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Casey Anthony Forensic Biology lab report March 11 2011

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Casey Anthony Forensic Biology lab report March 11 2011

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									FORENSIC BIOLOGY
LABORATORY REPORT
2300 Stratford Avenue, Willow Grove, PA 19090
                                                                                                                  .NMS
T 800.522.6671 

F 215.366.1511 

www.nmslabs.com


                                                                    CONFIDENTIAL
   TO:       The Baez Law Firm                                                       REPORT DATE: 02/10/11
             Attention: Jose A Baez                                                  NMS LABS' WORK ORDER NUMBER: 10262351
             522 Simpson Road                                                        AGENCY NUMBER: K-60126
             Kissimmee, FL 34744
                                                                                     SUBJECT(S): Anthony, Casey

                                                                    ITEMS SUBIVIITtED
   On 12103/10, the following items were submitted by Mike Vincent of the Orange County Sheriff's Office by way of
   Federal Express:
   ITEM NUMBER(S)                  DESCRIPTION
   One brown cardboard box containing:
   1                  One brown paper bag marked "Orange County - Sheriffs Office" (sic], "Report Number
                        080122093", "Tag KS0126", "Item 007", and "1, Laundry 8ag" containing several pieces of
                       -folded brown paper and one large piece-oLbr.own-paper-containingone-whita~Whitney--
                    - -"'D"eSign"-bi'an~-launClry oag-------- c - - - - -       ---------------.------­


    2                              One brown paper bag marked "Orange County Sheriffs Office" [sic], "Report Number
                                    080122093", "Tag K60126", "Item 003", and "1. Shorts" containing one piece of folded
                                    brown paper and one piece of brown paper marked "Shorts" containing one brown paper
                                    bag marked "Pink stripped short" (sic] and one multi~colored ·Circo· brand pair of shorts

                                 EXAMINATION AND SEROLOGICAL ANALYSIS

                                                                                                       The following sample was collected


                                                           of the handles and rim of the laund    ba

   Item 2 - ShortS
   The shorts were examined for the presence of human genetiC material. The following sample was collected and
   ass! ned an exhibit number:

   I=EX:. .:.; .;02o:. .-. .:. 1_ _,---,-Vc:..::8.p..llum-swabbing of the shorts _

                                                                         DNA ANALYSIS
   The question samples (EX01-1 and EX02-1) were tested by deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) analysis of short
   tandem repeats ($TRs) using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technology. The amplification of DNA was
   performed using Promega's PowerPlel!l Y kit, which includes eleven male-specific loci (DYS391, DYS3891,
   DYS439, DYS3891l, DYS438, DYS437, DYS19, DYS392, DYS393, DYS390, and DYS385). The analysis was
   performed on an A81 Prism 310 Genetic Analyzer. The raw analytical data is available upon request
                       DNA INTERPRETATION AND CONCLUSIONS 

                                   Summary Table of Y -STR DNA Results 





   Item 1 - Laundry Bag
    EX01-1
      Summary: No DNA profile generated
      The sample identified as EX01-1 did not produce a Y-STR DNA profile. Hence, no conclusions can be drawn
      regarding any male sources of this sample.

   Item 2 - Shorts
     EX02·1
      Summary: No DNA profile generated
      The sample identified as EX02-1 did not produce a Y-STR DNA profile. Hence, no conclusions can be drawn
      regarding any male sources of this sample.
                                                                                       ~-~-.-.---".-.--     .. "" .. "-- .. " " -   .­

                                           CLOSING REMARKS
   The submitted items and associated exhibits will be retained until further dispOSition. Sufficient quantities of
   question samples remain for reanalysis, depending upon the type of DNA analysis technology used.

   This analysis was performed under chain-of-custody.      The chain-af-custody documentation is on file at NMS
   Labs.

   Positive and negative controls in each stage of analysis of this case performed as expected.


   Analysis performed by:                                   Review performed by:


     ~~~------1~~
   Laura M. Keller, M.S.F.S. a.~erine L. Cross, M.S., F-ABC
   Forensic Biologist           Forensic Biologist


                                             ***** END OF REPORT *****




                                             CONFIDENTIAL
NMS Labs' Work Order Number: 10262351                   Page 2                                    Report Date: 02/10/11
Agency Number: K-60126
2300 Stratford Ave. Willow Grove, PA 19090
Tel: (215) 657-4900
Toll Free: (800) 522-6671
Direct: 215-366-1328
Fax: 115-366-1511
                                                                                   NMS
                                                                                   (         LABS
E-mail: nms@nmslabs.com




                 III     FAX           TRANSMISSION                                    III
      To:                                              From: Susan O'Neill, Criminalistics ext 1328

                                                       Pages:             Including cover sheet
                                                ./'
      Fax:                                     S       Date:

                                                       CC:

      Re:




       The infonnatlon contained in this fax is privileged, confidential, and intended only for the use of
       the individual or entity named above. If the reader is not the intended recipient, or the employee
       or agent responsible for delivery to the intended recipient, you are hereby notified that any
       distribution or copying of this communication is strictly prohibited. If you have received this
       communication in error, please notify us immediately by telephone and return the original
       message to us at the address above, by mail. Postage will be reimbursed. Thank you•.
Dr. Scott L Fairgrieve, Hons. B.Sc., M.Phil, Ph.D., F.A.A.F.S.
Associate Professor
Department of Forensic Science
Laurentian University
Sudbury, ON P3E 2C6

|anuary 23,201,1

Florida State Prosecutor's Office


Re.: Deposition For Florida v. Casey Anthony


To Whom It May Concern:

On December 16, 2010 between the hours of 0900-1200 I gave a deposition via a
live internet connection with prosecutors for the State of Florida in the matter of the
State of Florida v. Casey Anthony. A court reporter, Ms. Heather Penfound, was
present in order to generate a transcript of this deposition.

In an email to me, dated December L7,20L0, Ms. Penfound informed me that the
Prosecution in this case has not ordered a copy of the transcript. At the time of the
deposition I was told by the prosectutors that a copy of the transcipt would be sent
to me in order for me to examine the document and make any corrections. As of the
date of this letter,l have not received a copy of the transcript.

Mr. fos6 Baez, in an email to me, dated fanuary 2L,20LL, informs me thatthe State
wishes to have a letter from me "stating that all the information you provided in
your deposition contains all of the opinions you will render in this case." This letter
is in response to that request.

I   hereby state that to the best of my recollection, without having had the
opportunity to examine the transcript of my deposition on December L6,2010, all of
the information I provided in my deposition contains all of the opinions that I will
render in this case. This of course presupposes that the questions posed to me in
future are the same as those presented at the time of the deposition. Likewise, any
additioinal references to the professional literature that come to my attention since
the deposition may be drawn upon in order to answer any future questions posed
by the prosecution or defense in this matter.

Sincerely,

Z@)
Dr. Scott I. Fairgrieve
                           ^
                                   Kenneth G. Furton, Ph.D.


January 16, 2011

The Baez Law Firm
522 Simpson Road
Kissimmee, Florida 34744
Tel: 407-705-2626; Fax: 407-931-2625

                           Report from Kenneth G. Furton in the case of
            State of Florida vs. Casey Marie Anthony – Case No.: 48-2008-CF-15606

Dear Mr. Baez,

The following report outlines my expert opinions in the case of State of Florida vs. Casey Marie
Anthony – Case No.: 48-2008-CF-15606

INTRODUCTION

My name is Kenneth G. Furton. My business address is Florida International University, College
of Arts and Sciences, 11200 S.W. 8th Street, ECS453, Miami, Florida 33199. I am an expert in
the field of Analytical Chemistry and Forensic Science. My regular expert witness rate for
consulting and court testimony or deposition is $350.00 per hour. In this case I have agreed to
accept the JAC rate of $150.00 per hour.

BACKGROUND AND EDUCATION

I am a Professor in the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Dean of the College of Arts
and Sciences, and founding Director and currently Director Emeritus of the International
Forensic Institute at Florida International University (“FIU”). I received a Bachelor of Science
in Forensic Science (minor in Chemistry) at the University of Central Florida in Orlando,
Florida, in 1983, and completed an internship in the Detroit Police Headquarters Crime
Laboratory in Detroit, Michigan. I received my Ph.D. in Analytical Chemistry (minor in
Biology) at Wayne State University in 1986. I then completed post-doctoral studies in Nuclear
Chemistry (Physical/Inorganic studies) at British Nuclear Fuels (BNFL) and the University of
Wales, Swansea, U.K. in 1988 while also teaching Forensic Analysis for second- and final-year
honor students. I became a faculty member at FIU in 1988, and since that time I taught dozens of
different courses, enrolling thousands of students, and I have directed the research of more than
100 undergraduate and graduate students and have been the author or co-author of more than 600
publications and presentations and have been continuously funded for more than 20 years with
approximately $8M in external research grants. I have been an active participant in local,
national and international professional organizations, including having chaired the South Florida
Section of the American Chemical Society and I am a fellow of the American Academy of
Forensic Sciences. Notable awards I have received include the 1986 Boltz Award in Analytical
Chemistry, 1996 International Association of Forensic Sciences Award, the 2005 FIU
President’s Council Outstanding University Professor Award and the 2008 Collegian Award
from Wayne State University.




    University Medical and Forensic Consultants, Inc. (UMFC) • 10130 Northlake Boulevard; Suite 214 #300
                West Palm Beach, Florida 33412 • Phone (561) 795-4452 • Fax (561) 795-4768
I have participated in research programs focusing on forensic science and separation science
including the development of sample preparation methods prior to chromatographic analysis.
Since 1994 my research has focused on identifying the characteristic compounds that can be used
to locate and identify forensic specimens including accelerants, biotoxins, currency, drugs,
explosives, and human scent from living and deceased humans.

PUBLICATIONS

Below are the 48 publications I have authored in the last 10 years:

1. K.G. Furton and L.J. Myers, The Scientific Foundations and Efficacy of the Use of Canines
    as Chemical Detectors for Explosives, Invited review for special thematic issue "Methods for
    Explosive Analysis and Detection", Talanta, 54/3 (2001) 487-500.
2. K.G. Furton, Factors Affecting Selectivity in Supercritical Fluid Chromatography, Invited
    article for entry in the “Dekker Encyclopedia of Chromatography”, Edited by J. Cazes,
    Marcel Dekker, New York, 749-752 (2001).
3. J.R. Almirall and K.G. Furton, Forensic Chemistry, 2002 Yearbook of Science &
    Technology, MacGraw-Hill, New York, 113-115.
4. K.G. Furton, Y. C. Hong, Y.-L. Hsu, T. Luo, S. Rose and J. Walton, Identification of Odor
    Signature Chemicals in Cocaine Using Solid-Phase Microextraction / Gas Chromatography
    and Detector Dog Response to Isolated Compounds Spiked on U.S. Paper Currency, J.
    Chromatogr. Sci. 40 (2002) 147-155.
5. J.R. Almirall and K.G. Furton, New Developments in Sampling and Sample Preparation for
    Forensic Analysis, Invited chapter for “Sampling and Sample Preparation for the Field and
    Laboratory” in Wilson and Wilson’s Comprehensive Analytical Chemistry Vol. 37, edited by
    J.B. Pawliszyn, Elsevier, 2002, pp. 919-934.
6. J.R. Almirall, S. Montero and K.G. Furton, Association of Glass Fragments by their Trace
    Elemental Content Using ICP-MS and LA-ICP-MS in the Analysis Scheme in Enabling
    Technologies for Law Enforcement and Security, Edward M. Carapezza, Editor, Proc. SPIE,
    2002, pp. 61-71.
7. J.R. Almirall and K.G. Furton, “Trends in Forensic Science Education: Expansion and
    Increased Accountability”, Journal of Analytical and Bioanalytical Chemistry, 376 (2003)
    1156-1159.
8. N. Lorenzo, T. Wan, R.J. Harper, Y.-L. Hsu, M. Chow, S. Rose and K.G. Furton, Laboratory
    and field experiments used to identify canis lupus var. familiaris active odor signature
    chemicals from drugs, explosives and humans, Analytical and Bioanalytical Chemistry,
    invited paper for special forensic chemistry issue, 376 (2003) 1212-1224.
9. J.R. Almirall and K.G. Furton, Characterization of Background and Pyrolysis Products that
    May Interfere with the Forensic Analysis of Fire Debris, Invited paper for J. Analyt. Appl.
    Pyrolysis, 71(1) (2003) 51-67.
10. A.J. Sabucedo and K.G. Furton, Estimation of Postmortem Interval using the Protein Cardiac
    Troponin I, Forensic Sci. International, 134 (2003) 11-16.
11. K.G. Furton, R.J. Harper, J. M. Perr and J.R. Almirall, Optimization of biological and
    instrumental detection of explosives and ignitable liquid residues including canines,
    SPME/ITMS and GC/MSn, in Sensors and Command, Control, Communications and




                                                                                              2
    Intelligence Technologies for Homeland Defense and Law Enforcement, Edward M.
    Carapezza, Editor, Proc. SPIE, 2003, 183-192.
12. J.R. Almirall, T. Trejos, A. Hobbs and K.G. Furton , Trace elemental analysis of glass and
    paint samples of forensic interest by ICP-MS using Laser Ablation solid sample introduction,
    in Sensors and Command, Control, Communications and Intelligence Technologies for
    Homeland Defense and Law Enforcement, Edward M. Carapezza, Editor, Proc. SPIE, 2003,
    193-204.
13. K.G. Furton and R. Harper, Detection of Ignitable Liquid Residues in Fire Scenes Accelerant
    Detection Canine (ADC) Teams and other Field Tests Advances in Forensic Science in
    Advances in Forensic Science Techniques: Interpretation of Fire Scene Evidence, CRC
    Press, Boca Raton, 2004.
14. J.R. Almirall and K.G. Furton, Advances in Forensic Science Techniques: Interpretation of
    Fire Scene Evidence, Edited Book published by CRC Press, Boca Raton, February 2004, 264
    pages. First book in the series “Forensic Science Techniques Series” by CRC Press (J.R.
    Almirall and K.G. Furton, Series Eds.)
15. A.J. Sabucedo, M.A. Gutierrez, K.C. Mueller, B.L. Bellissima, Y.-L. Hsu, S. Rose, and K.G.
    Furton, Sex, Lies, and Niagra (Presence of Sildenafil in Niagra Actra Rx ®and Actra Rx®),
    JAMA, 291(5) (2004) 560-562.
16. S. Rose and K.G. Furton, Variables Affecting the Accuracy and Precision of Breath Alcohol
    Instruments Including the Intoxilyzer 5000, Invited Book Chapter for “Georgia DUI Law, A
    Resource for Lawyers and Judges” edited by George Stein, Michie, 2004
    (ISBN#0327162961).
17. J.R. Almirall, T. Trejos, A. Hobbs, J. Perr and K.G. Furton, Mass Spectrometry in Forensic
    Science, in Advances in Mass Spectrometry, Vol 16, A.E. Ashcroft, G. Breton and J.J.
    Monaghan, Eds., Elsevier, 2004, 167-187.
18. A.J. Sabucedo and K.G. Furton, Extractionless GC/MS Analysis of γ-Hydroxybutyrate and γ-
    Butyrolactone with Trifluoroacetic anhydride and Heptafluoro-1-butanol, J. Separation Sci.,
    27 (2004) 703-709.
19. A.M. Curran, S.I. Rabin and K.G. Furton, Analysis of the uniqueness and persistence of
    human scent, Forensic Science Communications, Vol. 7, No. 2, (April 2005), 23 pages
    accessed at
    http://www2.fbi.gov/hq/lab/fsc/backissu/april2005/research/2005_04_research02.htm.
20. J.M. Perr, K.G. Furton and J.R. Almirall, Solid phase microextraction ion mobility
    spectrometer interface for explosive and taggant detection, J. Separation Sci., Volume 28,
    Issue 2 (February 2005), (p 177-183).
21. A.M. Curran, P.A. Prada, A.A. Schoon, J.R. Almirall and K.G. Furton, Human Scent as a
    Biometric Measurement, in Biometric Technology for Human Identification II, edited by
    A.K. Jain and N.K. Ratha, Proc. Of SPIE Vol. 5779, SPIE, Bellingham, WA, March, 2005,
    398-408.
22. A.M. Curran, J.R. Almirall, A.A. Schoon and K.G. Furton, Human Scent as a Potential
    Biometric Measurement Utilizing Solid Phase Microextraction – Gas Chromatography/Mass
    Spectrometry (SPME-GC/MS), Proc. of the Eleventh International Symposium on Olfaction
    and electronic Nose – ISOEN 2005, S. Marco and I. Montoliu, Editors, Barcelona University,
    Spain, 2005 (ISBN: 84-689-113), pp. 345-348.
23. R.T. Griffith, K. Jayachandran, W. Whitstine and K.G. Furton, Differentiation of Hazardous
    Indoor Molds via Canine Detection and SPME-GC/MS, Proceedings of the Eleventh




                                                                                              3
    International Symposium on Olfaction and electronic Nose – ISOEN 2005, S. Marco and I.
    Montoliu, Editors, Barcelona University, Spain, 2005 (ISBN: 84-689-113), pp. 351-354.
24. L. Conner and K.G. Furton, Evaluation of Electronic Noses in Conjunction with Field
    Sampling Apparatus in Fire Investigations, Proceedings of the Eleventh International
    Symposium on Olfaction and electronic Nose – ISOEN 2005, S. Marco and I. Montoliu,
    Editors, Barcelona University, Spain, 2005 (ISBN: 84-689-113), pp. 222-225.
25. A.M. Curran, S.I. Rabin, P.A. Prada and K.G. Furton, Comparison of the Volatile Organic
    Compunds Present in Human Odor Using SPME-GC/MS, J. Chemical Ecology, Vol. 31, No.
    7 (2005) 1607 - 1619.
26. R.J. Harper, J.R. Almirall and K.G. Furton, Identification of dominant odor chemicals
    emanating from explosives for use in developing optimal training aid combinations and
    mimics for canine detection, Talanta, 67 (2005) 313-327.
27. J.M. Perr, K.G. Furton and J.R. Almirall, Gas Chromatography Positive Chemical Ionization
    and Tandem Mass Spectrometry for the Analysis of Organic High Explosives, Talanta, 67
    (2005) 430-436.
28. K.G. Furton and D.P. Heller, Advances in the reliable location of forensic specimens through
    research and consensus best practice guidelines for dog and orthogonal instrumental
    detectors, Canadian Journal of Police & Security Services, Special Issue: Advances in
    Forensic Science, Vol. 3, Issue 2 (2005), 97-107.
29. S. Rose and K.G. Furton, Fundamentals of Forensic Breath- and Blood-Alcohol Analysis
    (Chapter 5.01[B]), in Drunk Driving Defense, 6th Edition, by Lawrence Taylor and Steve
    Oberman, Aspen Publishers, New York, ISBN 0-7355-5429-3, pp. 317-349, 2006.
30. L. Conner, S. Chin and K.G. Furton, Evaluation of Field Sampling Techniques including
    Electronic Noses and a Dynamic Headspace Sampler for Use in Fire Investigations, Sensors
    and Actuators B, 116 (2006) 121-129.
31. Curran, A.M, S.I. Rabin, P.A. Prada, and K.G. Furton. On the Definition and Measurement
    of Human Scent: Response by Curran et. al., Journal of Chemical Ecology, Vol. 32 (2006)
    1617-1623.
32. K.G. Furton, M. Kusano and M.S. Macias, Gas Chromatography: Forensic Applications, in
    Encyclopedia of Separation Science, Elsevier Ltd., 2007, 1-8.
33. A.M. Curran, C.F. Ramirez, A.A. Schoon and K.G. Furton, The Frequency of Occurrence
    and Discriminatory Power of Compounds Found in Human Scent Across a Population
    Determined by SPME-GC/MS, J. Chromatogr. B, 846 (2007) 86-97.
34. R.J. Harper and K.G. Furton, Biological Detection of Explosives, Chapter 13 in
    "Counterterrorist Detection Techniques of Explosives", J. Yinon, Editor, Elsevier, 2007,
    395-431.
35. R.T. Griffith, K. Jayachandran, W. Whitstine and K.G. Furton, Differentiation of Toxic
    Molds via Headspace SPME-GC/MS and Canine Detection, Sensors, 7 (2007) 1415-1427.
36. K.G. Furton, M. Kusano and M.S. Macias, Gas Chromatography: Forensic Applications, in
    Encyclopedia of Separation Science, Elsevier Ltd., 2007, 1-8.
37. C.A. Newcombe and K.G. Furton, Dogs in Drug Detection, in Encyclopedia of Drugs,
    Alcohol & Addictive Behavior, 3rd edition, 2008, D-26-28.
38. P.A. Prada and K.G. Furton, Human Scent Detection: A Review of Its Developments and
    Forensic Applications, Revista de Ciencias Forenses, 1(2), 81-87, 2008.
39. A.A. Schoon, A.M. Curran and K.G. Furton, Odor Biometrics, In Encyclopedia of
    Biometrics, S.Z. Li, Editor, Springer, 2009, 1009-1014.




