenn Ökonomen die Wirtschaft über längere Zeit untersuchen, dann wollen sie diese zwei
Ereignisse trennen. Das heisst, sie wollen ein Mass der Güter und Dienstleistungen der Wirtschaft
das nicht von Preisänderungen betroffen ist. Dazu nimmt man das Real GDP.

Das real GDP beantwortet folgende Frage: Was wäre der Wert der Güter und Dienstleistungen,
wenn wir diese mit den Preisen von Jahr X bewerten.

Dies zeigt uns wie die Produktion der von Güter und Dienstleistungen der Wirtschaft sich verändert
hat.

The GDP Deflator
Ein relatives Mass für das Preis-Niveau eines Jahres im Vegleich zu dem Niveau eines späteren
Jahres, berechnet aus nominalem GDP durch realem GDP mal 100.
GDP and Economic Well-Being

Die Dinge, die das Leben lebenswert machen, werden vom GDP nicht direkt angegeben aber es gibt
an, wie gut wir fähig sind uns die dafür benötigten Dinge zu erschaffen und zu besorgen. Das GDP ist
aber kein gutes Mass für unser Wohlbefinden. Einige Dinge, die zu einem schönen Leben beitragen
können, sind nicht im GDP vertreten, wie etwa Freizeit. Würden alle auf Freizeit verzichten, dann
würde zwar das GDP steigen, aber es ist zu bezweifeln, dass sich dann alle besser fühlten. Würde
man alle Umweltgesetzte ausser Kraft setzen, dann würde das GDP auch steigen aber der
Menschheit würde es nicht besser gehen. Ehrenamtliche Arbeit erhöht das Wohlbefinden in unserer
Gesellschaft aber sie wird im GDP nicht wiederspiegelt. Das GDP sagt auch nichts darüber aus, wie
das Einkommen über die Gesellschaft verteilt ist.


24 Measuring the Cost of Living


The Consumer Price Index

Der CPI ist gibt die Kosten aller Güter und Dienstleistungen eines typischen Konsumenten an.

How the Consumer Price Index is Calculated
Die Office of National Statistics berechnet den CPI jeden Monat neu.

Die Schritte der Berechnung:

    1. Fix the Basket: Es muss bestimmt werden, welche Preise für die Konsumenten am
       wichtigsten sind. Die Güter, die am Meisten gekauft werden, sind die wichtigsten.
    2. Find the Prices: Die Preise der Güter im Basket müssen für jeden Zeitpunkt gesammelt
       werden.
    3. Compute the Basket’s Cost: Die Preise des Korbes werden für die verschiedenen Zeitpunkte
       berechnet. Während die Güter dieselben bleiben, ändern sich ihre Preise über die Jahre.
    4. Choose a base year and compute the index: Ein Jahr wird als Basisjahr bestimmt und dient
       als Vergleich. Um den Index auszurechnen wird der Preis des Korbes im Basisjahr durch den
       Preis des Vergleichsjahres geteilt und mit 100 multipliziert.
    5. Compute the Inflation Rate: Die Inflation entspricht der prozentualen Änderung des
       Preisindex im Vergleich zum Vorjahr.

    Es geibt auch noch den PPI er bezieht sich auf den Warenkorb der Produzenten. Da die
    Produzenten ihre Kosten meistens auf die Konsumenten weitergeben, gilt der PPI als wichtiger
    Indikator für CPI-Veränderungen.

Problems in Measuring the Cost of Living
Der CPI ist kein perfektes Mass für die Lebenskosten.

Probleme:
    1. Substitution Bias: Bei einem festen Warenkorb wird nicht einberechnet, dass die
       Konsumenten auf billigere Substitute umsteigen. So kommt es, dass die Zunahme der
       Lebenskosten zu hoch angegeben wird.
    2. Introduction of new goods: Grössere Auswahl macht jeden Franken mehr Wert. Da der CPI
       auf einem festgelegten Korb basiert, wird die vergrösserte Auswahl nicht mit einberechnet
       und die Lebenskosten scheinen höher als sie wirklich sind, da die höhere Kaufkraft des
       Frankens nicht einberechnet ist.
    3. Unmeasured quality change: Verschlechtert sich die Qualität eines Gutes, sinkt der Wert des
       Frankens, steigt die Qualität, braucht man kleinere Mengen des Gutes und daher steigt der
       Wert eines Frankens. (Lösung: die ONS macht eine Preisanpassung des Gutes entsprechend
       seiner Qualitätsänderung). Qualität is jedoch sehr schwer zu messen.

The CPI, the Harmonized Index of Consumer Prices and the Retail Price Index
Der CPI schliesst einige Güter aus, welche der RPI beinhaltet: Hauptsächlich Dinge, die das Wohnen
betreffen, wie etwa Gemeindesteuern oder Hypothekenzinsen. Diese Dinge werden ausgschlossen,
da ein Anstieg in Gemeindesteuern und Hypothekenzinsen aufgrund von Zinserhöhung nach dem
RPI eine steigende Inflation bedeuten würden obwohl die eigentlichen Inflationsauslöser der
Wirtschaft nicht auf eine Inflationserhöhung hindeuten. Ausserdem beinhaltet der CPI alle Haushalte
während der RPI die 4% Meistverdienenden und Rentner ausschliesst. Der CPI berücksichtigt auch
Bewohner von Lehranstalten und Auswärtige.

Dinge die für den CPI sprechen: Die Ökonomen glauben, dass er näher am Konzept des gesamten
Preisniveaus liegt. Die Zusammensetzung entspricht der anderer EU-Länder (HICP). Dies erlaubt
einen direkten Vergleich zwischen den Ländern.

The GDP Deflator Versus the Consumer Price Index
Es gibt zwei wichtige Unterschiede, die die beiden auseinanderlaufen lässt.

    1. Güter die im Ausland produziert werden und importiert werden sind nicht Teil des GDP aber
       Teil des Warenkorbes. Dies ist besonders wichtig für Produkte, die mit Öl zu tun haben.
    2. Die Güter im Korb sind bei den Vergleichen immer die Selben wie im Basisjahr. Für die
       Berechnung des GDP nimmt man den Preis der momentan produzierten Güter und
       vergleicht den Preis mit dem der vorangehenden Jahre(Preis der .momentanen Güter in der
       Vergangenheit)

    Dieser Unterschied ist nicht wichtig, wenn sich der Preis aller Güter gleich stark ändert. Ändern
    sich die Preise jedoch unterschiedlich, ist es wichtig, dass wir die Preise unterschiedlich
    gewichten.


Correcting Economic Variables for the Effects of Inflation

Money Figures From Different Times
Wir vergleichen die Löhne von Parlamentsabgeordneten. Waren die Löhne von 1911 (400£) hoch
oder tief im Vergleich zum heutigen Preisniveau? Angenommen der CPI von 1911 hätte heute einen
Wert von 5'040, dann würde das einem Faktor von 50.4 entsprechen.
50.4 × 400£ = 20’160£

 Der Lohn war eher schlecht.

CASE STUDY – Adjusting for inflation: Use the Force

Um festzustellen welches wirklich der beste Film aller Zeiten war, muss man den Preisanstieg der
Kinotickets mit einbeziehen.

Indexation
Indexierung ist die gesetzlich festgelegte automatische Anpassung eines Geldbetrages an die
Inflation.

So beinhalten viele Langzeitverträge von Firmen Indexierung an den Konsumentenpreisindex.

Real and Nominal Interest Rates
Die Anpassung von Ökonomischen Variablen an die Inflation ist dann sehr tricky, wenn wir uns
Zinssätze anschauen. Zinsen sind eine Gebühr in der Zukunft für eine Geldtransaktion in der
Vergangenheit. Daher verlangen Zinssätze immer einen Vergleich von Geldmengen zu
unterschiedlichen Zeitpunkten.

Der Nominalzins ist der Zins ohne Einberechnung der Inflation. Der Realzins ist der Zins, der an die
Inflation angepasst wurde.

RIR = NIR – IR


Conclusion

Inflation reduziert die Kaufkraft jeder Geldeinheit über Zeit.


25 Production and Growth


Economic Growth Around the World

Die reichsten Länder der Welt bleiben nicht automatisch die reichsten und die Ärmsten sind nicht
dazu verdammt, für immer die ärmsten zu bleiben.


Productivity: Its Role and Determinants

Why Productivity is so important
Robinsons Lebensstandard hängt davon ab, wie gut er Dinge produzieren kann. Produktivität
bezieht sich auf die Menge an Gütern und Dienstleistungen, die ein Arbeiter innerhalb einer Stunde
produzieren kann.
Je mehr Fisch Robinson fangen kann, um so mehr Fisch kriegt Robinson zu essen. Findet er einen
besseren Platz zum Fischen, fängt er mehr Fische.

Je höher die Produktivität der Arbeiter in einem Land, um so höher ist dessen Lebensstandard.

How Productivity is determined
Viele Faktoren beeinflussen die Produktivität.

Physical Capital

Der Vorrat an Ausrüstung und Einrichtungen, die zur Produktion dienen, ist das physische Kapital.

