Acceptable _Internet_ Use Policy

Document Sample
Acceptable _Internet_ Use Policy Powered By Docstoc
					                  Thames View Infants
                  Acceptable (Internet) Use Policy


Acceptable (Internet) Use Policy

PURPOSE

                      “While schools need to exercise caution when allowing children access to ICT, they should not be
                      deterred from using it. It’s educational benefits outweigh any possible dangers...

                      Schools have always helped learners to engage with society based on clear support and guidelines,
                      and the use of the Internet and related technology should be no exception…”. (NGFL, 2002).

This policy is designed to ensure that children can use the Internet safely and responsibly as an integral
part of lessons in all subjects of the curriculum. It reflects the opinion of all staff.


RATIONALE

The Internet has become an important aspect of everyday life to which children need to be able to respond
safely and responsibly. The Internet offers a valuable resource for teachers and children and children and
ways to communicated with others via the World Wide Web.

ICT provides a powerful resource for learning, as well as a powerful resource of communication.
Projects run by the DfES have shown that the use of ICT in education provides a number of specific
learning benefits (NGFL, December 2002), including:
       Improved subject learning across a wide range of curriculum areas.
       Improved motivation and attitudes to learning.
       Development of independent learning and research skills.
       Enhanced social and collaborative skills.

However, due to the unregulated nature of the Internet, there are risks that children may gain access to
material that is inappropriate. This policy sets out the measures to be taken that minimises these risks.

                      “As with any media, schools should preview material or provide supervision, as well as having a
                      more general strategy in place for ensuring children’s safe use of the Internet… Different
                      circumstances call for different approaches so that young children can be protected”. (NGFL,
                      2002).



Barking & Dagenham LEA Acceptable Use Policy for Schools:
It is a condition of Internet access through the LEA, and a condition of grant funding through the
Standards Fund, that schools adopt the LEA’s Acceptable Use Policy. In addition, it is required that the
following forms the core of a school policy:

                The school encourages use by pupils of the rich information resources available on the Internet,
                together with the development of appropriate skills to analyse and evaluate such resources.
                These skills will be fundamental in the society our pupils will be entering.

Document last changed on: 18/01/2008 19:32 by Paul Jordan                                                         Document author: Paul Jordan
W:\Policies\Acceptable Use Policy.doc                                                                                                   Page 0
                  Thames View Infants
                  Acceptable (Internet) Use Policy
                On-line services significantly alter the information landscape for schools by opening classrooms
                to a broader array of resources. In the past, teaching and library materials could usually be
                carefully chosen. All such materials would be chosen to be consistent with national policies,
                supporting and enriching the curriculum while taking into account the varied teaching needs,
                learning styles, abilities and developmental levels of the pupils. Internet access, because it may
                lead to any publicly available site in the world, will open classrooms to electronic information
                resources which have not been selected by teachers as appropriate for use by pupils.

                Electronic information research skills are now fundamental to preparation of citizens and future
                employees during the coming Information age. The school expects that staff will begin to
                investigate possibilities and blend use of such information as appropriate within the curriculum
                and that staff will provide guidance and instruction to pupils in the appropriate use of such
                resources. Staff will consult the IT co-ordinator for advice on content, training and appropriate
                teaching levels consistent with the school's IT programme of study.

                Independent pupil use of telecommunications and electronic information resources is not advised
                and will only be permitted upon submission of permission and agreement forms by parents of
                pupils and by pupils themselves.

                Access to on-line resources will enable pupils to explore thousands of libraries, databases, and
                bulletin boards while exchanging messages with people throughout the world. The school
                believes that the benefits to pupils from access to information resources and increased
                opportunities for collaboration exceed the disadvantages. But ultimately, parents and guardians
                of minors are responsible for setting and conveying the standards that their children should
                follow when using media and information sources. To that end, the school supports and respects
                each family's right to decide whether or not to apply for independent access.


GUIDELINES

The following guidelines state appropriate procedures for implementing the above policy and for
reviewing and evaluating its effect on teaching and learning.

