Motivational Moments by mcdargh

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Motivational moments are nuggets of inspiration by professional speaker Eileen McDargh, CSP, CPAE. Let Eileen help you not only survive difficult times but survive and thrive!

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									    Motivational Minutes
    Caring Advice For A Difficult Time

By Eileen McDargh, CSP, CPAE
                        Motivational Minutes by Eileen McDargh, CSP, CPAE


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 2011, McDargh Communications. All rights reserved.

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                      © 2011, McDargh Communications. All rights reserved.
                         Motivational Minutes by Eileen McDargh, CSP, CPAE


                       Intelligent Optimism Wins In Today’s World

The reality of today’s world seems to leave little room for optimism. Almost every news
story can lead because it does bleed. We hear of critical food shortages in Africa, daily gang
deaths on city streets, the profiteering from child pornography, and the climatic disasters
prompted by global warming. Health care costs move up faster than a hummingbird in
flight and more children now spout profanities as a regular part of speech. With such
negativity, no wonder a 2004 U.S. government survey found that depression afflicts one in
10 adults 14 days a month or more.

You probably get depressed just reading the opening paragraph. But wait! There is hope.
Not the cock-eyed optimism that became fodder for a song from the musical South Pacific,
but rather what psychologists in France are calling “intelligent optimism.” Such optimism
does not deny the reality of today’s world, but rather seeks to LEARN how to fashion a life
amid such difficulties. Martin Seligman, the psychologist who had made optimism and
happiness his life’s work, would agree with the French: optimism can be taught.

Consider these basic steps:

(1) Focus on what you can control. Don’t get carried away by circumstances you cannot
change. You might not change global warming but you can control your energy
consumption. You can’t stop the downsizing in your company but you can arm yourself
with marketable skills.

(2) Reframe the event so that you are not a victim. There is always another way to view a
situation. The flight cancellation that caused me to miss (and forfeit) a major engagement
was not “planned” to “get” me. It just was. My choice is to figure out what I can do to help
the current client and what I will put in the place of the canceled work.

(3) Think “enough”. When we concentrate on what we don’t have, we miss all the many
things we do have. The truth of the matter is that if you are reading this article, you do have
enough computer power. You do have enough intelligence. You do have enough time.

(4) Cultivate optimistic responses. Like a farmer tending a field, optimism will never grow
unless it is watered, fed, weeded and nourished. We all have days in which negativity can
take over. And, sometimes, that is a WISE response because it keeps us grounded in reality.
Just make sure it is reality and not the imagination making extraordinary leaps into
conjecture. Weed out that conjecture. Ask what you can DO to see a result that gives you a
sense of power. If we don’t cultivate such intelligent optimism, be aware of reality and
willing to find options, then we might do what Alexander Graham Bell warned. “Stare so
long at the closed door we fail to see the one that is opening.”

(5) Remember the power of generations. Children of depressed parents are more prone to
depression. Children of optimists are more prone to be optimists. What do you choose to
pass along? Even if your parents were negative, you can break the cycle with stopping,
freeze-framing a situation, listening to the negative self talk, and then literally giving


                       © 2011, McDargh Communications. All rights reserved.
                        Motivational Minutes by Eileen McDargh, CSP, CPAE


yourself a different message. Yes, this takes practice but you can make it a habit if you work
it over time.

Ultimately, intelligent optimists understand that change and chaos are given. They know
that “this too shall pass”. In the meantime, they CHOOSE to take whatever action they can
within their own sphere of influence and then settle back. It is enough.

© McDargh Communications. All rights reserved.

Since 1980, professional speaker and Hall of Fame member Eileen McDargh has helped
Fortune 100 companies as well as individuals create connections that count and
conversations that matter. Her latest book is Gifts from the Mountain-Simple Truths for
Life’s Complexities. Her other books include Talk Ain’t Cheap…It’s Priceless and Work for a
Living and Still Be Free to Live, one of the first books to address the notion of balance and
authentic work. A 59 year-old grandmother, she recently returned from climbing among
the highest mountains in the world. Find out more about this compelling and effective
professional speaker and join her free newsletter by visiting
http://www.EileenMcDargh.com.