Mehr Werkzeuge, erlauben es einem Arbeiter die Arbeit schneller und genauer zu erledigen. Kapital
ist ein produzierter Produktionsfaktor.  Kapital wird gebraucht um neues Kapital herzustellen.

Human Capital

Humankapital ist die Bezeichnung für das Wissen und die Fähigkeiten, die die Arbeiter mitbringen.
Diese Fähigkeiten und dieses Wissen erhalten sie über Bildung. Auch Humankapital wird zur
Produktion von neuem Kapital gebraucht.

Natural Resources

Natürliche Ressourcen sind ein Input in die Produktion, der von der Natur gegeben ist. Wie zum
Beispiel Flüsse, Mineralien, Land. Es gibt erneuerbare und nicht erneuerbare natürliche Ressourcen.
(Wald / Öl). Manche Länder sind heute reich, nur weil sie gute natürliche Ressourcen auf ihrem
Boden haben.

Technological Knowledge

Technologischer Fortschritt ist das Wissen, wie man am Besten produziert. Es gibt Allgemeinwissen
und solches, das geschützt ist, wie etwa das Coca Cola Rezept.

Der Unterschied zwischen Humankapital und technologischem Wissen besteht darin, dass das
technologische Wissen dazu da ist, zu verstehen wie die Welt funktioniert. Humankapital bezeichnet
die Ressourcen, die dazu ausgegeben werden dieses Wissen den Arbeitskräften zu vermitteln.

CASE STUDY – Are Natural Resources a Limit to Growth?

Die Marktpreise für die limitierten natürlichen Ressourcen sinken. Daher scheint es so, als ob die
Menschheit immer besser darin wird, die unersetzbaren natürlichen Ressourcen mit anderen Mitteln
zu ersetzen.


Economic Growth and Public Policy

Was kann die Wirtschaftspolitik tun, um Produktivität und Lebensstandard zu erhöhen?
The Importance of Saving and Investment.
Weil Kapital ein Produktionsfakor ist, kann eine Gesellschaft die Menge an Kapital ändern.
Produziert man heute mehr Kapital, hat man morgen mehr Vorrat und kann so wiederum mehr
Kapital in die Produktion investieren.

Mehr Ressourcen in der Kapitalproduktion bedeuten weniger Ressourcen für die Produktion von
Gütern und Dienstleistungen. Die Gesellschaft muss also heute auf Güter und Dienstleistungen
verzichten, um morgen mehr produzieren zu können.

Investitionen und Wachstum sind positiv voneinander abhängig.

Diminishing Returns and the Catch-Up Effect
Spart eine Nation, so werden weniger Ressourcen für die Produktion von Konsumgütern verbraucht
und mehr Ressourcen werden Frei, um Kapitalgüter herzustellen. Die Produktivität steigt und das
GDP steigt. Aber wie lange hält dies an?

Das Kapital ist einem abnehmendem Grenzertrag ausgesetzt: Haben die Arbeiter schon genug
Werkzeug, dann nützt zusätzliches Werkzeug nichts mehr. Über längere Zeit wird also der Nutzen
von erhöhtem Kapital immer wie kleiner. Bis dies erreicht ist vergehen jedoch manchmal einige
Dekaden.

Aufgrund des Catch-Up Effekts ist es für ärmere Länder einfacher zu wachsen als für schon reiche.
Deshalb ist China in den letzten Jahren auch etwa doppelt so schnell gewachsen, wie UK obwohl UK
mehr seines GDP in Kapital investiert hat.

Investment from Abroad
Ausländische Direktinvestitionen – BWM baut eine Fabrik in Portugal

Ausländische Portfolioinvestitionen – Ein Deutscher kauft eine Aktie einer portugiesischen Firma

In beiden Fällen stellen Deutsche Ressourcen zur Kapitalerhöhung in Portugal zur Verfügung. Wenn
jemand im Ausland investiert, erhofft er sich dadurch einen Gewinn. Investitionen aus dem Ausland
sind für ein Land ein Weg zum Wachsen, auch wenn der Investor einen Teil des Gewinns zu sich
mitnimmt.

Investitionen aus dem Ausland sind ein guter Weg für ein ärmeres Land state-of-the-art
Technologien zu erlernen

Education
Investition in Bildung ist mindestens so wichtig, wie Investition in physisches Kapital. In Europa
erhöht ein Schuljahr den Lohn eine Arbeiters etwa um 10%. In unterentwickelten Ländern ist die
Lücke sogar noch grösser.

Auch Humankapital hat Opportunitätskosten. Während die Kinder zur Schule gehen, verdienen sie
kein Geld. In armen Ländern verlassen die Kinder meist frühzeitig die Schule um der Familie zu
helfen.
Bildung generiert positive Externalitäten ( Bsp gute Erfindung, die dann den Wohlstand des Landes
erhöhen kann)

Brain Drain.

Property Rights and Political Stability
Geregelte Besitzverhältnisse sind wichtig für eine stabile Wirtschaft. Politische Stabilität ist eine
Voraussetzung für geregelte Besitzverhältnisse (Stichworte Korruption, Betrug, Kommunismus und
Anreiz zu Investitionen)

Free Trade
Handel ist auf eine Art Wissen. Handelt ein Land Weizen für Stahl, dann ist das als ob das Land eine
Technologie entwickelt hätte, Weizen in Stahl zu verwandeln. Deshalb wird ein Land, dass
Handelsbeschränkungen aufhebt ein Wachstum erleben, wie nach einem grossen technologischen
Durchbruch. Daher glauben heutzutage die meisten Ökonomen, dass es für ein armes Land am
besten ist, sich dem internationalen Handel zu öffnen. Man stelle sich vor, Südengland würde sich
vom Norden abgrenzen. Es müsste alle seine Güter nun selbst herstellen, was zu einem massiven
Wohlstandsverlust führen würde. Dies ist genau das, was nach innen orientierten Ländern, wie
Argentinien im 20. Jahrhundert wiederfahren ist.

Das Ausmass des Handels mit andern Nationen hängt auch von den geographischen Gegebenheiten
eines Landes ab. Es ist kein Zufall, dass viele der weltgrössten Städte an einem Gewässer liegen.

Research and Development
Der Hauptgrund dafür, dass der Lebensstandard heute höher als früher ist, ist der technologische
Fortschritt. Wissen ist grösstenteils ein öffentliches Gut. Sobald etwas neues erfunden wurde, geht
das Wissen in den Pool der Gesellschaft und andere Leute können es nützen. Regierungen in weit
entwickelten Ländern unterstützen dies z.B. mit gut ausgerüsteten Forschungsstätten, die sie
bezahlen. Sie könnten auch Gelder an Firmen bezahlen, die Forschung betreiben. Ein weiterer
Ansporn ist das Patentsystem. Erfinden Firmen ein neues Produkt, haben sie über eine gewisse Zeit
das exklusive Nutzungsrecht.

Population Growth
Eine grosse Population bedeutet mehr Arbeiter, die an der Herstellung von Produkten beteiligt sind.
Zur selben Zeit konsumieren mehr Leute diese Güter. Die Auswirkungen sind also nicht sehr
offensichtlich.

Stretching Natural Resources

Stretching Natural Resources.

Obwohl die Weltbevölkerung um das Sechsfache zugenommen hat in den letzten 2 Jahrhunderten,
ist der Lebensstandard durchschnittlich gestiegen. Als eine Folge der Bevölkerungszunahme sind
Hunger und Falschernährung zurückgegangen.
Diluting the Capital Stock

Einige moderne Theorien nehmen an, dass das Bevölkerungswachstum einen Effekt auf die
Kapitalanhäufung haben könnte. Hoher Zuwachs reduziert das GDP pro Arbeiter, weil das Kapital
dann auf die schnell wachsende Arbeitermenge verteilt werden muss. Dies führt zu geringerer
Produktivität und somit zu einem kleineren GDP

Diese Problem tritt am meisten beim Humankapital auf. Länder mit hohem Bevölkerungswachstum
haben viele Schulkinder. Dies legt eine grosse Last auf das Bildungssystem.

Man nimmt an, dass eine Reduktion der Wachstumsrate den armen Ländern helfen würde, ihre
Lebensstandard zu erhöhen (China, Verhütung). Kinder grossziehen birgt Opportunitätskosten.
Deshalb wollen immer weniger Frauen in der Schweiz Kinder bekommen, der Anreiz keine Kinder zu
haben wird immer grösser.

Promoting Technological Progress

Eine grössere Anzahl Leute bringt eine grössere Anzahl an guten Ideen mit sich. Dies führt zu
grösserem technologischen Fortschritt.


Conlusion: The Importance of Long-Run Growth

Der Lebensstandard eines Landes basiert auf dessen Fähigkeit, Güter und Dienstelistungen zu
produzieren. Politiker, die das wirtschaftliche Wachstum eines Landes ankurbeln wollen, müssen
darauf zielen, die Produktivität des Landes zu erhöhen, indem sie eine rasche Anhäufung der
Produktionsfaktoren ermöglichen, wobei sie versichern müssen, dass diese Faktoren so effizient wie
möglich eingesetzt werden. Geregelte Besitzverhältnisse und eine stabile Regierung sind wichtig.