                                                                                               4
40. D.T. Hudson, A.M. Curran and K.G. Furton,The Stability of Collected Human Scent Under
    Various Environmental Conditions, J. Forensic Sci., Vol. 54., No. 6, 1270-1277, 2009.
41. M.S. Macias, P. Guerra-Diaz, J.R. Almirall and K.G. Furton, Detection of piperonal emitted
    from polymer controlled odor mimic permeation systems utilizing Canis familiaris and solid
    phase microextraction–ion mobility spectrometry, Forensic Science International, 195
    (2010) 132-138.
42. A.M. Curran, P.A. Prada and K.G. Furton, The Differentiation of the Volatile Organic
    Signatures of Individuals Through SPME-GC/MS of Characteristic Human Scent
    Compounds, J Forensic Sci, Vol. 55, No. 1, 50-57, 2010.
43. P.A. Prada, A.M. Curran and K.G. Furton, Comparison of Extraction Methods for the
    Removal of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) Present in Sorbents Used for Human Scent
    Evidence Collection, Analytical Methods, Vol. 2, No. 5 (2010) 417-588.
44. P. Prada, A.M. Curran and K.G. Furton, Evaluation of Human Hand Odor Volatiles on
    Various Textiles: A Comparison between Contact and Non-Contact Sampling Methods,
    Journal of Forensic Sciences, 2010, in press.
45. A.M. Curran, PhD; P.A. Prada, K.G. Furton, Canine Human Scent Identifications with Post-
    Blast Debris Collected from Improvised Explosive Devices, Forensic Science International,
    199 (2010) 103-108.
46. K.G. Furton and A.M. Curran, “Identification of Humans through Characteristic Compounds
    Detected in Human Scent” United States Patent No. 7,781,218, Issued August 24, 2010.
47. S. Tolliver, W. L. Hearn and K.G. Furton, Evaluating the Relationship between Postmortem
    and Antemortem Morphine and Codeine Concentrations in Whole Blood, Journal of
    Analytical Toxicology, 34 (8) 491-497, 2010.
48. D.T. Hudson-Holness and K.G. Furton, Comparison between human scent compounds
    collected on cotton and cotton blend materials for SPME-GC/MS analysis, J. Forensic Res., 1
    (1) 1-6, 2010.

CASES

I have testified numerous times as an expert witness in local and federal courts on behalf of
prosecutors as well as defendants. Below are the seven cases in which I have testified as an
expert at trial or deposition within the last four years:

   1. 7/2/2008 retained by defense attorney S. Abramowitz in the Family Court case regarding
      the reliability of testing for drugs in hair related to custody for J.E. Kenyon. Testified on
      7/21/2008.
   2. 9/12/2008 retained by USAO in the case of U.S. v. Wade (District of Alaska). Testified
      in probable cause hearing regarding the reliability of human scent trailing canines on
      12/10/2008.
   3. 4/9/2009 retained by District Attorney Scott Perrilloux in the case of U.S. v. $19,960.00
      in U.S. Currency. Telephone deposition on 4/14/2009.
   4. 12/30/2009 retained by Fort Bend County Texas District Attorney’s Office (Amanda
      Bolin, Asst. District Attorney) in the case of State of Texas v. Rodolfo Dominguez,
      Cause # 49886.
   5. 1/8/2010. Retained by Los Angeles District Attorney’s Office (Martin J. Bean, Deputy
      District Attorney) in the case number GA069722. Testified in 1/11/2010 and 1/14/2010.




                                                                                                  5
   6. 1/27/2010. Court ordered for appointment as an expert by Salvador Salgado, Deputy
      Public Defender, County of Los Angeles in the case of People of CA v. Johnny Bruister.
      Telephone testimony on 2/1/2010.
   7. 7/27/2010. Retained by USAO/WDNY in the case of U.S. v. $60,020 in U.S. Currency
      (08-CV-6286 L). Testified on 11/13/2010.
   8. 11/17/2010. Retained by USAO/DWNY in the case of US v. Omari A. Graham (08-CR-
      6259(L). Testified on 11/30/2010.

MATERIALS REVIEWED

The materials I have reviewed in formulating an opinion with respect to State of Florida vs.
Casey Marie Anthony – Case No.: 48-2008-CF-15606, included the following:

   1. Case reports, autopsy reports and photos of 1998 Pontiac Sunfire, vehicle’s trunk and
      contents of the trunk
   2. Preliminary and final reports from A. Vass, M. Wise and M. Martin of Oak Ridge
      National Laboratory.
   3. Curriculum Vitae of A. Vass, M. Wise and M. Martin
   4. Depositions of M. Rickenbach, A. Vass, M. Wise and M. Martin
   5. Relevant literature

OPINIONS

Based upon my review of these materials, as well as my familiarity with professional practices, I
have reached the following expert opinions based upon a reasonable degree of scientific
certainty:

1) It is my expert opinion that there are currently no scientifically validated methods capable of
   identifying the presence of human remains based on the presence or absence of specific
   chemical residues. Since 2003, my research group, and others around the world have been
   pursuing such methods but, to date, no statistically validated techniques have been
   established. For live human scent there have been methods developed that utilize established
   statistical analysis demonstrating that a high degree of reliability (greater than 99%
   distinguish ability using spearman correlation). Example publications in this regard include
   the following:

       1. A.M. Curran, C.F. Ramirez, A.A. Schoon and K.G. Furton, The Frequency of
          Occurrence and Discriminatory Power of Compounds Found in Human Scent Across
          a Population Determined by SPME-GC/MS, J. Chromatogr. B, 846 (2007) 86-97.
       2. A.M. Curran, P.A. Prada and K.G. Furton, The Differentiation of the Volatile Organic
          Signatures of Individuals Through SPME-GC/MS of Characteristic Human Scent
          Compounds, J Forensic Sci, Vol. 55, No. 1, 50-57, 2010.
       3. K.G. Furton and A.M. Curran, “Identification of Humans through Characteristic
          Compounds Detected in Human Scent” United States Patent No. 7,781,218, Issued
          August 24, 2010.




                                                                                                 6
2) Over the years, numerous research groups, including my own, have studied the evolution of
   volatile organic compounds emanating from human remains and, to date, there is wide
   variation in the identified compounds and currently no consensus as to whether or not there
   are characteristic compounds that can reliably indicate the presence of human decomposition
   to the exclusion of other decompositional events. Relevant references include the following:

       1. S. Tolliver, M. Chow, K.G. Furton , Identification of Canis Familiaris Active Odor
          Signature Chemicals in Human Remains, The 30th Annual Meeting of the Federation
          of Analytical Chemistry and Spectroscopy Societies (FACSS), Ft. Lauderdale,
          Florida, October 19 - 23, 2003.
       2. A.A. Vass, R.R. Smith, C.V. Thompson, M.N. Burnett, D. Wolf, J.A. Synstelien, N.
          Dulgerian, B. Eckenrode. Decompositional odor analysis database. Journal of
          Forensic Science 2004; 49; 760-769.
       3. S.S. Tolliver, Identification of Canis familiaris signature odor chemicals in human
          remains using derivatization solid-phase microextraction / gas chromatography / mass
          spectrometry. Master’s thesis: Florida International University 2005.
       4. M. Statheropoulos, C. Spiliopoulou, A. Agapiou, A study of volatile organic
          compounds evolved from the decaying human body. Forensic Science International
          2005. 153: 147-155.
       5. M. Statheropoulos, A. Agapiou, C. Spiliopoulous, G.C. Pallis, E. Sianos,
          Environmental aspects of VOCs evolved in the early stages of human decomposition.
          Science of the Total Environment 2007; 385; 221-227.
       6. A.A. Vass, R. Smith, C.V. Thompson, M. Burnett, N. Dulgerian, B. Eckenrode, Odor
          analysis of decomposing buried human remains. Journal of Forensic Science 2008;
          53(2); 384-391.
       7. E.M. Hoffman, A.M. Curran, N. Dulgerian, R.A. Stockham, B.A. Eckenrode,
          Characterization of the volatile organic compounds present in the headspace of
          decomposing human remains. Forensic Science International 2009; 186; 6-13.
       8. L. E. DeGreeff. Development of a Dynamic Headspace Concentration Technique for
          the Non-Contact Sampling of Human Odor Samples and the Creation of Canine
          Training Aids. Doctoral Dissertation: Florida International University, 2010.

3) Previously touted techniques for locating human remains have not been demonstrated to be
   reliable. Examples include the unsuccessful location of human remains at the Barker Ranch
   in spite of indicative chemical markers purported to be present and use of divining rods to
   locate bodies which users refused to have independently tested. It is therefore important that
   any novel techniques such as the use of characteristic chemicals to identify the location of
   human remains be critically evaluated including the number of agencies employing the
   method and the number of times such methods have been employed and later confirmed by
   the recovery of an actual human body. Relevant references include the following:

       1. J. Howell, The Body Dowser, BusinessTN, Jan.Feb. 2009.
       2. J. Hallcox, A. Welch, Behind the yellow tape: On the road with some of America’s
          hardest working crime scene investigators, Penguin, 2009, pp. 118-119.




                                                                                                    7
4) The methods employed by Vass and coworkers at Oak Ridge National Laboratory are still in
   the experimental stage and do not have sufficient databases of chemicals present in
   background materials and an insufficient number of decompositional materials and
   conditions to make a scientific conclusions with reasonable degrees of scientific certainties
   using established statistical techniques. The data presented in the reports submitted does not
   allow for the calculation of error rates or the likelihood of false positive and false negatives
   under the conditions employed. Only a small fraction of the 478 “specific volatile
   compounds associated with burial decomposition” and the 30 chemicals Vass et. al. have
   reported as “key markers of human decomposition” were present in the tested samples with
   five chemicals used to draw conclusions about the possibility of a decompositional event
   occurring (chloroform, carbon tetrachloride, carbon disulfide, dimethyl disulfide, dimethyl
   trisulfide ). None of the fluorinated compounds Vass has reported to be specific for human
   decomposition were detected in the samples tested. Rather than interpreting that the lack of
   human specific fluorinated compounds as an indicator of a non-human decompositional
   event, Vass and coworkers speculate that this may indicate that their technique may not work
   for children. Similar speculation is found throughout the forensic report which ends with a
   conclusion that “a portion of the total odor signature” is “consistent with an early
   decompositional event that could be of human origin” with no reference to the degree of
   reliability of the method or statistical significance. The report does compare the compounds
   detected in the trunk samples and show that all of these compounds have been detected in
   animal remains as well. Relevant references include the following:

       1.  A.A. Vass, R.R. Smith, C.V. Thompson, M.N. Burnett, D. Wolf, J.A. Synstelien, N.
          Dulgerian, B. Eckenrode. Decompositional odor analysis database. Journal of
          Forensic Science 2004; 49; 760-769.
       2. A.A. Vass, R. Smith, C.V. Thompson, M. Burnett, N. Dulgerian, B. Eckenrode, Odor
          analysis of decomposing buried human remains. Journal of Forensic Science 2008;
          53(2); 384-391.

5) There is inadequate analysis of potential sources of the limited number of compounds
   reported as well as inadequate analysis of the significance of the concentrations of the
   compounds reported. The five chemicals used to draw conclusions about the possibility of a
   decompositional event are known to be present in cleaning products including bleach
   (chloroform and carbon tetrachloride) and in non-human decompositional events, including
   composting (carbon disulfide, dimethyl disulfide, dimethyl trisulfide). It is therefore critical
   to compare the concentrations/relative ratios of chemicals detected and compare these to
   databases of background materials and non-human decompositional events in order to
   determine if the levels detected are statistically significance. Relevant references include the
   following:
          1. P.J.L. Derikx, H.J.M. op Den Camp, C. Van Der Drift, L.J.L.D Van Griensven
               and G.D. Vogels, Odorous sulfur compounds emitted during production of
               compost used as a substrate in mushroom cultivation, Applied and Environmental
               Microbiology, 1990, Vol. 56, 176-180.
          2. M. Odabasi, Halogenated volatile organic compounds from the use of chlorine-
               bleach-containing household products. Environmental Science & Technology,
               2008, 42, 1445-1451.




                                                                                                  8
In summary, based on my training and experience in the field of analytical chemistry and
forensic science, the research I have conducted with human scent, my review of the literature and
the reports from this case, it is my expert opinion that the use of characteristic chemicals to
indicate a human-specific decompositional event has not been shown to be scientifically reliable
to a level sufficient for use in forensic casework. At present, there is currently a lack of identified
human-specific chemicals from decompositional events and an insufficient database of
background materials and non-human decompositional chemicals to allow the reliability of this
technique to be calculated.



                                                                               1/16/2011
Dr. Kenneth G. Furton, Ph.D.                                                   Date
Professor, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry
Founder and Director Emeritus, International Forensic Research Institute
Dean, College of Arts & Sciences, Florida International University
University Park, Miami, FL 33199, 305-348-6546, Fax: 305-348-4172




                                                                                                     9
Preliminary Entomological Evidence
              Report


     Orange County Sheriff’s Office
           Case # 08-069208
      (Homicide, Caylee Anthony)




                        Prepared by:
          Timothy E. Huntington, Ph.D., D-ABFE
           Board Certified Forensic Entomologist
                    175 E. Seward St.
                    Seward, NE 68434
                       402-730-9442
                                                                                  Case # 08-069208
                                                                                    Caylee Anthony
                                                                               Preliminary Findings
                                                                                             Page 2
Case #: 08-069208 Orange County Sheriff’s Office
         (Homicide, Caylee Anthony)

Requesting Agency: The Baez Law Firm,
                   522 Simpson Road
                   Kissimmee, FL 34744

Evidence Submitted:

1. Digital photographs (4802) accessible on secured server.
2. Weather data from NWS Station in Orlando, FL: 16 June – 12 December 2008.
3. Forensic entomology report (Anthony; 08-069208; FEI 1187 (A)) by Dr. Neal H. Haskell,
   dated 22 September 2009.
4. Four (4) containers of preserved insects collected from trash bag on 28 August 2008.
5. Decedent - Last known to be alive 16 June 2008
              - Corpse discovered 1125 hrs 11 December 2008

Conclusion:
Adult flies associated with the trash bag were identified as Megaselia scalaris. Because this
species is frequently associated with human garbage (synanthropy), their presence in and around
the trash bag (full of garbage) is unremarkable and is of no forensic value. The presence of a
single leg of a blow fly in a bag of garbage is unremarkable and is of no forensic value. The
presence of a single dermestid beetle larva in a bag of garbage with dead insects and dry food
remains in it is unremarkable and is of no forensic value. Based upon the foregoing, and a
reasonable degree of scientific certainty, the insects associated with the trash bag collected as
evidence in this case are not forensically significant and are of no medicocriminal value. These
findings are preliminary in nature, and are open to revision and reinterpretation upon subsequent
identification and analysis of any remaining evidence associated with this portion of the case.




Forensic Entomologist: _________________________________ Date: __________________
                       Timothy E. Huntington, Ph.D., D-ABFE
                                                                          Case # 08-069208
                                                                            Caylee Anthony
                                                                       Preliminary Findings
                                                                                      Page 3
Scenario: (from N. Haskell report Anthony; 08-069208; FEI 1187 (A)) “A white trash bag with
blue handles containing paper towels and miscellaneous items was removed from the trunk of a
1998 white Pontiac Sunfire (owned by the mother of the missing child) on July 16, 2008.” Dr.
Haskell (a forensic entomologist) subsequently evaluated entomological evidence collected from
the trunk of the car and from inside of the plastic trash bag.


Weather station data from the National Weather Service station in Orlando, Florida were
obtained from Dr. Haskell’s report (Anthony; 08-069208; FEI 1187 (A)).


I (Dr. Timothy Huntington, a forensic entomologist) was contacted in December 2008 and was
asked to evaluate entomological evidence and reports pertaining to this case.


Preliminary Results of Examination:
Sample # “1 of 2”- 8/28/08 (1100) – trash bag – Coll. M. Vincent
       (7) larvae- Diptera: Phoridae
       (1) puparium fragment – Diptera: Phoridae (likely)


Sample # “2 of 2” – 8/28/08 (1100) – trash bag – Coll. M. Vincent
       (ca. 30) puparia – Diptera: Phoridae


Sample # 1a – 10/12/2008 – white trash bag, blue handle (internal label indicates SA#: 3)
       (14) adult – Diptera: Phoridae; Megaselia scalaris
       (5) puparia – Diptera: Phoridae
       (1) larva – Coleoptera: Dermestidae


Sample # 6a – 8/28/08 – paper toweling (internal label indicates SA#: 5)
       (ca. 100+) uneclosed and eclosed puparia – Diptera: Phoridae
       (1) adult – Diptera: Phoridae w/o abdomen
       (1) leg – Diptera: Calliphoridae (likely)
                                                                              Case # 08-069208
                                                                                 Caylee Anthony
                                                                           Preliminary Findings
                                                                                         Page 4
Findings and Discussion: Adult flies associated with the trash bag were identified as Megaselia
scalaris, sometimes known as the scuttle fly or humpbacked fly. It is highly probable that the
larvae and puparia belong to this same species, but species-level identification of these immature
stages is not possible at this time. This species of fly is cosmopolitan (worldwide) in distribution
and is found on a wide variety of organic food substrates including, but not limited to,
vegetation, carrion, and excrement. Because this species is frequently associated with human
garbage (synanthropy), their presence in and around the trash bag (full of garbage) is
unremarkable and is of no forensic value. Possible sources of attraction and/or food within the
trash bag include partially eaten food, food packaging, grease, tobacco, and tobacco-saliva. This
species is also a common kitchen pest, so it is possible that the bag was infested with the adult
flies prior to its being removed from the home. Because this species readily enters closed and
confined spaces to access attractive food sources, it is also possible that the adult flies gained
access to the trash after the bag was already in the trunk.


According to Dr. Haskell’s report, “Michael Vincent noted that uneclosed and eclosed (hatched)
puparia and adult flies were seen in the mother’s car trunk during initial entry into the trunk of
the car July 16, 2008…” The indicated presence of eclosed puparia means that a generation of
development (egg to adult) had been completed. Temperature calculations used for estimating
insect development were made based on weather station data (Table 1). According to a
publication by Greenberg in 1990 (Table 2), M. scalaris requires approximately 85 Accumulated
degree-days minus a base temperature of 10°C (ADD-B10) to reach the pupal stage, and 257
ADD-B10 to complete the pupal stage (eclose). This places the latest date of initial oviposition
(egg-laying) by M. scalaris on or prior to 2 July 2008, with additional oviposition occurring
between 2 July and 12 July 2008. It should be noted that solar radiation would likely increase the
temperatures in the vehicle which would increase the number of degree-days for a given time
period. Therefore, estimates using uncorrected weather station data represent the longest
probable timeframe and the actual period of insect development would be shorter. Therefore the
latest date of initial oviposition by M. scalaris would fall sometime after 2 July.
                                                                                  Case # 08-069208
                                                                                     Caylee Anthony
                                                                               Preliminary Findings
                                                                                              Page 5
The adult fly leg found in the trash bag is most likely that of a blow fly (Diptera: Calliphoridae).
Here again, while blow flies are commonly collected in association with human and other animal
remains, adult blow flies are ubiquitous in nature and frequently found in association with
garbage. The presence of a single leg of a blow fly in a bag of garbage is unremarkable and is of
no forensic value.


The beetle larva collected from the trash bag was identified as belonging to the family
Dermestidae, also known as skin beetles, hide beetles, or carpet beetles. Dermestid beetle larvae
feed on a wide variety of dry tissue, dead insects, fur, leather, and other natural fibers. The
presence of a single dermestid beetle larva in a bag of garbage with dead insects and dry food
remains in it is unremarkable and is of no forensic value.


Based upon the foregoing, and a reasonable degree of scientific certainty, the insects associated
with the trash bag collected as evidence in this case are not forensically significant and are of no
medicocriminal value.