                       © 2011, McDargh Communications. All rights reserved.
                          Motivational Minutes by Eileen McDargh, CSP, CPAE


                          Run Your Own Race—At Your Own Pace

On Thanksgiving Day, dawn spills over Dana Point Harbor where thousands of runners
gather for the annual Turkey Trot. The largest holiday race in California beckons folks of all
ages, sizes, shapes, and abilities. Waiting at the starting line for the 10-K, I talk to a Dad and
his 7 year-old daughter. Around me, I hear bravado talk about marathons, triathlons, hard
bodies and zippo fat content. Thankfully, I spy silver haired folks with knee braces, a young
couple with babies in jogging strollers and runners decked in costumes ranging from Santa
Claus to Elvis Presley. Running in a gold polyester jump suit, and pompadour wig while
carrying a boom box blaring Elvis tunes will be some trick. Me-I just want to finish.

The gun goes off and we all inch our way under the balloon arch. Runners jostle for
position, elbowing their way to break into stride. Me-I just grin at the new day and feel
righteous for having gotten up and down to the event.

By mile two, my righteousness turns to dismay as the seven year-old passes me by. Elvis
has already made the turn way before me and I am lagging behind a woman who must have
10 years and 20 pounds on me. The sense of competitiveness heats up and so does my pace.
I forget that I already run two miles down to the Harbor and have 4.2 miles left to go. The
runners around me set my pace.

Suddenly, as I make the turn, I am struck by a humbling sight. Facing me, arms pumping
runs a young man with one leg glittering in the sun. The metal shank is attached to his
thigh. A thin aluminum calf leads to a metal foot curved like a rocker. He is oblivious to
anyone who passes him. He is running his own race at his own pace.

I slow down, take his lesson, and resume my 1-2-3-4 mantra. Lesson learned, smack
between the eyes. How many times do we let others set the pace, ignoring our own goals,
our abilities? How many times do we judge our success or our failure by what others have
done?

I finish despite the pain in my knee. Way behind the silver- haired lady. Well behind the 7
year-old. Ahead of the sleek bodied teenager. It doesn’t matter. It is my race, at my pace.
And it is a great day for the race-the human race.

© McDargh Communications. All rights reserved.

Since 1980, professional speaker and Hall of Fame member Eileen McDargh has helped
Fortune 100 companies as well as individuals create connections that count and
conversations that matter. Her latest book is Gifts from the Mountain-Simple Truths for
Life’s Complexities. Her other books include Talk Ain’t Cheap…It’s Priceless and Work for a
Living and Still Be Free to Live, one of the first books to address the notion of balance and
authentic work. A 59 year-old grandmother, she recently returned from climbing among
the highest mountains in the world. Find out more about this compelling and effective
professional speaker and join her free newsletter by visiting
http://www.EileenMcDargh.com.


                        © 2011, McDargh Communications. All rights reserved.
                        Motivational Minutes by Eileen McDargh, CSP, CPAE


        Patience Not Panic: Survive and Thrive Through Economic Turbulence

From 28,000 feet, snow still spots parts of Michigan, Illinois and other states further West.
The earth looks brown and barren, dark and ugly from this vantage point. But I know that if
I could walk the fields and wait patiently, I’d see signs of new growth inching out of
hardened earth. I’d eventually find dead-looking tree limbs swelling with rising sap,
pushing buds into blossom under the warming sun.

But what if I opted NOT to be patient? What if I panicked, burned the dead-looking trees,
cut off limbs, and retreated in disgust within my cocoon? Spring might NEVER come
because my shortsighted actions jeopardized the natural course of events.

That’s what has happened with the stock market and many of our companies. It concerns
me that such actions can create a rippling self-fulfilling prophecy. I’m concerned that
departed talent and trust might not be regained within the workplace. I’m concerned that
customers will retreat because quality and service could suffer as employees attempt to fill
the shoes of a thinned out workforce. Here’s a hard pill to swallow but perhaps all of us—
myself included-have become greedy for the amazing returns and astounding growth of the
past eight years. Perhaps we’ve grown fat and lazy instead of prudent and thoughtful.

I think now is the time to focus on what’s important. For our families and our businesses to
thrive, we need to ask ourselves what endures for the long haul and not the short gain.
Innovation, engaged and talent-focused employees, customer-focused products and
services and a deeply shared commitment to find ways for meaningful contribution carry
the day.

By historical standards, we’ve been through far more dramatic financial times. Once the
U.S. had 20,000 phone companies and 2000 auto companies. General Motors was once a
tech stock. As we say in the coaching world, “from breakdown comes build up.”