The Monetary Systems


The Meaning of Money

Geld ist ein Besitztum in einer Wirtschaft, das Leute regelmässig benützen, um Güter und
Dienstleistungen von anderen Leuten zu kaufen.

The Functions of Money
Geld hat in einer Wirtschaft drei Funktionen:

Es ist ein Tauschmittel.

Es ist eine Recheneinheit

Es ist eine Wertaufberwahrung

Geld ist das liquideste Zahlungsmittel.
The Kinds of Money
Commodity Money = Geld, das auch Wert hätte, wenn man es nicht als Geld benützen würde (z.B
Gold, Zigaretten)

Fiat Money = Geld das nur durch einen Regierungsbeschluss Wert hat. Damit Fiat Money
gebrauchsfähig wird, braucht es das Vertrauen der Bevölkerung.

Money in the Economy
In einer komplexen Wirtschaft ist es nicht einfach eine klare Linie zwischen Besitztümern, die man
“Geld” nennen könnte und zwischen solchen, die man nicht Geld nennen kann zu ziehen. Der
wichtige Punkt liegt darin, dass der Geldvorrat einer fortgeschrittenen Wirtschaft nicht nur aus
Währung besteht, sondern auch aus Sparguthaben bei Banken und anderen Finanzinstitutionen, auf
das man prompt zugreifen und Dinge damit bezahlen kann.


The Role of Central Banks

Die Zentralbank ist eine Institution zur Regulation der vorhandenen Geldmenge in der Wirtschaft.
Die Zentralbanken führen eine Geldpolitik. Wenn die Zentralbank z.B. beschliesst , die Geldmenge zu
erhöhen, kann sie Geld generieren und damit Bonds von der Öffentlichkeit kaufen. Danach ist die
Währung im Umlauf. Beschliesst sie die Menge zu verkleinern, kann sie Bonds an die Öffentlichkeit
verkaufen. Dann ist die Währung aus den Händen der Öffentlichkeit. Veränderungen in der
vorhandenen Geldmenge, können grosse Auswirkungen auf die Wirtschaft haben. Die Preise steigen,
wenn zu viel Geld gedruckt wird. Ein weiterer Grundsatz ist: Die Gesellschaft steht einem
kurzzeitigen Trade-off zwischen Inflation und Arbeitslosigkeit gegenüber. Die Entscheidungen der
Zentralbanken haben über längere Zeit einen Einfluss auf die Inflationsrate einer Wirtschaft und
über kürzere Zeit auf die Arbeitslosigkeit und die Produktion.


The European Central Bank and the Eurosystem

Haben mehrere Länder die selbe Währung, macht es Sinn, dass sie eine gemeinsame
Währungspolitik haben. Das Hauptziel der ECB ist die Preisstabilität. Sie hat es sich zum Ziel gesetzt
eine Preiserhöhung von unter/ nahe an 2% pro Jahr aufrechtzuerhalten. Die ECB ist vollkommen
unabhängig. Sie darf sich nirgends Rat holen.


The Bank of England

Wie die ECB hat auch die Bank of England die Preisstabilität als Hauptziel. Auch sie ist unabhängig in
der Ausübung der Finanzpolitik und besonders in der Festsetzung der Zinssätze, um die
Preisstabilität auch zu erreichen. Die Bedeutung von „Preisstabilität“ jedoch legt die Regirung fest.
Momentan ist die Zielinflationsrate 2% pro Jahr, gemessen am CPI. Tritt eine Verfehlung des Ziels
von über einem % ein, muss der Governor oft he Bank of England sich vor dem Finanzminister
rechtfertigen.
The Federal Reserve System


Banks and the Money Supply

The Simple Case of 100 Per Cent Reserve Banking
Einlagen, die die Banken erhalten haben aber noch nicht weiterverliehen haben, heissen Reserven.
Wenn Banken alle Einlagen in Reserve behält, verändert sie die Geldmenge einer Wirtschaft nicht.

Money Creation With Fractional-Reserve Banking
Die Bank könnte nun aber das Geld gegen Zins an Leute und Firmen ausleihen. Einen Teil müsste sie
natürlich zurückbehalten für allfällige Auszahlungen aber solange der Zufluss an neuen Einlagen
etwa so hoch ist wie die Auszahlungen, muss die Bank nur einen Bruchteil der Einlagen in Reserve
behalten. Dies nennt sich fractional reserve banking. Der Bruchteil, den die Bank als Reserven
zurückhält heisst reserve ratio. Dieses Verhältnis ist durch Regierungsregulationen und
Bankgrundsätze geregelt. Die meisten Zentralbanken veranlassen, dass die Banken einen Minium-
Reservebetrag (reserve requirement) halten. Zusätzlich dürfen die Banken excess reserves halten,
um sicherer zu sein nicht ohne Geld dazustehen. Wenn Banken nur einen Teil ihrer Einlagen in
Reserve behalten, generieren sie Geld. Die Wirtschaft ist liquider aber nicht reicher.

The Money Multiplier
Das ausgeliehen Geld kann wiederum zu einer anderen Bank gebracht werden, die wiederum das
Geld ausleiht und so fort. So wird immer mehr Geld generiert. Dies geht aber nicht unendlich weiter.
Die Menge des Geldes, das das Bankensystem aus einem Euro Reserven machen kann heisst money
multiplier. Es ist der Reziprokwert des reserve ratio.

The Central Bank’s Tools of Monetary Control
Wenn eine Zentralbank beschliesst, das Geldangebot zu verändern, muss sie beachten, wie ihre
Aktionen sich durch das Bankensystem auswirken.

Eine Zentralbank hat drei Hauptwerkzeuge:

Open-Market Operations

Die Zentralbank kann Bonds kaufen oder verkaufen, um die Geldmenge im Umlauf zu vermindern
oder erhöhen.

The Refinancing Rate

Die Zentralbank setzt einen Zinssatz fest, zu dem sie bereit ist den Banken Geld zu leihen.

Die Zentralbank kauft Bonds oder andere Assets von den Banken, um diese dann später wieder
zurückzuverkaufen. Wenn sie dies tut, hat die Zentralbank effektiv eine Anleihe ausgezahlt und dafür
die Bonds als Sicherheit erhalten. Der Zinssatz, den die Zentralbank auf die Anleihe verrechnet ist die
refinancing rate. Dieses Geschäft nennt sich repurchase agreement oder repo.
Banken geben sich untereinander kurzzeitige Kredite, um ihre Reserveraten zu decken. Dies ist der
money market. Besteht ein allgemeiner Engpass an Liquidität im Moneymarket, weil die Banken viel
Kredite gewährt haben, dann steigen die Zinsen für die gegenseitigen Anleihen. Besteht ein
Liquiditätsüberschuss, dann sinken die Zinsen. Die Zentralbank überwacht den Moneymarket und ist
bereit die Liquidität der Banken zu beeinflussen, was deren Kreditgeschäfte beeinflusst und
schlussendlich eine Auswirkung auf die Geldmenge im Umlauf hat.

Die Zentralbank kann die Geldmenge im Umlauf dadurch beeinflussen, dass sie die Repozinsen
ändert. Erhöht sie die Zinsen, dann werden die Banken versucht sein, ihre Anleihen zurückzuzahlen,
die Geldmenge im Umlauf nimmt also ab. Sind die Zinsen tief, nehmen die Banken Anleihen auf, was
zu einer Erhöhung der Geldmenge im Umlauf führt.

Reserve Requirements

Erhöht die Zentralbank die reserve requirements, dann können die Banken weniger Geld durch
Kredite generieren. Der reserve ratio steigt, der money multiplier sinkt, die Geldmenge im Umlauf
sinkt. Die Zentralbanken versuchen das reserve requirement so wenig wie möglich zu ändern oder
haben es gleich ganz abgeschafft, da das Bankengeschäft sonst darunter leidet.

Problems in Controlling the Money Supply
Obwohl die Zentralbanken einen beträchtlichen Einfluss auf die Geldmenge im Umlauf haben,
stellen sich trotzdem Probleme.

Zentralbanken haben keinen Einfluss darauf, wieviel Geld die Haushalte auf der Bank deponieren. Je
mehr Geld sie deponieren, um so mehr Reserven haben die Banken und umso mehr Geld können sie
generieren.

Das zweite Problem liegt darin, dass die Zentralbanken keinen Einfluss darauf haben, wieviel Geld
die Banken verleihen. Die Banken generieren nur Geld, wenn sie ihre Reserven auch verleihen.

Da in einem System des fractional-reserve bankings die Geldmenge im Umlauf vom Verhalten der
Einleger und der Banker abhängig ist, hat eine Zentralbank keine totale Kontrolle über die
Geldmenge im Umlauf.