Parental Permission:
       Internet Usage:
   No pupil should use the Internet in a Barking and Dagenham School without parental permission, and
   without accepting the school’s rules on acceptable use. The Internet Permission Form will form part
   of the home-school partnership agreement. This acknowledges that parents and carers accept some
   responsibility for the way in which their children use the Internet and that, in spite of all reasonable
   precautions and supervision, there still remains a small risk of children viewing inappropriate
   material.
       Photographs of Pupils:
   All parents are required to complete and return the Photograph Consent Form, which will also form
   part of the home-school partnership agreement.



Document last changed on: 18/01/2008 19:32 by Paul Jordan                                         Document author: Paul Jordan
W:\Policies\Acceptable Use Policy.doc                                                                                   Page 0
                  Thames View Infants
                  Acceptable (Internet) Use Policy
A Filtered Internet Service:
The LEA will provide a filtered Internet service to schools that currently filters out websites known to
contain racist, offensive, pornographic, illegal or other inappropriate material. Filters are never 100%
effective.    It is the responsibility of all teaching and non-teaching staff to report instances of
inappropriate sites not being filtered so that they can be blocked. Site URLS should be e-mailed without
delay to smartfilter@bardaglea.org.uk.

A “Commonsense Approach”:
Many of the risks of using the Internet and related technologies can be minimised by taking a
commonsense approach:
              Siting computers in areas with open access, where everyone can see what is on screen.
              Taking an interest in the Internet and regularly discussing what children see and use.
              Monitoring on-line time and being aware of the nature of work being completed on the web.
              Educating children to use the Internet in a sensible and responsible manner.
              Making pupils aware of the importance of not divulging personal information such as name, address and
              phone numbers on the Internet.
              Encouraging learners to be critical uses of the Internet: “Is the information true? How do you know?”.
              Warning children that there are some unsuitable sites on the Internet and discussing the issues involved.
              Making children clear of the consequences for misuse of the Internet and technologies present in school.
These issues, and others outlined elsewhere within this document, will be addressed within ICT & PSHE
lessons.

Supervision:
Pupils must be supervised when using a computer. Within communal areas (i.e. the hall and corridors), it
is accepted that children might not be supervised directly and that nearby staff will share this
responsibility.

Responsibilities of Children:
The school has developed a set of guidelines for Internet use by pupils. All children must be taught about
acceptable and responsible use of the Internet and should be made aware of these class rules:
       Children can only use the Internet at school if their parents agree.
       Children must always get permission from an adult before using a computer.
       Children can only use the computers at break and lunch times if a teacher is nearby.
       If we find something that is not nice on the Internet, we must sensibly turn the monitor off and tell
       a teacher straight away.
       There will be ‘time-out’ from the computers if a rule is broken.

Guidelines for Specific Technologies:
       Chat-rooms, Discussion Groups & Instant Messaging (MSN Messenger/Yahoo Messenger etc):
   Children are not allowed to enter or access the above within school. To decrease the risk of children
   accidentally stumbling upon these, staff are required not to log-on to chat-rooms, join discussion
   groups or use any form of Instant Messaging within school.

           Real Time Conferencing (NetMeeting):
       Real Time Conferencing will only take place within school under direct adult supervision during
       lesson time.



Document last changed on: 18/01/2008 19:32 by Paul Jordan                                             Document author: Paul Jordan
W:\Policies\Acceptable Use Policy.doc                                                                                       Page 0
                  Thames View Infants
                  Acceptable (Internet) Use Policy

           E-mail:
       Children are not allowed to access their home-based e-mail accounts within school. When required to
       access e-mail as part of the School’s ICT Scheme of Work, the School will provide children with a
       Learning Gateway class e-mail account, which will be temporary and not include children’s
       individual names. Children will be reminded not to divulge personal information via e-mail and will
       be warned of the dangers of:
              o Bullying by e-mail.
              o Anonymous senders.
              o Spam.