I fully intend to be the voice of reasonable optimism. Now-more than ever-we need to meet,
to talk, to vocalize our concerns and legitimize our fears so we can figure out a passage
through this blip in business history. Philosopher Howard Zinn said that to have hope one
does not need certainty, only possibility.

Let us figure out together how to be the bearers of hope.

© McDargh Communications. All rights reserved.

Since 1980, professional speaker and Hall of Fame member Eileen McDargh has helped
Fortune 100 companies as well as individuals create connections that count and
conversations that matter. Her latest book is Gifts from the Mountain-Simple Truths for
Life’s Complexities. Her other books include Talk Ain’t Cheap…It’s Priceless and Work for a
Living and Still Be Free to Live, one of the first books to address the notion of balance and
authentic work. A 59 year-old grandmother, she recently returned from climbing among
the highest mountains in the world. Find out more about this compelling and effective


                       © 2011, McDargh Communications. All rights reserved.
                        Motivational Minutes by Eileen McDargh, CSP, CPAE


professional speaker and join her free newsletter by visiting
http://www.EileenMcDargh.com.




                      © 2011, McDargh Communications. All rights reserved.
                         Motivational Minutes by Eileen McDargh, CSP, CPAE


                              Reclaiming Our Resilient Spirit

Our spirits are taking a beating. The daily barrage of bad news, violence, shrinking
resources, global warming, and economic slowdown can put us in a state of frustration and
paralysis. Some days, getting out of bed can be a challenge.

Within the word “resilience” are actions we can take to reclaim our bounce-back ability.

R: Remember to breathe. The ability to calm down is critical in order to take stock and
move forward.

E: Enlist support of others. Love people and be lovable in return. A supportive family
(whether genetic or hand-picked) is what keeps people alive. The English word wretched
comes from the Middle English word wrecche which means “without kin nearby.

S: Stay focused. Intentionality lays the groundwork for what we want in our life. See it, say
it and claim it. Don’t let external forces cloud your vision.

I: Identify your strengths. Energy and good health are two of the most essential ingredients
in resiliency. Work on your physical well being first because it is the quickest way to gain
control over a world that is uncontrollable.

L: Laugh out loud. You’ll be amazed at the looks you get. And you’ll feel better.

I: Insist on optimism. Positive mental health comes from the ability to reframe a situation.
This is not the Pollyanna or head- in-sand avoidance of reality but rather a recall of ways in
which you have handled similar situations.

E: Extend yourself to others. Self-absorption backfires. It only serves to deepen depression
and worry. Going out to serve others lifts the cloud around yourself and allows you to
become both blessed and a blessing.

N: Never say “never”. The resilient spirit knows that there is always tomorrow.

T: Thanks-give it! There is much to be grateful for.

© McDargh Communications. All rights reserved.

Since 1980, professional speaker and Hall of Fame member Eileen McDargh has helped
Fortune 100 companies as well as individuals create connections that count and
conversations that matter. Her latest book is Gifts from the Mountain-Simple Truths for
Life’s Complexities. Her other books include Talk Ain’t Cheap…It’s Priceless and Work for a
Living and Still Be Free to Live, one of the first books to address the notion of balance and
authentic work. A 59 year-old grandmother, she recently returned from climbing among
the highest mountains in the world. Find out more about this compelling and effective



                       © 2011, McDargh Communications. All rights reserved.
                        Motivational Minutes by Eileen McDargh, CSP, CPAE


professional speaker and join her free newsletter by visiting
http://www.EileenMcDargh.com.




                      © 2011, McDargh Communications. All rights reserved.
                          Motivational Minutes by Eileen McDargh, CSP, CPAE


                           Sanity Survival—PATIENCE, NOW!!!!!!

I admit it: I am a jack rabbit. I like to hop to it and get things done. Give me a project and I’ll
start immediately just so I can get it off of my to do list. The problem is, sometimes in my
haste I make mistakes. I admit that I have no tolerance for voicemail doom loops. I have
been known to bang a phone against the desk and scream, “Give me a real person!” (It
doesn’t work.)

I recently went through some surgery and even though they told me it would be four weeks
before I could exercise, that was not good enough for me. I gritted my teeth and impatiently
started back before I was supposed to. I found myself gasping for breath and wondering
where my muscles went. Too fast, too much, too soon.