CASE STUDY – Bank Runs and the Money Supply

Verlieren die Einleger das Vertrauen in ihre Bank und möchten alle zur selben Zeit ihr Geld abheben,
gerät die Bank in Schwierigkeiten. Sie muss zuerst genügend Liquidität beschaffen. Auch wenn eine
Bank Gewinn macht, kann sie unmöglich zur selben Zeit all die Einlagen ihrer Kunden zurückzahlen.
30 Money Growth and Inflation


The Classical Theory of Inflation

The Level of Prices and the Value of Money
Das Preisniveau ist ein Mass des Geldwertes. Ein Anstieg des Preisniveau bedeutet einen niedrigeren
Wert des Geldes, weil jede Geldeinheit nun weniger Güter und Dienstleistungen gekauft werden
können.

Money Supply, Money Demand and Monetary Equilibrium
Viele Faktoren beeinflussen die nachgefragte Geldmenge. Wieviel Geld die Leute in ihrem
Geldbeutel mit sich tragen, hängt davon ab, wie stark sie sich auf Kreditkarten verlassen und wie gut
ein Bankomat zu finden ist. Es hängt auch von der Höhe der Zinsen ab, die sie erhalten würde, wenn
sie das Geld statt es herumzutragen anlegen würden. Eine Variable jedoch steht vor allen andern:
Wie hoch das Preisniveau ist. Die Leute tragen Geld auf sich herum, weil es ein Tauschmittel ist. Ein
höheres Preisniveau verlangt also eine höhere Menge an Geld.

Was führt dazu, dass die von der Zentralbank herausgegebene Geldmenge der nachgefragten
Geldmenge der Leute entspricht? Über eine längere Zeit passt sich das Preisniveau an den Punkt an,
wo die Geldnachfrage dem Geldangebot entspricht. Ist das Preisniveau über dem Gleichgewicht,
wollen die Leute mehr Geld halten als die Zentralbank herausgegeben hat. Das Preisniveau muss
also fallen um Angebot und Nachfrage in Einklang zu bringen. Ist das Preisniveau unter dem
Gleichgewicht, wollen die Leute weniger Geld halten, als die Zentralbank herausgegeben hat. Das
Preisniveau muss steigen um Angebot und Nachfrage ins Gleichgewicht zu bringen.

The Effects of a Monetary Injection
Verdoppelt eines Tages die Zentralbank die Geldmenge im Umlauf, dann verliert das Geld die Hälfte
seines Wertes. Die Menge des vorhandenen Geldes bestimmt die Inflation.

A Brief Look at the Adjustment Process
Der sofortige Effekt einer Geldeinspritzung ist ein Überfluss an Geldangebot. Die Angebotene Menge
übersteigt nun die Nachfrage. Das überflüssige Geld muss nun ausgegeben werden. Der Güter- und
Dienstleistungsabsatz steigt nun an. Die Fähigkeit der Wirtschaft, diese Nachfrage zu decken hat sich
aber nicht geändert. Die Preise steigen also an. Die gestiegenen Preise wiederum bringen die Leute
zu einer grösseren Nachfrage nach Geld, weil die Leute mehr Geldeinheiten für die höheren Preise
brauchen. Es stellt sich ein neues Gleichgewicht ein.

The Classical Dichotomy and Monetary Neutrality
Alle ökonomischen Variablen gehören zu einer von zwei Gruppen: Die nominalen variablen –
Variablen, die man in Geldeinheiten misst - und die realen Variablen – Variablen, die man in
physischen Einheiten misst.
Geldpreise sind nominale Variablen, während relative Preise reale Variablen sind. Nominale
Variablen sind stark beeinflusst durch das monetäre System einer Wirtschaft, wobei das System
irrelevant für das Verständnis von Determinanten für wichtige reale Variablen ist.

Änderungen im Geldangebot beeinflussen nominale Variablen, nicht aber die realen Variablen.
Verdoppelt sich die Geldmenge, verdoppelt sich das Preisniveau, die Löhne verdoppeln sich und alle
anderen Währungswerte verdoppeln sich. Reale Variablen aber, wie Produktion, Arbeitsangebot,
Reallöhne und Realzinsen bleiben unverändert. Diese Gleichgültigkeit von realen Variablen
gegenüber monetären Veränderungen nennt sich monetary neutrality.

Das wäre wie wenn ein Meter neu nur 50cm hätte. Alle heutigen Längen würden sich verdoppeln.

Velocity and the Quantity Equation
Velocity of Money = Die Rate, mit welcher Geld die Hand wechselt.

V = (P × Y) / M Velocity = Price Level(GDP Deflator) × Quantity of Ouptut (Real GDP)/ Quantity of
Money

M × V = P × Y Quantity Equation

Bringt die Geldmenge mit dem Nominalwert des Outputs in Relation.

    1. Die Geldumlaufgeschwindigkeit ist relativ stabil über die Zeit
    2. Weil die Geschwindigkeit stabil ist, verursacht sie bei einer Geldumlaufmengenänderung
       eine proportionale Änderung im Nominalwert des Outputs.
    3. Der Output einer Wirtschaft ist hauptsächlich abhängig von Produktionsfaktoren und deren
       Verfügbarkeit und der verfügbaren Produktionstechnologie. Weil Geld neutral ist,
       beeinflusst Geld die Produktion nicht.
    4. Verändert die Zentralbank also die Geldzufuhr und bringt so eine Veränderung des
       Nominalwertes des Outputs mit sich, sind diese Änderungen im Preisniveau reflektiert.
    5. Erhöht also die Zentralbank die Geldzufuhr rapide, hat das Inflation zur Folge.

The Inflation Tax
Um ihre Ausgaben zu decken, können Regierungen zu verschiedenen Lösungen greifen: Sie können
die Steuern erhöhen, sie können sich verschulden, indem sie Bonds verkaufen oder sie können sich
einfach Geld drucken.

Lässt sich die Regierung Geld drucken, nennt sich das eine inflation tax erheben. Diese Steuer ist
nicht wie andere Steuern, niemand erhält eine Rechnung dafür. Druckt die Regierung Geld,
entwertet sich aber das Geld, das die Leute besitzen. Es ist sogar eine progressive Steuer. Die
Versuchung mag gross sein, die eigenen Ausgaben mit neuem Geld zu decken aber die Folgen sind
schlimm für die Wirtschaft.

The Fisher Effect
Real interest rate = nominal interest rate – inflation rate

Nominal interest rate = real interest rate + inflation rate
Erhöht die Zentralbank den Geldzuwachs, erhöht sich die Inflationsrate und der Nominalzins. Die
Angleichung des Nominalzinses an die Inflationsrate ist der Fisher effect. Dies über eine langsichtige
Perspektive.


The Costs of Inflation

A Fall in Purchasing Power? The Inflation Fallacy
Die Inflation selbst reduziert die reale Kaufkraft nicht. Die Nominallöhne halten mit der Inflation mit,
deshalb verändern sich die Reallöhne nicht.

Shoeleather Costs
Wie kann eine Person die Inflations-Steuer umgehen? Indem sie weniger Geld hält. Die Kosten, die
bei vermehrten Bankbesuchen (Transaktionskosten) aufgrund erwarteter Inflation entstehen. Die
Shoeleather Cost sind trivial. Ausser in Ländern mit Hyperinflation. Wenn sich die Preise stündlich
erhöhen, dient die Währung nicht mehr als Wertaufbewahrung und muss möglichst schnell in
Naturalien oder in eine andere Währung getauscht werden.

Menu Costs
Die Kosten, die Preisänderungen verursachen.

Relative Price Variability and the Misallocation of Resources
Weil Preise nur ab und zu ändern, bringt die Inflation eine höhere relative Preisvariabilität mit sich.
(Bsp: Restaurant, das gegen Ende Jahr mit zunehmender Inflation relativ immer wie billiger wird)

Inflation-Induced Tax Distortions
Fast alle Steuern verzerren Anreize, veranlassen Leute ihr Verhalten zu ändern und führen zu einer
weniger effizienten Verteilung der Ressourcen einer Wirtschaft. Viele Steuern jedoch werden noch
problematischer, wenn sie der Inflation ausgesetzt sind. Die Inflation erhöht vor allem die Steuern,
die das Einkommen aus Gespartem betreffen. (Bsp: Aktie gekauft zu 10.- verkauft zu 50.- bei einer
Inflation von 50% Gewinn = 30.- und nicht 40.-. Man bezahlt aber Steuern für einen Gewinn von 40.-)

Wenn die Inflation die Steuerbelastung auf Ersparnisse anhebt neigt sie dazu, die langfristige
Wachstumsrate einer Wirtschaft zu beeinträchtigen, da die Leute nicht mehr sparen und somit keine
Investitionen in Kapital mehr getätigt werden. Die Lösung wäre eine Indexierung des Steuersystems.
Die Steuern sollten nur noch auf die Realgewinne erhoben werden.

Confusion and Inconvenience
Wenn der Meter plötzlich mehr oder weniger als 100cm haben würde, ware das verwirrend. So auch
mit dem Geld. Die Zentralbank hat die Aufgabe, die Zuverlässigkeit einer häufig genützen
Masseinheit zu sichern. Die verursachten Kosten sind schwer zu bestimmen.