These findings are preliminary in nature, and are open to revision and reinterpretation upon
subsequent identification and analysis of any remaining evidence associated with this portion of
the case.


Discussion of Haskell Report: In reviewing Dr. Haskell’s report (Anthony; 08-069208; FEI
1187 (A)), I agree with the species identification of the samples that were submitted. Samples “1
of 2” (labeled “#1” on Haskell report) and sample #1a differ slightly in numbers of specimens
present (7 vs. 6 larvae and 14 vs. 15 adults respectively). Sample #1a contained a beetle larva
(Coleoptera: Dermestidae) which was not mentioned in the Haskell report. In my opinion these
differences are minor in scope and would not significantly impact any analysis of the evidence.


On page 6, Dr. Haskell states that phorid flies, such as Megaselia scalaris, indicate that
decomposition is well advanced when found in connection with decomposing animal carrion.
This is true, however, no decomposing animal carrion was found in connection with the insects
                                                                                  Case # 08-069208
                                                                                    Caylee Anthony
                                                                              Preliminary Findings
                                                                                             Page 6
other than typical kitchen garbage. All of the insects collected from the vehicle came from the
garbage within a trash bag, and this garbage would have supported growth and development of
the insects and would have served as an attractant to them. Megaselia scalaris is more commonly
collected in association with decaying organic matter other than carrion (i.e. garbage, feces, etc.)
than it is from human remains. In my own experience, I have only recovered phorid flies from
less than 20% of cases involving insects associated from human remains, with all of those cases
involving advanced states of decomposition from bodies recovered indoors. The speculation that
a body was in the trunk is not supported by the insect evidence. In fact, if a body had
decomposed within the trunk as is suggested by Dr. Haskell’s report, adult flies, puparia, and/or
maggots would have been easily collected in abundance from the trunk itself. If the speculation
was that the insects originated from human remains rather than garbage, DNA tests on the gut
contents1 of the maggots would have been an obvious step in the investigation. Without this kind
of definitive testing, I can find no reason to suggest that there were ever human remains of any
kinds within the trunk of the car based on presence of M. scalaris in a bag of garbage.


The mention of “coffin flies” on pages one, six, and seven of Dr. Haskell’s report is particularly
ambiguous. “Coffin fly” is a common name reserved for Conicera tibialis, a fly belonging to the
family Phoridae (the same family as M. scalaris). Suggesting that the behavior of C. tibialis is
somehow relative to that of M. scalaris is akin to saying that black-tailed prairie dogs (Cynomys
ludovicianus) behaves the same as fox squirrels (Sciurus niger) because those animals are in the
same family (Rodentia: Sciuridae). Obviously this is absurd. In reviewing the pertinent literature,
I can find no use of the common name “coffin fly” as a general descriptive term for the family
Phoridae, of which there are more than 200 genera and 3,000 described species. Publications
throughout the entomological literature, both forensic and otherwise, refer to phorids as “scuttle
flies” or “humpbacked flies” unless specifically referring to C. tibialis. Because there were no
specimens of C. tibialis recovered from either the bag of garbage or the trunk of the car, the
mention of this species in the report is misleading.


Dr. Haskell’s report states “The trunk of the car would exclude many of the early occurring
carrion insects for an initial period…” and uses this statement to explain the lack of carrion
                                                                                Case # 08-069208
                                                                                 Caylee Anthony
                                                                            Preliminary Findings
                                                                                           Page 7
insects in the trunk of the car that he suggests once held a decomposing body. There are a
number of case studies which demonstrate that blow flies and other early-colonizing insects have
little difficulty gaining access to a body in a trunk2. The lack of blow flies, other than a single leg
on a paper towel within a bag of garbage, and other carrion insects is more consistent with the
absence of a decomposing body in the trunk. The presence of a bag of garbage within the trunk
would not attract carrion-feeding insects such as blow flies, but would serve as a powerful
attractant to synanthropic flies such as M. scalaris. The presence of a single blow fly leg inside
of a bag of garbage literally means nothing in this case.


References Cited:
   1. Campobasso, CP, JG Linville, JD Wells, and F. Introna. 2005. Forensic genetic analysis
      of insect gut contents. Am. J. Forensic Med. Pathol. 26:161–65.
   2. Anderson, GS 2001. Insect succession on carrion and its relationship to determining time
      of death, In JH Byrd and JL Castner (eds.), Forensic Entomology: The Utility of
      Arthropods in Legal Investigations. CRC Press LLC, Boca Raton, FL.



   A final version of this report will be issued when all of the pertinent evidence has been
                                      obtained and analyzed
February 8, 2011

Mr. Jose Baez
625 East Colonial Drive
Orlando, FL 32803


RE:    State of Florida vs. Casey Marie Anthony
Case No.: 48-2008-CF-15606

NMS Expert Services Case No.

Dear Mr Baez:

I have been retained, by your office through National Medical Services, Inc., d.b.a. NMS Labs, as
an expert in toxicology and analytical chemistry. NMS Labs is accredited by both the American
Board of Forensic Toxicology (ABFT) and the American Society of Crime Laboratory Directors
– Laboratory Accreditation Board ISO 17025 program (ASCLD-LAB International).

I have a Bachelors degree in chemistry, and a PhD in forensic Toxicology, and have been Board
certified by ABFT since 1991. I am a forensic scientist with over twenty eight years experience,
and have more than eighty peer reviewed publications. I am a member of various professional
organizations, including the American Academy of Forensic Sciences, the Canadian Society of
Forensic Sciences, the Society of Forensic Toxicologists, and the International Association of
Forensic Toxicologists. I have researched and published on the issue of analytical chemistry and
toxicology, drug analysis, postmortem toxicology, drug and alcohol impairment, and intoxication.
I have conducted experiments in which animals (pigs) were dosed with drugs, euthanized and
allowed to decompose. I documented the decomposition process and performed analysis of
specimens from these animals. I have been qualified as an expert in courts in ten states, in
municipal, district, superior and federal court trials. My qualifications and experience are listed
in my curriculum vitae, which is attached.

I have been asked to provide opinions regarding testing performed on samples in the investigation
into the death of Caylee Anthony, that purports to show the presence of decomposing human
remains in items from a vehicle belonging to the defendant, Casey Anthony.

I have reviewed the following relevant documents and records:

        1. Case reports, autopsy reports in the death of Caylee Anthony.
        2. Preliminary, and final reports and laboratory notes from Oakridge National Laboratory.
        4. Depositions of A. Vass, M. Rickenbach, M. Wise and M. Martin
        5.Report of Dr Kenneth Furton
        6. Relevant literature (see footnotes).

        If called to testify I would testify to the following opinions, which I hold to a reasonable
degree of scientific certainty:



3701 Welsh Road, Willow Grove, Pennsylvania 19090        T 800.522.6671           www.nmslabs.com
    1. The principle of being able to detect evidence of decomposing human remains is based
       on pattern analysis or signature analysis techniques. The general principle is to examine
       some authentic decomposed specimens of human bodies, identify the chemicals that are
       present, and then to look for the presence of these chemicals in suspected human remains
       cases. This applies in this case to the trapping and analysis of volatile components from
       the trunk of a car, wheel well, and air samples, to analysis of metals and ions for the
       purposes of establishing decomposition, and to analysis of fatty acids in paper towels
       taken from the trunk interior.

    2. There are numerous factors that influence the rate, pattern and extent of decomposition,
       and which are likely to affect the presence and relative amounts of marker chemicals
       resulting from decomposition. These factors include: time since death, trauma,
       environmental and air temperature, contact with soil, soil or water acidity/alkalinity,
       specific bacterial/mold/fungal environment, prior exposure of the decedent to the
       chemical markers in interest, humidity/water content, clothing or covering of the remains,
       season, presence of insects and larvae and their excreta, and degree of exposure to air1,2,3.

    3. In order to be forensically reliable a laboratory technique must be validated. Validation
       is the process of challenging a particular test or technique with both expected and
       unexpected conditions, and ensuring that the test performs as intended. It should not be
       subject to interference, false positive or false negative results beyond specified limits.
       The types of samples or cases to which the technique is to be applied should be defined
       and should behave reliably and predictably to a specified level of performance. If the test
       has a quantitative component, the accuracy and precision of the test must perform to the
       specified level. The technique should be challenged with specimens whose identity is
       blinded to the operator, to ensure that they obtain the expected result for that specimen
       type, uninfluenced by bias or prejudice. Without validation, the end user of the result
       obtained using that technique cannot know what weight to give the result.

    4. Before a technique can be validated, it must first be characterized, meaning that the
       conditions and directions under which the test is to be performed have been described and
       documented, to the extent that someone with expertise in the same field (but not
       necessarily with the same method) could set up and replicate the test, or that someone
       reviewing the data could determine if the correct conditions had been used, and the
       appropriate steps had been followed. Until a new method or technique has been
       characterized, and documented it is not possible to validate it. The documentation of the
       method must specify the criteria under which a result will be called positive and when it
       will be called negative.

    5. Components of validation that would be appropriate for decompositional signature
       analysis would reasonably include:
           a. A comprehensive database must be built based on multiple decompositional
               events, in multiple circumstances, reflecting all possible variables listed above, in
               order to be able to apply it with any confidence to a single case with unknown
               specific circumstances.


1
  Fisher, BAJ, Techniques of Crime Scene Investigation, CRC Press 6th Edition, 2000
2
  Janaway RC, Percival SL, Wilson AS. Decomposition of Human Remains". In Percival, S.L.. Microbiology and
Aging. (2009) Springer Science.
3
  Haglund WD, Sorg, MH. Forensic Taphonomy: The Postmortem Fate of Human Remains. (1996) CRC Press.


                                                      2
              b. The significance of the presence or absence of specific decompositional markers
                 must be investigated and assessed.
              c. A statistical model must be developed that describes the number of
                 decompositional markers required in order to conclude that a decompositional
                 event has taken place.
              d. The significance of the absence of specific markers must be explained.
              e. Appropriate controls must be run when testing suspect or evidence samples to
                 ensure that the technique can give the correct result on true positive and true
                 negative cases, in this case meaning both the ability to detect the compounds of
                 interest and to interpret the findings as to whether they represent human
                 decomposition or some other phenomenon.
              f. The technique must be capable of having some degree of certainty or uncertainty
                 applied to any conclusion that it is used to support.
              g. If the technique is being offered to demonstrate evidence of decomposition of
                 human remains, it must be assessed to determine whether the marker chemicals
                 are specific to human remains, or may be common to the decomposition of non-
                 human remains (e.g. chicken, beef)4 or other vegetable or organic materials.
              h. The technique must be assessed to determine whether any other environmental
                 conditions or substances (e.g. human/animal/insect waste, humic or plant
                 decompositional products) could interfere or could contribute to a pattern from
                 human remains identification.

    6. The analytical procedures that established the model for testing in Caylee Anthony’s
       death, are not reliable for forensic purposes for the following reasons:

              a. The laboratory has no standard operating procedure for the use of the equipment,
                 or preparation of the samples in this case, at the time testing was performed.
              b. The technique has not been fully characterized. While the method is generally
                 described in two publications5,6 no laboratory method or standard operating
                 procedure has been prepared for its implementation.
              c. Consequently, no formal validation of the method has been performed.
              d. The database was established with a total of four cadavers buried underground.
                 There is no demonstration that these findings would apply to human bodies that
                 decomposed under different circumstances.
              e. The testing of the evidence was performed on an ad hoc basis with the test
                 conditions being continually changed and altered during the testing of the actual
                 evidential samples.
              f. There were multiple failures of the test equipment during the testing cycle caused
                 by the buildup of ice.
              g. Standards tested using the technique had very broad peaks with poor correlation
                 compared to the case samples. The reason for this was never investigated.
              h. The analysts notes for the decompositional odor analysis reflect multiple
                 incidents of compounds being present in blank samples, runs being done without
                 internal standards, compounds which were expected to be present in samples are

4
  Samples from pig decomposition were distinguished from human by reference to aldehyde and ketone ratios based on
analysis of deer, pig and dog bone, which the report authors indicate are not conclusive.
5
  Vass AA, Smith RR, Thompson CV, Burnett MN, Dulgerian N, Eckenrode BA. Odor analysis of decomposing buried
human remains. J Forensic Sci. 2008 Mar;53(2):384-91. PubMed PMID: 18366571.
6
  Vass AA, Smith RR, Thompson CV, Burnett MN, Wolf DA, Synstelien JA, Dulgerian N, Eckenrode BA.
Decompositional odor analysis database. J Forensic Sci. 2004 Jul;49(4):760-9.




                                                        3
                   missing, unexpected differences in peak sizes, runs being made with incorrect
                   flow rates due to valves being left closed. These are issues that can be avoided
                   with the use of a standard operating procedure for the test, which the lab does not
                   have.
              i.   There are a total of 424 chemicals in the decompositional database, of which 41
                   consistent with decompositional events were identified in the carpet from the
                   trunk of the Anthony vehicle. The significance of the fact that 90% of the
                   database compounds were not present has not been evaluated.
              j.   An authentic control from a human decompositional event from Montana
                   contained only 9 of the 51 chemicals (17%) identified in the samples from the
                   Anthony vehicle trunk air sample. The report does not indicate how many of the
                   compounds from the authentic Montana control were not present in the Anthony
                   vehicle samples. Their absence would raise questions about the conclusions of
                   the report.
              k.   Interference studies were not performed to rule out other possible sources of
                   these chemicals.
              l.   The laboratory acknowledges that the technique is not specific to human remains,
                   and some of the decompositional chemicals are present in animal remains.
              m.   Some of the compounds present in the decompositional odor database were
                   found in the bag of garbage taken from the vehicle.
              n.   Some of the compounds purported to be decompositional chemicals were present
                   in the garage air, and are also present in gasoline vapors.
              o.   The underlying research was conducted on adult remains, and no assessment has
                   been made as to whether the same decomposition profile applies to children.
              p.   No assessment has been made of whether different tissues would produce
                   different decompositional profiles7. Liver tissue, and dermal tissue for example
                   contain different amounts of fats, different proteins and enzymes, and connective
                   tissue which likely give rise to different relative amounts of the decomposition
                   products.
              q.   The laboratory had no criteria for which specific compounds had to be detected
                   in order to reach a conclusion that a human decompositional signature was
                   present.
              r.   The two compounds identified by Dr Vass in his deposition as being unique to
                   human decomposition are undecane and carbon tetrachloride. Neither
                   compound is included as a significant marker in other peer reviewed publications
                   on this topic8, and undecane does not appear to be present in the samples from
                   the Anthony trunk air samples as indicated in Table 1 in his report. The
                   significance of its absence is not explained.
              s.   The fatty acids found on the paper towels in this case are present in food9,10, and
                   living tissue as well as adipocere or grave wax, and are not specific to
                   decomposition of any kind. Dr. Vass notes in his report that the amounts of the
                   fatty acids reported in the case are calculated from an assumed response factor of
                   1.0, and that this was not verified experimentally.


7
  Hoffman EM, Curran AM, Dulgerian N, Stockham RA, Eckenrode BA. Characterization of the volatile organic
compounds present in the headspace of decomposing human remains. Forensic Sci Int. 2009 Apr 15;186(1-3):6-13.
8
  See 8.
9
  Ratnayake WM, Hollywood R, O'Grady E, Pelletier G. Fatty acids in some common food items in Canada. J Am
Coll Nutr. 1993 Dec;12(6):651-60.
10
   Abdulrahman O. Musaiger, Reshma D'souza Varghese, Jassim H. Al-Jedah, Nutritional profile of pizza commonly
consumed in Bahrain Nutrition & Food Science, 2007, 37 ( 2), pp.82 - 89


                                                       4
              t.   Chloroform which was found in the carpet sample and trunk air sample is listed
                   as a decompositional product in the database. The report fails to mention that
                   chloroform (a trihalomethane) is also a common constituent of both chlorinated
                   drinking water including Orange County FL11, and chlorinated swimming pool
                   water12.

     7. In forensic science and other scientific disciplines, characterization and validation of a
        technique or method can be accomplished in two ways. The first is an intensive
        structured assessment of the technique by its originator, including the criteria described
        throughout (above). The second approach is for multiple laboratories or researchers, over
        a period of time to conduct the same or similar work with the same results. Neither of
        these standards has been met in the field of decompositional signature analysis.

     8. Standards of practice in a research environment are understandably different from those
        deemed acceptable in a forensic environment. When investigating a problem from a
        research perspective, a problem can be assessed and the tools can be revised and refined
        on an ongoing basis to optimize the technique, and understand its strengths and
        limitations. Conclusions regarding the reliability of the technique can be drawn based on
        its overall performance, and general statements made about its reliability. In a forensic
        environment, conclusions regarding the reliability of examination of a particular piece of
        evidence can only be assessed if the technique has been well characterized and the
        method validated prior to its application to forensic casework.


Conclusions:

Based on my education, experience, training and research, I hold the following opinions to a
reasonable degree of scientific certainty:

         1. The practice of decompositional human remains identification by profiling of
            chemical residue patterns has not been subjected to the normal validation
            requirements of the relevant scientific community, and is not sufficiently reliable to
            be considered sound validated science.

         2. Even if the underlying science of human remains identification through
            decompositional signature analysis was deemed to be an established science, the
            execution of the testing performed in this case lacked organization and planning, was
            poorly documented, and did not follow even minimal standards of quality control and
            documentation appropriate for validation of a procedure for the purposes of forensic
            science casework.

         3. The laboratory in which the testing was performed is not a forensic laboratory, and
            does not observe the guidelines required by the American Society of Crime
            Laboratory Directors - Laboratory Accreditation Board (ASCLD-LAB), or the
            Guidelines of any other oversight or accrediting organization that are designed to
            safeguard the reliability of evidence intended for presentation in criminal litigation.

11
   http://www.orangecountyfl.net/Portals/0/Resources/Internet/DEPARTMENTS/Utilities/docs/AnnualDrinkingWaterR
eport2010-English.pdf
12
   Weaver WA, Li J, Wen Y, Johnston J, Blatchley MR, Blatchley ER 3rd. Volatile disinfection by-product analysis
from chlorinated indoor swimming pools. Water Res. 2009 Jul;43(13):3308-18.


                                                       5
           While accreditation is no guarantee of the validity of any particular result, it does
           ensue that the laboratory is familiar with appropriate forensic practice and has taken
           appropriate steps to comply, which clearly has not happened with this evidence, and
           is acknowledged by Dr Vass.

       4. Based on all the above irregularities and shortcomings, to allow the presentation in
          court of the findings regarding chemical evidence for human decomposition in this
          case would lend it an aura of scientific authority not justified by its novel nature,
          many deficiencies, and the lack of characterization and validation of the methods.


Respectfully Submitted,




Barry K Logan Ph.D., DABFT
National Director Forensic Services
NMS Labs




                                               6
                               Curriculum Vitae January 2011

                                  BARRY K. LOGAN
Position:             National Director, Forensic and Toxicological Services

Address:              National Medical Services, Inc.
                      3701 Welsh Road
                      Willow Grove, Pennsylvania 19090

Phone:                (215) 657 4900
                      (800) 522 6671

Fax:                  (215) 657 2972

e-mail:               barry.logan@nmslabs.com

Education

1982-1986    Doctor of Philosophy, (Ph.D.), Forensic Toxicology
             Department of Forensic Medicine and Science
             University of Glasgow, Scotland

1978-1982    Degree awarded: B. Sc. (Hons) Chemistry, June 1982
             Faculty of Science, University of Glasgow, Scotland

Board Certification

             Diplomate of the American Board of Forensic Toxicology (DABFT)
             March 1991 – present


Employment History


2008 - Present        Director, Forensic and Toxicological Services
                      National Medical Services, Inc. (NMS Labs)
                      3701 Welsh Road
                      Willow Grove, PA 19090

Responsibilities:     Director of NMS Labs Criminalistics Department (ASCLD_LAB
                      International ISO 17025 accredited laboratory) performing drug
                      identification, and forensic biology). Supervision and oversight of
                      toxicologists performing case review; Forensic toxicology interpretation
                      and consulting; Consultation and expert testimony in DUI alcohol and
                    drug cases, Analytical consultation to laboratory operations;
                    Toxicologist/forensic scientist development and training;

2010-Present        Executive Director, Center for Forensic Science Research and
                    Education
                     Fredric Rieders Family Renaissance Foundation (FRFRF)
                    2300 Stratford Ave
                    Willow Grove, PA 19090

Responsibilities:   Management of the FRFRF a 501(c)(3) organization dedicated to forensic
                    science research and education; Oversight of teaching for Arcadia
                    University‟s Masters of Science in Forensic Science degree program;
                    Oversight of the Forensics Mentors Institute Summer program;
                    development of professional continuing educational programs for forensic
                    scientists;

1990- 2008          Washington State Toxicologist
                    Washington State Toxicology Laboratory
                    2203 Airport Way S.
                    Seattle, WA 98134-2027

Responsibilities:   Director of the State Toxicology Laboratory for the State of Washington.
                    The Laboratory receives 6,000 death investigation cases and 5,000 DUI
                    cases each year. Duties include laboratory oversight, budgeting, expert
                    testimony, quality assurance oversight, training, and casework
                    consultation to 39 coroner and medical examiner offices. Research
                    interests include interpretive toxicology, clinical forensic toxicology,
                    postmortem redistribution, and drug and alcohol driver impairment.