Here is a startling discovery: Impatient people are prone to obesity, according to a study at
the University of Munich in Germany and the University of Michigan at Dearborn. Impatient
types are also shown to have a high risk for hypertension later in life. To add insult to
injury psychologists at the University of Bonn in Germany discovered that with a simple
test of patience those who put off doing something seemed to have higher IQs than the get-
it-done now group. Oh brother, I’m in trouble. In fact experts have described this kind of
behavior as time-urgency impatience, or T.UI.

So is this a behavioral flaw? A personality trait? Answer: it’s not a flaw but it is a behavior
that has no genetic bearing. It can be altered. The four tips below helped me so I am
sharing them in hopes they will help you.

1. Explore why waiting makes you uncomfortable. Sometimes it is our ego that demands
everything happen right away. Impatience comes from living in a 24 /7 chaotic world. It is
caused by trying to control things over which we have little to no control.

2. Manage expectations. What can you reasonably expect? Remember that my needs are
not the most important needs in the universe.

3. Go with the flow. While this sounds like something from the marijuana smoke filled days
of the 60s and 70s, it is also quite true. Learning to let go, and to stay in the present
moment, can be helped through deep breathing and even reciting a phrase over and over
again much like a mantra. (Even though sometimes that phrase is “I’m going to kill that
voicemail.”)

4. Remember to laugh. It can be actually quite humorous to watch customers compete for
the shortest line at the cashier counter.

I actually owe my down time a note of gratitude. Because I couldn’t exercise, I rediscovered
the wonder of easily walking along the beach. Because I couldn’t hop on the computer, I
discovered that e-mail still waits and what had seemed so urgent is relegated to the trash.




                        © 2011, McDargh Communications. All rights reserved.
                        Motivational Minutes by Eileen McDargh, CSP, CPAE


This experience reminded me that flowers forced to bloom before their time die faster. So
I’m working on changing my time-urgency impatience (TUI) into PUI patience ups
intelligence.

This takes patience. I’ve watched an interesting man on many occasions. He spends hours
at the beach balancing rocks on top of each other as though he is playing a children’s game.
The rocks stay in a pile until a high tide knocks them over. He then starts again.

© McDargh Communications. All rights reserved.

Since 1980, professional speaker and Hall of Fame member Eileen McDargh has helped
Fortune 100 companies as well as individuals create connections that count and
conversations that matter. Her latest book is Gifts from the Mountain-Simple Truths for
Life’s Complexities. Her other books include Talk Ain’t Cheap…It’s Priceless and Work for a
Living and Still Be Free to Live, one of the first books to address the notion of balance and
authentic work. A 59 year-old grandmother, she recently returned from climbing among
the highest mountains in the world. Find out more about this compelling and effective
professional speaker and join her free newsletter by visiting
http://www.EileenMcDargh.com.




                       © 2011, McDargh Communications. All rights reserved.
                         Motivational Minutes by Eileen McDargh, CSP, CPAE


When Your Get Up & Go Just Got Up And Went! Five Tips to Refresh and Renew
Yourself

Let’s face it: new years are not always “new”. Too often it feels like nothing more than a
new calendar in which to write down pages of non-stop activities, project deadlines, social
obligations, and commitments made by someone other than you.

SO stop! It’s time to plug into something that YOU choose-something that can renew your
batteries and refresh your interest in work AND life. Unlike the bobble-headed figures that
nod “yes” at every touch, you DO get to declare “time out” and place yourself first.

#1: Retreat to advance. Take yourself away for at least two nights and three days to a place
for a silent retreat. Yes-silence! Forbid yourself from using the phone, the television, or the
radio. It’s time to listen instead to the voices in your head that have been trying to get your
attention for ages. Write what you sense. Think on paper. And make resolutions that speak
to what matters most.

#2: Experience something far a field from your profession. Take a class or read a book that
is NOT in your chosen line of work. Select something that piques your curiosity. The notion
is to look for connections or ideas that might stimulate a new way of looking at your work
or your life. Former elementary teacher Gail Wenos studied ventriloquism and discovered a
new way to teach adults!

#3: Stretch yourself. If you take an exercise class once a month, try going two more times. If
you cook the same food the same way, alternate with a new cookbook. One father saw
himself as totally ill-equipped to ride anything that had less than four wheels. But he took
motorcycle lessons with his teenage son and his sense of personal accomplishment grew
along with the bond to his child.

#4: Practice your art every week. Everyone has an art. It might be hammering nails or
singing in the shower. It might be designing a garden or counseling a friend. But it uses a
talent you’ve got and when this talent is engaged, you burn brightly. You leave the time
refreshed. Put this down as a personal “no matter what” on your day timer.