A Special Cost of Unexpected Inflation: Arbitrary Redistribution of Wealth
Unerwartete Inflation verteilt Reichtum unter der Bevölkerung ohne Rücksicht auf Verdienst und
Bedürfnis. (Bsp Ein Kredit von 20000 über 10 Jahre bei einem Zinssatz von 7% würde 40000
Rückzahlung erfordern. Nach einer Hyperinflation könnte man das aus der Tasche bezahlen, nach
einer Deflation wäre es eine schwere Bürde.) Inflation ist speziell volatil, wenn die durchschnittliche
Inflationsrate eines Landes hoch ist.

The Price of Ice Cream
Hier fehlt 1 seite


33 Aggregate Demand and Aggregate Supply

Rezession = Eine Periode von fallenden Reallöhnen und steigender Arbeitslosigkeit.

Depression = starke Rezession

Der Fokus liegt nun auf den kurzfristigen Fluktuationen der Wirtschaft.


Three Key Facts About Economic Fluctuations

Fact 1: Economic Fluctuations Are Irregular and Unpredictable

Fact 2: Most Macroeconomic Quantities Fluctuate Together
Normalerweise wird das reale BIP genutzt, um kurzfristige Veränderungen in der Wirtschaft zu
beobachten. Aber eigentlich kommt es nicht drauf an, welches Mass an ökonomischer Aktivität man
wählt, da die meisten Makroökonomischen Werte zusammen schwanken. Aber obwohl sie
zusammen schwanken, schwanken sie doch um unterschiedliche Beträge. Verschlechtern sich die
ökonomischen Bedingungen, dann geht ein grosser Teil der Verschlechterungen auf das Konto der
reduzierten Investitionen.

Fact 3: As Output Falls, Unemployment Rises
Sinkt das reale BIP, bedeutet das, dass weniger Güter und Dienstleistung hergestellt werden. Dies
braucht dann weniger Arbeitskräfte. Die Arbeitslosigkeit steigt.


Explaining Short-Run Economic Fluctuations

How the Short Run Differs From the Long Run
Viele Ökonomen glauben, dass die klassische Theorie (reale und nominale Variablen getrennt) die
Welt langfristig wiederspiegelt, nicht aber kurzfristig. Wenn man die Wirtschaft von Jahr zu Jahr
betrachtet, ist die Annahme der Geldneutralität nicht mehr angebracht. Die meisten Ökonomen
nehmen an, dass über kurze Zeit die nominalen und die realen Variablen stark verbunden sind. Vor
allem Änderungen im Geldangebot können den Output kurzzeitig sehr stark von seinem langfristigen
Trend abbringen.
The Basic Model of Economic Fluctuations
Das model konzentriert sich auf das Verhalten von zwei Variablen. Die erste Variable ist der Output
an Gütern und Dienstleistungen einer Wirtschaft (real GDP, reale Variable). Die zweite Variable ist
das Preisniveau (CPI oder GDP deflator, nominale Variable).

Wir analysieren kurzfristige Fluktuationen in der Wirtschaft mit dem model of aggregate demand
and aggregate supply. Die aggregate demand curve zeigt die Menge der nachgefragten Güter und
Dienstleistungen bei den jeweiligen Preisniveaus. Die aggregate supply curve zeigt Die Menge der
Güter und Dienstleistungen, die die Firmen produzieren und verkaufen zu jedem Preisniveau.

Im Gegensatz zu den kleinen Märkten aus den früheren Supply-Demand Modellen, ist in diesem
Modell kein Ausweichen auf Substitute/ Abziehen von Arbeitskräften aus anderen Märkten möglich.


The Aggregate Demand Curve

Ein Preisanstieg führt zu einem Fallen der nachgefragten Güter und Dienstleistungen einer
Wirtschaft.

Why the Aggregate Demand Curve slopes Downward
Wieso führt ein Fall im Preisniveau zu einer Steigerung der nachgefragten Menge an Güter und
Dienstleistungen?

Y = C + I + G + NX

Consumption
Investment
Government purchases
Net exports

Jede dieser vier Komponenten trägt zum aggregate demand bei. G ist durch eine Gesetzgebung
fixiert. Die anderen drei hängen von den ökonomischen Bedingungen und im Speziellen vom
Preisniveau ab. Um zu verstehen, wieso die aggregate demand Kurve nach unten verläuft, müssen
wir untersuchen, wie das Preisniveau die Menge der Güter und Dienstleistungen, die für C,I und NX
nachgefragt werden, beeinflusst.

The Price Level and Consumption: The Wealth Effect

Ein sinkendes Preisniveau macht die Währung stärker und veranlasst die Leute mehr zu kaufen. Eine
grössere Menge an Gütern und Dienstleistungen wird nachgefragt.

The Price Level and Investment: The Interets Rate Effect

Ist das Preisniveau tief und die Haushalte haben viel Geld, möchten sie einen Teil Gewinnbringend
anlegen. Tun dies viele Haushalte, sinken die Zinsen. Tiefere Zinsen bringen Firmen dazu, Kredite
aufzunehmen, um zu investieren. Ein niedrigeres Preisniveau treibt Investitionen voran und erhöht
somit die Nachfrage nach Güter und Dienstleistungen.
The Price Level and Net Exports: The Exchange Rate Effect

Niedrigere Zinsen führen dazu, dass inländische Wertpapiere verkauft werden, um ausländische mit
besseren Zinsen zu kaufen. Somit wird das Angebot an inländischer Währung im Ausland im
Vergleich zur ausländischen Gross und sie beginnt im Vergleich an Wert zu verlieren. Ausländische
Güter werden somit teurer und die inländischen billiger. Dies führt zu erhöhten Exporten NX steigen
auch. Dies führt wiederum zu höherer Nachfrage nach Gütern und Dienstleistungen im Inland. Geld
wird also ins Ausland verschoben. Depreciation relative to foreign currencies.

Summary

Drei Gründe, wieso die Nachfrage bei sinkendem Preisniveau steigt:

    1. Konsumenten sind wohlhabender, sie fragen mehr Güter nach
    2. Zinsen fallen, was die Nachfrage nach Gütern erhöht
    3. Die Geldwechselrate verliert an Wert, was die Nachfrage nach Exporten erhöht.

Why the Aggregate Demand Curve Might Shift

Shifts Arising From Consumption

Sind die Leute plötzlich mehr aufs Sparen für das Alter bedacht, reduzieren sie ihren Konsum. Die
Kurve verschiebt sich nach links.

Irgend ein Ereignis, das den Konsum der Leute beeinflusst, verschiebt die Kurve entsprechend.
Beispiel: Steuern.

Shifts Arising From Investment

Irgend ein Ereignis, dass die Firmen dazu veranlass, ihre Investitionen bei einem bestimmten
Preisniveau zu verändern, verschiebt die aggregate demand Kurve.

Wird zum Beispiel eine neue Computergeneration auf den Markt gebracht, entscheiden sich viele
Firmen neue Computer zuzulegen. Die Nachfrage nach Gütern steigt.

Auch Steuererleichterungen für Investitionen fördern Investitionen und verschieben deshalb die
Kurve nach rechts.

Eine andere Variable wäre das Geldangebot: Ein erhöhtes Geldangebot senkt die Zinsen. Das macht
Kredite günstiger und fördert so die Investitionen. Es kommt zu einer Verschiebung nach rechts.

Shifts Arising From Net exports

Irgend ein Ereignis, das die Nettoexporte bei einem gegebenen Preisniveau verändert, verschiebt
auch den aggregate demand.

Erfährt beispielsweise die USA eine Rezession, kauft sie weniger Güter aus Europa.

Geldwechselratenveränderungen können Auswirkungen auf Nettoexporte haben und somit die
Kurve verschieben.
Summary

Table 33.1 S.691


The Aggregate Supply Curve

Die aggregate supply Kurve ist langfristig vertikal und kurzfristig nach oben gerichtet. Sie gibt uns die
totale Menge an Gütern und Dienstleistungen an, die Firmen produzieren bei jedem gegebenen
Preisniveau.

Why the Aggregate Supply Curve is Vertical in the Long Run
Was bestimmt langfristig die Menge an produzierten Gütern und Dienstleistungen? Über längere
Zeit hängt das reale BIP einer Wirtschaft von der Verfügbarkeit von Arbeit, Kapital und natürlichen
Ressourcen und der verfügbaren Technologie ab. Weil das Preisniveau diese Langzeitfaktoren des
realen BIP nicht beeinflusst, ist die Langzeit aggregate demand Kurve vertikal. Über längere Zeit ist
also das Angebot an Gütern und Dienstleistungen von den Produktionsfaktoren abhängig und die
sind gleich gross , egal wie hoch das Preisniveau ist (classical dichotomy and monetary neutrality).

Die Angebotskurve für einzelne Güter und Dienstleistungen kann nur steigend statt vertikal sein,
weil sie sich auf relative Preise bezieht.

Why the Long-Run Aggregate Supply Curve Might Shift
Die angezeigte Menge an totalem Output heist potential output oder full employment output. Wir
nennen sie die natural rate of output, weil sie zeigt, was eine Wirtschaft produzieren kann, wenn die
Arbeitslosigkeit auf normaler Rate ist. Die natural Rate ist das Produktionsniveau, wohin sich die
Wirtschaft über längere Zeit hinbewegt.