1999- 2008          Director, Forensic Laboratory Services Bureau, WSP
                    Washington State Patrol
                    2203 Airport Way S.
                    Seattle, WA 98134-2027

Responsibilities:   Directed the Forensic Laboratory Services Bureau of the Washington
                    State Patrol, and its 250 employees. Includes Crime Laboratory Division
                    (four full service, and two satellite crime laboratories, and latent prints
                    laboratory), State Toxicology Laboratory Division, and Impaired Driving
                    Section (Breath Alcohol and Drug Evaluation and Classification
                    programs). Laboratory services include controlled substances,
                    documents, trace evidence, firearms, arson, explosives, serology, DNA,
                    chemistry, tool marks, latent prints, and alcohol, drug and poison testing.

1990- present       Clinical Assistant Professor
                    Department of Laboratory Medicine
                    School of Medicine, University of Washington
                    Box 357110, NW-120
                    Seattle, WA 98195-7110

1990 - Present      Consultant in Forensic Toxicology
                    Dr. Logan consults on human performance, DUI, postmortem, and drug
                    facilitated sexual assault toxicology, and alcohol, drugs and traffic safety

                                                                                                   2
                     issues. He has testified in civil and criminal cases on behalf of
                     prosecutors and defense attorneys, plaintiffs and defendants in over 200
                     trials in ten states and in Federal court.

1987 – 1990          Senior/Research Associate
                     Toxicology Laboratory
                     Pathology Department
                     University of Tennessee Center for Health Sciences

1987- 1990           Instructor
                     Department of Allied Health Sciences
                     University of Tennessee, Memphis, TN

1982 - 1986          Instructor
                     Medical and Forensic Chemistry
                     Department of Chemistry
                     University of Glasgow
                     Glasgow, Scotland


Other Appointments / Honors (* current)

2011          Robert F Borkenstein Award, National Safety Council (announced Sept 2010)

2010          Adjunct Professor, Arcadia University Forensic Science Program

2010          Rolla N. Harger Award, American Academy of Forensic Sciences

2010*         Treasurer, American Academy of Forensic Sciences

2009*         Associate Director, Frederick Rieders Family Renaissance Foundation

2009*         Visiting Scholar, Indiana University, Department of Criminal Justice

2009*         Chair, Membership Committee, American Academy of Forensic Sciences

2009          Vice President, American Academy of Forensic Sciences

2009*         Guest Faculty, Arcadia University MS Toxicology Internship

2008*         T2010 Chair Scientific Program Committee, International Council on Alcohol
              Drugs and Traffic Safety, Oslo, Norway

2008*         NHTSA Expert Panel for Developing Protocols for Impairment for Driving Under
              the Influence of Drugs (DUID)

2008*         NHTSA consultative panel on strategic plan for drug impaired driving research

2007          President and CEO of T2007. A private limited corporation formed to run the
              T2007 ICADTS/TIAFT meeting.

2007          Chair/Host ITCADTS/TIAFT International Meeting, Seattle WA
                                                                                              3
2007*   Member, Blue Ribbon Panel on Automotive Industry Interlock Technology

2007    Chair AAFS Scientific Program Committee, 60th Annual Meeting, Wash. DC

2006    Co-Chair AAFS Scientific Program Committee, San Antonio, TX

2006    John P. McGovern Foundation Leadership Award for Substance Abuse
        Prevention

2006    Treasurer, International Council on Alcohol, Drugs and Traffic Safety (ICADTS)

2006    Toxicology Arbitration Panel, XXth Winter Olympic Games

2006    Chairman of Local Arrangements Committee for the American Academy of
        Forensic Sciences, 58th Annual Meeting, Seattle, WA, February 2006

2005    Board of Directors, American Academy of Forensic Sciences

2005    Nominating Committee, National Safety Council, Committee on Alcohol and
        Other Drugs

2005    Director, Board of Directors, Society of Forensic Toxicologists

2004    Toxicology Arbitration Panel, XXVIII Olympic Games

2004    Chair, Workshop “Diagnosing Drug Impaired Drivers” ICADTS meeting,
        Glasgow, Scotland, August 2004

2004    Scientific Program Chair, TIAFT 2007 Annual meeting

2004    Chair, NHTSA/National Safety Council symposium on Improving the Integration
        of DRE, Investigative, and Toxicological Evidence in Drug Impaired Driving
        Prosecutions. Seattle, WA, May 2004

2004    Chair, Indiana University Symposium on Administration and Management of
        State Breath Alcohol Test Programs, October 2004

2004    Chair, Organizing Committee for ICADTS 2007

2004    Chair, National Safety Council symposium on Improving Integration of DRE,
        Investigative and Toxicological Evidence in DUID prosecutions

2003    Assistant Treasurer, International Council on Alcohol, Drugs and Traffic Safety
        (ICADTS)

2003    2003 Mid-Career Achievement Award, The International Association of Forensic
        Toxicologists (TIAFT),

2003    Chair, NSC/AAFS/SOFT joint workgroup on per se DUID statutes

2003    Chair, Society of Forensic Toxicologists 2003 Scientific Program
                                                                                          4
2002*   Executive Director, Indiana University Center for Studies of Law in Action

2002    Chair, American Academy of Forensic Sciences 2003 Workshops

2002    Toxicology Arbitration Panel, 2002 Winter Olympic Games

2000    Chair, Drug Induced Diminished Capacity Workshop, Seattle, WA

2000    Chair, International Consultative Meeting on Drugs and Driving Impairment,
        Seattle, WA

2000*   Board of Directors, American Board of Forensic Toxicology

2000    Chair, American Academy of Forensic Sciences, Toxicology Section

2000    Chair, Multidisciplinary Session, AAFS 2001 meeting, Seattle, WA

1999*   Elected to National Safety Council, Executive Board

1999*   Appointed to editorial board, Journal of Forensic Sciences

1999    American Academy of Forensic Sciences, Toxicology section secretary

1998    American Academy of Forensic Sciences, Toxicology program chair

1998*   Appointed to Faculty, Center for Studies of Law in Action, Indiana University

1998*   Elected to International Council on Alcohol, Drugs and Traffic Safety

1998*   Chair, Committee on Drugs, Pharmacology, and Toxicology, National
        Safety Council Committee on Alcohol and Other Drugs

1998*   Member, Executive Committee, National Safety Council Committee on
        Alcohol and Other Drugs

1997*   Member, Review Committee, American Board of Forensic Toxicology

1997*   Appointed to Editorial review board, Journal of Analytical Toxicology

1997    SOFT, Nominating Committee

1997    AAFS, Toxicology section Awards and Scholarships committee

1997    AAFS, Toxicology section program committee

1996    Rosenblatt lecturer, Barnett Institute of Chemical Analysis and Materials
        Science, Northeastern University, Boston, MA

1995    Award of Excellence, (Government leadership) Washington Traffic Safety
        Commission

                                                                                        5
1995          United States representative, and rapporteur to the United Nations Drug
              Control Program, Vienna, Austria

1995          Chairman, Drug Impaired Driving Advisory Committee to the Washington Traffic
              Safety Commission

1994          Chairman of the Mass Spectrometry Database Committee of the Toxicology
              Section of the American Academy of Forensic Sciences

1994          Chairman of Local Arrangements Committee for the American Academy of
              Forensic Sciences, 47th Annual Meeting, Seattle, WA February 1995

1994 *        Elected to the National Safety Council

1993 *        Inspector, National Laboratory Certification Program, Substance Abuse
              and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA)

1993          Assoc. editor, American Academy of Forensic Sciences, “News & Views”

1992          Course administration and coordination for University of Washington Extension
              Program “Forensic Investigation” Class


1992          Guest lecturer, Graduate course in Analytical Chemistry Methods
              Department of Chemistry, University of Washington

1989          Guest Lecturer, Analytical and Forensic Toxicology, Toxicology Program,
              Biology Department, Memphis State University

Peer Review

Reviewer for the Journal of the Forensic Science Society (Society and Justice), Journal of
Analytical Toxicology, Clinical Chemistry, Analytica Chimica Acta, Talanta, Journal of High
Resolution Chromatography and Chromatographic Communications, Third World Academy of
Science, Journal of Forensic Sciences, Biological Psychiatry. Member of the Editorial Advisory
Board for the Journal of Analytical Toxicology, and the Journal of Forensic Sciences.

Continuing Professional Education

“Drug Use Testing Symposium”
       American Academy of Forensic Sciences, Pittsburgh, PA, February 1988. A one day
       symposium on chemical, clinical and legal aspects of drug testing in the workplace.

“D.U.I. Instructors course”
        University of Tennessee / NHTSA, Monteagle, TN, December 1988
        A four day instructor‟s course in Standardized Field Sobriety Testing techniques,
        including Horizontal Gaze Nystagmus (HGN). Formal qualification as NHTSA DUI/DWI
        Instructor

“Tests for BAC in Highway Safety Programs - Supervision and Expert Testimony”
       University of Indiana, Center for Studies of Law in Action, Bloomington, IN,
       December 1990
                                                                                              6
“The Effects of Drugs on Human Performance and Behaviour: Drugs and Driving / Drugs in the
Workplace”
       American Academy of Forensic Sciences, Anaheim, CA, February 1991
       A one day symposium on the pharmacology, subjective effects and potential for
       impairment of illicit and prescription drugs.

“The Benzodiazepines: Pharmacology and Analytical Techniques”
        American Academy of Forensic Sciences, New Orleans, LA, February 1992
“Frontiers in Forensic Toxicology”
        American Academy of Forensic Sciences, New Orleans, LA, February 1992

“Death Investigation”
      A 40 hour seminar on techniques and issues in forensic death investigation
      University of Washington, Continuing Medical Education, Seattle, WA, March 1992

“Forensic Investigation”
       A 30 hour lecture course covering analytical, investigative, and procedural aspects of
       serious crime investigation. University of Washington Extension Program, October 1992

“Analytical Toxicology: An Algorithm Approach”
       Society of Forensic Toxicologists and California Association of Toxicologists,
       Phoenix AZ, October 12, 1993

“Forensic Investigation”
      A 30 hour lecture course covering analytical, investigative, and procedural aspects of
      serious crime investigation. University of Washington Extension Program, October 1994

“Fundamentals in Forensic Toxicology: Pharmacologic Concepts”
      American Academy of Forensic Sciences, San Antonio, TX, February 1994

"Advanced Forensic Toxicology: Pharmacologic and Interpretative Topics"
      Society of Forensic Toxicology, Baltimore, MD, October 10, 1995

"Drugs and Driving: Current Pharmacologic Issues."
       Society of Forensic Toxicology, Baltimore, MD, October 10, 1995

"Stimulant Induced Impairment"
       California Association of Toxicologists, Lake Tahoe, CA, May 1996

"Drugs and Driving Toxicology"
       Northwest Association of Forensic Sciences / Utah Forensic Science Association,
       Salt Lake City, UT, September 1996

"Fundamentals of Medical Examiner Toxicology"
      Society of Forensic Toxicology, Denver, CO, October 15, 1996

“Isoenzyme Specific Metabolism of Drugs of Forensic Interest”
       Society of Forensic Toxicology, Denver, CO, October 15, 1996

"Uppers and Downers: The Pathology, Toxicology and Clandestine Chemistry of Drug Related


                                                                                           7
Death, Disability and Drug Related Deaths in Custody”
       American Academy of Forensic Sciences, New York, NY, February 1997

"Drug Induced Diminished Capacity in Crimes of Violence"
       American Academy of Forensic Sciences, New York, NY, February 1997 (chair)

“Fetal and Pediatric Pharmacology”
        Society of Forensic Toxicology, Salt Lake City, UT, October 1997

“Methamphetamine: Synthesis, Pharmacology, Analysis, and Toxicology”
      American Academy of Forensic Sciences, San Francisco, CA, February 1998 (chair)

“The Effects of Alcohol and Drugs on Human Performance and Behavior”
      American Academy of Forensic Sciences/California Association of Toxicologists,
      UCLA, CA, August 1998

“Pharmacology and Analytical Toxicology of Drugs in Saliva”
      Society of Forensic Toxicology/TIAFT, Albuquerque, NM, October 1998

“Practical Aspects of CI/MS for Drugs of Abuse”
        Society of Forensic Toxicology/TIAFT, Albuquerque, NM, October 1998

“Marijuana: a Forensic Symposium”
       American Academy of Forensic Sciences, Orlando, FL, February 1999

“Preparing for the New Millennium in the Forensic Toxicology Laboratory”
       American Academy of Forensic Sciences, Orlando, FL, February 1999 (chair)

“Breath Alcohol Testing for Forensic Purposes - Principles, Practice and Present Status”
       International Association of Forensic Sciences, Los Angeles, CA, August 1999

“The Effects of Drugs on Human Performance and Behavior”
        International Association of Forensic Sciences, Los Angeles, CA, August 1999

“Facilitator Skills Training”
         Washington State Department of Personnel, Olympia, WA, June 2000

“Graphical Display of Quantitative Information”
      Workshop presented by Edward Tufte, Seattle, WA, August 2001

“Robert F. Borkenstein Course on Alcohol and Highway Safety: Testing, Research and
Litigation” Indiana University Center for Studies of Law in Action, Bloomington, IN, Dec 2002

“FBI Laboratory Symposium on Forensic Toxicology”
       National Institute of Justice/FBI, Washington, DC, August 2004

“Evidence Based Forensic Medicine (Co Chair)”
       American Academy of Forensic Sciences, New Orleans, LA, February 2005

“Drug Driving Workshop”
       International Association of Forensic Sciences, Hong Kong, PRC, August 2005

“Symposium on Medicinal Drugs and Driving”
                                                                                                8
         TIAFT 2006, Ljubjana, Slovenia, September 2006

“Developing Standards for Research in Drugged Impaired Driving: Experts Meeting”
       International Invitational Symposium sponsored by European Union, National Institute
       on Drug Abuse – International Programs, Talloires, France September 2006


Grants


High Performance Liquid Chromatograph with Diode Array Detection, Automated Sample
Processor and computer based Data System
February 1989 - June 1990. Analytical equipment from Varian Associates, Walnut Creek, CA;
Courtesy Dr. T. Sheehan

Resolution of Amphetamine and Methamphetamine Enantiomers by HPLC without
Derivatization
Stafford DT, Francisco, JT, Logan BK.
January 1990. Acorn Grant awarded by the Forensic Sciences Foundation

Gas Phase Electrochemical Determination of Carbon Monoxide and Cyanide in Postmortem
Biological Fluids and Tissues
Logan BK, Principal Investigator
October 1991. National Institute of Justice, Forensic Science Technology Program

Drug and Alcohol in Drivers Involved in Traffic Fatalities I: Deceased Drivers in Fatal Accidents
Logan BK, Principal Investigator
May 1992. Washington Traffic Safety Commission

Methods for the Identification and Quantitation of Drugs in Blood from Impaired Drivers
Logan BK, Principal Investigator
May 1996. Washington Traffic Safety Commission


Publications (Peer reviewed)

1.       Sedation in Intensive Care: Morphine and Renal Failure.
         Bion J, Logan BK, Newman PM, Brodie MJ, Oliver JS, Aitchison TC, Ledingham IM.
         Intensive Care Medicine. 1986;12(5):359-65.

2.       The measurement and interpretation of morphine in blood.
         Logan BK, Oliver JS, Smith H. Forensic Science International. 1987;35(2-3):189-95.

3.       A simple laboratory test for the determination of the chemical form of cocaine.
         Logan BK, Nichols HS, Stafford DT. Journal of Forensic Sciences 1989; 34(3):678-81.

4.       Liquid/solid extraction on diatomaceous earth for drug analysis in postmortem blood.
         Logan BK, Stafford DT. Journal of Forensic Sciences. 1989; 34(3):553-64.

5.       Direct analysis of anticonvulsant drugs in vitreous humour by HPLC using a column
         switching technique.
         Logan BK, Stafford DT. Forensic Science International. 1989; 41(1-2):125-34.
                                                                                                9
6.    Rapid screening for 100 basic drugs and metabolites in urine using cation exchange
      solid-phase extraction and HPLC with diode array detection.
      Logan BK, Stafford DT, Tebbett IR, Moore CM. Journal of Analytical Toxicology.
      1990;14(3):154-9.

7.    The use of HPLC with diode array spectrophotometric detection in forensic drug
      analysis - a review.
      Logan BK, Stafford DT. Crime Laboratory Digest. 1990;17(1):5-12.

8.    Photodegradation of nifedipine relative to nitrendipine evaluated by liquid and gas
      chromatography.
      Logan BK, Patrick KS. Journal of Chromatography. 1990;529(1):175-81.

9.    Information resources useful in forensic toxicology.
      Stafford DT, Logan BK. Fundamental and Applied Toxicology. 1990;15(3):411-9.

10.   High performance liquid chromatography with column switching for the determination
      of cocaine and benzoylecgonine concentrations in vitreous humor.
      Logan BK, Stafford DT. Journal of Forensic Sciences. 1990;35(6):1303-9.

11.   Further applications for capillary gas chromatography in routine quantitative toxicological
      analysis.
      Phillips AM, Logan BK, Stafford DT. Journal of High Resolution Chromatography.
      1990;13:754-8.

12.   A rapid method for the determination of cocaine in brain tissue.
      Browne SP, Moore CM, Scheurer J, Tebbett IR, Logan BK. Journal of Forensic
      Sciences. 1991;36(6):1662-5.

13.   Case report: Identification of laudanosine, an atracurium metabolite, following a fatal
      drug-related shooting.
      Logan BK, Case GA. Journal of Analytical Toxicology. 1993;17(2):117-9.

14.   Case report: Poisonings associated with cyanide in over the counter cold medication in
      Washington state,1991.
      Logan BK, Howard J, Kiesel EL. Journal of Forensic Sciences. 1993; 38(2):472-476.

15.   Product tampering crime: a review.
      Logan BK. Journal of Forensic Sciences. 1993;38(4):918-927.

16.   Case Report: Three fatal drug overdoses involving bupropion.
      Friel PN, Logan BK, Fligner CL. Journal of Analytical Toxicology. 1993;17(7):436-438.

17.   Liquid chromatography with photodiode array spectrophotometric detection in the
      forensic sciences.
      Logan BK. Analytica Chimica Acta. 1994;288:111-22.

18.   Analysis of sertraline (Zoloft®) and its major metabolite in postmortem specimens by
      gas and liquid chromatography.
      Logan BK, Friel PN, Case GA. Journal of Analytical Toxicology. 1994;18(3):139-42.

                                                                                                10
19.   The significance of morphine concentrations in the cerebrospinal fluid in morphine
      caused deaths.
      Logan BK, Lüthi R. Journal of Forensic Sciences. 1994;39(3):699-706.

20.   Isopropanol interference with breath alcohol analysis: a case report.
      Logan BK, Gullberg RG, Ellenbaas JK. Journal of Forensic Sciences. 1994;39(4):
      1107-11.

21.   Differentiation of diethyl ether/acetone and ethanol/acetonitrile solvent pairs, and other
      common volatiles by dual column headspace gas chromatography.
      Logan BK, Case GA, Kiesel EL. Journal of Forensic Sciences. 1994; 39(6):1541-8.

22.   The origin and significance of ecgonine methyl ester in blood samples.
      (letter to the editor)
      Logan BK and Peterson KL. Journal of Analytical Toxicology. 1994;18(2):124-5 .

23.   Analysis of ketorolac in postmortem blood.
      Logan BK, Friel PN, Peterson KL, Predmore DB. Journal of Analytical Toxicology.
      1995;19(2):61-4.