#5: Throw out what weighs you down. Read only those things that are meaningful to you.
Can the clutter as well as the people who are the constant complainers and gripers. Ditch
the weight of unnecessary purchases and their financial burden. Give clothes you haven’t
worn in over a year to Goodwill . Remember, every ounce counts.

Think of this year as one that YOU take control over what charges your batteries and
renews your energy field. Guaranteed, it won’t cost $100 per barrel.

© McDargh Communications. All rights reserved.

Since 1980, professional speaker and Hall of Fame member Eileen McDargh has helped
Fortune 100 companies as well as individuals create connections that count and


                       © 2011, McDargh Communications. All rights reserved.
                        Motivational Minutes by Eileen McDargh, CSP, CPAE


conversations that matter. Her latest book is Gifts from the Mountain-Simple Truths for
Life’s Complexities. Her other books include Talk Ain’t Cheap…It’s Priceless and Work for a
Living and Still Be Free to Live, one of the first books to address the notion of balance and
authentic work. A 59 year-old grandmother, she recently returned from climbing among
the highest mountains in the world. Find out more about this compelling and effective
professional speaker and join her free newsletter by visiting
http://www.EileenMcDargh.com.




                       © 2011, McDargh Communications. All rights reserved.
                         Motivational Minutes by Eileen McDargh, CSP, CPAE


                                         Be Here Now

When we are young, we feel that time is on our side. Not any more.

Our days are a blur of perceived demands from workplaces stretched beyond the leading
edge to the bleeding edge, from technology that allows others to locate us even in the
privacy of our cars and bathrooms, from children and aging parents who name us and claim
us, and from our inability to find options for creating mind sets and actions that can give us
a modicum of breathing space and control.

We can all sing the chorus: “There’s too much to do and too little time.” We have created a
commodity worth of the Stock Exchange: Time. We spend it, lose it, waste it, and manage it.
We’re told to make time, use time, take time and, if we’ve had a run-in with the law, we
might even “do” time.

Time is the great equalizer, given in singular 24-hour chunks by the rising of the sun and
the setting of the moon. No money can buy it, no power can hold it, no army can stop it. We
need to concentrate on winning back our life—snatching it away from the blur of to-do
lists, technology, and work/life pressures.

Four Truths

The more I ponder time demands, I realize four truths:

Truth 1: Simplicity isn’t simple. It’s an admirable, essential goal that most of us are working
on. Simplicity takes time and requires an agreement from all those impacted by its
requirements. We’ve been given day-to-day wisdom to follow in realizing the already-
present abundance without adding to our closet, our bank account, our larder.

Truth 2: The technology genie will not go back into the bottle. Once released, our challenge
becomes to wisely choose when we access technology’s power. The seductiveness of
thinking we are so important that people must find us any time, any place, for any matter is
ego at its worst. Consider my experience with a man who brought his computer and
cellular phone along on a four-day cruise. He was not present. He missed the experience.
And, I think, he lost.

Truth 3: Time management creates order and structure. It does not create present moment
awareness. I’m not concerned with “managing time” as much as I am for discovering how to
make better choices for what we put in these blocks called “time.” This is not about finding
the latest time-saving devices. We all have a plethora of these. Too often, they’ve become
excuses for letting us cram our life with longer to-do lists. We end up working harder and
longer. What I want to have us consider is taking control, finding personal empowerment in
our work, lives, lifestyles, and relationships. It’s about finding more life in our years and
more years in our life. We do not have extra time, but we do have discretionary energy and
creativity. And we can learn to be present in the moment.



                       © 2011, McDargh Communications. All rights reserved.
                        Motivational Minutes by Eileen McDargh, CSP, CPAE


Truth 4: Being present takes practice. As children, we felt we had command of our day, at
least until bedtime. Summers stretched into hide-aways, street games, lightening bug
hunts, marshmallows over campfires, and inner tubes in pools. What would happen if we
could capture, practice, and re-frame the present so that at the end of a day, a week, or
year, we felt like we have lived life— with it’s joys and sorrows—in a manner of our
choosing? Plenty.

How to Get Started

Here are two examples of what you can do to be here now:

1. Create a sacred space for regrouping. This could be your car, your bathroom, your
backyard. When you enter this space, ban anything that distracts your attention from
simply breathing and noticing your surroundings.