Irgend eine Änderung in der Wirtschaft, die die natural rate of output verändert, verschiebt die
langfristige aggregate supply Kurve.

Shifts Arising From Labour

Würde eine Immigrationswelle das Angebot an Arbeitskräften erhöhen, würde die Menge an
Produzierten Gütern steigen und umgekehrt.

Die Kurve ist auch abhängig von der natürlichen Arbeitslosenrate. Jede Änderung in der natürlichen
Arbeitslosenrate führt zu einer Verschiebung. Würde also die Regierung die Mindestlöhne erhöhen,
würde das die Kurve verschieben.

Shifts Arising from Capital

Ein Anstieg oder eine Verminderung jeglichen Kapitals hat Einfluss auf die Produktivität und somit
auf das Angebot der Güter. Die Kurve verschiebt sich entpsrechend.
Shifts Arising from Natural Resources

Die Produktion einer Wirtschaft hängt von ihren natürlichen Ressourcen ab. Die Entdeckung eines
Minrealiendepots oder sich verändernde Wettereinflüsse können Einfluss auf die Produktion haben
und somit die Kurve verschieben.

Shifts Arising From Technological Knowlegde

Fortgeschrittene Technologie ist der wichtigste Grund, warum wir heute mehr als früher produzieren.
Sie verschiebt die Kurve.

A New Way to Depict Long-Run Growth and Inflation
Die beiden Kurven verschieben sich nun gleichzeitig nach rechts. Obwohl es viele Faktoren gibt, die
diese Verschiebung auslösen, sind die wichtigsten beiden technologischer Fortschritt und Geldpolitik.

Why the Aggregate Supply Curve Slopes Upward in the Short Run
Über kurze Zeit ist die aggregate supply Kurve stiegend statt senkrecht. Ein Anstieg im Preisniveau
verursacht kurzfristig eine Steigerung der produzierten Güter.

Dazu gibt es drei Theorien, wieso diese positive Beziehung zwischen Preisniveau und Output besteht.

Sie alle haben gemeinsam, dass die Outputmenge von ihrem Langzeitniveau abweicht, wenn das
Preisniveau vom erwarteten Preisniveau abweicht. Steigt das Preisniveau über das erwartetet
Niveau so steigt der Output über seine natürliche Rate und sinkt das Preisniveau unter das
erwartetet Level, so sinkt der Output unter sein natürliches Niveau.

The Sticky Wage Theory

Die sticky wages Theorie besagt, dass die short-run aggregate supply Kurve steigend ist, weil sich die
Nominallöhne nur langsam anpassen. Dies aufgrund von langfristigen Verträgen.

Das würde so aussehen: Eine Firma bezahlt einem Arbeiter einen Festen Nominallohn, aufgrund von
Preisniveauerwartungen. Ist nun das Preisniveau tiefer als erwartete, wird dem Arbeiter ein zu hoher
Reallohn bezahlt. Die Firma hat also höhere Kosten und wird darum weniger Arbeiter anstellen. Das
bedeutet, dass der Output bei tieferem Preisniveau tiefer ist.

The Sticky Price Theory

Die sticky price Theorie nimmt an, dass die Preise sich nur langsam an das neue Preisniveau
anpassen. Dies aufgrund der entstehenden Menükosten. Weil die Preise einzelner Firmen nicht
mehr stimmen, verkaufen sie entweder zu viel oder zu wenig. Sie passen ihre Produktion
entsprechend an.

The Misperception Theory

Nach dieser Theorie können Änderungen im Preisniveau die Kunden kurzzeitig verwirren. Sie
reagieren also auf die Preisänderungen und dies führt zu einer steigenden Kurve.
Angenommen das allgemeine Preisniveau sinkt unter das erwartete Level. Die Verkäufer sehen nun
ihre Preise fallen und könnten meinen, dass ihre relativen Preise gefallen sein könnten. Sie würden
dann die Produktion reduzieren, weil nach ihrer Meinung der Anreiz zu produzieren gesunken ist.

Umgekehrt könnten die Arbeiter meinen ihre Löhne seien gesunken, die Preise der Produkte aber
nicht. Die Belohnung für die Arbeit wäre also nicht mehr so hoch und sie würden die Arbeit
reduzieren.

Summary

Es gibt also drei alternative Erklärungen für die ansteigende short-run aggregate supply Kurve

Quantity of output = natural rate of output + a×(actual price level – expected price level)

a bestimmt, wie stark der Output auf die Änderungen im Preisniveau reagiert.

Why the Short-Run Aggregate Supply Curve Might Shift
Wenn wir uns überlegen, was die short-run supply Kurve zum Verschieben bringt, müssen wir alle
Variablen beachten, die die langfristige Kurve verschoben haben plus noch eine neue Variable, das
erwartete Preisniveau. Es beeinflusst sticky wages, sticky prices und misperceptions.

Faktoren, welche die kurzfristige Kurve beeinflussen: Änderungen in Arbeit, Kapital, natürliche
Ressourcen oder in technologischem Fortschritt.

Die wichtige neue Variable ist das erwartete Preisniveau (beeinflusst sticky wages, sticky prices und
misperceptions). Ist das erwartete Preisniveau hoch, bezahlen Firmen höhere nominale Löhne. Die
Kosten steigen und die Firmen produzieren weniger zu jedem gegebenen Preisniveau.

General Lesson: Eine Erhöhung im erwarteten Preisniveau reduziert die Menge an angebotenen
Gütern und Dienstleistungen und verschiebt die angebotskurve nach links. Eine Reduktion im
erwarteten Preisniveau erhöht die Menge angebotener Güter und verschiebt die Angebotskurve
nach rechts.

Kurzfristig sind die Erwartungen fix. Über längere Zeit jedoch sind sie flexibel.

Summary Tabelle 33.2 S. 699


Two Causes of Economic Fluctuations

The Effects of a Shift in Aggregate Demand
Angenommen eine Welle des Pesimismus geht durch das Land. Die Leute kaufen weniger daher
verschiebt sich die demand Kurve nach links. Dadurch sinkt der Ouput. Eine Rezession entsteht. Die
Löhne sinken und die Arbeitslosigkeit nimmt zu. Um dem entgegenzuwirken könnte die Regierung
ihre Ausgaben kurzzeitig erhöhen, um die demand kurve wieder nach rechts zu bringen. Auch ohne
Eingreifen würde sich die Rezession über eine gewisse Zeit wieder legen, da das Preisniveau durch
die gesunkene Nachfrage sinkt. Die Erwartungen passen sich an diese neue Situation an. Dadurch
sinkt das erwartete Preisniveau. Weil das erwartete Preisniveau Löhne, Preise und Vorstellungen
ändert, verschiebt sich die kurzfristige Angebotskurve nach rechts. Der Output ist nun wieder auf
seinem natürlichen Niveau. Langfrisitg ist also die Verschiebung in der Nachfrage vollkommen vom
gesunkenen Preisniveau wiederspiegelt, während sich der Output nicht verändert hat. Der
langfrisitge Effekt der veränderten Nachfrage ist also nominal (im Preisniveau) und nicht real (im
Output).

Über kurze Zeit verursachen Verschiebungen in der Nachfrage Fluktuationen im Output einer
Wirtschaft

Über lange Zeit verursachen Verschiebungen in der Nachfrage eine Veränderung des Preisniveaus
aber nicht des Outputs.

CASE STUDY – Big Shifts In UK Aggregate Demand: The Two World Wars and the Great
Depression

The Effects of a Shift in Aggregate Supply
Angenommen das Angebot verringert sich, verschiebt sich die kurzfristige Angebotskurve nach links.
Das Preisniveau erhöht sich und der Output verringert sich. Diese Ereignis heisst stagflation. Was
könnte man dagegen tun? Eine Möglichkeit wäre, nichts zu tun. Die Preise und Löhne würden sich
gelegentlich den höheren Produktionskosten anpassen. Die produzierte Menge würde sich wieder
langsam erhöhen und in den Ausgangszustand zurückkehren. Alternativ könnte Einfluss auf die
Nachfragekurve genommen werden. Gesetzesänderungen könnten dazu führen, dass sich die
Nachfragekurve nach rechts verschiebt und so wieder zur natural rate of output führt. Dadurch
würde das Preisniveau steigen.

Verschiebungen im Angebot können stagflation verursachen. Eine Kombination aus Stagnation
und Inflation

Diese beiden negativen Effekte können nicht gleichzeititg durch die Veränderung der Nachfrage
wett gemacht werden.

CASE STUDY – Oil and the Economy


34 The Influence of Monetary And Fiscal Policy on Aggregate Demand


How Monetary Policy Influences Aggregate Demand

Wealth effect, interest rate effect und exchange rate effect sind die Gründe, warum die demand
kurve sinkend ist. Diese drei Effekte treten simultan auf, sind aber nicht alle gleich wichtig.

    1. Interest rate effect
    2. Exchange rate effect (Kommt auf die Offenheit der Wirtschaft an.)
    3. Wealth effect
The Theory of Liquidity Preference
Die Zinshöhe adjustiert sich, um Angebot und Nachfrage nach Geld ins Gleichgewicht zu bringen.
Die erwartete Inflationsrate sei konstant.  Realzins und Nominalzins verhalten sich gleich.