24.   An evaluation of the reliability of Widmark calculations based on breath alcohol
      measurements.
      Friel PN, Logan BK, Baer J. Journal of Forensic Sciences. 1995;40(1):91-4.

25.   Detection of cocaine and its polar transformation products and metabolites in human
      urine.
      Peterson KL, Logan BK, Christian GD. Forensic Science International. 1995;73(3):
      183-96.

26.   Variability of ethanol absorption and breath concentrations during a large scale alcohol
      administration study.
      Friel PN, Baer JS, Logan BK. Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research.
      1995;19(4):1055-60.

27.   Unexpected amantadine intoxication in the death of a trauma patient.
      Hartshorne NJ, Harruff RC, Logan BK. American Journal of Forensic Medicine and
      Pathology. 1995;16(4):340-3.

28.   Gastric contamination of postmortem blood samples during blind-stick sample collection.
      Logan BK, Lindholm G. American Journal of Forensic Medicine and Pathology.
      1996;17(2):109-11

29.   Postmortem distribution and redistribution of morphine in man.
      Logan BK, Smirnow D. Journal of Forensic Sciences. 1996;41(2):221-9.

30.   Case Report: Distribution of methamphetamine in a massive fatal ingestion.
      Logan BK, Weiss EL, Harruff, RC. Journal of Forensic Sciences. 1996;41(2):322-3.

31.   Drug and alcohol use in fatally injured drivers in Washington state.
      Logan BK, Schwilke EW. Journal of Forensic Sciences. 1996;41(3):311-16.



                                                                                               11
32.   Methamphetamine and driving impairment.
      Logan BK. Journal of Forensic Sciences. 1996;41(3):457-64.

33.   Simple versus sophisticated models of breath alcohol exhalation profiles.
      Lubkin SR, Gullberg RG, Logan BK, Maini PK, Murray JD. Alcohol and Alcoholism.
      1996;31(1):61-7.

34.   Differentiation of Mycobacterium genevense and Mycobacterium simiae by automated
      mycolic acid analysis with high performance liquid chromatography.
      Ritter D, Carlson LC, Logan BK, Ramos LS, Kilburn JO, Coyle MB. Journal of
      Clinical Microbiology. 1996;34(8):2004-6.

35.   Analysis of ecgonine and other cocaine biotransformation products in postmortem whole
      blood by protein precipitation-extractive alkylation and GC-MS.
      Smirnow D, Logan BK. Journal of Analytical Toxicology. 1996;20:463-7.

36.   Lack of predictable site-dependent differences and time-dependent changes in
      postmortem concentrations of cocaine, benzoylecgonine, and cocaethylene in humans.
      Logan BK, Smirnow D, Gullberg R. Journal of Analytical Toxicology.1997; 20(1): 23-31.

37.   Sequential injection extraction for sample preparation.
      Peterson KL, Logan BK, Christian G, Ruzicka J. An Chim Acta. 1997;337:99-106.
38.   Methadone levels in breast milk.
      Geraghty B, Graham E, Logan BK and Weiss E. Journal of Human Lactation.
      1997;13(3):227-30.

39.   Identification of tramadol and its metabolites in blood from drug-related deaths and
      drug-impaired drivers.
      Goeringer KE, Logan BK, Christian GD. Journal of Analytical Toxicology.
      1997;21(7):529-37.

40.   GCMS analysis and postmortem distribution of felbamate in humans.
      Friel PN, Logan BK, Formoso EJ. Epilepsy. 1997;10(6):283-6.

41.   Cause and manner of death in fatalities involving methamphetamine.
      Logan BK, Fligner CL, Haddix T. Journal of Forensic Sciences. 1998;43(1):28-34.

42.   Lack of effect of tongue piercing on an evidential breath alcohol test.
      Logan BK, Gullberg RG. Journal of Forensic Sciences. 1998;43(1):239-240.

43.   Evaluation of the effect of asthma inhalers and nasal decongestant sprays on a breath
      alcohol test.
      Logan BK, Distefano S, Case GA. Journal of Forensic Sciences. 1998;43(1):
      197-9.

44.   Ethanol content of various foods and soft drinks and their potential for interference
      with a breath-alcohol test.
      Logan BK, Distefano S. Journal of Analytical Toxicology. 1998;22(3):181-3.




                                                                                              12
45.   A patient with multiple incidences of cocaine induced seizures and corresponding
      blood cocaine and metabolites concentrations.
      Winbery S, Blaho K, Logan BK, Geraci S. American Journal of Emergency Medicine.
      1998;16(5):529-33.

46.   Reproducibility of within-subject breath alcohol analysis.
      Gullberg RG, Logan BK. Med Sci Law. 1998;38(2):157-62.

47.   Drug concentrations in cocaine caused and related deaths.
      Liou IW, Logan BK, Fligner CL. J Invest Med. 1999;46(1):99A-99A.

48.   Development of dosing guidelines for reaching selected target breath alcohol
      concentrations.
      Friel PN, Logan BK, O'Malley D, Baer JS. J Stud Alcohol. 1999;60(4):555-65.

49.   Detection of the novel metabolite ethylphenidate after methylphenidate overdose with
      alcohol coingestion.
      Markowitz JS, Logan BK, Diamond F, Patrick KS. J Clin Psychopharmacol.
      1999;19(4):362-6.

50.   Alcohol content of beer and malt beverages: forensic considerations.
      Logan BK, Case GA, Distefano S. Journal of Forensic Sciences. 1999;44(6):
      1292-5.

51.   Determination of -hydroxybutyrate (GHB) in biological specimens by gas
      chromatography-mass spectrometry.
      Couper FJ, Logan BK. Journal of Analytical Toxicology. 2000;24(1):1-7.

52.   Tabulation of alcohol content of beer and malt beverages.
      Case GA, Distefano S, Logan BK. Journal of Analytical Toxicology. 2000;24(3):
      202-10.

53.   Carisoprodol, meprobamate and driving impairment.
      Logan BK, Case GA, Gordon AM. Journal of Forensic Sciences. 2000;45(3):619-23.

54.   Postmortem forensic toxicology of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors: a review of
      pharmacology and report of 168 cases.
      Goeringer KE, Raymon L, Christian G, Logan BK. Journal of Forensic Sciences.
      2000;45(3):633-48.

55.   Blood cocaine and metabolite concentrations, clinical findings, and outcome of patients
      presenting to an ED.
      Blaho K, Logan BK, Winbery S, Park L, Schwilke E. American Journal of Emergency
      Medicine. 2000;18(5):593-8.

56.   Cocaine metabolism in hyperthermic patients with excited delirium.
      Blaho K, Winbery S, Park L, Logan B, Karch SB, Barker LA. Journal of Clinical
      Forensic Medicine. 2000;7:71–76.

57.   Postmortem forensic toxicology of trazodone.
      Goeringer KE, Raymon L, Logan BK. Journal of Forensic Sciences. 2000;45(4):
      850-6.
                                                                                               13
58.   Endogenous ethanol „autobrewery syndrome‟ as a drunk-driving defence challenge.
      Logan BK, Jones AW. Medicine, Science and the Law. 2000;40(3):206-15.

59.   Zolpidem and driving impairment.
      Logan BK, Couper FJ. Journal of Forensic Sciences. 2001;46(1):105-110.

60.   GHB and driving impairment.
      Couper FJ, Logan BK. Journal of Forensic Sciences. 2001;46(4):919-23.

61.   Ecgonine is an important marker for cocaine use in inadequately preserved specimens.
      Logan BK. Journal of Analytical Toxicology. 2001;25(3):219-20.

62.   Amphetamines: an update on forensic issues.
      Logan BK. Journal of Analytical Toxicology. 2001;25(5):400-4.

63.   3,4-Methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA, Ecstasy) and driving impairment.
      Logan BK, Couper FJ. Journal of Forensic Sciences. 2001;46(6):1426-33.

64.   Syva Emit II drugs of abuse in urine reagents adapted to whole blood extracts.
      Hughes MP, Tyler-Freer S, Friel P, Logan BK. American Journal of Clinical Pathology.
      2001;116;278-94.

65.   Methamphetamine – effects on human performance and behavior.
      Logan BK. Forensic Science Review. 2002;14(1/2): 133-51.

66.   Prevalence of drug use in commercial tractor-trailer drivers.
      Couper FJ, Pemberton M, Jarvis A, Hughes M, Logan BK. Journal of Forensic
      Sciences. 2002;47(3):562-67.

67.   3,4 Methylenedioxymethamphetamine (Ecstasy) – effects on human performance and
      behavior.
      Logan BK, Couper FJ. Forensic Science Review. 2003;15(1/2)

68.   Alcohol, Drugs and Driving.
      Logan BK, Gullberg RG. In Clarke's Isolation and Identification of Drugs
      In pharmaceuticals, body fluids, and postmortem material
      Third edition. Royal Pharmaceutical Society, Dec 2003.

69.   Endogenous ethanol production in a child with short gut syndrome.
      Logan BK, Jones AW. J Pediatric Gastroent. Nutr. 2003 Mar;36(3):419-20

70.   Addicted to Driving Under the Influence – a GHB/GBL Case Report.
      Couper FJ, Logan BK J Anal Tox 2004 Sept;28:512-515

71.   Suspected GHB Overdoses in the Emergency Department.
      Couper FJ, Thatcher JE, Logan BK J Anal Tox 2004(Sept);28:481-484

72.   Lorazepam and Driving Impairment.
      Clarkson JE, Gordon AM, Logan BK J Anal Tox 2004 Sept);28:475-480


                                                                                        14
73.   Case Report: A Death Attributed to Use of 2,4 Dinitrophenol for Weight Loss.
      Miranda EJ, McIntyre IM, Parker DR, Gary RD, Logan BK J Analytical Tox
      2006;30(3): 219-222

74.   Drugs and Human Performance Fact Sheets.
      Couper FJ and Logan BK NHTSA publication 2005
      http://www.nhtsa.dot.gov/people/injury/research/job185drugs/drugs_web.pdf

75.   Changing Patterns of Alcohol and Drug Use in Fatally Injured Drivers in Washington
      State.
      Schwilke E, Dos Santos I, Logan BK J Forensic Sci 2006 Sep;51(5):1191-8

76.   Case Report: Death of an Infant Involving Benzocaine.
      Logan BK, Gordon AM. J Forensic Sci 2005 Nov;50(6):1486-8
77.   Results of a Proposed Breath Test Proficiency Program.
      Gullberg RG, Logan BK J Forensic Sci 2006 Jan;51(1):168-72

78.   Epidemiology of MDMA and Associated Club Drugs in the Seattle Area.
      Banta-Green C, Goldbaum G, Kingston S, Golden M, Harruff R, Logan BK
      Substance Use and Misuse 2005;40:1295-1315

79.   Recommendations for Toxicological Investigation of Drug Impaired Driving.
      Farrell LJ, Kerrigan SBA, Logan BK J Forensic Sci, 2007 Sep;52(5):1214-8.

80.   Case Report of a Multi-Drug Intoxication Fatality Involving Xyrem® (GHB)
      Akins B, Miranda E, Lacy M, Logan BK. Journal of Forensic Sciences. 2009 Feb
      54(2):495- 496 also Response to Akins et al (09-154), Journal of Forensic Sciences (J
      Forensic Sci. 2009 Sep;54(5):1203-4; author reply 1205.

81.   Toluene Impaired Drivers: Behavioral Observations, DRE Assessment and Toxicological
      Findings
      Capron B, Logan BK Journal of Forensic Sciences. 2009 Feb 54(2):486- 489

82.   A Series of Five Deaths Related to Purchase of Dextromethorphan Over the Internet
      Logan BK, Goldfogel G, Hamilton R, Kaufmann J J Anal Tox. 2009 Mar;33(2):99-103.

83.   Dextromethorphan and Chlorpheniramine Impairment in Drivers
      Logan BK J Forensic Sciences 2009 Sep;54(5):1176-80.

84.   Technical Note: Trazodone, meta-Chlorophenylpiperazine (an Hallucinogenic Drug and
      Trazodone Metabolite), and the Hallucinogen Trifluoromethylphenylpiperazine Cross-
      React with the EMIT®II Ecstasy Immunoassay in Urine
      Logan BK, Costantino A, Rieders E, Sanders D J Analytical Toxicology, 2010 34(9),
      587–589

85.   Drugs in Traffic
      Beirness DJ, Logan BK, and Swann P, Organization for Economic Cooperation and
      Development (OECD), 2010

86.   Butalbital and Driving Impairment
      Logan BK Yeakel JK, Manuscript in Preparation


                                                                                           15
87.    Development and Validation of an Liquid Chromatography Tandem Mass Spectrometry
       Method for the Identification and Quantification of JWH-018, JWH-073, JWH-019 and
       JWH-250 in Human Whole Blood
       Kacinko SL, Xu A, Homan JW, McMullin MM, Warrington DX, Logan BK Manuscript
       in Preparation

88.    Analysis and Stability Determination of Salvinorin A and B in Human Blood, Plasma,
       and Urine by Liquid Chromatography Tandem Mass Spectrometry
       Logan BK, Xu A, McMullin MM Manuscript in Preparation

89.    Identification of Synthetic Cannabinoids in K2 Herbal Incense and Drug
       Paraphernalia by TLC, GCMS, LCMSMS, and LCTOF
       Logan BK, Reinhold LE, Diamond FX, Xu A J For Sci in Review

90.    Dextromethorphan Abuse Leading to Assault, Suicide, or Homicide
       Logan BK, Yeakel JK, Goldfogel G, Frost MP, Sandstrom G, Wickham D,
       J For Sci In Review



Publications (not peer reviewed)

The Routine Determination of Morphine in Postmortem Blood by HPLC with Electrochemical
Detection.
Logan BK, Oliver JS and Smith H. Proceedings of the 21st annual meeting of The
International Association of Forensic Toxicologists, Brighton, United Kingdom, 1984. TIAFT

Solid Phase Extraction Methods and the Use of HPLC with Electrochemical Detection in the
Analysis of Morphine in Clinical Specimens.
Logan BK. Proceedings of 1985. Advanced Analytical Techniques symposium, Association
of Clinical Biochemistry, Glasgow, 1985. ACB

Cyanide Poisonings Associated with Over the Counter Cold Medication - Washington State,
1991.
Howard J, Pouw TH, Arnold J, Logan B, Kobayashi J, Davis J. Morbidity and Mortality Weekly
Report. 1991;40(10):161-8.

In-line Solid Phase Sample Preparation for the Analysis of Drugs in Postmortem Fluids by High
Performance Liquid Chromatography.
Logan BK and Stafford DT. Forensic Toxicology: Proceedings of 26th Annual Meeting of The
International Association of Forensic Toxicologists, Glasgow, United Kingdom, August 1989.
Ed. J.S. Oliver. Aberdeen University Press, 1992

The Use of Gas Chromatography for the Determination of Ethyl Alcohol and Other Volatiles in
Biological Materials.
Logan BK. in “Gas Chromatography in Forensic Science” Ellis Horwood Series in Forensic
Sciences. Ellis Horwood, Sydney, Australia. Ed. I.R. Tebbett, 1992.

Effects of Toluene Exposure on the DataMaster.
Logan BK. IACT Newsletter. 1994; 5(3):14-5.

Gas Chromatography – Applications: Clinical and Toxicological Analysis.

                                                                                             16
Logan BK. Encyclopedia of Analytical Science, Ed. A. Townsend, Academic Press, London,
1995

Common DUI Defense Challenges.
Jones AW and Logan BK. Handbook of Drug Abuse. CRC Press. S. Karch, Editor, 1998.

Review of Drugs and Death: Profiles of Illegal Drug Abuse.
Logan BK. Journal of Forensic Sciences. 2000;45(5);1176.


Review of Criminal Poisoning: Investigational Guide for Law Enforcement, Toxicologists,
Forensic Scientists, and Attorneys.
Logan BK. Journal of Forensic Sciences 2000; 45(5); 1177

Tabulated data on alcohol content of 400 beers.
Case GA, Logan BK. IACT Newsletter 1998

Review of Drug Effects on Psychomotor Performance.
Logan BK. Journal of Forensic Sciences. 2001;46(3):766.


Review of Experimental and Clinical Toxicology.
Logan BK. Journal of Forensic Sciences. 2001;46(3):767.

Review of Benzodiazepines and GHB Detection and Pharmacology.
Logan BK. Journal of Forensic Sciences. 2002

Review of Drug-Facilitated Sexual Assault: A Forensic Handbook
Logan BK. Journal of Forensic Sciences. 2003 (in press)

Robert F. Borkenstein - Obituary
Logan BK. Journal of Forensic Sciences. 2003;48(3):1-2

Cocaine, methamphetamine and driving
Logan BK, Isenschmid DS in Medico-Legal Aspects of Drugs M Burns (ed), Lawyers and
Judges Publishing Co., Inc., Tucson AZ, 2003

Review of Dreisbach's Handbook of Poisoning
Logan, BK Journal of Forensic Sciences. 2004;49(4)

Review of Advances in Forensic Mass Spectrometry
Logan, BK Journal of Forensic Sciences.

Marijuana and Driving
Logan BK in Marijuana. Mahmoud ElSohly, Ed. Humana 2006

Sample Calculations (in blood and breath alcohol cases)
Logan BK, and Jones AW, in Postmortem Toxicology of Abused Drugs Ed. SB Karch, CRC
Press, 2008

Review of Handbook of Workplace Drug Testing
Logan, BK Journal of Forensic Sciences 2009;54(5):1194
                                                                                          17
Synthetic Cannabinoids – A new challenge for drug testing programs and drug testing
laboratories.
Logan, BK Drug Abuse Testing Industry Association (DATIA) Newsletter (December 2010)

Stimulants: Interpretive Toxicology Strategies in Impaired Driving Cases
Logan BK, in “Interpretive Toxicology and Drug Impaired Driving: A DUID Case Study
Approach.” Sarah Kerrigan, Michelle Spirk Eds. Humana Press in Press 2010

Drugs and Driving
Logan BK. Osselton DM, in Clarke‟s Analysis of Drugs and Poisons, 4th Edition
Pharmaceutical Press, Cambridge, in Press 2011

New Strategies to Curb Drug Driving
DuPont RL, Logan BK, Talpins SK Between the Lines, National Traffic Law Center (NTLC) of
the National District Attorney’s Association (NDAA) Newsletter, Summer 2010

Draft Discussion Paper on Drug Testing in Traffic Fatality Cases
Logan BK, Canadian Council on Substance Abuse, In Review October 2010



Presentations (* = invited presentation)

1.     The Routine Determination of Morphine in Postmortem Blood by HPLC with
       Electrochemical Detection.
       Logan BK, Oliver JS and Smith H. 21st Annual meeting of The International
       Association of Forensic Toxicologists, Brighton, United Kingdom, March 1984

2.     The Detection of Local Anaesthetics Used as Doping Agents in Greyhound Racing.
       Logan BK, Oliver JS and Smith H. 22nd Annual meeting of The International
       Association of Forensic Toxicologists, Rigi-Kaltbaad, Switzerland, March 1985

3.     The Identification of THC, Cannabinol and Cannabidiol in Questioned Material by HPLC
       with Electrochemical Detection.
       Logan BK, Oliver JS and Smith H. 22nd annual meeting of The International
       Association of Forensic Toxicologists, Rigi, Switzerland, March 1985

4.     Solid Phase Extraction of a Range of Drugs from Postmortem Blood.
       Logan BK, Stafford DT. 40th Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Forensic
       Sciences, Philadelphia, PA, USA, February 1988

5.     Increasing the Resolving Power of HPLC through Complementary Analysis and
       Selective Detection.
       Logan BK, Stafford DT. 39th annual Pittsburgh Conference, New Orleans, LA,
       February 1988


6.     Some Experiences with Solid Phase Extraction Techniques in Postmortem Drug
       Analysis.
       Logan BK. Southern Association of Forensic Scientists - Spring Meeting, Memphis,
       TN, USA, May 5-7, 1988
                                                                                          18
7.     Determination of Vitreous Cocaine and Benzoylecgonine Concentrations Using HPLC
       with Column Switching.
       Logan BK, Stafford DT, 41st meeting of the American Academy of Forensic Sciences,
       Las Vegas, NV, February 1989

8.     Selection of Sample Preparation Techniques in Forensic Toxicology.
       Logan BK, Stafford DT, 41st meeting of the American Academy of Forensic
       Sciences, Las Vegas, NV, February 1989