2. Try and discover something you have never seen or heard before. There will always be
something. This is like any exercise. The regular practice will allow you to stop at any given
moment and be in control, centered, and observant. Keep a journal, and joy a few words of
some event, person, experience or observation that struck you as meaningful. This is part of
being in the now.

Being present means seeing wit new eyes and looking beyond the obvious to that
metaphorical magic which takes an event in time and earmarks it as a memory. By
collecting these moments and capturing them in word or picture, at the end of a year, you’ll
be amazed at how much you have won by being present. You have won back a portion of
your life.

© McDargh Communications. All rights reserved.

Since 1980, professional speaker and Hall of Fame member Eileen McDargh has helped
Fortune 100 companies as well as individuals create connections that count and
conversations that matter. Her latest book is Gifts from the Mountain-Simple Truths for
Life’s Complexities. Her other books include Talk Ain’t Cheap…It’s Priceless and Work for a
Living and Still Be Free to Live, one of the first books to address the notion of balance and
authentic work. A 59 year-old grandmother, she recently returned from climbing among
the highest mountains in the world. Find out more about this compelling and effective
professional speaker and join her free newsletter by visiting
http://www.EileenMcDargh.com.




                       © 2011, McDargh Communications. All rights reserved.
                         Motivational Minutes by Eileen McDargh, CSP, CPAE


                            Brainpower For The Overwhelmed

Walk into the room and can’t find your keys? Or forget why you entered the room in the
first place? Wondering what has happened to your short term memory? Feel overwhelmed
by information, people, to-do lists and demands on your time?

You very well could be suffering from SAAD – situational attention deficit disorder, a term
coined by Anderson Consulting Institute for Strategic Change. Specifically, most of us are
now in situations in which we are bombarded by so many demands for our attention that
our brains close down.

It’s a phenomenon of our time. Our brains, evolved over eons to respond to our
environment and each other are exponentially being taxed by the growth in information
and technology. Everyone and everything is vying for attention. We are hardwired to
respond but when it’s deluged like that, the brain just “goes blind”. Engineers discovered
this phenomenon when they installed hundreds of communication devices in cockpits,
thinking it would improve the pilot’s performance. Instead, when the pilots performance
decreased.

Information and technology will not go away. But there are ways to turn from “SAAD” to
glad.

1. Determine your priorities and focus on them.

Don’t let yourself be pulled into anything from meetings, to readings, to conversations that
thwart your priorities. Literally block out space on your daily to-do list for things that are
important to you: from projects, to exercise, to family time. Hold these times as sacred.

2. Say “no” to answering every message.

The average American receives 201 phone, paper, and e-mail messages a day. Take care of
those that are priority and let the rest drop off. Ignore the messages that are uninvited and
unnecessary.

3. Let technology work for you in prioritizing.

Called ID and voice mail can allow you to screen calls. For those who depend upon business
coming in via phone and need to take every call, develop a way to shorten incoming sales
calls. Telemarketing calls that come in via a computer dial-up have a few seconds of silence
before a voice is heard. If that’s the case, just hang up. If you are solicited, ask them to
please out your name on the DO NOT call list. And then hang up.

4. Create a centering place.

Whether it is in the silence of your car, or in a shower, or closing your door, take 15
minutes per day to practice paying attention to ONE thing: your breathing, a flower, a fish


                       © 2011, McDargh Communications. All rights reserved.
                         Motivational Minutes by Eileen McDargh, CSP, CPAE


tank. Like the muscle in our bodies, the brain gets strong I the places where we train it.
Focus turns SADD into glad!

© McDargh Communications. All rights reserved.

Since 1980, professional speaker and Hall of Fame member Eileen McDargh has helped
Fortune 100 companies as well as individuals create connections that count and
conversations that matter. Her latest book is Gifts from the Mountain-Simple Truths for
Life’s Complexities. Her other books include Talk Ain’t Cheap…It’s Priceless and Work for a
Living and Still Be Free to Live, one of the first books to address the notion of balance and
authentic work. A 59 year-old grandmother, she recently returned from climbing among
the highest mountains in the world. Find out more about this compelling and effective
professional speaker and join her free newsletter by visiting
http://www.EileenMcDargh.com.




                       © 2011, McDargh Communications. All rights reserved.
                         Motivational Minutes by Eileen McDargh, CSP, CPAE


              Tips for Relighting After Burnout: Energizing Self and Others

The current environment brings additional stress to our homes and offices. You all
probably know some of the symptoms. Here are but a few. Check them off and then
consider some actions.