Responsibilities of Staff:
All staff (teaching and non-teaching) must be made aware about acceptable and responsible use of the
Internet and should be made aware of school guidelines on the matter. Irresponsible use of the Internet
jeopardises the safety of children.

           Inappropriate Materials:
       Staff (teaching or non-teaching) must never knowingly seek to view material over the Internet that is
       illegal, pornographic, sexist, and racist or in any way offensive to minorities or that would be
       considered unsuitable within a school environment. This includes those sites that may display images
       and other material in poor taste, and jokes that are aimed at an adult audience. It is acceptable to use
       the Internet in school for social or personal activities, but not e-commerce.

           Photographs of Children:
       Staff are required to ensure that parental permission has been granted before taking or using an image
       of a pupil. Electronic images of children remain school property and should be used for school
       purpose only.

            Children on School Websites:
       It is the school’s duty to ensure that every child in their care is safe and, accordingly, it is important
       that no individual child is able to be identified or contacted by visitors to the school’s website.
       Consequently, school websites should not include:
            o Photographs of individual children (use only group or whole class images with very general
                labels such as “science lesson” or “making Christmas decorations”).
            o Personal details or names of any child (or adult) in a photograph. (As a guide, if the pupil is
                named, avoid using their photograph; if the photograph is used, avoid naming the pupil).
            o Images of pupils in unsuitable dress (i.e. PE kit), to reduce the risk of inappropriate use.
        Images of children should be “within a context”: include photographs of children’s work, extracts
        from written work and scanned images of artwork. Allow pupils to exhibit their work to a wider
        audience, without increasing the risk of images being used inappropriately.

          Chat-rooms, Discussion Groups & Instant Messaging (MSN Messenger/Yahoo Messenger etc):
       As noted above, in order to decrease the risk of children accidentally stumbling upon these, staff are
       required not to log-on to chat-rooms, join discussion groups or use any form of Instant Messaging
       within school (except those of a professional nature).

           E-mail:
       Staff should not check their “Hotmail” or “Yahoo” e-mail accounts at school. This is due to the high
       amount of pornographic spam and unsuitable “pop up” windows associated with such sites. After
Document last changed on: 18/01/2008 19:32 by Paul Jordan                                        Document author: Paul Jordan
W:\Policies\Acceptable Use Policy.doc                                                                                  Page 0
                  Thames View Infants
                  Acceptable (Internet) Use Policy
       checking their e-mails, staff are asked to ensure that they have fully “logged out” from their e-mail
       programme.

           Using the CC3 Server:
       In order to preserve and maintain school resources in good order, staff are reminded to save files into
       the correct directory of the “Shared Area” of the CC3 server.

           Downloading Files & Attachments and Virus Awareness:
       In order to protect the resources of the school, staff should be aware of anti-virus practices. To avoid
       the risk of virus infection, teachers are requested not to download any programme from the Internet
       onto any school-based machine. Staff are asked to be aware of hidden viruses when opening e-mail
       attachments; and if in doubt, to seek advice of the ICT Technician.

          Privacy:
       Although staff are permitted to save personal files within their own password-protected area of the
       CC3 server, ultimate possession of this data lies with School and, from time to time, will require
       access. At such times, passwords will need to be divulged to those concerned.

           Legal Considerations:
       Certain behaviour is clearly illegal, such as using a computer to perpetuate credit card fraud, to spread
       viruses, to hack into other computers, or to download copyrighted materials. Such issues are covered
       by the Computer Misuse Act 1990, the Data Protection Act 1998 and copyright legislation.


Responsibility of Parents
Parental involvement can help reinforce the messages of Internet safety and extend the learning progress
into the home. As well as returning the “Internet Permission Slip” and “Photograph Consent Form”,
parents are sent home a copy of the “Parents Guide to the Internet” (see below).