9.     A Comparison of Three Solid Phase Extraction Methods for Sample Preparation Prior to
       HPLC and GC in Forensic Toxicology.
       Logan BK, Stafford DT. 40th annual Pittsburgh Conference, Atlanta, GA, March 1989

10.    In-line Solid Phase Sample Preparation for the Analysis of Drugs in Postmortem Fluids
       by High Performance Liquid Chromatography.
       Logan BK, Stafford DT. 26th annual meeting of The International Association of
       Forensic Toxicologists, Glasgow, United Kingdom, August 1989

11.*   I) Principles of Solid Phase Extraction and its Application in Forensic Toxicology
       II) Automating Solid Phase Extraction Procedures
       Logan BK. Two Day Solid Phase Extraction Workshop for the Illinois State Police
       Crime Laboratory Service, organized by Department of Pharmacy, University of Illinois,
       December 7-8, 1989

12.    An Integrated Approach for the Identification of Cocaine in Street Drugs.
       Logan BK, Nichols HS, Stafford DT. 42nd Annual meeting of the American
       Academy of Forensic Sciences, Cincinnati, OH, February 1990

13.    A Robust Solid Phase Extraction Method for Basic Drugs and Metabolites in Postmortem
       Blood.
       Logan BK, Stafford DT. 42nd Annual meeting of the American Academy of
       Forensic Sciences, Cincinnati, OH, February 1990

14.    The Use of HPLC with Diode Array Spectrophotometric Detection in the Forensic Drug
       Laboratory
       Logan BK, Nichols HS, Fernandez GS, Phillips AM and Stafford DT. 42nd Annual
       meeting of the American Academy of Forensic Sciences, Cincinnati, OH, February 1990

15.    Analysis of Drugs in Postmortem Biofluids Using an In-Line Sample Preparation Device (AASP).
       Logan BK, Stafford DT. 41st Pittsburgh Conference, New York, NY, March 1990

16.*   The Use of Horizontal Gaze Nystagmus in DWI Arrests
       Logan BK. United States Health Service. “None for the Road”, Indian Health
       Service Program, Spokane, WA, August 1991



17.*   The Breath Test: Changes in the State‟s Program and the WAC.
       in “Defending DWI‟s - Winning Strategies for the Nineties”
       Logan BK. Continuing Legal Education Program, University of Washington, April 1991


                                                                                           19
18.    Prosecuting DWI‟s in Washington State - Use of Expert Testimony
       Logan BK and others.
       Continuing Legal Education seminar series. 1991, 1992, 1993, 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997

19.*   Washington Administrative Code Provisions for Breath Alcohol Testing
       Logan BK. Continuing Legal Education Program Pierce Co. Bar Assn. May 1991

20.    Liquid/Liquid vs. Solid Phase Extraction for the Isolation of 11-Nor-Delta-9-
       Tetrahydrocannabinol-9-Carboxylic Acid from Alkaline Hydrolyzed Urine.
       Logan BK. 44th Annual meeting of the American Academy of Forensic Sciences, New
       Orleans, LA, February 1992

21.    Changes in the Illegal Drug Market in Memphis TN 1979-1989
       Logan BK, Nichols HS, and Stafford DT. 44th Annual meeting of the American
       Academy of Forensic Sciences, New Orleans, LA , February 1992

22.    Cyanide in Sudafed 12-Hour Cold Capsules in Washington State 1991
       Logan BK, Howard J, Kiesel E. 44th Annual meeting of the American Academy of
       Forensic Sciences, New Orleans, LA , February 1992

23.    State Toxicology and Death Investigation
       Logan BK. University of Washington, Continuing Medical Education, Seattle, WA,
       March 1992

24.    A Comparison of Two Solid Phase Extraction Methods for Acid Neutral Drugs in
       Postmortem Blood
       Formoso E, Logan BK. NW Assoc. of Forensic Sciences, Reno, NV,May 1992

25.    Estimation of BAC and Time to Peak BAC in Drinkers Following the Rapid Consumption
       of Alcohol
       Predmore D, Logan BK. Northwest Association of Forensic Sciences, Reno, NV,
       May 1992

26.    Role of Chemical Tests for Alcohol in DWI Prosecutions
       Logan BK. Washington Association of Prosecuting Attorneys, District Court Training,
       Burien, WA, June 1992

27.    Drugs, Poisons and Chemical Analysis
       Logan BK. University of Washington Extension Program, “Forensic Investigation,”
       Seattle, WA, October 1992

28.    Forensic Toxicology
       Logan BK. University of Washington Extension Program, “Forensic Investigation,”
       Seattle, WA, October 1992




29.    Analytical and Postmortem Forensic Toxicology of Bupropion and Sertraline, Two New
       Non-Tricyclic Antidepressants.
       Logan BK. Department of Laboratory Medicine, University of Washington, Chemistry
       Research Conference, May 19, 1992
                                                                                         20
30.    Identification of “Mycobacterium genavense” by Analysis of Mycolic Acids and Whole-
       Cell Fatty Acids
       Ritter D, Carlson LC, Kilburn JO, Logan BK, Coyle MB. 93rd General Meeting of
       American Society of Microbiology, Atlanta, GA, May 1993

31.    Detection and Characterization of Sertraline (Zoloft®) in a Suicidal Hanging
       Logan BK, Case GA. 45th Annual meeting of the American Academy of Forensic
       Sciences, Boston, MA, February 1993

32.    Three Fatal Drug Overdoses Involving Bupropion (Wellbutrin®)
       Logan BK, Friel PN, Fligner CL, Schnell S. 45th Annual meeting of the American
       Academy of Forensic Sciences, Boston, MA, February 1993

33.    Evaluation of Methods for the Analysis of Drugs in Cerebrospinal Fluid (CSF) in
       Postmortem Forensic Toxicology.
       Lüthi R, Logan BK. 45th Annual meeting of the American Academy of Forensic
       Sciences, Boston, MA, February 1993

34.*   Advantages of a Comprehensive Approach in Postmortem Toxicology
       Logan BK. Society of Forensic Toxicologists/California Association of Toxicologists,
       1993, Joint Meeting, Phoenix, AZ, October 12, 1993

35.*   Detection of Drugs in Fatally Injured Drivers in Washington State, 1992-1993.
       Logan BK. Washington Traffic Safety Conference, Tumwater, WA, December 7, 1993

36.    Measuring Carbon Monoxide and Cyanide in Postmortem Blood and Tissue Using a Gas
       Phase Electrochemical Technique
       Logan BK. 46th Annual meeting of the American Academy of Forensic Sciences, San
       Antonio, TX, February 1994

37.    Diethyl Ether Misidentified as Acetone by Headspace Gas Chromatography.
       Logan BK, Case GA, Kiesel EL. 46th Annual meeting of the American Academy of
       Forensic Sciences, San Antonio, TX, February 1994

38.    Ethanol Absorption During Stress
       Logan BK, Friel PN, Baer JS. 46th Annual meeting of the American Academy of
       Forensic Sciences, San Antonio, TX, February 1994

39.    Analysis of Polar Cocaine Metabolites in Urine and Spinal Fluid
       Peterson KL, Logan BK, Christian GD, Ruzicka J. 46th Annual meeting of the
       American Academy of Forensic Sciences, San Antonio, TX, February 1994

40.    Effects of Stress on Pharmacokinetics of Ethanol in a Laboratory Environment
       Logan BK, Friel PN, Baer JS. 7th Annual meeting of the International Association of
       Chemical Testing, Denver, CO, April 1994


41.*   Forensic Aspects of Breath Alcohol Measurement
       Logan BK, Gullberg RG. Department of Environmental Health seminar series,
       University of Washington, June 2, 1994

                                                                                              21
42.*   The Use of Toxicology Testing in Felony Prosecutions
       Logan BK. Washington Association of Prosecuting Attorneys, spring training,
       Chelan, WA, June 24, 1994

43.*   The Death Investigations System in Washington State
       Reay D, Logan BK Orientation for newly elected officials, Washington Association of
       Counties and Washington Association of County Officials, Tumwater, WA,
       November 30, 1994

44.*   Sample Collection Procedures for Death Investigation Toxicology
       Logan BK. Washington Association of Coroners and Medical Examiners, Winter
       Training, Tumwater, WA, November 28, 1994

45.*   Drugs and Driving
       Logan BK. Workshop for Washington Traffic Safety Commission, Alcohol and Traffic
       Safety Conference, Tumwater, WA, December 6, 1994

46.*   Washington‟s Breath Alcohol Testing Program - Past and Future
       Logan BK. Washington Traffic Safety Commission, Alcohol and Traffic Safety
       Conference, Tumwater, WA, December 7, 1994

47.    Use of a Statewide Database in the Management of a Forensic Breath Alcohol Test
       Program: A Seven Year Perspective.
       Distefano S, Speck P, Gullberg RG, Logan BK, American Academy of Forensic
       Sciences, 47th Annual Meeting, Seattle, WA, February 1995

48.    Evaluation of the Ability of the BAC Verifier DataMaster to Distinguish Ethanol from
       Other Organic Solvents.
       Case GA, Distefano S, Logan BK, American Academy of Forensic Sciences, 47th
       Annual Meeting, Seattle, WA, February 1995

49.    Drug and Alcohol Use in Fatally Injured Drivers in Washington State.
       Schwilke EW, Logan BK, American Academy of Forensic Sciences, 47th Annual
       Meeting, Seattle, WA, February 1995

50.    Postmortem Concentrations of Sertraline and Norsertraline
       Marker EK, Levine A, Kirk S, Stajic M, Logan BK, American Academy of Forensic
       Sciences, 47th Annual Meeting, Seattle, WA, February 1995

51.    Two Fatalities Associated with Amantadine Overdose
       Lüthi R, Logan BK, Predmore D, Friel P, Hartshorne N, Harruff RC, Fligner CL,
       Schmunk G. American Academy of Forensic Sciences, 47th Annual Meeting,
       Seattle, WA, February 1995

52.    GC/MS Analysis of Felbamate, a New Antiepileptic Drug in Postmortem Specimens
       Friel PN, Formoso E, Logan BK. American Academy of Forensic Sciences,
       47th Annual Meeting, Seattle, WA, February 1995

53.*   Sudafed Product Tampering
       Logan BK. Multidisciplinary Symposium, American Academy of Forensic Sciences,
       47th Annual Meeting, Seattle, WA, February 1995

                                                                                              22
54.    Applying Confidence Intervals to Results of Breath Alcohol Analyses
       Bosman RA, Logan BK, Gullberg RG, 8th Annual meeting of the International
       Association of Chemical Testing, Milwaukee, WI, April 1995

55.    Cocaine Metabolite Extraction from Whole Blood and Sequential Derivatization and
       Detection by GC/MS
       Smirnow D, Logan BK, Academy of Clinical Laboratory Physicians and Scientists
       meeting, Syracuse, NY, June 1995

56.    Postmortem Distribution and Redistribution of Morphine in Acute Drug Overdose Deaths
       Smirnow D, Logan BK, Academy of Clinical Laboratory Physicians and Scientists
       meeting, Syracuse, NY, June 1995

57.    Sequential Injection Extraction
       Peterson KL, Logan BK, Ruzika J. Association of Official Analytical Chemists,
       Olympia, WA, July 1995

58.    Sequential Injection Extraction Techniques for the Analysis of Drugs in Human Urine
       Peterson KL, Logan BK, Christian G, Federation of Analytical Chemistry and
       Spectroscopy Societies, Cincinnati, OH, October 24, 1995

59.    Time Dependant Changes and Site Dependant Differences in Postmortem Morphine
       Concentration in Man
       Logan BK, Smirnow D, Society of Forensic Toxicology 25th Annual Meeting,
       Baltimore, MD, October 1995

60.    Sequential Derivatization, Extraction and Analysis of Polar Cocaine Metabolites in
       Postmortem Blood
       Logan BK, Smirnow D, Society of Forensic Toxicology, 25th Annual Meeting,
       Baltimore, MD, October 1995

61.*   Methods for the Analysis of Barbiturates
       Logan BK. United Nations Drug Control Program, Consultative Meeting on the
       Detection and Assay of Benzodiazepines and Barbiturates in Biological Fluids, Kowloon,
       Hong Kong, November 13-17, 1995

62.*   Postmortem Distribution of Morphine in Man.
       Logan BK. Heroin Redux. Workshop presentation for the American Academy of
       Forensic Science 48th Annual Meeting, Nashville, TN, February 1996

63.*   Sudafed Product Tampering
       Logan BK. Multidisciplinary Symposium, American Academy of Forensic Science
       48th Annual Meeting, Nashville, TN, February 1996

64.    Time Dependant Changes and Site Dependant Differences in Postmortem
       Concentration of Cocaine, Benzoyl Ecgonine and Cocaethylene in Man
       Logan BK, Smirnow D, American Academy of Forensic Science
       48th Annual Meeting, Nashville, TN, February 1996

65.    Sequential Injection Extraction of Weakly Acidic and Basic Drug from Urine
       Peterson KL, Logan BK, Christian GD, and Ruzicka J. American Academy of Forensic
       Science 48th Annual Meeting, Nashville, TN, February 1996
                                                                                             23
66.*   Forensic Toxicology in Product Tampering Investigations
       Logan BK. Rosenblatt Guest Lecture, The Barnett Institute, Northeastern University,
       Boston, MA, February 1996

67.*   Site Dependant Differences and Time Dependant Changes in Postmortem Drug
       Concentrations.
       Logan BK. Rosenblatt Guest Lecture, The Barnett Institute, Northeastern University,
       Boston, MA, February 1996

68.*   Toxicology Testing in Drug Recognition Expert Programs
       Logan BK. National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, Prosecutor Training,
       Tumwater, WA, February 1996

69.*   Drug Recognition Expert programs
       Logan BK. Washington State Association of District and Municipal Court Judges -
       Legislative and Licensing Committees, SeaTac, WA, April 1996

70.    Methamphetamine and Driving Impairment
       Logan BK. Stimulant Impaired Driving Workshop, California Association of
       Toxicologists, 1996 Spring Meeting, North Lake Tahoe, CA, May 4, 1996

71.*   Recent Experience with Methamphetamine in Washington State
       Logan BK. Postdoctoral lecture series in criminal psychology, Washington State
       Hospital, Steilacoom, WA, June 1996

72.*   Interpretive Toxicology
       Logan BK. Death Investigation Seminar, Washington Criminal Justice Training
       Commission, Burien, WA, July 1996

73.    Further Validation of Widmark Calculations Based on Breath Alcohol Concentrations
       Friel PN, O'Malley D, Logan BK, Baer JS Northwest Association of Forensic Sciences
       meeting, Salt Lake City, UT, October 1996

74.    Evaluation of a Method That Isolates and Quantitates Ecgonine and Other Metabolites
       in Whole Blood.
       Schwilke ES, Logan BK, Blaho KE, Mandrell TD Northwest
       Association of Forensic Sciences meeting, Salt Lake City, UT, October 1996

75.    Determination of Tramadol and its Metabolites in Postmortem Blood
       Goeringer KE, Logan BK Society of Forensic Toxicology, Denver, CO, October 1996

76.    Clinical Manifestations of Acute Cocaine Intoxication and Corresponding Levels from
       Patients Evaluated in an Inner City Emergency Department.
       Merigian K, Blaho K, Logan BK, Winberry S, Geraci, S. Society of Forensic
       Toxicology, Denver, CO, October 1996

77.    Chest Pain Associated with Cocaine Intoxication: Case Reports with Corresponding
       Drug Levels.
       Geraci S, Blaho K, Logan BK, Merigian K, Winberry S Society of Forensic
       Toxicology, Denver, CO, October 1996

                                                                                             24
78.    Characterization of a Model for Acute Cocaine Intoxication in Conscious Pigs.
       Blaho K, Mandrell T, Labranche G, Merigian K, Geraci S, Winbery S, Logan BK
       Society of Forensic Toxicology, Denver, CO, October 1996

79.*   Fundamentals of Medical Examiner Toxicology: Heroin and Cocaine
       Logan BK. Workshop presentation, Society of Forensic Toxicology, Denver, CO,
       October 1996

80.    Case Reports of Cocaine Induced Chest Pain: Correlation Between Clinical Findings
       and Blood Concentrations?
       Geraci S, Blaho K, Winbery S, Logan BK, Merigian K. American Society of Clinical
       Pharmacology and Therapeutics, St. Louis, MO, March 1997

81.    Cocaine Blood Concentrations and Clinical Symptoms in Thirty Sequential Patients
       Evaluated in an Inner City Emergency Department. Winbery S, Blaho K, Logan BK,
       Merigian K, Geraci S. American Society of Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics,
       St. Louis, MO, March 1997

82.    A Novel Animal Model for Cocaine Intoxication.
       Blaho K, Mandrell T, Labranche G, Winbery S, Merigian K, Logan BK, Geraci S.
       American Society of Clinical Pharmacology and Therap., St. Louis, MO, March 1997

83.    Drug Induced Diminished Capacity in Crimes of Violence
       Logan BK. Workshop Chair and moderator, American Academy of Forensic Sciences,
       49th annual meeting, New York, NY, February 1997

84.*   Considerations in the Interpretation of Postmortem Drug Concentrations
       Logan BK. American Academy of Forensic Sciences, 49th Annual meeting, New
       York, NY, February 1997

85.*   Role of the Forensic Toxicologist in the Investigation of Terrorism and Mass Disaster.
       Logan BK. American Academy of Forensic Sciences, 49th Annual meeting, New
       York, NY, February 1997

86.    Methamphetamine Fatalities in Washington State 1993-95: Cause and Manner of
       Death in Fatalities Involving Methamphetamine.
       Logan BK, Fligner CL, Haddix T. American Academy of Forensic Sciences, 49th
       Annual meeting, New York, NY, February 1997
87.*   How Alcohol Affects the Body, Mind and Behavior
       Logan BK. Oregon Annual DUII conference, Beaverton, OR, April 18, 1997

88.*   Methamphetamine and Violence
       Logan BK. Washington Association of Prosecuting Attorneys, Criminal Track training,
       Tumwater, WA, April 24, 1997



89.*   Drug and Alcohol Testing Related to DUI
       Logan BK. CLE seminar, Associated Council for the Accused, Seattle, WA,
       May 13, 1997

90.*   Cause and Manner of Death Associated with Methamphetamine Use
                                                                                                25
       Logan BK. Clark County Medical Examiners Office, Mini-symposium on Drug
       Related Deaths, Vancouver, WA, June 9, 1997

91.*   Meeting Continuing Challenges in the Practice of Forensic Toxicology
       Logan BK, Plenary Lecture, 35th Annual meeting International Association of Forensic
       Toxicologists, Padova, Italy, August 1997

92.    Methamphetamine and Driving Impairment
       Logan BK. 35th Annual meeting of The International Association of Forensic
       Toxicologists, Padova, Italy, August 1997

93.    The Cause of the Increased Heroin Fatality Rate in Seattle
       Li M, Raven K, Harruff R, Logan, BK National Association of Medical Examiners
       Baltimore, MD, September 1997

94.    Clinical Findings and Drug Kinetics in Two Cases of Catastrophic Reactions to Cocaine
       Blaho K, Logan BK, Winbery S, Park L, Geraci, S. Society of Forensic Toxicologists,
       Salt Lake City, UT, October 1997

95.    Postmortem Forensic Toxicology of Trazodone in Man
       Goeringer K, Logan BK. Society of Forensic Toxicologists, Salt Lake City, UT,
       October 1997

96.    Review of Postmortem Toxicology in Twenty Deaths Involving Sertraline
       Goeringer K, Logan BK. Society of Forensic Toxicologists, Salt Lake City, UT,
       October 1997

97.    Tricyclic Antidepressant Concentrations in Overdose Patients Presenting in an Inner City
       Emergency Department.
       Winbery S, Logan BK, Blaho K. Society of Forensic Toxicologists, Salt Lake City, UT,
       October 1997

98.    Ante/Postmortem Kinetics of Cocaine in Juvenile Swine
       Logan BK, Blaho K, Schwilke G, Mandrell T. Society of Forensic Toxicologists,
       Salt Lake City, UT, October 1997

99.    PC Based Assessment of Alcohol Related Impairment with Synwork1
       Friel PN, O‟Malley D, Baer JS, Logan BK CAT/NWAFS/SWAFS/SAT meeting,
       Las Vegas, NV, November 1997

100.   Beer and its Forensic Implications
       Case GA, Logan BK, CAT/NWAFS/SWAFS/SAT meeting, Las Vegas, NV,
       November 1997