Some Burnout Symptoms:

* Work leaves you physically and emotionally drained.
* You feel like you are accomplishing less and doing more.
* You put your work first but no one appreciates your efforts.
* You’ve lost your sense of humor and playfulness.
* You find yourself short-tempered and angry.
* You go on vacation but the feeling of overwhelm comes back immediately upon return.

What can you do to gain a sense of control? Consider just some of these options:

* Hold certain times sacred. Mark off a period of time for yourself on your calendar and
treat it with gold.

* Learn to say “no” by creating realistic boundaries. Speak up when you are overwhelmed.
Remember, no one but YOU knows what you really do in the course of a day. Establish
limits that honor the needs of the people around you while preserving the integrity of what
you can honestly do.

* Create a workspace that nurtures your soul. Whether it’s filled with pictures of the
grandkids or flowers from your garden, this space must speak of you.

* Exercise to burn off stress.

* Allow 15 minutes in the morning just for you. This is quiet time for centering, breathing,
preparing for the day. You’ll be glad you did.

Remember: you are the captain of your ship. Pay attention to the wind and waves.

© McDargh Communications. All rights reserved.

Since 1980, professional speaker and Hall of Fame member Eileen McDargh has helped
Fortune 100 companies as well as individuals create connections that count and
conversations that matter. Her latest book is Gifts from the Mountain-Simple Truths for
Life’s Complexities. Her other books include Talk Ain’t Cheap…It’s Priceless and Work for a
Living and Still Be Free to Live, one of the first books to address the notion of balance and
authentic work. A 59 year-old grandmother, she recently returned from climbing among
the highest mountains in the world. Find out more about this compelling and effective
professional speaker and join her free newsletter by visiting
http://www.EileenMcDargh.com.


                        © 2011, McDargh Communications. All rights reserved.
                         Motivational Minutes by Eileen McDargh, CSP, CPAE


                             About Eileen McDargh, CSP, CPAE

Since founding McDargh Communications in 1980, Eileen McDargh has
helped organizations and individuals transform the life of their business
and the business of their life through conversations that matter and
connections that count.

She draws upon practical business know-how, life's experiences and years
of consulting to major national and international organizations that have
ranged from global pharmaceuticals to the US Armed Forces, from health
care associations to religious institutions. Executive Excellence magazine continually ranks
her as one of the top 50 thought leaders in self-leadership development. Global Gurus
International, a British-based provider of resources for leadership, communication and
sales training, also named her as one of the World’s Top 30 Leadership Professionals
following a global survey of 22,000 business professionals.

She authored Work for a Living & Still Be Free to Live, the first book on work/life balance—a
topic that placed her as a futurist in this issue and continues to be published in revised
editions. Her second book, The Resilient Spirit, is found from South Africa to California. Talk
Ain't Cheap... It's Priceless - Connecting in a Disconnected World serves as a leadership guide
for numerous organizations and her newest book, Gifts from the Mountain: Simple Truths
for Life's Complexities, won the Benjamin Franklin Gold Award in 2008. This book has been
adapted for a training film.

As a business author and commentator, she’s appeared on network news, on radio
programs and in business journals and in major metropolitan newspapers.

Clients have ranged from American Airlines to Xerox, from 3M to IBM, from drill foremen in
the Arctic to juvenile offenders in prison. She served as one of ten faculty members in a
business television series, Reclaiming Business Excellence and has headlined with speakers
like NBA Coach Pat Riley, Notre Dame's former coach Lou Holtz, Dr. Ken Blanchard,
executive strategist Marshall Goldsmith and boardroom poet, David Whyte.

Eileen is a certified speaking professional (CSP) and her election into the CPAE Speaker
Hall of Fame places her among the top 3% of speakers in the United States. She recently
completed two three-year terms on the Board of Directors of the National Speakers
Association and also currently sits on an advisory board for Take Back Your Time, a North
American initiative for work/life integration practices. She’s also listed as a recommended
expert through the Sloan Work and Family Research Network at Boston College.

You can join Eileen's quarterly e-zine The Energizer at
http://www.eileenmcdargh.com/newsletter/ and read her blog at
http://www.eileenmcdargh.com/blog/.




                       © 2011, McDargh Communications. All rights reserved.

								
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