Projector Health and Safety issues
It is important that all users are aware of the health and safety implications of using projection equipment
in the classroom, particularly if children might stand in front of the beam to give presentations. All
projectors have the potential to cause eye injury; so some simple guidelines should be followed:
       • Control light in the room by using blinds which diffuse rather than remove ambient
         lighting thus reducing the need to increase the beam intensity.
       • No one should stare directly into the beam of the projector. Retaining some ambient
         light enables eye to eye contact to be maintained and there is some evidence that
         pupils work more ably when exposed to natural light. Restore natural daylight
         promptly on conclusion of interactive whiteboard sessions.
       •      The use of a stick or laser pointer is recommended to avoid the need for the user to enter the beam.
       •      Children should be supervised at all times when a projector is being used and in particular when
              they are asked to point out something on the screen.
       •      Projectors should be installed as far forward as possible to avoid the projector beam entering the
              user’s field of vision. This is best achieved by ceiling-mounting, rather than floor— or table-
              mounting, the projector. There are also some all in one interactive whiteboards emerging which

Document last changed on: 18/01/2008 19:32 by Paul Jordan                                         Document author: Paul Jordan
W:\Policies\Acceptable Use Policy.doc                                                                                   Page 0
                  Thames View Infants
                  Acceptable (Internet) Use Policy
              remove any potential danger of getting the light beam in the eye of the user and almost eliminates
              the area of shadow from the user.
       •      Board positioning should be determined following an appropriate risk assessment.
       •      Electrical standards and regulations apply in relation to all interactive whiteboards aspects.


WiFi Health and Safety issues
The school has a Wireless (WiFi) Network. WiFi is used widely in homes, offices and in public areas.
The Government has moved to reassure teachers that the use of wireless computer networks (WiFi) in
schools does not pose any known risk to staff or pupils. The Health Protection Agency has advised the
DfES that it does not consider WiFi to be harmful. As a result, the British Educational Communications
and Technology Agency (Becta) and the DfES have recommended the deployment of wireless networks
in schools.


_______________________________________


References:
“Acceptable Use Policy for Barking & Dagenham Schools”, (1996-8, ACITT): http://www.lbbd.gov.uk/9-cias/ict-team/PDF/acceptable-use-policy-lbbd.pdf

“Guidelines for the Use of the Internet in Schools”, (May 2001, LBBD ICT Unit): http://www.lbbd.gov.uk/9-cias/ict-team/pdf/internet-guidelines05-01.pdf

“Developing an Acceptable Use Policy”, (NGFL, January 2003): http://safety.ngfl.gov.uk/schools/pdf/d56.pdf

“Writing a School Internet Policy”, (PFP, 2001): http://ngfl.bardaglea.org.uk/schools-intranet/ict/pdf/pfp/03policy.pdf (U/P: bardaglea / brandnew)

“ICT, Education & Safety Issues”, (NGFL, December 2002): http://safety.ngfl.gov.uk/schools/pdf/d51.pdf

“Warren Junior School Acceptable Use Policy”, (Goodyear, 1999): http://www.warren-j.bardaglea.org.uk/PDF_workspace/Internet_aup.pdf

“Images of Pupils on Websites”, (NGFL, December 2002): http://safety.ngfl.gov.uk/schools/pdf/d27.pdf

“Setting up Your Own Website”, (NGFL, December 2002): http://safety.ngfl.gov.uk/schools/pdf/d2.pdf

“Projector health and safety issues” (Becta, 2007): http://schools.becta.org.uk/index.php?section=re&catcode=ss_res_env_02&rid=12898

“WiFi: no known risk” (Teachernet, 2007): http://www.teachernet.gov.uk/teachers/issue51/primary/news/WiFinoknownrisk/, www.hpa.org.uk/radiation




Document last changed on: 18/01/2008 19:32 by Paul Jordan                                                                             Document author: Paul Jordan
W:\Policies\Acceptable Use Policy.doc                                                                                                                       Page 0
                  Thames View Infants
                  Acceptable (Internet) Use Policy

A Parent's Guide to the Internet

What is the Internet?