101.  Concentrations of Cocaine and Metabolites in a Drug Abusing Population
      Logan BK, Blaho K, Winbery S, Geraci SA 5th International Congress of Therapeutic
      Drug Monitoring and Clinical Toxicology, Vancouver, BC, Canada, November 1997
102.* Speed Kills; The Downside of Methamphetamine Use in Drivers.
      Logan BK. Washington Traffic Safety Commission, Impaired Driver Conference,
      Fife, WA, December 1997

103.   Methamphetamine and Driving.
                                                                                            26
       in Methamphetamine: Synthesis, Pharmacology, Analysis, and Toxicology
       Logan BK. American Academy of Forensic Sciences, San Francisco, CA,
       February 1998

104.   Effects of Death and Decomposition on Concentrations of Cocaine and Metabolites in
       Juvenile Swine.
       Logan BK, Blaho B, Mandrell T, Berryman H, Goff ML , Goldberger BA , Schwilke S,
       Ropero-Miller J, American Academy of Forensic Sciences, San Francisco, CA,
       February 1998

105.* Considerations When Trying to Determine the Role Cocaine May Have Played in a
      Death.
      Logan BK. California Association of Toxicologists, San Francisco, CA, February 1998

106.   Chest Pain and Cocaine Concentrations
       Geraci S, Blaho K, Logan BK, Winbery S, American Society of Clinical Pharmacology
       and Therapeutics, New Orleans, LA, March 1998

107.   Clinical Manifestations of Cocaine and Five Metabolites in A drug Abusing Population
       Blaho K, Logan BK, Winbery S, Geraci S, American Society of Clinical Pharmacology
       and Therapeutics, New Orleans, LA, March 1998

108.   Lack of Correlation Between Clinical Symptoms, Treatment Modalities, and Cocaine
       Blood Concentrations.
       Blaho K, Winbery S, Logan BK, Geraci S, American Society of Clinical Pharmacology
       and Therapeutics, New Orleans, LA, March 1998

109.   Cocaine Metabolite Levels Fail to Correlate with EKG Symptoms or Changes
       Geraci S, Blaho K, Winbery S, Logan BK American Society of Clinical Pharmacology
       and Therapeutics, New Orleans, LA, March 1998

110.   Occular Findings in Cocaine Abusing Patients Presenting to an Inner City Emergency
       Department.
       Blaho K, Winbery S, Park L, Logan BK
       Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology, Lauderdale, FL, May 1998

111.   Alcohol Content of Beer and Malt Beverages - Forensic Considerations
       Case GA, Logan BK International Association for Chemical Testing, Las Vegas, NV,
       April 1998

112.* Legal Issues Associated with Drug Use, Drug Abuse and Drug Testing
      Logan BK. Postgraduate Seminar Series, The Washington Institute, Washington State
      Hospital, Steilacoom, WA, May 1998

113.* Medico Legal Intoxication - A Growing Problem
      Logan BK. Postgraduate Seminar Series, The Washington Institute, Washington State
      Hospital, Steilacoom, WA May 1998

114.* The Downside of Methamphetamine.
      Logan BK. International Association of Chiefs of Police, DRE Training Conference,
      Portland, OR, June 1998

                                                                                            27
115.* Pharmacology of Methamphetamine and its Relationship to Human Behavior Impairment
      Logan BK. The Effects of Alcohol and Drugs on Human Performance and Behavior,
      American Academy of Forensic Sciences/California Association of Toxicologists,
      UCLA, CA, August 1998

116.   Death of an Infant Involving Benzocaine
       Gordon A M, Logan BK. Society of Forensic Toxicology/TIAFT, Albuquerque,
       NM, October 1998

117.   Cocaine Half Lives in Drug Abusing Patients Presenting to an Inner City Emergency
       Department
       Blaho K, Winbery S, Logan BK, Park LJ, Karch SA. Society of Forensic
       Toxicology/TIAFT, Albuquerque, NM, October 1998

118.   Lessons Learned from an Unexplained Hospital Death
       Blaho K, Winbery S, Park LJ, Karch SA, Logan BK, Gunther W
       Society of Forensic Toxicology/TIAFT, Albuquerque, NM, October 1998

119.* The Drugged Driver: Science, Detection and the Law
      Moczula B, Logan BK, Page T 1998 National Safety Council Congress and Exposition
      Los Angeles, CA, October 1998

120.   Statistical analysis of duplicate blood alcohol data from a forensic toxicology laboratory.
       Gullberg RG, Logan BK American Academy of Forensic Sciences, Orlando, FL,
       February 1999

121.   Comparison of DRE opinion and toxicology results in 204 consecutive cases.
       Schwilke GS, Logan BK American Academy of Forensic Sciences, Orlando, FL,
       February 1999

122.   Carisoprodol (Soma®), Meprobamate (Miltown®, Equanil®) and driving impairment.
       Logan BK, Case GA American Academy of Forensic Sciences, Orlando, FL,
       February 1999

123.* Common DUI defense challenges.
      in Breath Alcohol Testing for Forensic Purposes - Principles, Practice and Present
      Status. AW Jones, Chair. Logan BK. International Association of Forensic Sciences.
      15th Triennial meeting, University of California, Los Angeles, CA, August 1999

124.* Stimulants and their effects on human performance and behavior.
      in The Effects of Drugs on Human Performance and Behavior. V Spiehler, Chair.
      Logan BK. International Association of Forensic Sciences. 15th Triennial meeting,
      University of California, Los Angeles, CA, August 1999

125.   Determination of GHB in Clinical and Postmortem Specimens.
       Couper FJ, Logan BK Society of Forensic Toxicologists, Puerto Rico, October 1999

126.   Pharmacological Facilitation of Robbery: Analysis of Two Cases from the Emergency
       Department
       Blaho KE, Park LJ, Logan, BK, Winbery SL Society of Forensic Toxicologists, Puerto
       Rico, October 1999


                                                                                                28
127.   CNS Catastrophes Presenting as a Common Adverse Event to Acute Cocaine Abuse
       Winbery SL, Blaho KE, Logan BK, Schwilke EW, Karch SB Society of Forensic
       Toxicologists, Puerto Rico, October 1999

128.   Carisoprodol (Soma), Meprobamate (Miltown, Equanil) in Driving Impaired Cases
       Logan BK, Walls HC, Marinetti L Society of Forensic Toxicologists, Puerto Rico,
       October 1999

129.* Meth, Mothers Milk, and Murder
      Logan BK. American Academy of Forensic Sciences Annual Meeting, 52nd Annual
      meeting, Reno, NV, February 2000

130.   Zolpidem and Driving Impairment
       Logan BK, and Couper FJ American Academy of Forensic Sciences Annual Meeting,
       52nd Annual meeting, Reno, NV, February 2000

131.   Determination of Drug Use in Tractor Trailer Drivers: "Operation Trucker Check"
       Couper FJ, Jarvis A, Logan BK American Academy of Forensic Sciences Annual
       Meeting, 52nd Annual meeting, Reno, NV, February 2000

132.   Proficiency Test Results Among Several Forensic Breath Alcohol Test Instruments
       Case G, Logan BK, Gullberg R International Association for Chemical Testing, Halifax,
       Nova Scotia, April 2000

133.   Carisoprodol (Soma®), Meprobamate (Miltown®, Equanil®) and Driving Impairment
       Logan BK. International Consultative Meeting on Drugs and Driving Impairment,
       Seattle, WA, August 2000

134.   Methamphetamine and Driving Impairment
       Logan BK. International Consultative Meeting on Drugs and Driving Impairment,
       Seattle, WA, August 2000

135*   Amphetamines: An Update
       Logan BK. Society of Forensic Toxicologists, Milwaukee, WI, October 2000

136.   Driving Under The Influence of GHB
       Couper F, Logan BK Society of Forensic Toxicologists, Milwaukee, WI, October 2000

137.   Cocaine and Metabolite Concentrations After Swallowing Illicit Cocaine
       Logan BK, Blaho K, Winbery S, Schwilke EW, Harruff R Society of Forensic
       Toxicologists, Milwaukee, WI, October 2000

138.   Detection of Nefazodone (Serzone) in Whole Blood by Gas Chromatography/Mass
       Spectrometry
       Schwilke EW, Friel PN, Logan BK. Society of Forensic Toxicologists, Milwaukee, WI,
       October 2000

139.   Cardiomyopathy in Young Cocaine Abusing Patients Presenting to an Inner City
       Emergency Department
       Winbery S, Blaho K, Park L, Logan BK, Karch S Society of Forensic Toxicologists,
       Milwaukee, WI, October 2000

                                                                                          29
140.* Amphetamines: An Update
      Logan BK. Northwest Association of Forensic Scientists, Seattle, WA, October 2000

141.* DUID in Washington: Challenges and Strategies
      Logan BK. Washington Traffic Safety Conference, Olympia, WA, December 2000

142.   Case Reports of Drivers Impaired by MDMA
       Logan BK. American Academy of Forensic Sciences, Seattle, WA, February 2001

143.   Drugs, Driving, and Human Performance Testing
       Logan BK. American Academy of Forensic Sciences, Seattle, WA, February 2001

144.   The Tragedy of Hate Crime and the Response of the Forensic Sciences
       Logan BK. American Academy of Forensic Sciences, Seattle, WA, February 2001
       (chair)

145.* Assessing Challenges to Blood and Breath Alcohol Tests
      Logan BK. Los Angeles Superior Court Judicial DUI Seminar, Oxnard, CA, March 2001

146.* Drugs and Driving
      Logan BK. California Association of Toxicologists, Berkeley, CA, August 2001

147.* Clinical Pharmacology and Analytical Toxicology of Amphetamines
      Logan BK. International Congress of Therapeutic Drug Monitoring & Clinical
      Toxicology, Washington DC, September 2001

148.   Methamphetamine and Driving Impairment Revisited
       Logan BK. Society of Forensic Toxicologists, New Orleans, LA, October 2001

149.   Methadone Findings in Drivers and Post Mortem Cases in Washington State
       Gordon A, Friel P, Logan BK. Society of Forensic Toxicologists, New Orleans, LA,
       October 2001

150.   Addicted to DUI – a GHB/GBL Case Report
       Couper F, Logan BK Society of Forensic Toxicologists, New Orleans, LA,
       October 2001

151.   Issues Related to Simulator Solution Temperature Measurement in a Breath Alcohol
       Simulator
       Logan BK, Gullberg RG American Academy of Forensic Sciences, Atlanta, GA,
       February 2002

152.   CNS stimulants impair driving, but blood concentrations do not predict specific effects
       Logan BK. American Academy of Forensic Sciences, Atlanta, GA, February 2002

153.* The Professional Practice of Forensic Toxicology - 2002
      Logan BK. American Academy of Forensic Sciences, Atlanta, GA, February 2002

154.* MDMA and Methamphetamine
      Logan BK, and Raymon L. Society of Forensic Toxicologists, Dearborn, MI,
      October 2002

                                                                                                 30
155.   Reported death by ingestion of 2,4-dinitrophenol.
       Miranda EJ, Logan BK. Society of Forensic Toxicologists, Dearborn, MI,
       October 2002

156.   Significance of cyclobenzaprine in death investigation and impaired driving cases in
       Washington State.
       Gordon AM, Logan BK. Society of Forensic Toxicologists, Dearborn, MI,
       October 2002

157.   The Toxicological Significance of Tramadol in Death Investigation and Impaired Driving
       Cases.
       Thatcher JE, Lacey M, Fligner CL, Thiersch N, Howard J, Logan BK, American
       Academy of Forensic Sciences, Chicago, IL, February 2003

158.   Methamphetamine in Fetal and Infant Deaths in Washington State
       Gordon AM and Logan BK American Academy of Forensic Sciences, Chicago, IL,
       February 2003

159.* Forensic Toxicology of Methamphetamine
      Logan BK Public Defenders Association CLE, Gonzaga University Law School,
      Spokane, WA, and Tacoma, WA, March 2003

160.* Drugs and Driving: “What BAC Is That Equivalent To?” and Other Unlikely Questions.
      Logan BK California Association of Toxicologists, Albuquerque, NM, May 2003

161.* Drugs and Driving: What Does the Future Hold for Washington?
      Logan BK Washington Drug Recognition Program Regional Representatives Meeting,
      Leavenworth, WA, May 2003

162.* CNS stimulants impair driving, but blood concentrations do not predict specific effects.
      Logan BK IACP Western Regional Drug Recognition Expert Conference, Vancouver,
      WA, September 2003

163.* Methamphetamine: Forensic Science in Washington Meeting the Challenge
      Logan BK, Gordon AM Governors Methamphetamine Coordinating Committee
      Methamphetamine Summit, Vancouver, WA September 2003

164.* DUID Toxicology: Progress and Future Directions
      Logan BK NSC/SOFT/AAFS workgroup on per se drug impaired driving legislation.
      Portland, OR October 2003

165.   A Short Series of Deaths Involving MDMA
       Logan BK, Luthi R, Gordon AM Society of Forensic Toxicologists Annual Meeting,
       Portland, OR, October 2003



166.   The Presence of N-Methyl-1-(1-(1,4 cyclohexadienyl))-2-propanamine, a Birch
       Reduction Product, in Methamphetamine Positive Toxicology Samples.
       Marshall WP and Logan BK Society of Forensic Toxicologists Annual Meeting,
       Portland, OR, October 2003


                                                                                              31
167.   Driver Behavior, Responses and Performance with Blood Alcohol Concentration (BAC)
       greater than 0.30g/100mL.
       Pemberton ML, Logan BK Society of Forensic Toxicologists Annual Meeting, Portland,
       OR, October 2003

168.   Changes in Patterns of Drug and Alcohol Use in Fatally Injured Drivers in Washington
       State
       Schwilke EW, dos Santos IS, Logan BK Society of Forensic Toxicologists Annual
       Meeting, Portland, OR, October 2003

169.   Lorazepam and Driving Impairment
       Thatcher JE, Gordon AM, Logan BK Society of Forensic Toxicologists Annual Meeting,
       Portland, OR, October 2003

170.   Phencyclidine Findings in Drivers in Washington State
       Gordon AM and Logan BK Society of Forensic Toxicologists Annual Meeting,
       Portland, OR, October 2003

171.   Driving Under the Influence of Ephedrine
       Wilson M, Friel PN, Gordon AM, Logan BK       Society of Forensic Toxicologists Annual
       Meeting, Portland, OR, October 2003

172.   Multiplexed CYP 2D6 *3 *4 and *5 Polymorphism - Real Time PCR for Application in
       Forensic Pathology/Toxicology Methamphetamine/MDMA Cases
       Wagner MA, Sakallah S, Gordon AM, Logan BK       Society of Forensic Toxicologists
       Annual Meeting, Portland OR, October 2003

173.* Neurobiology of Depression and Pharmacology of Antidepressants
      Logan BK Society of Forensic Toxicologists Annual Meeting, Portland, OR,
      October 2003

174.* Stimulant Use and Road User Behavior
      Logan BK The International Association of Forensic Toxicologists Annual Meeting,
      Melbourne, Australia, November 2003

175.   Methadone Concentrations in a Treatment population, Impaired drivers, and Death
       Investigation Cases.
       Logan BK and Gordon AM The International Association of Forensic Toxicologists
       Annual Meeting, Melbourne, Australia, November 2003

176.   Ecstasy use, multiple perspectives shed light on use of „club drug‟: Youth, young adults
       and MSM in Seattle
       Caleb Banta-Green, MPH, MSW, Gary Goldbaum, MD, MPH, Susan Kingston, BS,
       Michael Hanrahan, BA, Richard Harruff, MD, PhD, Logan BK, Matthew Golden, MD,
       MPH, 131st Annual Meeting of APHA, November 17, 2003


177.* Depression and Antidepressant Drugs
      Logan BK 18th Annual Impaired Driver Conference, Washington Traffic Safety
      Commission, Skamania Lodge, Stevenson, WA, December 2, 2003

178.* Drug Impaired Driving: The Second Front
                                                                                              32
       Logan BK 18th Annual Impaired Driver Conference, Washington Traffic Safety
       Commission, Skamania Lodge, Stevenson, WA, December 4, 2003

179.* Drug Facilitated Sexual Assault
      Logan BK Forensic Investigation of Sexual Assault Conference, Spokane, WA
      December 16-17, 2003

180.* Lorazepam and Driving Impairment
      Logan BK, Thatcher JE Transportation Research Board, TRB Committee on Alcohol,
      Other Drugs and Transportation (A3B10), Washington DC, January 2004

181.   Methadone Concentrations in Treatment, Impaired Driving, and Death Populations.
       Gordon AM, Logan BK American Academy of Forensic Sciences, Dallas, TX,
       February 2004

182.* Toxicology, Technology and Drugged Driving Laws
      Logan BK Plenary Lecture - Symposium on Developing Global Strategies for
      Identifying, Prosecuting, and Treating Drug-Impaired Drivers, Tampa, FL,
      February 2004

183.* Drug and Alcohol Impaired Driving
      Logan BK Washington State Liquor Control Board, Everett, WA, February 2004

184.* Forensic Toxicology Workshop
      Logan BK Two-day NFSTC toxicology workshop, Ventura County, CA, April 2004

185.* Research in Impaired Driving Toxicology
      Logan BK IACP DRE Conference for Governors Highway Safety Representatives.
      Alexandria, VA May 2004

186.* Opportunities for Greater Interaction between DREs and Toxicologists
      Logan BK IACP Technical Advisory Panel, Alexandria, VA May 2004

187.* Improving the Integration of DRE, Investigative, and Toxicological Evidence in Drug
      Impaired Driving Prosecutions.
      Logan BK NHTSA/NSC symposium, Seattle, WA, May 2004

188.   An Online Database of Breath Alcohol Test Data for Public Information and Discovery
       Purposes.
       Logan BK, Noedel J, Gullberg RG International Council on Alcohol Drugs and Traffic
       Safety, Glasgow, Scotland, August 2004

189.   Changing Patterns of Alcohol and Drug Use in Fatally Injured Drivers in Washington
       State 1992-2003
       Logan BK, Schwilke EW International Council on Alcohol Drugs and Traffic Safety,
       Glasgow, Scotland, August 2004

190.* Diagnosing Drug Impaired Drivers – Stimulants and Driving
      Logan BK International Council on Alcohol Drugs and Traffic Safety, Glasgow,
      Scotland, August 2004

191.* Diagnosing Drug Impaired Driving –Plenary Session
                                                                                            33
       Logan BK International Council on Alcohol Drugs and Traffic Safety, Glasgow,
       Scotland, August 2004

192.   Toxicology of Methamphetamine and Related By-Products
       Logan BK FBI Laboratory Symposium on Forensic Toxicology, Washington DC,
       August 2004

193.   Methamphetamine Detection in Urine of Children Co-Existing with Clandestine
       Methamphetamine Manufacturing
       Gordon AM, Logan BK Society of Forensic Toxicologists/TIAFT Annual Meeting,
       Washington DC, August 2004

194.   Lorazepam and Death Investigation
       Clarkson JE, Gordon AM, Logan BK Society of Forensic Toxicologists/TIAFT Annual
       Meeting, Washington DC, August 2004

195.* Methamphetamine Evidence in Children
      Logan BK Washington Association of Prosecuting Attorneys, Leavenworth, WA
      September 2004

196.* Forensic Science in the State of Washington
      Logan BK, Judicial Education DUI Forum, Lynnwood, Olympia, Spokane, WA,
      September – October 2004

197.* Drug Use by Drivers: Principal Drugs in Common Use
      Logan BK Countermeasures XV, Toronto, ON, November 2004

198.* Toxicology, Technology and Drug Driving Laws
      Logan BK Countermeasures XV, Toronto, ON, November 2004

199.* Stimulants and Driving Impairment
      Logan BK Arizona Department of Public Safety, Phoenix, AZ, November 2004

200.* Sampling in Forensic Toxicology.
      Logan BK Evidence Based Forensic Medicine. American Academy of Forensic
      Sciences, New Orleans, LA, February 2005

201.   Topiramate: Positive Death Investigation and Impaired Driving Cases in Washington
       State
       Gordon AM, Logan BK American Academy of Forensic Sciences, New Orleans, LA,
       February 2005

202.* DUID Enforcement Issues
      Logan BK Transportation Research Board, Committee on Alcohol Drugs and
      Transportation, Woods Hole, MA, June 2005


203.* Adverse Effects of Stimulants and Marijuana on Driving
      Logan BK International Association of Forensic Sciences, Hong Kong, PRC,
      August 2005

204.* Approaches to Drug Impaired Driving – The North American Experience
                                                                                           34
       Logan BK International Association of Forensic Sciences, Hong Kong, PRC,
       August 2005.