Money Supply

Das Geldangebot wird von der Zentralbank reguliert und wird nicht von anderen Variablen
beeinflusst. Die Geldangebotskurve ist fix, also vertikal.

Money Demand

Geld wird behalten, weil es das liquideste Mittel in der Wirtschaft ist. Obwohl Wertpapiere höhere
Zinsen abwerfen, bevorzugen die Leute das flüssigere Geld.

Die Zinsen sind die Opportunitätskosten für das sparen von Geld. Geld im Portemone generiert
keine Zinsen im Gegensatz zu Wertpapieren. Man verliert also den Zins. Eine Reduktion der Zinsen
verringert also die Opportunitätskosten und erhöht dadurch die Nachfrage nach Geld. Deshalb ist die
Geldnachfragekurve sinkend bei steigenden Zinsen.

Equilibrium in the Money Market

Es besteht also eine Zinsrate, bei der das Angebot und die Nachfrage im Einklang sind. Ist dem nicht
so, werden die Leute ihre Asset-Zusammensetzung ändern, was zu einem Gleichgewicht führen wird.

The Downward Slope of the aggregate Demand Curve
Angenommen das Preisniveau steigt an. Die Nachfrage nach Geld steigt, weil mehr Geld gebraucht
wird, um die gestiegenen Preise zu bezahlen. Das bedeutet also, dass ein gestiegenes Preisniveau die
nachgefragte Geldmenge bei jedem gegebenen Zinssatz erhöht. Die Geldnachfragekurve wird also
nach rechts verschoben. Für ein fixes Geldangebot muss also der Zins steigen um Angebot und
Nachfrage auszubalancieren.

Der gestiegene Zins führt zu einer Reduktion in nachgefragten Gütern und Dienstleistungen.

Fazit: es besteht eine negative Beziehung zwischen Preisniveau und der nachgefragten Menge an
Gütern und Dienstleistungen, was sich durch eine sich senkende aggregate demand Kurve auswirkt.

Changes in the Money Supply
Gibt die Zentralbank Geld heraus, verschiebt sich die Geldangebotskurve nach rechts. Die
Geldnachfrage bleibt gleich. Deshalb muss sich der Zins senken, um die Leute dazu zu bringen das
Geld anzunehmen. Das zusätzliche vorhandene Geld bringt höhere Ausgaben und stimuliert so die
Nachfrage nach Gütern und Dienstleistungen. Die aggregate demand Kurve verschiebt sich also nach
rechts.

The Role of Interest Rates
Die Zentralbank hat eine Zielzinsrate (oder eine Zielwchstumsrate) und nicht eine Zielgeldmenge. Sie
betreibt dann die entsprechenden Offen-Markt-Operationen um den Zinssatz zu erreichen.
Veränderungen im Geldangebot, die darauf zielen den aggregate demand zu erhöhen, kann man
einerseits als Erhöhung der Geldmenge oder als Senkung der Zinsen beschreiben.

Veränderungen in der Geldpolitik, die darauf zielen den aggregate demand zu verringern können
entweder als Verringerung der vorhandenen Geldmenge oder als Erhöhung der Zinsen beschrieben
werden.

CASE STUDY – Why Central Banks Watch the Stock Market (and Vice Versa)


How Fiscal Policy Influences Aggregate Demand

Changes in Government Purchases
Wenn die Regierung ihre Käufe an Gütern verändert, dann beeinflusst sie die aggregate demand
Kurve direkt.

The Multiplier Effect
Wenn die Regierung für 10 Millionen bauen last, hat das Auswirkungen. Es reduziert die
Arbeitslosigkeit und erhöht den Profit des Bauunternehmens. Das Bauunternehmen und die Arbeiter
werden also mehr Geld wieder ausgeben. Das führt also dazu, dass sich die aggregate demand für
viele weitere Firmen erhöht. Die Regierungseinkäufe haben also einen multiplier effect. Er führt zu
einer regelrechten Kettenreaktion.

A Formula for the Spending Multiplier
Marginal propensity to consume: Für jeden zusätzlich verdienten Franken gibt ein Haushalt einen
bruchteil davon aus anstatt ihn zu sparen.

Multiplier = 1/(1-MPC)

Je grösser das MPC um so grösser der Multiplier.

Other Applications of the Multiplier Effect
Der Multiplier Effekt tritt auch bei Investitionen, Konsum, Government purchases und Net exports
auf.

The Crowding-Out Effect
Die Effekte des Multiplier Effektes führen zu einer grösseren Nachfrage nach Geld. Die Zinsen
müssen steigen. Der crowding out Effekt setzt die nach rechts verschobene aggregate demand Kurve
wieder zurück.

Je nachdem welcher der beiden Effekte stärker ist, verändert eine Regierungsausgabe von 10
Milliarden also den aggregate demand um mehr oder weniger 10 Milliarden.
Changes in Taxes
Reduziert die Regierung die Steuern, haben die Haushalte mehr Geld zum Ausgeben. Die aggregate
demand Kurve verschiebt sich nach rechts. Die Grösse der Verschiebung ist auch wieder durch den
multiplier und den crowding-out Effekt beeinflusst.

Es kommt auch darauf an, wie lange die Reduktion/Erhöhung der Steuer anhält.


Using Policy to Stabilize the Economy

The Case for an Active Stabilization Policy

The Case against an Active Stabilization Policy

Automatic Stabilizers
Sind Änderungen in der Fiskalpolitik, die den aggregate demand stimulieren, wenn die Wirtschaft in
eine Rezession rutscht, ohne dass jemand aktiv etwas verändern muss.

Bsp: Geht die Wirtschaft in eine Rezession, verringern sich die Steuern dies erhöht den aggregate
demand genau zur richtigen Zeit.

Bsp2: Regierungsausgaben agieren auch als automatische Stabilisatoren. Geht eine Wirtschaft in
eine Rezession, werden Arbeitslosengelder und Sozialhilfe von der Regierung bezahlt, welche den
aggregate demand wieder ankurbeln.

Diese Stabilisatoren sind in der Regel nicht stark genug, um die Rezession abzuwenden.


28 Unemployment


Identifying Unemployment

What is unemployment
Als arbeitslos gelten jene Leute, die für eine Anstellung zu den momentanen Löhnen verfügbar
wären, aber keine Stelle erhalten.

How Is Unemployment Measured?
Es gibt zwei grundsätzliche Arten Arbeitslosigkeit zu messen.

The Claimant Count

Ein einfacher Weg ist es, die Anzahl der Arbeitslosengeldempfänger zu zählen. Die Regierung weiss
zudem, wieviele abreitende Personen es gibt und kann somit die Prozentzahlen ausrechnen.

Die Methode hat jedoch gewichtige Nachteile:
Die Arbeitslosenzahl hängt von den Bedingungen ab, die zu einem Arbeitslosengeldbezug
berechtigen.

Labour Force Surveys

Die zweite, zuverlässigere Methode sind Umfragen. Dabei wird die Definition von arbeitslos etwas
angepasst. Es werden ca. 60000 Leute quartalsweise befragt. Dabei wird zwischen angestellt,
arbeitslos oder ökonomisch inaktiv unterschieden. As ersteren zwei setzt sich die Labour Force
zusammen.

Die Arbeitslosenrate, ist definiert als das Verhältnis von Arbeitslosen zu der Labour Force mit 100
multipliziert.

Die Erwerbsquote ist das Verhältnis der Labour Force zur erwachsenen Bevölkerung mit 100
multipliziert. Sie sagt etwas darüber aus, wie viele Leute sich dafür entschieden haben in der
Erwerbsbevölkerung mitzutun.

CASE STUDY – Labour Force Participation of Men and Women in the UK Economy

How long are the Unemployed Without Work?
Kurzfristige Arbeitslosigkeit stellt kein grosses Problem dar, ganz im Gegensatz zu langfristiger
Arbeitslosigkeit. Die meiste Arbeitslosigkeit stammt von den Langzeitarbeitslosen. Wenn 52 Leute
eine Woche lang arbeitslos sind, dann ist eine Person, die ein Jahr lang arbeitslos ist genau gleich
lang arbeitslos, wie 52 zusammen.

Der grösste Teil der Arbeitslosigkeit ist also den wenigen Langzeitarbeitslosen zuzuschreiben .

Why Are There Always Some People Unemployed?
In den meisten Märkten einer Wirtschaft passen sich die Preise so an, dass sie Angebot und
Nachfrage in Einklang bringen. In einem idealen Arbeitsmarkt würden sich die Löhne so anpassen,
dass sie das Arbeitsangebot und die Arbeitsnachfrage in ein Gleichgewicht bringen würden. Das
würde dazu führen, dass alle Arbeitnehmer immer angestellt wären.

In der Realität jedoch, fällt die Arbeitslosigkeit nie auf 0%. Sie fluktuiert um die natürliche
Arbeitslosenrate. Dafür gibt es vier Gründe.