The Internet is a large number of computers all over the world linked together with cables. In most cases,
each of these computers is also linked locally to a number of other computers, in a local network. It is
possible for someone using one of these computers to access information on any of the other computers.
The system was established by Universities and Government organisations. It was designed for the fast
and efficient transfer of largely text-based information around the world directly from one computer to
another.

It is possible for other people, outside these local networks, to connect to the Internet by using standard
telephone lines between their computers and those already connected to the Internet. A number of
companies specialise in providing this service for a fee.


What is the World Wide Web?

To make the appearance of information available through the Internet more attractive, and to assist people
in finding information more easily, it is now possible for special pages of information to contain text,
colours, and pictures, sound and even video. These pages, collectively, make up what is known as the
World Wide Web. Most of these pages include information on the location of other pages on the World
Wide Web, and it is possible to follow up links between pages with similar or related content. Moving
from one page to another, regardless of where in the world they might be located, is called browsing, or
surfing the net or web. Many of these Web pages contain information that may be useful in the classroom,
and it is presented in a way which is often easy to use.

A number of UK suppliers including BT and Research Machines, offer schools the facility of keeping
their own pages on the Internet. These school "home pages might describe the school's activities to
outsiders or explain project work that pupils are involved in.


What is Electronic Mail (E-mail)

This is merely a way of sending messages from one person to another via the Internet. Each Internet user
has a unique e-mail address (such as anybody@msn.com) and by sending a message to this address, the
recipient can read the message the next time he or she connects to the Internet. Internet e-mail addresses
are usually provided along with a school's connection to the Internet and normally individual pupils will
not have their own e-mail address.




Document last changed on: 18/01/2008 19:32 by Paul Jordan                                  Document author: Paul Jordan
W:\Policies\Acceptable Use Policy.doc                                                                            Page 0
                  Thames View Infants
                  Acceptable (Internet) Use Policy
What are News Groups?

These are collections of messages written for public readership rather than addressed to an individual.
Each collection, or group, of messages is about a particular subject or theme. Individuals can reply to
these messages, and these replies are also public. In this way it is possible to track a conversation about an
important issue of the day. At present there are more than 10,000 different topics available for discussion,
from specialist science research to support groups for asthma to fans of James Bond movies. Most of the
press concern for pornography on the Internet refers to newsgroups but they are the easiest for school
Internet providers to police.



What are the dangers of the Internet referred to in the media?

It is true that there is some material on the Internet that would be offensive to most people, such as
pornography, racist and fascist material, and this can be accessed by children if using the Internet
unsupervised. The main educational providers try to 'filter' known offensive locations of material of this
kind, but there is too much for this filtering to be very effective, and the locations change frequently. The
only way to block access to this kind of material is to have a restricted range of pages available, in which
case many of the advantages of the global and dynamic nature of the Internet may be lost. It is a feature of
the Internet that the information available is free. Increasing restrictions will undoubtedly lead to systems
of charging for access to specific material, in addition to the other costs described. An alternative system
is to educate pupils and encourage an acceptable use policy and partnership between home and school in
dealing with the less savoury side of Internet use.


 How can I get more information?

There are many magazines in newsagents that cater for beginners-advanced use of the Internet. If you
have any specific questions please contact the school.




Document last changed on: 18/01/2008 19:32 by Paul Jordan                                     Document author: Paul Jordan
W:\Policies\Acceptable Use Policy.doc                                                                               Page 0
                                                        Rules for using the

                                    Computers and the Internet:

              Children can only use the Internet at
              school if their parents agree.
              Children must always get permission
              from an adult before using a computer.
              Children can only use the computers at
              break and lunch times if a teacher is
              nearby.
              If we find something that is not nice
              on the Internet, we must sensibly turn
              the monitor off and tell a teacher
              straight away.
              There will be ‘time-out’ from the
              computers if a rule is broken.


Document last changed on: 18/01/2008 19:32 by Paul Jordan                     Document author: Paul Jordan
W:\Policies\Acceptable Use Policy.doc                                                               Page 9