205.* Marijuana and Effects on Driving
      Logan BK Washington State Patrol Forensic Laboratory Services Bureau Brown Bag,
      September 2005

206.* Stimulants and Driving
      Logan BK Society of Forensic Toxicologists, Nashville, TN, October 2005

207.* Postmortem Redistribution of Drugs
      Logan BK Society of Forensic Toxicologists, Nashville, TN, October 2005

208.* Trends in Alcohol and Drug Impaired Driving
      Logan BK Alaska Highway Safety Office, Law Enforcement Training Conference,
      Anchorage, AK, November 2005

209.* Combined Drug and Alcohol Use in Drivers Suspected of Vehicular Assault and
      Homicide.
      Logan BK 2006 Impaired Driver Conference, Washington Traffic Safety Commission.
      Stevenson, WA, December 2005

210.* Drug and Alcohol Use in Drivers Suspected of Vehicular Assault and Homicide
      Logan BK Washington State Impaired Driver Conference, Skamania Lodge,
      December 2005

211.   Combined Drug and Alcohol Use in Drivers Suspected of Vehicular Assault and
       Homicide
       Logan BK Transportation Research Board, Washington, DC, January 2006

212.   Combined Drug and Alcohol Use in Drivers Suspected of Vehicular Assault and
       Homicide.
       Logan BK, Barnes L American Academy of Forensic Sciences, Annual Meeting,
       Seattle, WA, February 2006

213.   Application of Huestis Models for the Prediction of Time of Marijuana Exposure from
       Blood of Drivers Arrested for DUI
       Gordon AM, Logan BK American Academy of Forensic Sciences, Annual Meeting,
       Seattle, WA, February 2006

214.* Alcohol Drugs and Driving – Contribution of Forensic Science.
      Logan BK University of Washington, Mini-Med School. March 2006

215.* Combined Drug and Alcohol Use in Drivers Suspected of Vehicular Assault and
      Homicide.
      Logan BK 2006 Lifesavers Conference, Austin, TX, June 2006

216.* The Downside of Methamphetamine
      Logan BK DRE National Conference, Kansas City, MO, June 2006

217.* Drug Impaired Driving: Importance of Toxicology in Assessing the Problem and
      Developing Countermeasures
                                                                                             35
       Logan BK 2006 McGovern Award Dinner, Cosmos Club, Washington, DC, June 2006

218.   Driving Impairment from Dextromethorphan Abuse
       Logan BK The International Association of Forensic Toxicologists, Ljubljana, Slovenia,
       September 2006

219.   Application of Huestis Models for the Prediction of Time of Marijuana Exposure from
       Blood of Drivers Arrested for DUI
       Gordon AM, Logan BK The International Association of Forensic Toxicologists,
       Ljubljana, Slovenia, September 2006

220.* Toxicological Issues in Drugged Driving Research
      Logan BK “Developing Standards for Research in Drugged Impaired Driving: Experts
      Meeting” International Invitational Symposium sponsored by European Union, National
      Institute on Drug Abuse – International Programs, Talloires, France, September 2006

221.* Consequences of Methamphetamine Exposure in Children
      Logan BK CLE Seminar, Washington Association of Prosecuting Attorneys,
      Leavenworth, WA, September 2006

222.* Update on Drug Impaired Driving
      Logan BK 19th Annual Washington Traffic Safety Commission Impaired Driver
      Conference. SeaTac, WA, December 2006.

223.* Forensic Toxicology of Methamphetamine
      Logan BK, Miami Dade County Medical Examiners Office, Miami, FL, December 2006

224.* Drugs in Drivers – Effects and Consequences
      Logan BK, Lethal Weapon Training, Santa Fe, NM, February 2007

225.   Methadone and Driving Impairment
       Gordon AM Logan BK American Academy of Forensic Sciences, San Antonio, TX,
       February 2007

226.* The Pharmacology of SSRI related Drugs.
      Logan BK in Investigating SSRI related deaths: Are the Drugs Really to Blame or is
      this a Matter of Science Versus the Law? American Academy of Forensic Sciences,
      San Antonio, TX, February 2007

227.   The Role of Methamphetamine in Cause and Manner of Death – An Update
       Logan BK, Banta-Green CM, Miller S, and Gordon AM
       T2007 – Joint ICADTS/TIAFT meeting, Seattle WA, August 2007

228.   Postmortem Cesium Concentrations in a Cancer Patient: A Case Report
       Nuwayhid N, Wickham D, Ann Gordon AM, and Logan BK
       T2007 – Joint ICADTS/TIAFT meeting, Seattle WA, August 2007

229.   An Examination of 1, 1-Difluoroethane in Traffic Cases
       Thatcher JE, Gordon AM, and Logan BK
       T2007 – Joint ICADTS/TIAFT meeting, Seattle WA, August 2007



                                                                                             36
230.   Blood Drug Concentrations of Frequently Encountered Drugs in Impaired and Fatally
       Injured Drivers
       Logan BK, Gordon AM, and Loew S
       T2007 – Joint ICADTS/TIAFT meeting, Seattle WA, August 2007

231.   Recommendations for Toxicological Investigation of Drug Impaired Driving
       Farrell LJ, Kerrigan SJ, and Logan BK
       T2007 – Joint ICADTS/TIAFT meeting, Seattle WA, August 2007

232.   Suicidal Drug Ingestion Involving Zaleplon
       Swenson S, Lacy JM, Gordon AM, and Logan BK
       T2007 – Joint ICADTS/TIAFT meeting, Seattle WA 98134, August 2007
233.   Case Report of a Multidrug Intoxication Fatality Involving GHB
       Akins BE, Miranda E, Lacy JM, Gordon AM, and Logan BK
       T2007 – Joint ICADTS/TIAFT meeting, Seattle WA 98134, August 2007

234.   Death and Brain Injury From an Apparent Intentional Methomyl Poisoning
       Louis Asa, Fusaro A, Gordon AM, and Logan BK
       T2007 – Joint ICADTS/TIAFT meeting, Seattle WA 98134, August 2007

235.   A Series of 1,1-Difluorethane Related Deaths
       Johnston C, Gordon AM, and Logan BK
       T2007 – Joint ICADTS/TIAFT meeting, Seattle WA 98134, August 2007

236.   A Short Series of Toluene Impaired Drivers
       Capron B, Gordon AM, and Logan BK
       T2007 – Joint ICADTS/TIAFT meeting, Seattle WA 98134, August 2007

237*. Stimulants and the assessment of risk for accident involvement
      Logan BK in Risk Assessment for Priority Drugs involved in Impairment
      T2007 – Joint ICADTS/TIAFT meeting, Seattle WA 98134, August 2007

238*. Topics in Drug Impaired Driving for DRE programs
      Logan BK, CA Highway Patrol In Service, Ontario CA, September 2007


239*. Drug testing in human participants in animal sports.
      Logan BK, National In-Service for Horeseracing Stewards, Kent WA, October 2007

240*. Inhalants and Impaired Driving: A Challenge for Toxicologists, Law Enforcement and
      the Courts
                                             th
      Logan BK, Thatcher JE, Capron B. 20 Annual Impaired Driver Conference,
      Washington Traffic Safety Commission, SeaTac, WA December, 2007

241*. Historical Perspectives on Human Performance Forensic Toxicology
      Logan BK, Historical Perspectives on Forensic Toxicology, American Academy of
      Forensic Sciences, Washington DC, February 2008

242*   Development of Recommendations for Screening and Confirmation Thresholds in
       Impaired Operator Toxicology Casework
       Logan BK, Civil Aviation Medical Institute, Oklahoma City, OK, May 2008


                                                                                           37
243*   Approaches to Assessing Drug Related Driving Impairment
       Logan BK, North American Congress on Clinical Toxicology, Toronto, Canada,
       September 2008

244*   Pharmacological Effects on Alcohol and Drugs on Driving
       Logan BK, National Judicial College, Reno NV, October 2008

245*   Toxicology for Pathologists
       Logan BK, National Forensic Science Technology Center, Largo, FL, October 2008

246    Alcohol and Drug Use Among Motorcycle Fatalities in Washington State from 2005-
       2007
       Peterson B, Turcott M, Logan BK, Society of Forensic Toxicologists, Annual Meeting,
       Phoenix AZ, October 2008

247    Contribution of Fruit Consumption to Ethanol Breath Measurement
       Louis A, Logan BK, Couper F, Society of Forensic Toxicologists, Annual Meeting,
       Phoenix AZ, October 2008

248*   Human Performance Toxicology
       Logan BK, Society of Forensic Toxicologists, Student Enrichment Program, Phoenix
       AZ, October 2008

249*   Methamphetamine and Designer Amphetamines: Case Studies
       Logan BK, Society of Forensic Toxicologists, “The "Stimulating” Realm of
       Sympathomimetic Amines and Tryptamines”, Phoenix AZ, October 2008

250    Priority Drug Classes in DUID Investigations
       Logan BK, Society of Forensic Toxicologists, “The Borkenstein Course on Drugs and
       Their Effects on Human Performance and Behavior – A Sampler” Phoenix AZ, October
       2008

251*   Dextromethorphan Forensic Pharmacology and Toxicology
       Logan BK, Emergency Medicine Residents Program, Drexel University Medical School,
       January 2009

252*   Assessment of Drugs and Driving Impairment
       Logan BK, 50th Anniversary of Toxicology Symposium, University of Glasgow, Scotland
       March 2009.

253*   Toxicology for Capital Litigators, and Toxicology of Lethal Injection
       Logan BK, NCSTL/Stetson University Forensic Science for Capital Litigators, Tampa
       FL, May 2009

254*   Developing Protocols to Assess the Potential of Drugs to Impair Driving - A Combined
       Behavioral, Toxicology/Pharmacology and Epidemiology Approach
       Logan BK, Kay, G, National Academies of Sciences, Transportation Research Board,
       Committee on Alcohol, Drugs and Traffic Safety, Woods Hole, MA, September 2009

255*   The Art and Science of Forensic Toxicology
       Logan BK, Penn State University, Forensic Science Lecture Series, State College, PA,
       September 2009
                                                                                             38
256*   DRE Refresher Training
       Logan BK Indiana Law Enforcement Training Center, Indianapolis IN, October 2009

267    Butalbital and Driving Impairment
       Logan BK, Society of Forensic Toxicologists, Oklahoma City, OK, October 2009

268    Drugs and Other Xenobiotics : Factual Issues
       Logan BK, in ABFT Preparation Workshop, Society of Forensic Toxicologists,
       Oklahoma City, OK, October 2009

269*   Toxicology and the Role of the Toxicologist in DUI Litigation
       Logan BK, Pennsylvania DA‟s Association, State College PA, Nov 2009

270*   Pharmacology and Chemistry of Ethanol
       Logan BK, American College of Medical Toxicology, Forensic Workshop, Baltimore
       MD, November 2009

271*   Ethanol Pharmacokinetics
       Logan BK, American College of Medical Toxicology, Forensic Workshop, Baltimore
       MD, November 2009

272*   Analysis of Alcohol in Blood and Breath
       Logan BK, American College of Medical Toxicology, Forensic Workshop, Baltimore
       MD, November 2009

273*   Forensic Toxicology: Capital Litigation and Lethal Injection
       Logan BK, American College of Medical Toxicology, Forensic Workshop, Baltimore
       MD, November 2009

274*   An ABFT perspective on Method Validation in Forensic Toxicology
       Logan BK, California Association of Toxicologists, November 2009

275*   Method Validation in Forensic Toxicology
       Logan BK, American Association of Clinical Chemists, PA Local Section Education
       Program, Philadelphia, PA December 2009

276*   Method Validation in Forensic Toxicology
       Logan BK, Indiana University, Department of Toxicology and Pharmacology, IUPUI,
       Indianapolis, January 2009

277*   Developments in DUI Toxicology, Drug Abuse, and Forensic Biology
       Logan BK, West Virginia Prosecuting Attorney‟s Association, Charlestown WV,
       January 2009

278*   Salvia Divinorum: Effects and Legal Status
       Logan BK NMS Labs sponsored live Webcast, March 2010 (Archived)

279    Propofol: Analytical & Interpretive Challenges
       Kacinko SL, Logan BK, American Academy of Forensic Sciences, Seattle WA February
       2010

                                                                                         39
280*   Stimulants and Depressants – A Dangerous Mix
       Logan BK, 16th National IACP DRE Conference, Pittsburgh, PA

281    Approaches to Estimating Measurement Uncertainty in Forensic Breath Alcohol Analysis
       Logan BK, T2010 International Council on Alcohol Drugs and Traffic Safety, Oslo,
       Norway, August 2010

282    Case Reports of Impaired Driving Resulting from Butalbital Use
       Logan BK, T2010 International Council on Alcohol Drugs and Traffic Safety, Oslo,
       Norway, August 2010

283    How to develop your career path and/or leadership potential
       Logan BK, T2010 International Council on Alcohol Drugs and Traffic Safety, Oslo,
       Norway, August 2010

284*    Salvia and Synthetic Cannabinoids: The Latest Challenges in Forensic Chemistry and
       Toxicology
       Logan BK, Southern Association of Forensic Sciences (SAFS), Tunica MS, September
       2010

285*   Discussing Strengthening Forensic Sciences in the United States: A Path Forward
       Logan BK, Southern Association of Forensic Sciences (SAFS), Tunica MS, September
       2010

286*   Panel: To quantitate or not to quantitate?
       Logan BK. Panel discussion on DUID Toxicology, California Association of
       Toxicologists (CAT), Anaheim CA, November 2010

287*   Panel: When is one qualified to render an opinion?
       Logan BK. Panel discussion on DUID Toxicology, California Association of
       Toxicologists (CAT), Anaheim CA, November 2010

288*   Defining and Determining Impairment due to Opiates and Other Drugs
       Logan BK American College of Medical Toxicologists. Opioids Seminar, Philadelphia
       PA, November 2010

289*   Panel Discussion: Expert Testimony: Deposition and Trial Testimony
       McKay C, Brent J, Logan BK American College of Medical Toxicologists. Opioids
       Seminar, Philadelphia PA, November 2010

290*   Pharmacology and Chemistry of Ethanol
       Logan BK, American College of Medical Toxicology, Forensic Workshop, Baltimore
       MD, December 2010

291*   Ethanol Pharmacokinetics
       Logan BK, American College of Medical Toxicology, Forensic Workshop, Baltimore
       MD, December 2010

292*   Analysis of Alcohol in Blood and Breath
       Logan BK, American College of Medical Toxicology, Forensic Workshop, Baltimore
       MD, December 2010

                                                                                          40
293   Framework for Assessing the Potential of Drugs and Medications to Impair Driving:
      Multidisciplinary Effort. 2) Pharmacological and Toxicological Review
      Logan BK Transportation research Board of the National Academies, Washington DC,
      January 2011

294   Synthetic Cannabinoids: A Controlled Administration Study
      Logan BK. American Academy of Forensic Sciences (AAFS) Workshop: K2 and
      Beyond: A Synthetic Cannabinoid Primer, Chicago IL, February 2011

295   Identification of Synthetic Cannabinoids in K2 Herbal Incense and Drug
      Paraphernalia by TLC, GCMS, LCMSMS, and LCTOF
      Logan BK, Reinhold LE, Diamond FX, Xu A American Academy of Forensic Sciences
      (AAFS) Chicago IL, February 2011

296   Identification of Markers of JWH-018 and JWH-073 Use in Human Urine
      Kacinko SL, Xu A McMullin MM, Logan BK American Academy of Forensic Sciences
      (AAFS) Chicago IL, February 2011

297   Analysis and Stability Determination of Salvinorin A and B in Human Blood, Plasma,
      and Urine by Liquid Chromatography Tandem Mass Spectrometry
      Logan BK, Xu A, McMullin MM American Academy of Forensic Sciences (AAFS)
      Chicago IL, February 2011

298   Effects of Smoking the Synthetic Cannabinoids JWH-018 and JWH-073 on Human
      Performance and Behavior: Controlled Administration and DUID Case Reports
      Miles A, Logan BK, Xu A, Welsh R, Durbin T American Academy of Forensic
      Sciences (AAFS) Chicago IL, February 2011

299   Recommendations on National Drugged Driving Policies: Submitted to the Office of
      National Drug Control Policy
      DuPont RL, Logan BK, Talpins SK, Voas RB, College on Problems of Drug
      Dependence (CPDD), Hollywood FL, June 2011

Professional Organizations

Current
1984-present   Member, International Association of Forensic Toxicologists (TIAFT)
1991-present   Diplomate, American Board of Forensic Toxicology (DABFT)
1991-present   Member, National Safety Council, Committee on Alcohol and Other Drugs
1995-present   Fellow, American Academy of Forensic Sciences (AAFS)
1995-present   Member, the Society of Forensic Toxicologists (SOFT)
1997-present   Member, International Association for Chemical Testing (IACT)
1998-present   Member, International Council on Alcohol Drugs and Traffic Safety (IACDTS)
2002-present   Member, Canadian Society of Forensic Sciences (CSFS)
2002-present   Member, American Society of Crime Laboratory Directors (ASCLD)



Past
1991-99        Member of the Forensic Science Society
1991-95        American Academy of Forensic Sciences; Member
1991-94        Washington State Patrol Crime Laboratory Users Committee
                                                                                           41
1991-94       Washington Coalition of Government Laboratory Directors
1989-93       Member of the Southern Association of Forensic Science
1989-91       American Academy of Forensic Sciences; Provisional Member
1986-95       Member, Royal Society of Chemistry (MRSC, C.Chem.)
1984-87       Member of the Association of Clinical Biochemists (UK)
1984-86       Graduate member of the Royal Society of Chemistry (GRSC)
1983-86       Member of the Forensic Science Society


Professional References On Request




                                                                          42
                                             Table 1                                         Case # 08-069208
                                     Data from Haskell Report                                  Caylee Anthony
                                                                                          Preliminary Findings

                       Weather station
Month   Date   Year   temperature (°C) DD-B10   ADD-B10 Comments
    7    16    2008        26.4          16.4     16.4
    7    15    2008        27.5          17.5     33.9
    7    14    2008        27.8          17.8     51.7
    7    13    2008        25.8          15.8     67.5
    7    12    2008        27.8          17.8     85.3
    7    11    2008        28.3          18.3    103.6
    7    10    2008        28.9          18.9    122.5
    7     9    2008        27.5          17.5    140.0
    7     8    2008        27.5          17.5    157.5
    7     7    2008        27.2          17.2    174.7
    7     6    2008        27.8          17.8    192.5
    7     5    2008        27.8          17.8    210.3
    7     4    2008        27.2          17.2    227.5
    7     3    2008        27.2          17.2    244.7
    7     2    2008        26.7          16.7    261.4 latest date of initial oviposition by M. scalaris
    7     1    2008        29.4          19.4    280.8
    6    30    2008        27.8          17.8    298.6
    6    29    2008        28.1          18.1    316.7
    6    28    2008        28.3          18.3    335.0
    6    27    2008        27.8          17.8    352.8
    6    26    2008        26.7          16.7    369.4
    6    25    2008        27.8          17.8    387.2
    6    24    2008        27.8          17.8    405.0
    6    23    2008        27.2          17.2    422.2
    6    22    2008        26.1          16.1    438.3
    6    21    2008        25.8          15.8    454.2
    6    20    2008        28.3          18.3    472.5
    6    19    2008        27.5          17.5    490.0
    6    18    2008        27.5          17.5    507.5
    6    17    2008        27.8          17.8    525.3
    6    16    2008        27.5          17.5    542.8
                                               Table 2                         Case # 08-069208
                                                                                 Caylee Anthony
                                                                            Preliminary Findings




Megaselia scalaris
Average minimum stage duration at two temperatures.
                                           Averages
      Rearing Temp (°C)     22       29       25.5  DH-B10 DD-B10 ADD-B10
                  Egg (h)   31       18       24.5     380      16     16
                Larva (h)   73       50       61.5     953      40     56
Postfeeding 3rd instar (h)  60       33       46.5     721      30     86
                 Pupa (h)  363      168      265.5    4115     171    257
                  ∑ (hrs)  527      269       398     6169     257




Greenberg, B. 1991. Flies as forensic indicators. J Med Ento 28: 565-577.

								
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