Der erste Grund ist, dass es Zeit braucht, um einen passenden Job zu finden. Dies nennt sich
frictional unemployment die ist sehr kurzfrisitg.

Die anderen drei Gründe resultieren aus einem Arbeitsengpass im Arbeitsmarkt. Dies nennt sich
structural unemployment und ist meisten langwierig. Diese Art von Arbeitslosigkeit entsteht durch
Löhne, die zu hoch sind um Arbeitsangebot und Arbeitsnachfrage in Einklang zu bringen.

Drei Gründe für Löhne über dem Gleichgewicht sind: Minimallohngesetzte, Gewerkschaften und
Leistungsbezogene Löhne.
Job Search

Der Prozess, der Arbeiter zu einem ihnen entsprechenden Job führt.

Why Some Frictional unemployment Is Inevitable
Friktionelle Arbeitslosigkeit ist oft die Folge von Änderungen in der Arbeitsnachfrage einzelner
Firmen. Wenn Arbeiter die entlassen werden und eine neue Anstellung bei einer anderen Firma mit
Arbeitsnachfrage suchen, entsteht Arbeitslosigkeit. Auch regionale Fluktuationen sind von
Bedeutung.

Sinkt zum Beispiel der Ölpreis, müssen Ölfirmen Mitarbeiter entlassen, während Autofirmen, deren
Nachfrage gestiegen ist, Arbeiter einstellen.

Public Policy and Job Search
Je schneller Informationen über freie Stellen und verfügbare Arbeiter sich verbreiten, umso kleiner
wird die friktionelle Arbeitslosigkeit. (Stichworte: Internet, RAV, Umschulungsprogramme)

Vertreter dieser Massnahmen glauben, sie könnten die Wirtschaft effizienter machen. Kritiker sind
der Ansicht, die Rgierung solle sich nicht in die Arbeitssuche einmischen. Sie meinen, dass die
Entscheidung welcher Job am besten zu einem passt, jedem selbst überlassen sein soll.

Unemployment Insurance
Arbeitslosengeld verursacht ungewollt friktionelle Arbeitslosigkeit. Die Vorteile der
Arbeitslosenversicherung verschwinden, wenn man einen neuen Job annimmt. Arbeitslose sind nicht
mehr so stark motiviert eine neue Stelle zu finden. Sie werden unattraktive Jobs nicht mehr so oft
annehmen. Manche Ökonomen meinen, die Arbeitslosenversicherung helfe den Leuten aber einen
besser passenden Job zu finden, da sie sich nicht den erstbesten nehmen müssen, was die Wirtschaft
wiederum effizienter macht.


Minimum Wage Laws

Minimallöhne erhöhen das Angebot an Arbeit auf dem Markt und reduzieren die Nachfrage an
Arbeit. Es entsteh ein Arbeitsangebotsüberschuss.

Minimallöhne sind aber nicht der Hauptgrund für Arbeitslosigkeit: Die meisten Arbeiter in der
Wirtschaft haben Löhne weit über den gesetzlichen Mindestlöhnen. Minimallöhne sind am
verbreitetsten bei den am wenigsten begabten und erfahrenen Arbeitern, wie etwa Teenagern. Dort
verursachen sie dann auch wirklich Arbeitslosigkeit.


Unions and Collective Bargaining

The Economics of Unions
Eine Gewerkschaft ist eine Art Kartell. Der Verhandlungsprozess über die Arbeitsbedingungen heisst
collective bargaining.
Gewerkschaftsmitglieder verdienen gesamthaft mehr als Arbeiter, die nicht in einer Gewerkschaft
organisiert sind. Wenn Gewerkschaften die Löhne erhöhen, dann sinken sie in den Industrien, die
keine Gewerkschaften haben. Arbeiter in Gewerkschaften ernten also die Vorteile, während die
anderen mit den Nachteilen leben müssen.

Are Unions Good or Bad For the Economy?
- : Kartell, Arbeitsreduktion, Lohnreduktion im Rest der Wirtschaft, Reduktion der Arbeit unter das
effiziente Niveau in Firmen mit Gewerkschaften, Ungerechtheit.

+ : Gegenmittel gegen Marktmacht der Firmen, wenn keine Alternativen bestehen, effiziente
Vermittlung zwischen Arbeitnehmer und Arbeitgeber, Hilfe für die Firmen glückliche und produktive
Arbeiter zu haben.


The Theory of Efficient Wages

Firmen halten die Löhne freiwillig hoch, damit die Arbeiter motiviert und produktiv sind.

Worker Health
Besser bezahlte Arbeiter ernähren sich besser. Dies gilt hauptsächlich für arme Länder

Worker Turnover
Hohe Löhne sorgen dafür, dass die Angestellten nicht gleich wieder zu einer anderen Firma wechseln.
Neue Arbeiter sind unerfahren und müssen erst ausgebildet werden. Das verursacht Kosten.

Worker Effort
Hohe Löhne geben den Arbeitern einen Anreiz ihren Job zu behalten. Sie werden darum dafür
sorgen, nicht gefeuert zu werden. Wären die Löhne auf Gleichgewichtsniveau, würden scih die
Arbeiter nicht so Mühe geben, da sie bald wieder einen neuen Job finden könnten.

Worker Quality
Ein höherer Lohn lockt mehr Bewerber an. So finden sich die begabtesten, die bei einem niedrigeren
Lohn gar nicht an der Arbeit interessiert wären.


The Short-Run Trade-Off Between Inflation and Unemployment


The Phillips Curve

Die kurzfristige Beziehung zwischen Inflation und Arbeitslosigkeit.
Origins of the Phillips Curve

Aggregate Demand, Aggregate Supply and the Phillips Curve
Das AD/AS-Modell bietet eine einfache Erklärung für alle möglichen Auskommen der Phillips-Kurve.
Bewegt sich die AD-Kurve entlang der AS-Kurve werden sich dadurch Arbeitslosigkeit und
Preisniveau in die entgegengesetzte Richtung bewegen.


Shifts in the Phillips Curve: The Role of Expectations

Kann man langfristig einen bestimmten Punkt auf der Phillips-Kurve „wählen“?

The Long-Run Phillips Curve
Nach Friedman und Phelps gibt es keinen Langfristigen Trade-Off zwischen Arbeitslosigkeit und
Inflation. Dies weil die wichtigste Determinante der Inflation das Geldwachstum ist. Aber
Geldwachstum hat keine realen Effekte. Es verändert einfach die Masseinheit. Vor allem hat
Geldwachstum keinen Einfluss auf Determinanten der Arbeitslosigkeit, wie etwa auf Gewerkschaften,
effiziente Löhne oder auf die Jobsuche. Es existiert also kein Grund, dass die Inflation langfristig mit
der Arbeitslosigkeit in Relation steht.

Die langfristige Phillips-Kurve ist also vertikal.

Obwohl monetäre Politik die natürliche Arbeitslosenrate nicht beeinflussen kann, gibt es andere
Möglichkeiten. Eine Änderung der Verordnungen, welche die natürliche Arbeitslosenrate senkt,
verschiebt die Phillips-Kurve nach links. Da die tiefere Arbeitslosigkeit bedeutet, dass mehr Leute
Güter und Dienstleistungen herstellen, steigt die Zahl der angebotenen Güter und Dienstleistungen
bei jedem gegebenen Preisniveau und die langfristige AS-Kurve verschiebt sich nach rechts. Die
Wirtschaft könnte dann tiefere Arbeitslosigkeit und höheren Output bei jedem Geldwachstum und
bei jeder Inflationsrate geniessen.

Expectations and the Short-Run Phillips Curve
Die erwartete Inflation ist ein Faktor, der die Position der kurzfristigen AS-Kurve verändert. Ändert
sich das Geldangebot, verschiebt sich die AD-Kurve entlang der gegebenen AS-Kurve. Kurzfristig
bringt also eine Änderung der Geldmenge unerwartete Fluktuationen in Output, Preisen,
Arbeitslosigkeit und Inflation.

Die unerwartete Inflation existiert aber nur über kurze Zeit.

Deshalb gilt: Arbeitslosenrate = natürliche Arbeitslosenrate – a × (aktuelle Inflation – erwartete
Inflation)

Diese Gleichung impliziert, dass es keine stabile kurzfristige Phillips-Kurve gibt. Jede kurzfristige
Phillips-Kurve wiederspiegelt eine bestimmte erwartete Inflationsrate.

Es ist nicht ratsam, die Phillips Kurve als eine Auswahl an verschiedenen Inflations und
Arbeitslosenniveaus zu sehen, da sich die erwartetet Inflation über Zeit anpasst dabei aber die
Arbeitslosenrate gleich bleibt.
The Unemployment-Inflation Trade-Off

Natural-rate hypothesis:

Die Arbeitslosigkeit kehrt mit der Zeit zu ihrem normalen Niveau zurück ungeachtet der
Inflationsrate.


The Long-Run Vertical Phillips Curve As an Argument For Central Bank
Independence

Ist die Zentralbank unter der Kontrolle der Regierung, kann diese Arbeitslosenzahlen kurzfristig zu
Wahlzwecken manipulieren.

								
To top