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					                                     Objectives Overview Sheet

Utah State Elementary Core Standard 1: Students will understand that the appearance of the
moon changes in a predictable cycle as it orbits Earth and as Earth rotates on its axis.
State Core Objective 1: Explain patterns of changes in the appearance of the moon as it orbits
Earth.
         Unit ILO 1. Given a diagram of the moon’s phases for one complete cycle with blanks
where the moon’s shape would appear, and pictures of the moon in it’s eight major phases,
students will recognize the patterns in the movement of the moon and be able to position the
moon’s correct shape as seen from earth in the proper position in the diagram.
State Core Objective 2: Demonstrate how the relative positions of Earth, the moon, and the sun
create the appearance of the moon’s phases.
         Unit ILO 2. Given examples to choose from, students will recognize the difference in the
motion of an object that is rotating on an imaginary axis, and one that is revolving around
another point or object. When this principle is applied to earth, students will be able to explain
which causes day and night, and which causes the seasons of the year.
         Unit ILO 3. Given a list of positions in the sky, including the north pole, students will
recognize how familiar celestial objects (i.e. Sun, Moon, and Stars) appear to change positions in
the sky due to the rotation of the earth. They will then be able to identify the point in the sky
around which these objects appear to revolve.
         Unit ILO 4. Given a diagram showing the positions of the earth, moon, and sun relative
to each other, students will recognize how the moon would appear from the earth and how long it
would take to move to another position in the cycle.
         Unit ILO 5. Given the moon’s position in the sky at a specific time as a reference point in
the moon’s cycle, students will predict the position of the moon in the sky on any given day of
the cycle at that same hour.
         Unit ILO 6. Given a farmers almanac or other appropriate reference source, students will
predict the moon’s phase on any assigned day.
Standard 2: Students will understand how Earth’s tilt on its axis changes the length of daylight
and creates the seasons.
State Core Objective 1: Describe the relationship between the tilt of Earth’s axis and its yearly
orbit around the sun.
       Unit ILO 7. Students will recognize that the tilt of the earth’s axis causes the sun’s rays to
hit the earth’s surface at different angles at different positions in earth’s orbit around the sun, and
that it also causes different portions on the earth to receive more hours of daylight than others.
With this understanding students will be able to identify which positions in the earth’s orbit
around the sun will cause which season in each hemisphere.
       Unit ILO 8. Students will recognize and identify the correct angle of the earth’s axis in
relation to earth’s orbit around the sun.
State Core Objective 2: Explain how the relationship between the tilt of Earth’s axis and its
yearly orbit around the sun produces the seasons.
       Unit ILO 9. Given a diagram of the earth’s orbit around the sun that shows the earth’s
axis and equator relative to the sun, students will identify the correct season for the hemisphere
in question.


                                             Tasks
1.1.a.1 Students will observe the moon for two weeks and describe the changes that took place
with 100% accuracy.

1.1.b.1 Given a diagram of the moon’s phases for one complete cycle with blanks where the
moon’s shape would appear, and cut out pictures of the moon in it’s eight major phases, students
will recognize the patterns in the movement of the moon and be able to position the moon’s
shape correctly as seen from earth in the proper positions in the diagram with 100% accuracy.

1.1.b.2 Given the moon’s position in the sky at a specific time as a reference point in the moon’s
cycle, students will predict the position of the moon in the sky on any given day of the cycle at
that same hour with 90% accuracy

1.1.b.3 Given a farmers almanac or other appropriate reference source, students will predict the
moon’s phase on any assigned day in the year with 90 % accuracy.

1.1.b.4 Given a diagram showing the positions of the earth, moon, and sun relative to each other,
students will recognize how the moon would appear from the earth and how long it would take to
move to another position in the cycle. With 90 % accuracy.

1.1.c.1 Students will observe the position and shape of the moon for two weeks and create a
model that shows the relationship between the sun the earth and the moon with 100% accuracy
for that two weeks.

1.1.d.1 Students will design an investigation, collect data, and construct a chart that will depict
the phases of the moon with 90% accuracy.
1.2.a.1 Given examples to choose from, students will recognize objects that are rotating on an
imaginary axis, and objects that are revolving around another point or object. And be able to
identify which is which with 100% accuracy.

1.2.b.1 Students will create a time laps picture that shows how the position of the moon, the
planets, and the stars change in relative position over the course of the day and night with 90 %
accuracy.

1.2.c.1 Given objects to represent the Sun, Earth, and Moon, students will show their positions
relative to each other during each of the eight major phases of the moon with 100% accuracy.

2.1.a.1 Given a model or diagram students will describe the yearly revolution of the earth around
the sun with 100 % accuracy.

2.1.b.1 Using a model students will show how the Earth’s axis is tilted relative to its yearly orbit
around the sun with 90% accuracy.

2.1.c.1 Students will investigate the relationship between he amount of heat absorbed and the
angle of to the light source and report the results with 90% accuracy.

2.2.a.1 Students will show the position of the Earth’s axis and equator in relationship to the sun
for each season in each hemisphere with 100% accuracy.

2.2.b.1 Students will use a model and compare the hours of daylight and the angle of incidence
of the sun’s rays as they strike the Earth’s surface during each season and show the relationship
between the length of time the sun shines on the surface of the earth and the angle of incidence
and the season it causes with 90 % accuracy.

2.2.c.1 Using data they have collected, and sunrise sunset charts for Utah, students will identify
and show patterns of seasonal daylight changes with 80% accuracy.

2.2.d.1 Given a drawing or model showing different angles at which the suns rays strike the
surface of the earth, students will be able identify which angle delivers the most concentrated
energy to the surface of the earth with 100% accuracy.

2.2.e.1 Given a model of the earth orbiting the sun, students will be able to identify the correct
position in the earth’s orbit for each season in both hemispheres with 100% accuracy.

				
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